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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 23, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. as aerial evacuations continue, a member of the afghan security forces is killed in a firefight at the gates of kabul airport. us and german troops were involved. the uk prime minister will ask joe biden at a g7 meeting to keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the 31st of august, amid fears the withdrawal could prevent further evacuation flights — but ministers say they'll need cooperation from the taliban, who won't accept an extension to the deadline. although they might be the seven most powerful people on the planet meeting to discuss what they want to do, they don't get to make the decision of themselves — the taliban get a vote, as well.
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in the uk, all 16— and17—year—olds have been offered their first coronavirus vaccine, as a campaign is launched to encourage teenagers to getjabbed — warning of the effects of long covid. are you a young person suffering with long covid? tell me what it's been like for you by tweeting me, using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. in an emotional interview, a widow tells the bbc how her husband took his own life after relapsing into a gambling addiction i looked out of the window and... two policemen got out the car and the way they walked in, i knew what they were going to say. the tokyo paralympics starts tomorrow. we'll be speaking to a sports psychologist who's been helping athletes prepare ahead of the games.
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and the british boxing olympic silver medallist ben whittaker achieves his dream — becoming mayor of wolverhampton for a day. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. a member of the afghan security forces has been killed in an exchange of fire with unidentified gunmen at the north gate of kabul airport. it's reported that the exchange of fire also resulted in three members of the afghan security forces being wounded. the german military has tweeted that american and german forces were also involved in the incident but no german soldiers were harmed. the uk's prime minister is expected
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to ask president biden at tomorrow's meeting of g7 countries to delay withdrawing the last american forces from afghanistan to allow more time for the evacuation effort. but the taliban say they won't accept an extension to the deadline. us troops are due to leave kabul airport in just over week, but several thousand people remain there, desperate to flee the country and escape the taliban. they include afghans who worked for the british military. the uk says it has evacuated more than 1,800 people from afghanistan on eight flights in the last 2a hours. nine more flights are expected in the next 2a hours. president biden has warned of a risk of attacks from so—called islamic state militants, and says he hopes he won't have to delay the airlift. on the exchange of fire at kabul airport, our delhi correspondent, danjohnson, said an investigation is under way to determine who was behind the attack.
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that is not clear yet. there was a firefight at the airport early this morning involving afghan forces. we believe they are remnants of the afghan army that were left behind at the airport, soldiers who refused to surrender to the taliban last week and have been helping the international forces to secure the airport and process evacuees onto flights. one of those soldiers has lost his life, three have been injured, and this firefight also involved german defence forces and us soldiers, although we don't understand any of those were injured. as to who was responsible, it is still unclear. there was a terror threat over the weekend. the us embassy in kabul advised its citizens to stay away from the airport and the streets around it, notjust because of the crowded scenes, but also because of a terror threat from is militants in the country. whether what has happened this morning is anything to do with that, we will have to wait and see
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and whether any more lives have been lost in that violence. it is another indication of the threat to the evacuation operation, the interruptions it faces. as we felt something was getting into a routine, starting to calm down after the chaotic scenes we have witnessed over the last week. and the armed forces minister here, james heappey, saying this morning it is known that is want to, in his words, want to get a hit on western forces, adding to the pressure in an already chaotic situation around kabul. looking at the country more broadly, talk to us about that security situation in other parts of afghanistan. you were talking about afghan security forces in kabul who had not wanted to surrender to the taliban. there are pockets of resistance to the taliban in other parts of afghanistan, as well. there are. in particular the region just north of kabul. it is a traditional
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stronghold of resistance, somewhere taliban was not able to wield power last time they had control of afghanistan and somewhere that hasn't yet given into them this time. they were even reports of districts around there where taliban had gained power in the last two weeks, having been reclaimed by resistance fighters. us vice president kamala harris has been speaking in singapore this morning — as part of a tour of the region. she said the us withdrawal from afghanistan will be examined in time but the focus now is on getting people out. there is no question there will be — and should be — a robust analysis of what has happened. but right now, there's no question that our focus has to be on evacuating american citizens, afghans who worked with us, and vulnerable afghans — including women and children. that has to be our primary focus, and where we are placing our
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attention on the issue of afghanistan. approximately 1,800 uk nationals, and more than 2,200 afghans who helped british forces, are now the "focus" of the british government's evacuation efforts from afghanistan. but ministers say there are thousands more people the british authorities want to help, and time is running short. here's our political correspondent, chris mason. queueing to get out, clinging on to possessions, to children. frightened and fleeing to an uncertain future. the thing that i think we've all learned over the last week or so is that the timelines around which we plan are not always completely in our own control. now obviously, the more time that we've got, the more people we can evacuate and that's what we're pushing for. the ministry of defence says 5,725 people have been evacuated from afghanistan in the last ten days.
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more than 1,000 uk armed forces personnel are currently deployed in kabul. caught out and wrong—footed by the speed of the taliban's capture of afghanistan a week ago, western powers have been grappling to salvage what they can ever since. the limitations are obvious for all to see. president biden wants all american troops out by the end of the month. the uk is pressing for them to stay longer. the prime minister will make that case directly to the president tomorrow. there's discussions going on among us and the military about extending. our hope is we will not have to extend. but they're going to be some discussions i suspect on far along we are in the process. the government is also exploring how hubs could be set up in neighbouring countries to help afghans reach
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the uk once flights out of kabul are no longer possible. chris mason, bbc news. our political correspondent, nick eardley, says it's difficult to assess how much influence borisjohnson may have on president biden�*s policy making. we have seen over the last couple of weeks in the uk quite a lot of frustration both from government ministers and from mps about the way president biden went about the withdrawal of american troops from afghanistan. the hope is that the meeting tomorrow can of pressure to president biden to extend the deadline by which he wants to remove us troops by 31st of august. when we heard from him last night he did hint that that was not an absolute deadline. he was prepared to discuss potentially moving that back. the reason this matters so much is
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because ministers in london are pretty clear that they can't do this without the us backing, both the number of troops at kabul airport and the infrastructure in place around the airport. without that there uk seems to think itjust can't operate these evacuations in the same weight that it is at the moment. we have been hearing this morning from armed forces minister in the ukjames heappey about what he thinks that pressure is likely to pay off. there is discussion tomorrow for g7 leaders about whether or not we can extend, but let's be clear — although they might be the seven most powerful people on the planet meeting to discuss what they want to do, they don't get to make the decision of themselves — the taliban get a vote, as well. and that's why, in this building, we are continuing to work
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towards a deadline of the 315t of august and we are trying to make sure that every minute counts in bringing out as many people as possible before that time. and that is an uncomfortable but... governments are facing up to it and admitting an uncomfortable position for them to be in, that ultimately the taliban has a big say in what happens next and whether they can extend that deadline, should they wish to. what sort of plans are being made, or discussions with the taliban beyond the next few days? looking to that short to medium term, you know, contacts, trying to build contacts, trying to build some sort of working relationship? i think this will be one of the big questions for g7 leaders tomorrow because in the conversations that the prime minister has been having with his counterparts around the world, one thing downing st keeps telling us is that he is pressing for countries to work together to decide when they want to recognise any new government in kabul and it seems to be that that is likely to be at least in
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part because borisjohnson and some of his allies, like the french president emmanuel macron, want to put pressure on the taliban to make sure they are upholding some of the promises that they have made to the international community in terms of interviews we have seen in the last few days, like respecting human rights, like women's rights, as well. i think that is going to be something that comes up in that g7 discussion tomorrow. i suppose there is also the wider question of, as well as the evacuation now, what happens in the medium term when it comes to a potential refugee crisis in and around afghanistan? one thing the government in london is working on is the idea of hubs around afghanistan, which would
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allow people fleeing the taliban to go there and claim asylum in the uk from a remote destination. not a huge amount of detail about that yet but ministers have confirmed it is taking place. so remember that there have been about 6,000 people evacuated by the uk since the airlift started around ten days ago at the airport but we think there are at least 4,000 people who are definitely eligible to come to the uk left in afghanistan, potentially thousands who could be a part of new extended schemes that the government here has announced. so there is a lot of work to do. inger ashing is chief executive of save the children who have stepped in afghanistan.
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we currently have 2300 staff members, a bit more than half of them community—based in country, and of course they are really demoralised by the situation, fearing for their country, the children they are there to set for their own safety. what have they been telling you about their ability to carry out their work since the taliban took over? since the situation on the ground is very we as all other ngos and the un have been forced to pause most of our operations in country, having our staff, making sure they are in safe locations. right now we are waiting and seeing what is happening on the ground, but we are as an organisation committed to stay and deliver and most of our staff are determined to go out again to the front line, serving as doctors, teachers, etc, making sure they are supporting children in their communities. the headlines on bbc news... as aerial evacuations continue a member of the afghan security forces is killed in a firefight at the gates of kabul airport. us and german troops were involved. the uk prime minister will ask joe biden to keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the 31st
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of august, amid fears the withdrawal could prevent further evacuation flights — but ministers want cooperation from the taliban, who say they won't accept an extension to the deadline. in the uk, all 16— and17—year—olds have been offered their first coronavirus vaccine, as a campaign is launched to encourage teenagers to getjabbed — warning of the effects long covid. in england, young patients suffering from the debilitating effects of long covid have urged people to get their vaccine in a new nhs video. all 16— and 17—year—olds have been offered their firstjabs from today. the latest figures for england show people aged 18 to sa now make up more than a fifth of those admitted to hospital with the virus. let's take a look at the campaign.
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i think the worst thing is like normally you would be able to go to bed, go to sleep and wake up feeling ready to face the day. i could sleep for a week and still feel tired. the kind of other one i have suffered with is joint and body aches, kind of when you've got a cold or the flu, that all—over ache. like even your teeth hurt. i get that most of the time. ifeel like i'm always sore in some way. my my daughter has finally been diagnosed with lung disease. she has chronic fatigue, insomnia, brain fog chronic fatigue, insomnia, brainfog and chronic fatigue, insomnia, brain fog and an intermittent racing height. to the gp was reluctant to link the symptoms to covid. shalit says, my
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friend in her early 30s has long covid, chronic fatigue and brain fog. previously healthy and paediatric nurse, she is no longer to work —— can no longer able to work full—time. there is no sign of improvement 15 months later. jayna says, my daughter has long covid, nine months later still suffering i cannot tell you how debilitating it is for her and how heart wrenching as a parent to what your child be so ill. it took ages to be taken seriously but now she has lots of support from staff at blackburn hospital. i want to say thanks to all of you who have been sending in your tweets. all of you who have been sending in yourtweets. keep all of you who have been sending in your tweets. keep them coming in and we will try to read out some whether you are a young people suffering from long covid works in caring for someone with long covid, we would be interested to hear your stories. dozens of companies selling covid pcr travel tests are to be removed from the british government's list of approved providers. the firms either no longer exist or don't provide all the tests
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required by holidaymakers. others have been warned they could also be removed if they advertise misleading prices. the number of people killed by flash floods in the us state of tennessee has risen to more than 20. dozens are still missing. roads and bridges were washed away and power cuts have affected thousands of people. the east coast of the united states has also been hit by strong winds and heavy rain, as tropical storm henri passed through the area. tanya dendrinos reports. debris and devastation, this is tennessee after flash flooding wreaked havoc. i'm like trying to get them out the door, but the water is so high and it's pushing against the door that i'm having a hard time pushing to open the door to get them out. i'm holding two babies. as locals assess the unimaginable damage following the record rainfall, search and rescue teams were looking for survivors. tremendous loss of life. a number of missing people
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on the ground, homes washed off their foundations, cars strewn around the community. it is a devastating picture of loss and heartache. the loss front of mind in sunday's presidential address. good afternoon. i want to begin by expressing my deepest condolences for the sudden and tragic loss of life due to this flash flood. i know we've reached out to the community and we stand ready to offer them support. i've asked the administrator to speak to governor lee of tennessee right away and we will offer any assistance they need right away for this terrible moment. meanwhile, more than 20,000 homes were left without power after tropical storm henri made landfall on rhode island, downgraded from a category one hurricane, many residents along the northeast coast of the united states were breathing a sigh of relief.
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we've seen a lot of wind damage, trees down and stuff like that, a couple of inches of water on the road. that's about it. and loss of power. henri is weakening, but heavy rainfall is expected to continue with potential for more flooding. disaster relief has already been approved for a number of states, with the president pledging the government will do everything it can to help them respond and recover. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. world trade centre one has been struck by lightning as tropical storm henri battered new york. a bolt can be seen striking the top of the building in lower manhattan, connecting with the spire, 550 metres above ground level. more than 120,000 homes in rhode island are without power because of the storm. the us vice—president kamala harris is in singapore as part of a trip to southeast asia
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aimed at countering china's growing influence. she will meet singapore's leaders, visit the changi naval base and tour the uss tulsa — an american navy combat ship. on the second leg of her visit, she will go to vietnam. joining me now is chris brankin, ceo at td ameritrade singapore, a platform for local investors to buy us stocks. thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news today. how thank you very much for “oining us on bbc news today.— thank you very much for “oining us on bbc news today. how worried you think the us — on bbc news today. how worried you thinkthe us is _ on bbc news today. how worried you think the us is about _ on bbc news today. how worried you think the us is about relations - on bbc news today. how worried you think the us is about relations with l think the us is about relations with this part of the world?— this part of the world? well, look, i think this — this part of the world? well, look, i think this trip _ this part of the world? well, look, i think this trip is _ this part of the world? well, look, i think this trip is pretty _ i think this trip is pretty significant, a kind of indicator. the us relationship not only with singapore but across southeast asia and the key of the indo pacific region. if you go back to 2017 when the us withdrew from the tpp,
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basically at the us has been notably missing from some of these key summits we have had. so for me, and iam in summits we have had. so for me, and i am in that camp like this is a step to help repair some of that, and part of kamala harris' trip not only to singapore but also next to vietnam shows the fitment and strength that they understand singapore not onlyjust for itself but also around southeast asia and across the indo pacific region. find across the indo pacific region. and her visit clearly _ across the indo pacific region. and her visit clearly comes while there are concerns in the us that china is gaining a huge amount of influence in the region. that is fuelled by some of that feeling of neglect in some of that feeling of neglect in some quarters, that you alluded to. is there a real opportunity here for a rebalancing to happen? weill. is there a real opportunity here for a rebalancing to happen? well, look, i think a rebalancing to happen? well, look, i think some — a rebalancing to happen? well, look, i think some people _ a rebalancing to happen? well, look, i think some people believe - a rebalancing to happen? well, look, i think some people believe that - a rebalancing to happen? well, look, i think some people believe that the | i think some people believe that the us really needs to get in catch—up mode across the region, compared to what china has done over the last
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few years. i think this is a key step and a key indicator is not the first trick the vice president makes to asia is to singapore. —— first trip. we understand the importance of singapore, it is the linchpin throughout southeast asia, not only economically but also they work with the us in semi—different things. counterterrorism, military training, cyber security. the terms of commitment they have had to each other over the years. really interesting thing if you look at it, the actually invests more money in singapore than they do in china, india and south korea combined. there is definitely a two—way partnership year that has been beneficial not only to singapore but the united states and i think there is some concern that china is gaining additional influence across the region and the us is kind of taking an important step here the trip from kamala harris not only to singapore but then on to vietnam after he had. tell singapore but then on to vietnam after he had-—
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after he had. tell us more about what a reinvigorated _ after he had. tell us more about what a reinvigorated economic l what a reinvigorated economic partnership with the united states might look like, and what sort of level of confidence do your investors have at the moment in us stocks? 50 investors have at the moment in us stocks? ., , ., stocks? so that is a good point. the markets have _ stocks? so that is a good point. the markets have been _ stocks? so that is a good point. the markets have been very _ stocks? so that is a good point. the markets have been very sentiment l markets have been very sentiment driven over the last 12 month period. we have seen our customers constantly adding net new buying positions. over the last 12 months, they have been net new buyers every month across the snp 500 except this last four week period. a little bit of profit—taking, now covid has reared its head and looking at how the global demand picture has had a bit of volatility added to it. from an overall perspective, our clients are actively engaged with us exchange rated products and they look to stay that way throughout the remainder of 2021.— look to stay that way throughout the remainder of 2021. good to speak to ou toda , remainder of 2021. good to speak to you today. thank _ remainder of 2021. good to speak to you today, thank you _ remainder of 2021. good to speak to you today, thank you for _ remainder of 2021. good to speak to you today, thank you for your - you today, thank you for your thoughts on the visit of vice
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president to singapore. chris brankin, ceo of td ameritrade singapore. more now on the situation in afghanistan — the defence secretary ben wallace has been speaking from fort george near inverness, giving an update on what's happening at kabul airport... the prime minister is obviously at g7 going to raise the prospect of seeing if the united states will extend. it is really important for people to understand there are over 6000 people in the appointment when they withdraw that will take away they withdraw that will take away the framework that allows us to withdraw and we will have to go, as well. i don't think there is any likelihood of staying on after the united states if their timetable extends even by a day or two and that will give us a day or two more to evacuate people. because we are really down to hours now, not weeks, and we have to make sure we exploit every minute to get people out of. uk defence secretary at ben wallace there and in a few minutes i will be speaking to former british ambassador to the us, sir
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christopher mayo, so stay with us for that, asking him for his thoughts on the developments in afghanistan. a widow who lost her husband to a gambling addiction is urging the government to stop online betting companies from giving away free bonuses — which allow you to bet without depositing any money. luke ashton took his own life in april after he started gambling again while on furlough during lockdown. jayne mccubbin has been speaking to his wife, annie. i looked out of the window and his van wasn't there. and then the panic set in. i rang the police and they came round and took a statement. around about four o'clock on the 22nd of april, i looked out the window and two policemen got out the car and the way they walked in, i knew what they were going to say. annie's husband luke
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had taken his own life. she had no idea why until police handed back his telephone. gosh, i can't even describe the shock. i saw betting activity that must have consumed him from morning till night. it just escalated. it became uncontrollable. and i knew — i knew why he'd done it. the gambling commission estimate there are around 350,000 problem gamblers here in the uk. luke had previously beaten an addiction but, when lockdown hit, the ao—year—old was furloughed. that's when annie says the first of many free bets landed in his e—mails, and luke was drawn back in. there's no doubt about it. the only people that knew about luke's addiction were luke and the company. and at no point did they step in and do anything about it. there was a free bet that dropped into his account
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the day he disappeared. by that point, he had already, you know, decided on what he was doing. last year, a house of lords report found that for every person with a problem, six more were harmed. that's 2 million people harmed by divorce, crime, loss of work, of homes and, ultimately, loss of life. that report found that 60% of gambling companies' profits come from the 5% of customers who have a problem. and studies show that covid made online gambling numbers soar. search "free bets" online and you will find a staggering number. onjust one page, offers from 5a companies. £1,700 worth of free bets, if you were to sign up. and that's just the first page that pops up on the internet.
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it's terrifying. there is no other word for it. it's terrifying. they are inducements, so they are the free cigarette, or the free shot of heroin. it's your first shotl of heroin, isn't it? liz and charles ritchie set up the charity gambling with lives after their 24—year—old son jack took his own life in 2017. they and annie want to see free bets banned. for some people, that. will be the start of their journey into addiction. we set up gambling with lives to warn other parents, because nobody warned us, because there is no messaging. and i've spoken to so many mums and dads who say to me, "i warned them about road safety, i warned them about sexual predators, i warned them about drugs. i didn't know there was another predator out there to warn them about."
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annie is pushing for change in the name of her husband just as the government reviews current legislation to make sure it is fit for the digital age, the government told us. legislation was passed in 2005 and was quickly outdated by technology, which put a casino and a bookmaker in the palm of everybody�*s hand. the betting and gaming council told us, "promotions are an issue for individual operators," but added, "the industry is determined to protect people. and the rate of problem gamblers has remained stable for the past 20 years. free bets, they are not designed to give anyone anything, they are not designed to be free. they are enticing people to open accounts and, potentially, they cost lives. the headlines on bbc news... as aerial evacuations continue — a member of the afghan security forces is killed in a firefight at the gates of kabul airport. us and german troops were involved.
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the uk prime minister will ask joe biden to keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the 31st of august, amid fears the withdrawal could prevent further evacuation flights — but ministers want cooperation from the taliban, who say they won't accept an extension to the deadline. in the uk, all 16 and 17 year olds have been offered their first coronavirus vaccine, as a campaign is launched to encourage teenagers to getjabbed — warning of the effects long covid. in an emotional interview, a widow tells the bbc how her husband took his own life after relapsing into a gambling addiction. the tokyo paralympics starts tomorrow. we'll be speaking to a sports psychologist, who's been helping athletes prepare ahead of the games. more now on afghanistan. the taliban say they won't extend the deadline
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for western forces to leave afghanistan. a spokesman said the 31st of august was a red line. he said president biden had said troops would be out by that date, and extending it meant extending afghanistan's occupation. britain's prime minister, borisjohnson, had been expected to use an emergency g7 meeting on tuesday to ask president biden to delay the us troop withdrawal to allow more time for evacuations from kabul airport. sir christopher meyer is here. he is a former british ambassador to the us. thank you for first of all, this response from the taliban rejecting any extension on the 31st of august deadline. any surprise? hat any extension on the 31st of august deadline. any surprise?— deadline. any surprise? not really. this is what — deadline. any surprise? not really. this is what they _ deadline. any surprise? not really. this is what they negotiated - deadline. any surprise? not really. this is what they negotiated and i this is what they negotiated and want to stick to. it puts joe this is what they negotiated and want to stick to. it putsjoe biden in a difficult place, you might say he put himself in this awkward situation but the last thing he will
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once unless he can persuade the taliban to do something else, is to find himself with his american troops in bloody firefights with the taliban fighters and that looks like being the outcome if biden were to accept boris johnson's position. the if biden were to accept boris johnson's position. the taliban are the ower johnson's position. the taliban are the power in _ johnson's position. the taliban are the power in kabul— johnson's position. the taliban are the power in kabul now— johnson's position. the taliban are the power in kabul now and - johnson's position. the taliban are the power in kabul now and that i johnson's position. the taliban are the power in kabul now and that is| johnson's position. the taliban are l the power in kabul now and that is a fact of life, if it is a fact of life then we should negotiate with them, we shouldn't have any qualms with talking to them because if we don't we won't secure any objectives at all. i would say that we should not accept this as a final reply from the taliban and that we should
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find ways and means of extending the deadline if we can and then that might make it more possible to get joe biden to changes mind. from what biden has been saying in his press conferences, he is a busy thinking of extending the deadline but what will make his position much harder will make his position much harder will be the taliban saying they will fight them from doing that. that would confront not only the united states and united kingdom with some very unpalatable choices. do you think borisjohnson will continue with this plan to speak to president biden and consider extending the deadline, notwithstanding what we have just heard from the taliban in the last hour or so? if have just heard from the taliban in the last hour or so?— the last hour or so? if we have heard this _ the last hour or so? if we have heard this in _ the last hour or so? if we have heard this in the _ the last hour or so? if we have heard this in the last _ the last hour or so? if we have heard this in the last hour - the last hour or so? if we have heard this in the last hour or. the last hour or so? if we have | heard this in the last hour or so i think it will be a case of back to the drawing board about what we do. there is no point in trying to persuade the americans in staying with us beyond the 31st of august deadline if it will result in an
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ignition of warfare between the americans, british and the taliban. we haven't taken any casualties from the taliban for a very long time now so it would be the return of hot war but that is still an option, which is to pour troops into kabul and retake it. there is an option for the american and british to ensure that the evacuations carry on but that the evacuations carry on but thatis that the evacuations carry on but that is possibly the worst of all. i don't think i would do this at the g7, it is not the appropriate venue. i will try and thrash this out at nato itself, that is where the discussion amongst the allies should take place, why? because the whole thing is back to 20 years ago when the nato allies invoked article five of the nato treaty which obliges all members to come to the aid of one members to come to the aid of one member under attack. that is the
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format, the framework in which these discussions should take place. clearly today's developments add a huge amount of pressure on an already hugely pressurised situation at the airport in terms of the evacuations with airlines alongside military aircraft trying to get people out. more broadly in terms of the us, uk relationships, how awkward is it at the moment? it is awkward is it at the moment? it is awkward but _ awkward is it at the moment? it is awkward but we _ awkward is it at the moment? it 3 awkward but we have had that before. ever since the creation of the so—called special relationship, i don't like never used when i was ambassador, there have been all sorts of disagreements, some far worse than now, if you think of suez just after the second world war, if
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you think about bill clinton giving gerry adams a visa to visit the united states, and then of course there is the invasion of the island of grenada. so it is not a smooth, upward line, it is a series of troughs and peaks. in upward line, it is a series of troughs and peaks. upward line, it is a series of trou~hs and eaks. , ., ., troughs and peaks. in terms of talks ofthe troughs and peaks. in terms of talks of the taliban _ troughs and peaks. in terms of talks of the taliban at _ troughs and peaks. in terms of talks of the taliban at this _ troughs and peaks. in terms of talks of the taliban at this stage, - troughs and peaks. in terms of talks of the taliban at this stage, you - of the taliban at this stage, you have already said that western powers shouldn't accept this statement from the taliban as a final reply on the issue and they should continue to try to work to try and extend out if required. would you think of the nature of the talks and on an ongoing basis should be with the taliban? clearly the world is waiting and watching and once western troops finally
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withdrawn to see how the taliban behaves. ., , , ., ., behaves. our approach to the taliban as well as any — behaves. our approach to the taliban as well as any other— behaves. our approach to the taliban as well as any other problem - behaves. our approach to the taliban as well as any other problem in - as well as any other problem in world affairs, you can't take the world affairs, you can't take the world as you would wish it to beaver because it leads you to all kind of delusions. you must take it as it comes. the question you ask yourself is who holds power in kabul? right now it is the taliban and it makes common practical sense to simply talk to them and see if there is flexibility in their position. that is pure common sense in my point of view. of course the taliban are guilty of all kind of hideous human rights abuses, abuses against women and things like that, that cannot be used as a final and definitive argument it not engaging with them in order to save thousands of other lives for afghan refugees, both
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those employed by the americans or those employed by the americans or those employed by us or other nato countries. ., ., , ., those employed by us or other nato countries. ., . , ., . ~ countries. former ambassador, thank ou ve countries. former ambassador, thank you very much — countries. former ambassador, thank you very much for _ countries. former ambassador, thank you very much for your— countries. former ambassador, thank you very much for your time - countries. former ambassador, thank you very much for your time today. i the opening ceremony for the paralympics gets under way in tokyo this tuesday. more than 4,000 athletes from across the globe will be competeing in japan. but with covid cases risng, offcials have warned the games are in a difficult situation. i'm joined now by the director of think believe perform helen davis, a chartered sports psychologist, who has worked with the paralympic team in tokyo. great to have you with a salon. you must be hugely excited for the athletes. —— great to have you with us, helen. athletes. -- great to have you with us. helen-— us, helen. yes, it is very exciting that the paralympic _ us, helen. yes, it is very exciting that the paralympic games - us, helen. yes, it is very exciting that the paralympic games are i us, helen. yes, it is very exciting i that the paralympic games are upon us. i'm so looking forward to watching it, having had a few weeks break from the previous olympics. so i'm very excited. 50 break from the previous olympics. so i'm very excited-— i'm very excited. so is your “ob in
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terms of the i i'm very excited. so is your “ob in terms of the preparation h i'm very excited. so is yourjob in terms of the preparation you - i'm very excited. so is yourjob in terms of the preparation you are | terms of the preparation you are doing with athletes will you be speaking to them in the course of the games? i speaking to them in the course of the games?— the games? i still have regular contact. weekly _ the games? i still have regular contact. weekly meetings, - the games? i still have regular- contact. weekly meetings, individual meetings and team meetings with coaches as well. so it is good that i am keeping that contact while they are out there in tokyo. bud i am keeping that contact while they are out there in tokyo.— are out there in tokyo. and given ou have are out there in tokyo. and given you have been — are out there in tokyo. and given you have been involved _ are out there in tokyo. and given you have been involved in - are out there in tokyo. and given l you have been involved in months, are out there in tokyo. and given - you have been involved in months, no doubt years of preparation, what are you saying to them at this point? after all the waiting they are finally here on the brink of competition.— finally here on the brink of competition. finally here on the brink of com etition. ., ., finally here on the brink of cometition. ., . ., ~ competition. you are right. the work has been done. _ competition. you are right. the work has been done, i _ competition. you are right. the work has been done, i have _ competition. you are right. the work has been done, i have been - competition. you are right. the work has been done, i have been working | has been done, i have been working with the athletes for a number of months and years in preparation for this event, so now it is putting into practice all the things we have been working together, the psychological plans they have got in place all the things they need to remind themselves when they are there so they can go out there and deliver their best performances. so is it about not letting the challenges of the day, the emotion
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take over all the preparation? is that what it is about?— take over all the preparation? is that what it is about? obviously it is very individual _ that what it is about? obviously it is very individual depending - that what it is about? obviously it is very individual depending on i that what it is about? obviously it | is very individual depending on the athletes and the things they find they need to work on when they are there. there will be athletes there that have emotional regulation strategies they will be practising now in the lead up, that might involve some relaxation, cognitive self talk processes, whether motivational or instructional. think they have prepared that will help them feel like they have the resources to cope on the day with the big occasion. bud resources to cope on the day with the big occasion.— resources to cope on the day with the big occasion. and what have you done with the _ the big occasion. and what have you done with the added _ the big occasion. and what have you done with the added uncertainty - the big occasion. and what have you done with the added uncertainty of. done with the added uncertainty of covid and the knowledge that something could happen at the very last moment?— last moment? there's so much in sort last moment? there's so much in sport anyway- _ last moment? there's so much in sport anyway. covid _ last moment? there's so much in sport anyway. covid and - last moment? there's so much in sport anyway. covid and the - last moment? there's so much in - sport anyway. covid and the pandemic aside, sport is an event where anything can happen. athletes generally are prepared for uncertainty. with the pandemic as well, we have all got quite good at
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uncertainty and living with uncertainty. so again, psychologically, we will have prepared for what if scenarios if this happens and i will do this, all this happens and i will do this, all this helps athletes feel confident that they have a plan in place if something happens or there is a curve ball or something comes up which it often does in sport anyway. in terms of the challenges of not having the family, the friends that they would have hoped to have around them, with them injapan for this event, how challenging has that been for the athletes you have been working with?— for the athletes you have been workin: with? �* ., . . , , working with? again, that has been somethin: working with? again, that has been something we _ working with? again, that has been something we have _ working with? again, that has been something we have talked - working with? again, that has been something we have talked about i working with? again, that has been something we have talked about in| something we have talked about in the lead up to it with the time difference, who are their support people? who will they run too if they are frustrated? you are the people they will talk to about something else other than the olympic games. those people who are important to the athletes, how often they will speak to them, how they can connect to them, all those
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things are part of the support i have worked with athletes. find things are part of the support i have worked with athletes. and for the paralympians, _ have worked with athletes. and for the paralympians, how— have worked with athletes. and for the paralympians, how useful- have worked with athletes. and for the paralympians, how useful hasl have worked with athletes. and for| the paralympians, how useful has it been to watch the olympic games and have a sense of build—up and anticipation and getting ready to put in that peak performance? i think it has been incredibly exciting. just watching team gb with all the success they have had in tokyo, i think it has just raised the excitement levels even more and they were just all happy to get on they were just all happy to get on the plane to go out there and show off what they can do.— the plane to go out there and show off what they can do. enjoy watching off what they can do. en'oy watching the games. — off what they can do. en'oy watching the games. the h off what they can do. en'oy watching the games, i'm sure i off what they can do. enjoy watching the games, i'm sure you _ off what they can do. enjoy watching the games, i'm sure you will, i off what they can do. enjoy watching the games, i'm sure you will, helen| the games, i'm sure you will, helen davies, a psychologist at think believe perform who has been working with the olympic team there in tokyo. iran has reported a record number of deaths from covid—19, more than 680 in a single day. this is despite six days of restrictions that ended on saturday. iran is dealing with what officials are calling a fifth wave of the virus. the bbc�*s azadeh moshiri reports.
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after six days of restrictions, iranians are back on the streets. but at what cost? just as restrictions were lifted, officials revealed that the fifth wave of the covid—19 pandemic has tightened its grip on the country. new figures show that deaths are continuing to hit record numbers. spiking from more than 500 deaths before the restrictions to 684. means that since the pandemic began iran has registered more that means that since the pandemic began iran has registered more than four million covid cases and more than 102,000 deaths. while officials confess the real toll is higher, it still makes iran the worst hit the country among the worst hitthe country among its neighbours in the middle east. translation: the market was closed
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for six days but the roads were not. i they did not shut down funeral services or public gatherings. when you close the market, people go somewhere else. the situation does not change by closing down. the delta variant is partly to blame. but iran's vaccine programme has also failed to meet its targets. iran's supreme leader banned the import of vaccines made in the us and uk, opting for others instead. and while officials insist that iran's own vaccine is effective, there is no public data to prove it. looking at the figures, despite a population of more than 80 million, just overfive million have received both doses. judging by the number of iranians who are able to leave the country to go to the caucuses and obtain vaccines produced in the west, there is ample evidence that iranians themselves do not trust the vaccines produced in country. the government vowed to import more vaccine.
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but in the meantime, iranians are still facing a deadly wave of the virus. azadeh moshiri, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... as aerial evacuations continue — a member of the afghan security forces is killed in a firefight at the gates of kabul airport. us and german troops were involved. the uk prime minister will ask joe biden to keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the 31st of august, amid fears the withdrawal could prevent further evacuation flights — but ministers want cooperation from the taliban, who say they won't accept an extension to the deadline. in the uk, all 16 and 17 year olds have been offered their first coronavirus vaccine, as a campaign is launched to encourage teenagers to getjabbed — warning of the effects long covid
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more than 200,000 people in the uk are waiting for medical assessments so that they can renew their driving licences. that's according to doctors' union, the bma. they say health issues could be missed or played down as drivers try to avoid the wait at their gp and turn to other medical practitioners, who don't have their full medical records. they're warning that road safety could be at risk and are calling for a "safety—first" approach from the government. the dvla say they're bringing in extra staff to help process applications. dr peter holden, from the bma, explains why they're so concerned... the first issue is there is a huge backlog which was foreseen many a year ago and not a lot has been about it by the government. the second issue is that at the moment a driver can go to any doctorfor the medical. now the government has said we're going to build back better after the pandemic, and what we're saying is there has always been this hole in driver licensing, and there have been well—publicised cases of people who have obtained a licence who shouldn't
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have a licence medically, and the result has been a disaster for another road user or a pedestrian. and so we have the twin problem of we've got to crack the backlog, and it's time we plugged the hole. the government have just plugged the hole on firearms — or are about to — that's been long in the pipeline, it's not from last week's dreadful event. it's the same now with driver licensing. you need to have the full record, otherwise it becomes a case of "the driver tells me so". and there are a small number who will not say accurately what is necessary because it could cost them their licence. i think there is an expectation—management thing here, but actually i'm almost getting to the view now where we've got 90,000 shortage of hgv drivers, we've lost roughly 20,000 because of brexit — you've all seen the supermarket shelves the way they are, we depend on these people. actually the government needs to take a concerted effort to crack
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this once and for all. amazon is setting up its african headquarters in south africa. it's a multi—million dollar investment with the promise of thousands of jobs, but there's a catch: the land chosen is dear to the hearts of the khoi and san, the original inhabitants of the southern tip of the continent. vumani mkhize reports. drumming and chanting. a sacred ritual on sacred land. this is a cleansing ceremony for their fallen ancestors on contested land which the indigenous khoi and san consider the birthplace of our culture. the soil beneath our feet is when, in 1657... ..very serious developments occurred that would start the complete smashing and conquering of indigenous communities
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in south africa, as we know it, by colonial powers. in a country where land ownership has a painful legacy, the very place that i stand on is the site of south africa's first land dispossession. that's according to some members of the khoi and san communities who are in a desperate fight with developers of this particular site. us retail giant amazon is set to build its african headquarters here but the indigenous community say they will not give up without a fight. i think there's a lot of variables on this site that, i guess, the objecting parties don't really fully understand. at the heart of the dispute is a $284 million project — housing units, stores, as well as us retail giant amazon's new 70,000 square metres african headquarters are set to be built on the land.
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we are doing exactly what i believe they want. we rehabilitate the area, we restore the heritage of the area. there is no heritage here at the moment. no—one lived on the site, there are no burial graves at all on the site but that gives us the opportunity to restore it. in a country with a staggering 32% unemployment rate, experts say this development is economic crucial. it is a marker for other investors. it will help to encourage other foreign investors into the country on the grounds that this place is stable, it's got a good skills base, and it's a place for the future. for tariq, it's not aboutjobs or the economy, it's about culture and tradition. if we lose the river, we lose everything. if we lose this embankment, we lose everything. for the san and khoi communities, they say their heritage is not for sale. vumani mkhize, bbc news, cape town. olympic silver medallist
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ben whittaker has spent the day as mayor of wolverhampton — something he said was a dream come true. it came about after he joked that he wanted to be mayor if he won gold in tokyo. he won a silver medal — but still got his day in office, as liz cooper reports. it's a golden accolade, a political honour, a source of civic pride. a source of civic pride — becoming the mayor of wolverhampton. boxer ben whittaker donned the official regalia of the first citizen. this had been ben's manifesto after his olympic quarterfinal. i want to go back with a gold medal and i want to become the mayor of wolverhampton. i want one of those nice chains on my neck and i'll be calling all the shots. everyone in wolverhampton will have a nice grill, and a nice big chain, courtesy of ben whittaker. after trying on that nice big chain, it was time to get to work with some official engagements. amongst them, a visit to a city centre youth club.
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it's a dream come true, i keep saying this, when i was a kid, with my coach i said, "i'm going to be the mayor, "i'm going to be the mayor." went to the olympics, "i'm going to be the mayor." come back, i'm the mayor! so dream is a reality, really. the role of the mayor involves encouraging young people. this group seemed impressed. we both do boxing together. |and itjust, that's our dream, so| we're going to hopefully reach it. it inspired me a lot, and i can't believe he won the medal, the silver. i was proud, he should be proud of himself. i he made everyone else proud, it was the best he could do. i everywhere we've been today, he's been inundated with people wanting to wish him well, telling him how proud they are, having pictures with him. and he's so good with the local community. he is happy to meet everybody. celebrations as ben met the crowds at wolves, time also for some new policies. i told them that the kids can have monday to wednesday, have a couple of playstations and a bottom grille, so i think i'm
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winning with the kids. the mum and dads, things like that, they're not agreeing. but if you can get the kids to vote, i think i'll get a couple of votes and you might see me there with the chain on, with the robes permanently! it could be a while before he swaps the boxing ring for the political fray but this honorary mayor seems to have secured the popular vote. visitors to paris may be in for a surprise when strolling up the champs—elysees next month. work has started on an art project to cover the arc de triomphe monument in a shimmering wrapping. daniel wittenberg reports. it's an ambitious project of monumental proportions, and the preparations, too, are immense. three crews have begun work around the clock to prepare the arc de triomphe for its glossy makeover. currently, france's most famous arch is surrounded by cranes and scaffolding, but from mid—september it will be swathed in silvery blue fabric and 3,000 metres of red rope. sketched out nearly 60 years ago
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by the bulgarian—born artist christo and his wifejean claude, the arc de triomphe wrapped project is finally being brought to life a year after his death. christo was known for his towering installations on monuments around the world. in 1995, he wrapped the reichstag parliament building in berlin. and in his last major work he floated more than 7,000 painted barrels on london's serpentine lake. but, according to his nephew, who's directing this project, christo's biggest dream was to wrap the arc de triomphe. just keeping a promise to him. that's as simple as that. hopefully, christo would be most happy if somebody looks at it and says, "it looks just like the drawings." looming over the champs—elysees, the 50—metre—high installation promises to transform one of paris's most recognisable panoramas, and it offers a final chance to unwrap one of christo's landmark ideas.
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daniel wittenberg, bbc news. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. high pressure is going to be dominating our weather this week, which means things will be a lot more settled and there'll be less cloud than there was last week. however, there'll still be some cloud and it will largely dry but that cloud thick enough now and again for the odd spot of drizzle. you'll also expect some warm sunshine, but no heat wave on the cards. here's the high pressure dominating our weather, the air moving around it in a clockwise direction so looking at breezy conditions, especially across the southeast and especially so across kent — but that will take the edge off the temperatures slightly. so, this afternoon, you could catch a shower on higher ground across scotland. shetland hanging on to a fair bit of cloud, as will some parts of the coast of western scotland
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and the coast of northern ireland. here, too, inland on higher ground, you could see the odd shower. for england and for wales, though, a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine, maybe the odd shower with height in wales and the south west — but they will be the exception rather than the rule. top temperatures 23 degrees. now through this evening and overnight, more cloud will come in from the north sea across northern england, the midlands, into wales — again, thick enough for some drizzle — and there'll be low cloud, mist and fog draped across the coastlines of the north and west of scotland and the north and east of northern ireland. by the end of the night, we could also see some mist and fog with poor visibility across parts of central and eastern scotland. now, high pressure still very much with us tomorrow. you can see the wind arrows pointing to where we've got the wind direction coming from — namely from the northeast. so breezy along this northeast coastline, as well as the english channel, and our weather front sinking southwards — there's a fairly weak feature taking its cloud and some drizzle with it across england and wales, but hanging on once again — especially across the northern isles — just some of that low cloud lingering on the coastline. inland, we're back into the sunshine.
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for wednesday, well, we've got this weak weather front, which is going to sink south during thursday, actually, bringing not much more than a band of cloud. and on wednesday, too, you can see there will be a bit more cloud across parts of the north and the east, and also into southern england, as well. still a keen breeze down that north sea coastline, so feeling cooler here. move out towards the north and the west, and you've got something drier, sunnier and also that bit warmer. now, on thursday, i mentioned that weather front sinking south, but it won't do much more than bring a band of cloud with it, and generally it's going to feel cooler along the east coast. the highest temperatures will be in the west, but even so, they'll take a slight dip.
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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. the headlines at 11: the uk prime minister will ask joe biden to keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the end of august, amid fears the withdrawal could prevent further evacuation flights, but the taliban say they won't accept an extension to the deadline. i don't think there is any likelihood on staying on after the united states, if their timetable extends at all, that'll give us some days more to evacuate people, because we are down to not weeks. as aerial evacuations continue. a member of the afghan security forces is killed in a firefight at the gates of kabul airport. us and german troops were involved. in an emotional interview, a widow tells the bbc how her husband took his own life after relapsing into a gambling addiction.
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i looked out of the window and two policemen got out the car and the way they walked in, i knew what they were going to say. as all 16— and 17—year—olds are offered their first coronavirus vaccine, a campaign is launched to encourage teenagers to getjabbed, warning of the effects long covid. and the british boxing olympic silver medallist ben whittaker achieves his dream. becoming mayor of wolverhampton — for a day. the prime minister is expected to ask president biden to delay withdrawing the last american forces from afghanistan to allow more time
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for the evacuation effort at kabul international airport. borisjohnson will make the request at an emergency meeting of leaders from the g7 countries tomorrow. us troops are due to leave kabul airport in just over week, but several thousand people remain there, desperate to flee the country and escape the taliban. they include afghans who worked for the british military. the uk says it has evacuated more than 1800 people from afghanistan on eight flights in the last 24 hours. nine more flights are expected in the next 24 hours. president biden has warned of a risk of attacks from so—called islamic state militants, and says he hopes he won't have to delay the airlift. this morning the german military reports a member of the afghan security forces has been killed in an exchange of fire with unidentified gunmen at the north gate of kabul airport. the first of our reports is from our political
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correspondent, chris mason. queueing to get out, clinging on to possessions, to children. frightened and fleeing to an uncertain future. the thing that i think we've all learned over the last week or so is that the timelines around which we plan are not always completely in our own control. now obviously, the more time that we've got, the more people we can evacuate and that's what we're pushing for. the ministry of defence says 5725 people have been evacuated from afghanistan in the last ten days. more than 1000 uk armed forces personnel are currently deployed in kabul. caught out and wrong—footed by the speed of the taliban's capture of afghanistan a week ago, western powers have been grappling to salvage what they can ever since. the limitations are obvious for all to see. president biden wants all american
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troops out by the end of the month. the uk is pressing for them to stay longer. the prime minister will make that case directly to the president tomorrow. there's discussions going on among us and the military about extending. our hope is we will not have to extend. but they're going to be some discussions i suspect on far along we are in the process. the government is also exploring how hubs could be set up in neighbouring countries to help afghans reach the uk once flights out of kabul are no longer possible. chris mason, bbc news. the defence secretary ben wallace has confirmed that the uk will leave kabul airport when the united states does. well, the prime minister is, obviously at g7, going to try and raise the prospect of seeing if the united states will extend. it is really important for people to understand the united states have over 6000 people in kabul airport and when they withdraw, that will take away the framework that has allowed us to withdraw
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and we will have to go as well. i don't think there is any likelihood on staying on after the united states. if their timetable extends even by a day or two, then that will give us a day or two more to evacuate people. because we are really down to hours now, not weeks and we have to make sure we exploit every minute to get people out. the former british ambassador to the us, sir christopher meyer, said given the taliban's latest announcement against america extending its deadline, it will lead to borisjohnson having to think again about his approach with president biden at the g7 meeting tomorrow. i think it will be a case of back to the drawing board and what we do? there is i think it will be a case of back to the drawing board and what we do? there is no point in trying to persuade the americans to stay with us beyond the 31st of august deadline if it is going result in an ignition of warfare between the americans, british and taliban. after all, we haven't taken any casualties from the taliban for a
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long time now, so it would be the return of war, but that is still an option, to get troops into kabul and retake it to ensure the refugees can carry on. but this is almost the worst option of them all, so at the moment i wouldn't try and do this at the g7, i do not think it is a good venue or appropriate. i would try and thrash this out at nato itself and thrash this out at nato itself and that is where the discussion among the allies should take place. why? because the whole thing goes back 20 years to when the nato allies invoked article five of the nato treaty which obliges all members to come to the aid of one members to come to the aid of one member under attack. that is the format, the framework in which these discussions should take place. as we've been hearing,
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a member of the the afghan security forces has been killed and another three injured in an exchange of fire with unidentified gunmen at the north gate of kabul airport. our delhi correspondent, danjohnson, explained that it's still not clear who attacked the afghan soldiers. that is not clear yet. there was a firefight at the airport early this morning involving afghan forces. we believe they are remnants of the afghan army that were left behind at the airport, soldiers who refused to surrender to the taliban last week and have been helping the international forces to secure the airport and process evacuees onto flights. one of those soldiers has lost his life, three have been injured, and this firefight also involved german defence forces and us soldiers, although we don't understand any of those were injured. but as to who was responsible, it is still unclear. there was a terror threat over the weekend. the us embassy in kabul advised its citizens to stay away from the airport and the streets around it, notjust because of the crowded scenes, but also because of a terror threat
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from is militants in the country. now, whether what has happened this morning is anything to do with that, we will have to wait and see, and whether any more lives have been lost in that violence. but it is another indication of the threat to the evacuation operation, the sort of interruptions that it faces, even just as we thought things were getting into some sort of routine, starting to calm down a little bit after the chaotic scenes we have witnessed over the last week. us vice president kamala harris has been speaking in singapore this morning as part of a tour of the region. she said the us withdrawal from afghanistan will be examined in time but the focus now is on getting people out. there is no question there will be — and should be — a robust analysis of what has happened. but right now, there's no question that our focus has to be on evacuating american citizens, afghans who worked with us,
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and vulnerable afghans — including women and children. that has to be our primary focus, and where we are placing our attention on the issue of afghanistan. and to that end, we have seen a successful drawdown of the embassy and, thankfully, without any american casualties. we have seen thousands of people who have been evacuated from the airport in afghanistan, where the united states military, doing very hard and difficult work, were able to contain that airport so that we could successfully evacuate the people who have been evacuated so far. so as the president has said, listen, this is a difficult mission — there is no question about that — but our focus has to be on the task at hand. as it relates to america's relationship around the world, i am standing here in singapore because of our
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commitment to a long—standing relationship which is an enduring relationship with the indo pacific region, with southeast asian countries, and in particular with singapore. daphne jayasinghe is from the international rescue committee. they have been working in afghanistan since 1988 and has helped millions of people through aid since then. thank you for joining us. what would you estimate is the number of people currently on the move in afghanistan? is it possible to get a grip on that? fine possible to get a grip on that? one thint is possible to get a grip on that? one thing is very _ possible to get a grip on that? iez thing is very clear is possible to get a grip on that? i2 thing is very clear is that possible to get a grip on that? (zii2 thing is very clear is that the number of people displaced inside the country is increasing rapidly, so people made to flee their home, internally displaced, going up by 53% in august alone up from 360,000 to 550,000, so the scale of movement
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of people made to flee is really devastating. of people made to flee is really devastating-— of people made to flee is really devastating. of people made to flee is really devastatint. ., , , devastating. right now the focus is on car-al devastating. right now the focus is on carpal airport — devastating. right now the focus is on carpal airport as _ devastating. right now the focus is on carpal airport as the _ devastating. right now the focus is on carpal airport as the airlifts i on carpal airport as the airlifts continue and we see those desperate scenes. is it possible to try to work out how many are heading there and where others are going? iiiiiiiere and where others are going? where theole are and where others are going? where people are destined _ and where others are going? where people are destined far _ and where others are going? where people are destined far is _ and where others are going? where people are destined far is difficult i people are destined far is difficult to estimate but what is clear is that you need they will be facing will be escalating, the need for shelter, food, water, the humanitarian need is on the rise in a country where the humanitarian needs where faced by 18 million people already. we anticipate that will increase alarmingly. fiend people already. we anticipate that will increase alarmingly.— will increase alarmingly. and what is our will increase alarmingly. and what is your organisation _ will increase alarmingly. and what is your organisation able - will increase alarmingly. and what is your organisation able to - will increase alarmingly. and what is your organisation able to do i is your organisation able to do right now? we is your organisation able to do right now?— is your organisation able to do ritht now? . ., ., ., right now? we are on the ground, we have been in — right now? we are on the ground, we have been in afghanistan _ right now? we are on the ground, we have been in afghanistan for- right now? we are on the ground, we have been in afghanistan for 30 i have been in afghanistan for 30 years and we will remain their delivering services, monitoring the situation and the security
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situation, minute by minute, to understand the security situation for resuming essential humanitarian services committee services including food, shelter, water and crucially, essential services for women and girls who we are concerned is particularly vulnerable at this time. 50 is particularly vulnerable at this time, ,., is particularly vulnerable at this time, y., is particularly vulnerable at this time. i. ., , time. so you said about resuming services, meaning _ time. so you said about resuming services, meaning currently i time. so you said about resuming | services, meaning currently things are on hold?— are on hold? there are services continuing. _ are on hold? there are services continuing. we _ are on hold? there are services continuing, we are _ are on hold? there are services continuing, we are monitoring i are on hold? there are services i continuing, we are monitoring the situation comedy security situation to make sure that services can be safely delivered. —— situation, security situation. have you had to bring any workers out or are they staying? irate bring any workers out or are they stain? ., bring any workers out or are they stain? . ., ., staying? we cannot comment on the movement of — staying? we cannot comment on the movement of staff _ staying? we cannot comment on the movement of staff for _ staying? we cannot comment on the movement of staff for security i movement of staff for security reasons, but we are in constant contact with our colleagues in afghanistan.— contact with our colleagues in afthanistan. ., , ., .
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afghanistan. constantly in touch with them with _ afghanistan. constantly in touch with them with regards - afghanistan. constantly in touch with them with regards to i afghanistan. constantly in touch with them with regards to theirl with them with regards to their safety. 50 with them with regards to their safe . ,, ., , with them with regards to their safe . , ., ., with them with regards to their safe . , ., . ., safety. so in terms of what you are actually doing _ safety. so in terms of what you are actually doing right _ safety. so in terms of what you are actually doing right now— safety. so in terms of what you are actually doing right now on - safety. so in terms of what you are actually doing right now on the i actually doing right now on the ground and that's a offered, can you describe where you are working, what you are doing and what the indications are on the safety situation?— indications are on the safety situation? , ., ., , . ., situation? the situation is changing very rapidly. _ situation? the situation is changing very rapidly. as _ situation? the situation is changing very rapidly. as you _ situation? the situation is changing very rapidly, as you know. - situation? the situation is changing very rapidly, as you know. where i situation? the situation is changing l very rapidly, as you know. where we are able to monitor the situation to resume services, we will be, it is a minute by minute situation where we have to be confident those can be delivered safely, but what we know is there is a devastating need and what is important is humanitarian services are unimpeded and access is safe and so there is a vital role to make sure humanitarian access is available. ., , ., , make sure humanitarian access is available. ., , ., available. can you tell us more about the _
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available. can you tell us more about the security _ available. can you tell us more about the security of _ available. can you tell us more about the security of the i available. can you tell us more i about the security of the services you offer, has there been verbal threats from the taliban? is it the physical situation? we threats from the taliban? is it the physical situation?— threats from the taliban? is it the physical situation? we are keeping in touch with _ physical situation? we are keeping in touch with colleagues, - physical situation? we are keeping in touch with colleagues, what i physical situation? we are keeping in touch with colleagues, what we | in touch with colleagues, what we will commit to you is remaining, we have been in afghanistan for 30 years and the needs of people in afghanistan are paramount. you are obviously limited _ afghanistan are paramount. you are obviously limited in _ afghanistan are paramount. you are obviously limited in what _ afghanistan are paramount. you are obviously limited in what you - afghanistan are paramount. you are obviously limited in what you feel i obviously limited in what you feel able to say, which speaks volumes on itself in terms of how your concern for those in the country. the security situation _ for those in the country. the security situation is - for those in the country. ti2 security situation is really devastating, we have to keep the security of colleagues paramount and what we know is we are monitoring the needs and that there was a growing daily. the needs and that there was a growing daily-— the needs and that there was a ttrowin dail . ~ ~ ., growing daily. when you think about the americans _ growing daily. when you think about the americans on _ growing daily. when you think about the americans on this _ growing daily. when you think about the americans on this deadline i growing daily. when you think about the americans on this deadline is i the americans on this deadline is leaving by the 31st of august, the government here saying it wants the americans to stay beyond that to get
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those that need and want to be airlifted out of the country, what are your thoughts? i airlifted out of the country, what are your thoughts?— airlifted out of the country, what are your thoughts? i think we have to work with _ are your thoughts? i think we have to work with the _ are your thoughts? i think we have to work with the situation - are your thoughts? i think we have to work with the situation we i are your thoughts? i think we have to work with the situation we are i to work with the situation we are faced with, the situation will change depending on decisions that are taken, but what we will be responding to is the needs of people who are displaced, that increase internally, safe routes for people fleeing their homes and essential services to support them in their survival. it services to support them in their survival. , , ., ., , survival. it will be diplomatically a difficult time _ survival. it will be diplomatically a difficult time as _ survival. it will be diplomatically a difficult time as the _ a difficult time as the international community grapples with how to interact with the taliban administration and whether, what sort of links there potentially might be. in terms of the impact on that on what happens on the ground
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in resources getting to charities and freedom to operate, what are your thoughts right now? we and freedom to operate, what are your thoughts right now?- your thoughts right now? we will continue to _ your thoughts right now? we will continue to provide _ your thoughts right now? we will continue to provide services, i your thoughts right now? we will continue to provide services, the| continue to provide services, the humanitarian needs of people affected are paramount in our mind and we will be identifying the safest ways to get the services to the people that needed most. in of the people that needed most. in of the diplomatic role that needs to be played, it is important humanitarian access remains safe and open and those services can get to the people that needed the most.— those services can get to the people that needed the most. thank you for talkint us that needed the most. thank you for talking us daphne _ that needed the most. thank you for talking us daphne jayasinghe. i young patients suffering from the debilitating effects of long covid have urged people to get their vaccine in a new nhs video. all 16— and 17—year—olds in england have been offered their firstjabs from today. the latest figures for england show people aged 18 to 34 now make up
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more than a fifth of those admitted to hospital with the virus. let's take a look at the campaign. i think the worst thing is, like, normally you would be able to go to bed, go to sleep and wake up feeling ready to face the day. i could sleep for a week and still feel tired. the kind of other one i have suffered with is joint and body aches, kind of when you've got a cold or the flu, that all—over ache. like even your teeth hurt. i get that most of the time. ifeel like i'm always sore in some way. dozens of companies selling covid pcr travel tests are to be removed from the government's list of approved providers. the firms either no longer exist or don't provide all the tests required by holiday—makers. others have been warned they could also be removed if they advertise misleading prices. a widow who lost her husband
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to a gambling addiction is urging the government to stop online betting companies from giving away free bonuses — which allow you to bet without depositing any money. luke ashton took his own life in april after he started gambling again while on furlough during lockdown. jayne mccubbin has been speaking to his wife annie. i looked out of the window and his van wasn't there. and then the panic set in. i rang the police and they came round and took a statement. around about four o'clock on the 22nd of april, i looked out the window and two policemen got out the car and the way they walked in, i knew what they were going to say. annie's husband luke had taken his own life. she had no idea why until police handed back his telephone.
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gosh, i can't even describe the shock. i saw betting activity that must have consumed him from morning till night. it just escalated. it became uncontrollable. and i knew — i knew why he'd done it. the gambling commission estimate there are around 350,000 problem gamblers here in the uk. luke had previously beaten an addiction but, when lockdown hit, the 40—year—old was furloughed. that's when annie says the first of many free bets landed in his e—mails, and luke was drawn back in. there's no doubt about it. the only people that knew about luke's addiction were luke and the company. and at no point did they step in and do anything about it. there was a free bet that dropped into his account the day he disappeared.
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by that point, he had already, you know, decided on what he was doing. last year, a house of lords report found that for every person with a problem, six more were harmed. that's 2 million people harmed by divorce, crime, loss of work, of homes and, ultimately, loss of life. that report found that 60% of gambling companies' profits come from the 5% of customers who have a problem. and studies show that covid made online gambling numbers soar. search "free bets" online and you will find a staggering number. onjust one page, offers from 54 companies. £1700 worth of free bets, if you were to sign up. and that's just the first page that pops up on the internet. it's terrifying. there is no other word for it. it's terrifying.
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they are inducements, so they are the free cigarette, or the free shot of heroin. it's your first shotl of heroin, isn't it? liz and charles ritchie set up the charity gambling with lives after their 24—year—old son jack took his own life in 2017. they and annie want to see free bets banned. for some people, that. will be the start of their journey into addiction. we set up gambling with lives to warn other parents, because nobody warned us, because there is no messaging. and i've spoken to so many mums and dads who say to me, "i warned them about road safety, i warned them about sexual predators, i warned them about drugs. i didn't know there was another predator out there to warn them about." annie is pushing for change in the name of her husband just as the government reviews current
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legislation to make sure it is fit for the digital age, the government told us. legislation was passed in 2005 and was quickly outdated by technology, which put a casino and a bookmaker in the palm of everybody�*s hand. the betting and gaming council told us... "promotions are an issue for individual operators," but added, "the industry is determined to protect people. and the rate of problem gamblers has remained stable for the past 20 years." free bets, they are not designed to give anyone anything, they are not designed to be free. they are enticing people to open accounts and, potentially, they cost lives. the number of people killed by flash floods in the us state of tennessee has risen to more than 20. dozens are still missing. roads and bridges were washed away and power cuts have affected thousands of people. the east coast of the united states has also been hit by strong winds and heavy rain, as tropical storm henri passed through the area. tanya dendrinos reports.
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debris and devastation, this is tennessee after flash flooding wreaked havoc. i'm like trying to get them out the door, but the water is so high and it's pushing against the door that i'm having a hard time pushing to open the door to get them out. i'm holding two babies. as locals assess the unimaginable damage following the record rainfall, search and rescue teams were looking for survivors. tremendous loss of life. a number of missing people on the ground, homes washed off their foundations, cars strewn around the community. it is a devastating picture of loss and heartache. the loss front of mind that in sunday's presidential address. i want to begin by expressing my deepest condolences for the sudden and tragic loss of life
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through this flash flood. i know we've reached out to the community and we stand ready to offer them support. i've asked the administrator to speak to governor lee of tennessee right away. and we will offer any assistance they need for this terrible moment. meanwhile, more than 20,000 homes were left without power after tropical storm henri made landfall on rhode island, downgraded from a category one hurricane, many residents along the northeast coast of the united states were breathing a sigh of relief. we've seen a lot of wind damage, trees down and stuff like that, a couple of inches of water on the road. that's about it. and loss of power. henri is weakening, but heavy rainfall is expected to continue with potential for more flooding. disaster relief has already been approved for a number of states,
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with the president pledging the government will do everything it can to help them respond and recover. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. world trade center one has been struck by lightning as tropical storm henri battered new york. a bolt can be seen striking the top of the building in lower manhattan, connecting with the spire 550 metres above ground level. more than 120,000 homes in rhode island are without power because of the storm. olympic silver medallist ben whittaker has spent the day as mayor of wolverhampton — something he said was a dream come true. it came about after he joked that he wanted to be mayor if he won gold in tokyo. he won a silver mdeal, but still got his day in office, as liz cooper reports. it's a golden accolade, a political honour, a source of civic pride. becoming the mayor of wolverhampton. boxer ben whittaker donned the official regalia of the first citizen.
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this had been ben's manifesto after his olympic quarterfinal. i want to go back with a gold medal and i want to become the mayor of wolverhampton. i want one of those nice chains on my neck and i'll be calling all the shots. everyone in wolverhampton will have a nice grille, and a nice big chain, courtesy of ben whittaker. after trying on the nice big chain, it was time to get to work with some official engagements. amongst them, a visit to a city centre youth club. it's a dream come true, i keep saying this, when i was a kid, with my coach i said, "i'm going to be the mayor, i'm going to be the mayor." went to the olympics, "i'm going to be the mayor." come back, i'm the mayor. so dreams a reality, really. the role of the mayor involves encouraging young people. this group seemed impressed. we both do boxing together. |and itjust, that's our dream, so| we're going to hopefully reach it. this inspired me a lot, and i can't believe he won the medal, the silver. i was proud, he should
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be proud of himself. i he made everyone else proud, it was the best he could do. i everywhere we've been today, he's been inundated with people wanting to wish him well, telling him how proud they are, having pictures with him. and he's so good with the local community. he is happy to meet everybody. celebrations as ben met the crowds at wolves, time also for some new policies. i told them that the kids can have monday to wednesday, have a couple of playstations and a bottom grille, so i think i'm winning with the kids. the mum and dads, things like that, they're not agreeing. but if you can get the kids to vote, i think i'll get a couple of votes and you might see me there with the chain on, with the robes permanently. it could be a while before he swaps the boxing ring for the political fray, but this honorary mayor seems to have secured the popular vote. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. high pressure is going to be dominating our weather this week, which means things will be a lot
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more settled and there'll be less cloud than there was last week. however, there'll still be some cloud and it will largely dry but that cloud thick enough now and again for the odd spot of drizzle. you'll also expect some warm sunshine, but no heat wave on the cards. here's the high pressure dominating our weather, the air moving around it in a clockwise direction so looking at breezy conditions, especially across the southeast and especially so across kent — but that will take the edge off the temperatures slightly. so, this afternoon, you could catch a shower on higher ground across scotland. shetland hanging on to a fair bit of cloud, as will some parts of the coast of western scotland and the coast of northern ireland. here, too, inland on higher ground, you could see the odd shower. for england and for wales, though, a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine, maybe the odd shower with height in wales and the south west — but they will be the exception rather than the rule. top temperatures 23 degrees. now through this evening and overnight, more cloud will come in from the north sea across northern england, the midlands, into wales — again, thick enough for some drizzle — and there'll be low cloud, mist and fog draped across the coastlines
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of the north and west of scotland and the north and east of northern ireland. by the end of the night, we could also see some mist and fog with poor visibility across parts of central and eastern scotland. now, high pressure still very much with us tomorrow. you can see the wind arrows pointing to where we've got the wind direction coming from — namely from the northeast. so breezy along this northeast coastline, as well as the english channel, and our weather front sinking southwards — there's a fairly weak feature taking its cloud and some drizzle with it across england and wales, but hanging on once again — especially across the northern isles — just some of that low cloud lingering on the coastline. inland, we're back into the sunshine. for wednesday, well, we've got this weak weather front, which is going to sink south during thursday, actually, bringing not much more than a band of cloud. and on wednesday, too, you can see there will be a bit more cloud across parts of the north and the east, and also into southern england, as well. still a keen breeze down that north sea coastline, so feeling cooler here. move out towards the north and the west, and you've got something drier, sunnier and also that bit warmer.
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now, on thursday, i mentioned that weather front sinking south, but it won't do much more than bring a band of cloud with it, and generally it's going to feel cooler along the east coast. the highest temperatures will be in the west, but even so, they'll take a slight dip.
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hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: the uk prime minister will ask joe biden to keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the end of august, amid fears the withdrawal could prevent further evacuation flights, but the taliban say they won't accept an extension to the deadline. as aerial evacuations continue, a member of the afghan security forces is killed in a firefight at the gates of kabul airport. us and german troops were involved. in an emotional interview, a widow tells the bbc how her husband took his own life after relapsing into
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a gambling addiction. as all 16 and 17—year—olds are offered their first coronavirus vaccine, a campaign is launched to encourage teenagers to getjabbed, warning of the effects long covid. teenagers to getjabbed, warning of the effects of long covid. and the british boxing olympic silver medallist, ben whittaker, achieves his dream. becoming mayor of wolverhampton for a day. sport now and time for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. good morning. the team for the solheim cup has been announced and there are three english players selected for europe's defence of the title against the united states next month. georgia hall and charley hull made the team automatically, while mel reid is one of six picks from captain catriona matthew. let's look at the full team. anna nordqvist�*s win at the women's open yesterday meant she got the points to qualify automatically, as did georgia hall who came joint second at carnoustie. there are four rookies in the team, including captain's pick leona maguire, ireland's first ever
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solheim cup player. earlier, matthew told us some of the decision making behind the process, as the final major of the year came to a close. it was a tough phone call two years ago, to say you hadn't quite made it and asked to be vice captain. i think that shows how much she loves it. she didn't think for an instant and said she would do it. it was a much nicer phone call this time. i think she will be a great addition. she has the experience and has the passion for team play. they have been trying for two years to make the team and to finally get that confirmation you are in the team, obviously, the players are very excited, especially the rookies, i think, when you are playing on your first one. i managed to catch mel, just before she set off for atlanta,
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and as you can imagine she was just delighted. the england bowler mark wood is out of the third test against india, which begins this week after suffering a shoulder injury. hejarred his right shoulder in the last test at lord's, which england lost by 151 runs, having drawn the first match in the series. the third test takes place at headingley, starting on wednesday. chelsea manager thomas tuchel believes romelu lukaku has proved his worth to the squad already, after scoring on his first match back at chelsea yesterday. the belgian found the net afterjust14 minutes in an impressive performance as chelsea beat arsenal 2—0 at the emirates. lukaku was a £97.5 million signing from inter milan and has become the premier league's second most expensive player of all time. we are very happy that he could score so early. he set up some other chances, he was always dangerous, and, yeah, it gives something to our game that we can play very, very direct and to the last line he can protect balls. it's very, very good. there were some really ugly scenes in the ligue one match
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between nice and marseilles, which had to be abandoned. marseille and former west ham midfielder dmitri payet was hit by a bottle, but then threw it back into the crowd. supporters then stormed onto the pitch with stewards and police struggling to restrain them. the players tried to leave and marseilles coachjorge sampaoli had to be held back by his staff. after a long delay, the nice players came out to finish the game, but the marseilles players refused to do so. andy murray beat american noah rubin in the winston—salem open first round. he was due to be playing nick kyrgios, but the australian pulled out with a knee injury. murray won in straight sets 6—2, 6—0 and took victory by winning ten successive games. the final tennis major of the year, the us open starts next week. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the 2020 paralympic games kick off in tokyo tomorrow. more than 4,000 athletes will take
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part, but those with intellectual disabilities are still competing under the shadow of a cheating scandal that happened 21 years ago. in sydney, the spanish basketball team won gold, only to have to give back their medals when it was revealed only two of the team members were genuinely disabled. one of those two is ray torres. here's his story. we won all the games and the final we won russia and i didn't believe it. it was something that i think everybody would say, it's a dream come true.
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these people went to sydney without doing no tests and not being special. for me, we are special. and we earned that. and these people didn't fight nothing and didn't earn it. i had to give back my gold medal. and that was the bit that is very difficult, even now, to think about it. one of the athletes excluded from the games when intellectual disability sports was removed from the competition was the british swimmer dan pepper. now he's the presenter of a new bbc podcast the fake paralympians,
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which investigates what happened in 2000. hejoins me now in the studio, along with the podcast�*s producer simon maybin. welcome, both of you. well, it's an incredible story. i didn't know much about this. obviously i had a huge impact on you, you are not able to compete in two paralympics because of this. what impact did that have on your career?— of this. what impact did that have on your career? yeah, i messed out of athens in — on your career? yeah, i messed out of athens in 2004 _ on your career? yeah, i messed out of athens in 2004 and _ on your career? yeah, i messed out of athens in 2004 and beijing i on your career? yeah, i messed out of athens in 2004 and beijing in i of athens in 2004 and beijing in 2008, when i was at my prime. i was one of the fortunate athletes that managed to make london 2012, but in the swing world i was kind of walking out with —— in the swimming world, i was kind of walking out with a zimmerframe, i was an old man by that stage. i was thankful to make my dreams come true by making it to the paralympics, but it was bittersweet because at my prime i was kind of untouchable in my
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events. you could never say i was guaranteed a medal, because that sport, but it's hard to think that wouldn't at least have made the podium. 50 wouldn't at least have made the odium. ., wouldn't at least have made the todium. ., .,, wouldn't at least have made the todium. ., , ., podium. so how has it been for you, no speaking — podium. so how has it been for you, no speaking to _ podium. so how has it been for you, no speaking to some _ podium. so how has it been for you, no speaking to some of _ podium. so how has it been for you, no speaking to some of those i podium. so how has it been for you, no speaking to some of those who i podium. so how has it been for you, i no speaking to some of those who are involved in it?— involved in it? yeah, it's kind of been eye-opening, _ involved in it? yeah, it's kind of been eye-opening, really. i- involved in it? yeah, it's kind of. been eye-opening, really. i knew been eye—opening, really. i knew bits about the story, but how in—depth it was and how this was a planned event about cheating, it didn'tjust kind of happen, there was a thought around and we spoke to people about how long this thought process went on, and simon in his research found out about how this process all came about, really. so, simon, process all came about, really. so, simon. tell— process all came about, really. so, simon. tell us _ process all came about, really. so, simon, tell us more about what you have learned. one episode has been broadcast so far and there is obviously more to come, but how much of an eye opener has it been for you? of an eye opener has it been for ou? . , of an eye opener has it been for ou? ., , ., , , , you? huge, really. so many twists and turns in— you? huge, really. so many twists
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and turns in the _ you? huge, really. so many twists and turns in the story. _ you? huge, really. so many twists and turns in the story. i _ you? huge, really. so many twists and turns in the story. i found - you? huge, really. so many twists and turns in the story. i found it i and turns in the story. i found it really _ and turns in the story. i found it really fascinating are quite shocking because i think the story in itself_ shocking because i think the story in itself is — shocking because i think the story in itself is really fascinating, but it tells _ in itself is really fascinating, but it tells you so much about the world of disability sport and how people with different disabilities are seen in wider_ with different disabilities are seen in wider society. so one of the really— in wider society. so one of the really surprising things i found out was that_ really surprising things i found out was that there was another team, another_ was that there was another team, another basketball team in 2000, where _ another basketball team in 2000, where there were allegations of cheating — where there were allegations of cheating. and we get into that and explore _ cheating. and we get into that and explore that. and then i think the most _ explore that. and then i think the most fascinating character, really, we talk _ most fascinating character, really, we talk about in the series is the luy we talk about in the series is the guy who — we talk about in the series is the guy who was accused of being the mastermind of the whole thing. and one of— mastermind of the whole thing. and one of the _ mastermind of the whole thing. and one of the most surprising things about— one of the most surprising things about him — one of the most surprising things about him was that he was actually instrumental in introducing intellectual disability sport to the paralympics in the first place, and he deserves credit for that. and yet because _ he deserves credit for that. and yet because of— he deserves credit for that. and yet because of the scandal that he was accused _ because of the scandal that he was accused of— because of the scandal that he was accused of being behind, there is the guy— accused of being behind, there is the guy who was accused of being the mastermind of the whole thing. and one of— mastermind of the whole thing. and one of the _ mastermind of the whole thing. and one of the more surprising things about— one of the more surprising things about him — one of the more surprising things about him was that he was actually instrumental in introducing intellectual disability sport to the paralympics in the first place, and
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he deserves credit for that. and yet because _ he deserves credit for that. and yet because of— he deserves credit for that. and yet because of the scandal that he was accused _ because of the scandal that he was accused of— because of the scandal that he was accused of being behind, there's a huge _ accused of being behind, there's a huge impact on athletes like dan pepper— huge impact on athletes like dan pepper and we still are feeling that at the _ pepper and we still are feeling that at the paralympics today. in extraordinary twist. what's the ongoing legacy of this? intellectual disability sports — ongoing legacy of this? intellectual disability sports were _ disability sports were reintroduced in 2012, _ disability sports were reintroduced in 2012, which is why dan got to compete — in 2012, which is why dan got to compete again but past his best years _ compete again but past his best years. but it wasn't at the same level— years. but it wasn't at the same level as — years. but it wasn't at the same level as in — years. but it wasn't at the same level as in 2000. a few new events were _ level as in 2000. a few new events were added — level as in 2000. a few new events were added in rio de janeiro and tokyo. _ were added in rio de janeiro and tokyo. but— were added in rio de janeiro and tokyo, but the numbers are still way down _ tokyo, but the numbers are still way down on _ tokyo, but the numbers are still way down on 2000. and there is still no basketball — down on 2000. and there is still no basketball. ~ ., ., , ., ~' down on 2000. and there is still no basketball. ~ ., ., ~ ., basketball. what do you think about that? it's basketball. what do you think about that? it's great _ basketball. what do you think about that? it's great they _ basketball. what do you think about that? it's great they are _ basketball. what do you think about that? it's great they are getting - that? it's great they are getting more events — that? it's great they are getting more events in, _ that? it's great they are getting more events in, but _ that? it's great they are getting more events in, but there - that? it's great they are getting more events in, but there are i that? it's great they are getting | more events in, but there are no more events in, but there are no more sports coming in, so it still only the three sports that were at london 2012. so there is no inclusion for people in these different sports. so you just kind of always feel like on the outside and sideline. and there is no choice. if you want to compete at
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the paralympic games, you have those three sports to choose from. so you just don't always feel part of it. simon, what is the reason behind introducing some sports but not others? ., ., others? so, the argument for the international _ others? so, the argument for the international paralympic - others? so, the argument for the i international paralympic committee was the _ international paralympic committee was the one team to reintroduce athletes — was the one team to reintroduce athletes with a learning disability gradually. there was some anxiety arouhd _ gradually. there was some anxiety around whether there could be further — around whether there could be further cheating and a whole new system _ further cheating and a whole new system of — further cheating and a whole new system of testing was introduced in london _ system of testing was introduced in london 2012. that includes a sports specific— london 2012. that includes a sports specific element and so for each sport— specific element and so for each sport you — specific element and so for each sport you want to reintroduce they have to _ sport you want to reintroduce they have to establish less sports— specific — have to establish less sports— specific part of the testing. and that is— specific part of the testing. and that is taking time. to include more events, _ that is taking time. to include more events, they— that is taking time. to include more events, they would have to exclude others _ events, they would have to exclude others because they can't just expahd — others because they can't just expand the games. so that's their perspective on it. you expand the games. so that's their perspective on it.— perspective on it. you have to sread perspective on it. you have to spread the — perspective on it. you have to spread the impact _ perspective on it. you have to spread the impact on - perspective on it. you have to spread the impact on your- perspective on it. you have to - spread the impact on your career. in terms of being a swimmer and how much enjoyment you get out of it,
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how important a part of your life has not been?— how important a part of your life has not been? ,, , ., ~ ., has not been? massively. you know, at school i has not been? massively. you know, at school i was _ has not been? massively. you know, at school i was always _ has not been? massively. you know, at school i was always the _ has not been? massively. you know, at school i was always the one - has not been? massively. you know, at school i was always the one that l at school i was always the one that struggled in everything. in the classroom, but as soon as we went to the swimming lessons once a week, all of a sudden, i was the best at swimming and it gave me that confidence. that then spread into other aspects of my life, whether it be work and then obviously my swimming kind of took off and give me more and more confidence, being able to talk and communicate and have this kind of interaction in ways that works best for me and being able to showcase myself and the best way. you being able to showcase myself and the best way-— being able to showcase myself and the best way. you must feel so sad that people — the best way. you must feel so sad that people cheated _ the best way. you must feel so sad that people cheated the _ the best way. you must feel so sad that people cheated the system - the best way. you must feel so sad | that people cheated the system and the impact it's had on so many because of that?— the impact it's had on so many because of that? exactly. people cheated and _ because of that? exactly. people cheated and impacted _ because of that? exactly. people cheated and impacted my - because of that? exactly. people cheated and impacted my life - because of that? exactly. people cheated and impacted my life in | because of that? exactly. people l cheated and impacted my life in so many other peoples lives, and in wider society. turn on the paralympics but people with an
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intellectual disability, for them, the games just weren't there. you felt on the side and we weren't showcased or shown in the best way. i right in thinking it was very course that you were told that you couldn't compete?— couldn't compete? there were exhibition _ couldn't compete? there were exhibition events _ couldn't compete? there were exhibition events ahead - couldn't compete? there were exhibition events ahead of - couldn't compete? there were - exhibition events ahead of athens. i had some of the team kit and then i got a phone call to say they had pulled the events and i would have to send my kit back. it was absolutely heartbreaking. somehow my coach and everyone encouraged me to get back in the pool and fortunately i did and eight years from then was london. . ., , ., i did and eight years from then was london, ,, ., , ., ., i did and eight years from then was london. ,, ., i. ., , i did and eight years from then was london. ,, ., , ., ., , ., london. simon, you are shining a lirht london. simon, you are shining a liuht on london. simon, you are shining a light on something _ london. simon, you are shining a light on something that _ london. simon, you are shining a light on something that i - london. simon, you are shining a light on something that i think i london. simon, you are shining a | light on something that i think not many people were that aware of. it
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must be quite a privilege to be involved in doing this? absolutely. i mean, i involved in doing this? absolutely. i mean. i was _ involved in doing this? absolutely. i mean, i was surprised _ involved in doing this? absolutely. i mean, i was surprised when - involved in doing this? absolutely. i mean, i was surprised when i - i mean, i was surprised when i started — i mean, i was surprised when i started looking into the story about how much — started looking into the story about how much there was behind it. i had no idea _ how much there was behind it. i had no idea of— how much there was behind it. i had no idea of the ban, the number of people _ no idea of the ban, the number of people who — no idea of the ban, the number of people who had their sporting careers— people who had their sporting careers ruined. it's been a privilege _ careers ruined. it's been a privilege to do that. dan pepper has never— privilege to do that. dan pepper has never presented anything before and he has _ never presented anything before and he has been an absolute natural. it's he has been an absolute natural. it's great — he has been an absolute natural. it's great to talk to you both. thank you forjoining us. the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister will ask joe biden to keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the 31st of august, amid fears the withdrawal could prevent further evacuation flights, but ministers say they'll need cooperation from the taliban. a member of the afghan security forces has been killed in a firefight at the gates of kabul airport. us and german troops were involved. as all 16 and 17 year olds
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are offered their first coronavirus vaccine, a campaign is launched to encourage teenagers to getjabbed, warning of the effects long covid. more than 200,000 people in the uk are waiting for medical assessments so that they can renew their driving licences. that's according to doctors' union, the bma. they say health issues could be missed or played down as drivers try to avoid the wait at their gp and turn to other medical practitioners, who don't have their full medical records. they're warning that road safety could be at risk and are calling for a safety—first approach from the government. the dvla say they're bringing in extra staff to help process applications. dr peter holden, from the bma, explains why they're so concerned... the first issue is there is a huge backlog which was foreseen many a year ago and not a lot has been about it by the government. the second issue is that at the moment a driver can go to any doctorfor the medical. now, the government has said we're going to build back better after the pandemic, and what we're saying is there has
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always been this hole in driver licensing, and there have been well—publicised cases of people who have obtained a licence who shouldn't have a licence medically, and the result has been a disaster for another road user or a pedestrian. and so we have the twin problem of we've got to crack the backlog, and it's time we plugged the hole. the government have just plugged the hole on firearms — or are about to — that's been long in the pipeline, it's not from last week's dreadful event. it's the same now with driver licensing. you need to have the full record, otherwise it becomes a case of "the driver tells me so". and there are a small number who will not say accurately what is necessary because it could cost them their licence. i think there is an expectation—management thing here, but actually i'm almost getting to the view now where we've got 90,000 shortage of hgv drivers, we've lost roughly 20,000 because of brexit — you've all seen the supermarket shelves the way they are,
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we depend on these people. actually the government needs to take a concerted effort to crack this once and for all. more now on the campaign to encourage young people to get their coronavirus vaccine. young patients suffering from the debilitating effects of long covid have appeared in a new nhs video urging others to getjabbed. it comes as all 16 and 17—year—olds in england have been offered their first jabs. well, joining me now is harry leeming, in east london, who has been suffering from long covid for more than a year. before we talk about the effects of long covid, tell me how active you were before it hits. i long covid, tell me how active you were before it hits.— were before it hits. i was fit and health , were before it hits. i was fit and healthy. no _ were before it hits. i was fit and healthy, no previous— were before it hits. i was fit and healthy, no previous medical. healthy, no previous medical conditions. exercising every day. outdoor sports were a massive part of my life. and actually recovered from the initial covid infection quite quickly back in september. and i return to work for a few days, but
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my body is had a meltdown prayer was having massive fluctuations in blood pressure and heart rate was over the place, chest pain, brain fog, pressure and heart rate was over the place, chest pain, brainfog, a pressure and heart rate was over the place, chest pain, brain fog, a loss of balance. and for months i couldn't stand. so it's been quite a change. couldn't stand. so it's been quite a chance. ., , ., , ,., change. that must have been so frightening and _ change. that must have been so frightening and confusing - change. that must have been so i frightening and confusing because of course it's taken quite a longtime for medical professionals to get to grips with long covid. how clear was it that that is what it was and have you had it explained to you, what is going on with your body that is making this happen? hie. going on with your body that is making this happen?— going on with your body that is making this happen? no, i haven't. three times — making this happen? no, i haven't. three times i _ making this happen? no, i haven't. three times i went _ making this happen? no, i haven't. three times i went into _ making this happen? no, i haven't. three times i went into ian - making this happen? no, i haven't. three times i went into ian d, - making this happen? no, i haven't. three times i went into ian d, i - making this happen? no, i haven't. j three times i went into ian d, i was turned away, saying i had anxiety and i was thinking wrong, which is the same experience for a lot of people with long covid. and that's pretty tough to deal with. and since then, i've actually been diagnosed with myocarditis, heart damage. so
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there really was something going on back then. but they just couldn't have the tests to be able to tell me what it was. have the tests to be able to tell me what it was-— have the tests to be able to tell me what itwas. �* what it was. and so, as you say, you were obviously _ what it was. and so, as you say, you were obviously fit _ what it was. and so, as you say, you were obviously fit and _ what it was. and so, as you say, you were obviously fit and healthy. - what it was. and so, as you say, you were obviously fit and healthy. the | were obviously fit and healthy. the message today is for people to get the vaccine. the vaccine wasn't available when you got covid, was it, so you are in a different position. i know you are now part of a community of people who have suffered from it, so what is your message?— message? well, i think, for young --eole, message? well, i think, for young people. you're _ message? well, i think, for young people, you're either _ message? well, i think, for young people, you're either going - message? well, i think, for young people, you're either going to - message? well, i think, for young | people, you're either going to have to get the vaccine or you are probably going to get covid at this rate, that's the reality. when you look at the long—term effects of covid, they are very significant. 400,000 people with symptoms over a year and long covid happens to young people as much as all people. i wouldn't want anyone to go through the hell i have been through for the
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last year and i think young people think there are two options, you get covid and you either make it or you don't. and the data says young people will probably be fine. but people will probably be fine. but people aren't really discussing this third option, which as you are left with chronic illnesses and i think young people need to know that's a very serious possibility. molar young people need to know that's a very serious possibility.— very serious possibility. now you have been _ very serious possibility. now you have been diagnosed _ very serious possibility. now you have been diagnosed with - very serious possibility. now you have been diagnosed with the i have been diagnosed with the myocarditis, that very specific heart issue, is that know the limit of the issues for you? do you still have other things going on? i still have other things going on? i still have other things going on? i still have neurological _ have other things going on? i still have neurological issues, - have other things going on? ist it have neurological issues, issues with my memory, myjob is quite difficult. i'm one of the lucky ones, i am getting better. difficult. i'm one of the lucky ones, iam getting better. even difficult. i'm one of the lucky ones, i am getting better. even in my 11th month, but i know people who are not recovering after 17 months. i have a friend was a doctor, 27 years old, she has not been able to work or function properly for months
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now. . ., work or function properly for months now. ,, ., ., ., work or function properly for months now. ., ., ,., work or function properly for months now. ., ., ., now. so... you are sort of in unchartered _ now. so... you are sort of in unchartered territory - now. so... you are sort of in unchartered territory with i now. so... you are sort of in - unchartered territory with something like this, obviously? yes. unchartered territory with something like this, obviously?— like this, obviously? yes, i mean, it's desperate. _ like this, obviously? yes, i mean, it's desperate. there _ like this, obviously? yes, i mean, it's desperate. there aren't - it's desperate. there aren't really any answers and it will be years before clinical trials and research is published, so patients are really taking on themselves to figure it out. and we do see some strong signals that there might be some drugs that are working, but this quite a bit of reluctance from doctors in the nhs. they are playing it very safe. and ijust doctors in the nhs. they are playing it very safe. and i just don't think they are taking this seriously enough and i don't think they understand how debilitating is not being able to work. some people have breathing issues, heart issues, neurological issues, for months on end. �* , neurological issues, for months on end. 3 , . neurological issues, for months on end. . �* neurological issues, for months on end. ., ~ ., ., end. it's brutal. and one of the --eole end. it's brutal. and one of the people who _ end. it's brutal. and one of the people who is _ end. it's brutal. and one of the people who is involved - end. it's brutal. and one of the people who is involved in - end. it's brutal. and one of the people who is involved in this | people who is involved in this campaign talking about long covid says that simple things, something silly, she says, like brushing your
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hair can become quite emotionally traumatising. hair can become quite emotionally traumatising-_ traumatising. would you identify with that? absolutely. _ traumatising. would you identify with that? absolutely. i - traumatising. would you identify with that? absolutely. i think. traumatising. would you identify| with that? absolutely. i think the neurological stuff is probably some of the scariest. and it's tough to deal with when there are just no answers. one of the speak —— scariest aspects of long covid is we just don't know what the long—term effects are. just don't know what the long-term effects are. . ~ just don't know what the long-term effects are. ., ~ , ., , just don't know what the long-term effects are-— just don't know what the long-term effects are. ., ~ i. , . ., effects are. thank you very much for 'oinin: us, effects are. thank you very much for joining us. |— effects are. thank you very much for joining us. i hope — effects are. thank you very much for joining us, i hope you _ effects are. thank you very much for joining us, i hope you continue - effects are. thank you very much for joining us, i hope you continue to i joining us, i hope you continue to get better, harry. thank you. thank ou. it's peak music festival season, or it should be. over half of all the major festivals in the uk have been cancelled this year, many because they couldn't afford the insurance to cover the risk of last minute cancellations. a new government scheme has been announced that's designed to help. but will it? ben thompson reports. last year, there wasn't much to dance about. covid wiped out most festivals.
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but with more vaccines, more tests and a return to something more normal this year, organisers felt more confident to stage events and sell tickets. but one by one, many of those have been forced to cancel. glastonbury was one of the first. in normal times, it welcomes nearly 200,000 people. but despite the uncertainty, some smaller events did get the go—ahead, like this music festival in birmingham. after the first lockdown, we did glastonbury on the back lawn, so we set all our lights up and stayed in a tent in the garden and had the screens up. and just basically pretended we were at a festival. this is the first gig that i've been to since obviously it all shut down two years ago now, was our last festival. so, yeah, it's good to have this as a first one and just get back into the music scene again. we came last time pre—pandemic, and this one was super—tiny- so it was her first ever festival. so it's lovely being able to be back, isn't it? - yeah. for the traders here,
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it's their first taste of work in 18 months. we was nearly two years out of actually being on events, which was heartbreaking. and it's my mainstay of income. so it's difficult, it was very difficult. i ended up being a scaffolderfor a year. i know, got these! previously, we've done a lot of pop—ups and click and collects so we've had to adapt, to adjust to the market. but it'sjust been really nice to just get backjust talking to the customers and engaging, it's been really good. but others are still reluctant to put on events. they're worried that a surge in infections could force them to cancel, leaving them to count the cost. and so the government has launched an insurance scheme to reassure the industry that it is safe to reopen. but the group representing festival organisers says it's too little, too late. and many, they say, have already lost millions. and with the summer break nearly over, time is running out.
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the success of the next few weeks will determine whether there is really anything to celebrate. the changing of the guard is back again at buckingham palace. it's the first time since the pandemic began that the ceremony has taken place at the palace. it's usually held at three different locations in london: buckingham palace, stjames's palace and wellington barracks. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. high pressure is going to be dominating our weather this week, which means things will be a lot more settled and there'll be less cloud than there was last week. however, there'll still be some cloud and it will largely dry but that cloud thick enough now and again for the odd spot of drizzle. you'll also expect some warm sunshine, but no heat wave on the cards. here's the high pressure dominating our weather, the air moving around it in a clockwise direction so looking at breezy conditions, especially across the southeast and especially so across kent — but that will take the edge off the temperatures slightly. so, this afternoon,
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you could catch a shower on higher ground across scotland. shetland hanging on to a fair bit of cloud, as will some parts of the coast of western scotland and the coast of northern ireland. here, too, inland on higher ground, you could see the odd shower. for england and for wales, though, a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine, maybe the odd shower with height in wales and the south west — but they will be the exception rather than the rule. top temperatures 23 degrees. now through this evening and overnight, more cloud will come in from the north sea across northern england, the midlands, into wales — again, thick enough for some drizzle — and there'll be low cloud, mist and fog draped across the coastlines of the north and west of scotland and the north and east of northern ireland. by the end of the night, we could also see some mist and fog with poor visibility across parts of central and eastern scotland. now, high pressure still very much with us tomorrow. you can see the wind arrows pointing to where we've got the wind direction coming from — namely from the northeast. so breezy along this northeast coastline, as well as the english channel, and our weather front sinking southwards — there's a fairly weak feature taking its cloud and some drizzle with it across england and wales,
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but hanging on once again — especially across the northern isles — just some of that low cloud lingering on the coastline. inland, we're back into the sunshine. for wednesday, well, we've got this weak weather front, which is going to sink south during thursday, actually, bringing not much more than a band of cloud. and on wednesday, too, you can see there will be a bit more cloud across parts of the north and the east, and also into southern england, as well. still a keen breeze down that north sea coastline, so feeling cooler here. move out towards the north and the west, and you've got something drier, sunnier and also that bit warmer. now, on thursday, i mentioned that weather front sinking south, but it won't do much more than bring a band of cloud with it, and generally it's going to feel cooler along the east coast. the highest temperatures will be in the west, but even so, they'll take a slight dip.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... borisjohnson will askjoe biden to keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the end of august, amid fears the withdrawal could prevent further evacuation flights — but the taliban say they won't accept an extension to the deadline. i don't think there is any likelihood on staying on after the united states. if their timetable extends even by a day or two, then that will give us a day or two more to evacuate people. because we are really down to hours now, not weeks and we have to make sure we exploit every minute to get people out. as aerial evacuations continue — a member of the afghan security forces is killed in a firefight at the gates of kabul airport. us and german troops were involved. in an emotional interview, a widow tells the bbc how her husband took his own life after relapsing into a gambling addiction.
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i looked out of the window and two policemen got out the car and the way they walked in, i knew what they were going to say. as all 16— and 17—year—olds are offered their first coronavirus vaccine, a campaign is launched to encourage teenagers to getjabbed, warning of the effects long covid. the changing of the guard returns to buckingham palace for the first time since the beginning of the pandemic. and the british boxing olympic silver medallist becoming mayor of wolverhampton for a day. the uk government says it will ask the united states to keep its soldiers
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at kabul airport beyond the current deadline of next tuesday. but the taliban say they are opposed to any extension. borisjohnson will make the request at an emergency meeting of leaders from the g7 countries tomorrow. us troops are due to leave kabul airport in just over week. several thousand people remain there, desperate to flee the country and escape the taliban. they include afghans who worked for the british military. the taliban spokesman, suhail shaheen, told the bbc that it would be a clear violation if foreign forces did not withdraw on the august 31st deadline they have announced. the uk says it has evacuated more than 1800 people from afghanistan on eight flights in the last 24 hours. nine more flights are expected in the next 24 hours. president biden has warned of a risk of attacks from so—called islamic state militants and says he hopes he won't have to delay the airlift. this morning the german military reports a member of the afghan security forces has been killed in an exchange of fire with an unidentified gunmen
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at the north gate of kabul airport. the first of our reports is from our political correspondent chris mason. queueing to get out, clinging on to possessions, to children. frightened and fleeing to an uncertain future. the thing that i think we've all [earned over the last week or so is that the timelines around which we plan are not always completely in our own control. now obviously, the more time that we've got, the more people we can evacuate and that's what we're pushing for. the ministry of defence says 5725 people have been evacuated from afghanistan in the last ten days. more than 1000 uk armed forces personnel are currently deployed in kabul. caught out and wrong—footed by the speed of the taliban's capture of afghanistan a week ago, western powers have been grappling to salvage what they can ever since. western powers have been grappling the limitations are
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obvious for all to see. president biden wants all american troops out by the end of the month. the uk is pressing for them to stay longer. the prime minister will make that case directly to the president tomorrow. there's discussions going on among us and the military about extending. our hope is we will not have to extend. but they're going to be some discussions i suspect on far along we are in the process. the government is also exploring how hubs could be set up in neighbouring countries to help afghans reach the uk once flights out of kabul are no longer possible. chris mason, bbc news. the defence secretary ben wallace has confirmed that the uk will leave kabul airport when the united states does. well, the prime minister is, obviously at g7, going to try and raise the prospect of seeing if the united states will extend. it is really important for people
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to understand the united states have over 6000 people in kabul airport and when they withdraw, that will take away the framework that has allowed us to withdraw and we will have to go as well. i don't think there is any likelihood on staying on after the united states. if their timetable extends even by a day or two, then that will give us a day or two more to evacuate people. because we are really down to hours now, not weeks and we have to make sure we exploit every minute to get people out. the former british ambassador to the us, sir christopher meyer, said given the taliban's latest announcement against america extending its deadline, it will lead to borisjohnson having to think again about his approach with president biden at the g7 meeting tomorrow. i think it will be a case of back to the drawing board and what do we do? there is no point in trying to persuade the americans to stay with us beyond the 31st of august deadline if it is going result in an ignition of warfare between the americans, british and the taliban.
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after all, we haven't taken any casualties from the taliban for a very, very long time now, so it would be the return of hot war, but that is still an option, which is to pour troops into kabul and retake it as a kind of rid—out for the americans and british to ensure that the removal of refugees can carry on. but that is almost the worst option of them all. so, at the moment, i wouldn't try and do this at the g7. i do not think it is a good venue, it not the appropriate venue. i would try and thrash this out at nato itself and that is where the discussion among the allies should take place. why? because the whole thing goes back 20 years to when the nato allies invoked article 5 of the nato treaty which obliges all members to come to the aid of one member under attack. that is the format, that is the framework in which these discussions should take place.
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as we've been hearing, a member of the the afghan security forces has been killed and another three injured in an exchange of fire with unidentified gunmen at the north gate of kabul airport. our delhi correspondent, danjohnson, explained that it's still not certain who attacked the afghan soldiers. that is not clear yet. there was a firefight at the airport early this morning involving afghan forces. we believe they are remnants of the afghan army that were left behind at the airport, soldiers who refused to surrender to the taliban last week and have been helping the international forces to secure the airport and process evacuees onto flights. one of those soldiers has lost his life, three have been injured, and this firefight also involved german defence forces and us soldiers, although we don't understand any of those were injured. but as to who was responsible, it is still unclear. there was a terror threat over the weekend. the us embassy in kabul
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advised its citizens to stay away from the airport and the streets around it, notjust because of the crowded scenes, but also because of a terror threat from is militants in the country. now, whether what has happened this morning is anything to do with that, we will have to wait and see, and whether any more lives have been lost in that violence. but it is another indication of the threat to the evacuation operation, the sort of interruptions that it faces, even just as we thought things were getting into some sort of routine, starting to calm down a little bit after the chaotic scenes we have witnessed over the last week. under taliban rule in the 1990s, women were allowed to work or get an education. micro they were not allowed to work or get an education. the taliban insist things will be different now but many are sceptical. fawzia koofi is a prominent women's rights campaigner and former mp, who was also part of the government's team negotiating with the taliban. she's been speaking to our afghanistan correspondent,
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secunder kermani, about her concerns. iam very i am very worried about the future of the country as a whole. women being part of that. at this stage, the situation is very uncertain, very chaotic, there is no government and given the taliban's history from the past, women are the most probably concerned citizens these days. but there is uncertainty and what will happen to the country and to them, whether they will lose their jobs, to them, whether they will lose theirjobs, whether they to them, whether they will lose their jobs, whether they will to them, whether they will lose theirjobs, whether they will be safe, whether they will be oppressed, to stay home, whether their husbands will lose jobs, whether there will be another war. lots of women contacted me, they come to see me or message me, they are trying to get a way out or looking for something different. not only in terms of security but in terms of hope for a better country. they don't have it any more. it in
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the meantime i am proud to see them getting ready to resist and protest if the situation gets worse was to ban what you have seen from the taliban so far, does it give you hope they will respect women's rights or do you think we will see a return to what we saw in the 1990s? at this stage i think they are trying to pretend it will be ok. but whether that is something that will be respected across afghanistan by all of their foot soldiers because in the meantime we receive reports of still house searching, execution, still taking hostages, we still have these reports in some rural places, still reports of very young taliban and men forcing a woman to wear a
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burqa. so the practices are different, different foot have different, different foot have different practice. in general i think we have to really wait to see how everything will evolve. our security correspondent frank gardner is here. the government going to askjoe biden at the g7 talks urgently convened to extend the deadline for the us to stay in the country. with the us to stay in the country. with the taliban saying they will absolutely not support it, is there any way at all there is likely to be any way at all there is likely to be any sort of agreement between american and britain to stay? i think it is pretty unlikely because up think it is pretty unlikely because up until now, this entire airport evacuation, what the brits called —— it is entirely on taliban complaints. they acted well, apart from the odd unexplained incident in the last one in four hours, there have not been any confrontation at
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the airport, they have allowed people with some obstruction but generally allowed people to get through. they have not stopped the evacuation that they see the presence of foreign forces as an occupation and the hardliners in the taliban have said we agreed to the argus to the 31st deadline, that is a red line, and you heard from their spokesmen they will not change that. it doesn't matter how much pressure any g7 leader puts onjoe biden, if the taliban say you have got to leave by argus the 31st, any difference to that would be a hot while, you will have to then get troops in and make the taliban go back. you're basically going to war. so hence the increased urgency to get everyone out in the last remaining eight days. we get everyone out in the last remaining eight days. we can only imaaine remaining eight days. we can only imagine everybody _ remaining eight days. we can only imagine everybody who _ remaining eight days. we can only imagine everybody who wants - remaining eight days. we can only imagine everybody who wants to l remaining eight days. we can only l imagine everybody who wants to get out there and being even more desperate knowing there is the
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immovable deadline. —— immovable. they're talking about setting up hobs in neighbouring countries, like uzbekistan across the border where if people can make their way over land, they will then be evacuated, but apple be a perilous journey, costing lots of money, travelling through taliban territory and risk bandits on the way the stop that is not a great solution. haifa bandits on the way the stop that is not a great solution.— bandits on the way the stop that is not a great solution. how long would that journey — not a great solution. how long would that journey take? _ not a great solution. how long would that journey take? depends - not a great solution. how long would that journey take? depends where i not a great solution. how long would i that journey take? depends where you that 'ourney take? depends where you are that journey take? depends where you are settin: that journey take? depends where you are setting off — that journey take? depends where you are setting off from. _ that journey take? depends where you are setting off from. if— that journey take? depends where you are setting off from. if you _ that journey take? depends where you are setting off from. if you are - are setting off from. if you are close, not so far, that in kandahar, it could take you weeks, and you will be stopped at checkpoints asking where you are going to stop it is not a great option. anyone who can get out is getting out now in the remaining eight days. so there will be the rush _ the remaining eight days. so there will be the rush for— the remaining eight days. so there will be the rush for the _ the remaining eight days. so there will be the rush for the flights - will be the rush for the flights with days to go. and we have seen chaotic scenes, what are the issues?
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there are two threats underlying. there are two threats underlying. the most urgent one is that of an isis suicide bomber, a suicide attacker, and there was threatening intelligence that isis were planning to disrupt the airport evacuation. weirdly ices are not on the same page as the taliban, they do not like each other, they are rivals. ice ice has this the takeover, saying it is not really a victory, the americans gave it to them, the taliban as students of the americans etc, they cannot stand them. you thought they would be on the same page, but they are rivals. isis have a vested interest in creating as much chaos as they can. they will want to establish a basis, so they are a thread. the second one as if after argus the 31st any foreign forces remain at the airport or
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anywhere else in afghanistan, they risk being attacked by the taliban. and how much of a thread are isis in afghanistan? the taliban say they will not allow attacks on the west to be launched from afghan soil. they may not necessarily be in a position to stop all of them. isis rn insurgency, it is not known how many militants they have, they are not as strong as the taliban or al-anda, but they have carried out a number of attacks, they have had over 200 clashes with both under the previous governmentjust overthrown, clashes with the afghan security forces, the americans and also with the taliban. they are fighting everybody. they are the chaos instructors and they would love to set up a new colour fade. they have already referred to their activities as islamic state province, their word for the entire region of
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activities. despite the fact they don't like the taliban, they are —— their supporters are hailing it as a victory for violent jihad their supporters are hailing it as a victory for violentjihad and it may well encourage others. that is the worry. well encourage others. that is the wor . . ~' well encourage others. that is the wor . ., ., ~ the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister will ask joe biden to keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the 31st of august, amid fears the withdrawal could prevent further evacuation flights — but ministers say they'll need cooperation from the taliban. a member of the afghan security forces has been killed in a firefight at the gates of kabul airport — us and german troops were involved. as all 16 and 17—year—olds are offered their first coronavirus vaccine, a campaign is launched to encourage teenagers to getjabbed — warning of the effects long covid. sport and for a full round up,
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from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. the team for the solheim cup has been announced and there are three english players selected for europe's defence of the title against the united states next month. georgia hall and charley hull made the team automatically, while mel reid is one of six picks, from captain catriona matthew. let's look at the full team. anna nordqvist�*s win at the women's open yesterday meant she got the points to qualify automatically, as did georgia hall who came joint second at carnoustie. there are four rookies in the team, including captain's pick leona maguire, ireland's first ever solheim cup player. the england bowler mark wood is out of the third test against india, which begins this week after suffering a shoulder injury. hejarred his right shoulder in the last test at lord's, which england lost by 151 runs, having drawn the first match in the series. the third test takes place at headingley, starting on wednesday. chelsea manager thomas tuchel believes romelu lukaku has proved his worth to the squad already, after scoring on his first match back at chelsea yesterday. the belgian found the net
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afterjust 14 minutes, in an impressive performance as chelsea beat arsenal 2—0 at the emirates. lukaku was a £97.5 million signing from inter milan and has become the premier league's second most expensive player of all time. there were some really ugly scenes in the ligue1 match between nice and marseilles, which had to be abandoned. marseille and former west ham midfielder dmitri payet was hit by a bottle, but then threw it back into the crowd. supporters then stormed onto the pitch with stewards and police struggling to restrain them. the players tried to leave and marseille coachjorge sampaoli had to be held back by his staff. after a long delay, the nice players came out to finish the game, but the marseille players refused to do so. andy murray beat american noah rubin in the winston—salem open first round. he was due to be playing nick kyrgios, but the australian pulled out with a knee injury. murray won in straight sets 6—2, 6—0 and took victory by winning 10 successive games.
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the final tennis major of the year, the us open starts next week. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. has been unprecedented rainfall, roads and bridges were damaged and thousands of people were left without power. world trade center one has been struck by lightning as tropical storm henri battered new york. a bolt can be seen striking the top of the building in lower manhattan, connecting with the spire 550 metres above ground level. more than 120,000 homes in rhode island are without power because of the storm. i'm joined now by cbs news correspondent bradley blackburn in long island, where there has been some flooding, although tropical storm henri's last minute shift saved the area from extensive damage.
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thank you forjoining us. tell us what it is like there.— what it is like there. residents were bracing — what it is like there. residents were bracing for— what it is like there. residents were bracing for another - what it is like there. residents were bracing for another super what it is like there. residents - were bracing for another super storm sandy, very worried about storm surges in this area, like this marina. thankfully we were spared the worst and the weather has dramatically improved. that the storm is still dumping a lot of rain
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on the north—east, young patients suffering with the debilitating effects of long covid have urged people to get their vaccine in a new nhs video. 16 and 17—year—olds in england have been invited to book their first jabs from today. the latest figures for england show people aged 18 to 34 now make up more than a fifth of those admitted to hospital with the virus. let's take a look at the campaign. i think the worst thing is like normally you would be able to go to bed, go to sleep and wake up feeling ready to face the day. i could sleep for a week and still feel tired. the kind of other one i have suffered with is joint and body aches, kind of when you've got a cold or the flu, that all—over ache. like even your teeth hurt. i get that most of the time. ifeel like i'm always sore in some way. megan higgins, who you saw there in the video,
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told us more about the impact long covid has had on her life. i was diagnosed with covid on the 6th of january — that was when i got my positive test — and that is a day that is engraved in my brain. and i was quite lucky, i suppose — i was able to do my two weeks and then i returned to work and i returned to kind of normal life. and ijust kind of thought that, you spend two weeks in bed suffering from quite a nasty virus, you've got to expect to be a bit tired. but weeks and months went by and i wasn't getting better, and it felt like any time i did something to maybe build up my fitness, i got worse. you know, i kind of... i used to be a horse rider, i used to run, i used to walk the dog a lot and it got to the point where sort of working in a school, as well, i couldn't even do head, shoulders, knees and toes or the hokey—cokey with the kids, i was so tired just doing anything physical. low income workers on universal credit would be allowed to to keep more of their pay under a labour government, the party says. universal credit is claimed
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by more than 5.5 million households in the uk. the payment, which combines six benefits for working—age people, currently pays a minimum standard allowance of £344 a month. i'm joined now by the shadow work and pensions secretary, jonathan reynolds. he is speaking about labour�*s alternative in a speech and he can tell us more now. thank you for joining us. what would your system mean for someone who incidents his who is getting that minimum of £344 a month? it who is getting that minimum of £344 a month? , ., ., ., who is getting that minimum of £344 a month? , ., , ., ~ ., a month? it is good to be talking to ou toda a month? it is good to be talking to you today that _ a month? it is good to be talking to you today that l _ a month? it is good to be talking to you today that i am _ a month? it is good to be talking to you today that i am setting - a month? it is good to be talking to you today that i am setting out - you today that i am setting out first of all when we come back to parliament in september, working with everything we have to make sure the government doesn't cut the £1000 a yearfrom universal the government doesn't cut the £1000 a year from universal credit introduced at the beginning of the pandemic and the crisis. but it is also important to set out we recognise the problems of universal credit going beyond the set amount and keeping the upper left. and
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crucially, this is something the prime minister and chancellor are missing, is how it will work for the people in low paid work, 40% of the entire universal credit claimant threshold, 5% in work and as they earn more, work more hours, universal credit is tapered off and reduced and what we say is a clear commitment, we will lower the taper rate, steadily over time so people in those low—paid jobs are keeping more of the money they earn and that is part of a wider package to tackle in work poverty which is at high levels in the uk. 50 in work poverty which is at high levels in the uk.— in work poverty which is at high levels in the uk. so can you put some figures — levels in the uk. so can you put some figures on _ levels in the uk. so can you put some figures on it? _ levels in the uk. so can you put some figures on it? currently i levels in the uk. so can you put| some figures on it? currently for every £1 earned, payments reduced by 63 p. what would you change that?
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that 63p doesn't account for tax and national insurance, so for a single parent working 30 hours a week on the minimum wage on rented accommodation, it goes up to 75p in the pound, so it is higher than the headline figures sometimes adjust was that we not putting a specific figure today because we need to know before an election what the claimant count was in order to make the regulations properly. moving forward with our plans, notjustify the government's reduction in universal credit when we talk about our plans for the future, we are making clear commitments... for the future, we are making clear commitments. . .— for the future, we are making clear commitments... sorry to interrupt, ou want commitments... sorry to interrupt, you want to — commitments... sorry to interrupt, you want to make _ commitments... sorry to interrupt, you want to make it _ commitments. .. sorry to interrupt, you want to make it clear— you want to make it clear commitment, but if you are not putting an amount on it because you need to be able to know what the claimant count is, to know the scale of commitment, how much of a commitment is it? you might then look at the figures and say, actually, we can't reduce it that much and it will not be where the huge amount to anyone. it is much and it will not be where the huge amount to anyone. it is about makin: huge amount to anyone. it is about
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making clear _ huge amount to anyone. it is about making clear what _ huge amount to anyone. it is about making clear what our _ huge amount to anyone. it is about making clear what our priorities - making clear what our priorities are. the event in manchester, people have pointed out there are many problems in how the system works, the five—week wait, how the two child limit works, it is important for me as the shadow secretary of state for work and pensions to lay out clearly now what we would want as a priority to see changed. i wake up as a priority to see changed. i wake up everyday one—to—one to do more fare in work poverty. one in eight british workers is in poverty. i am not prepared to wait until an election to start talking about what i want to change so it is important to set out the priorities like making the speech today, this is a crucial priority, the promises made by previous governments about how universal credit will always make it work, they have increased the barriers to working more hours. some people have seen the benefit but not enough people. it is to make clear what the direction of travel should be, for me, people in low—paid jobs should keep more of their money. i
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should keep more of their money. i know you are focused on that in manchester today but i want to ask you about afghanistan. the government intending to ask america tomorrow to extend the deadline be on the 31st of august for the withdrawal of us troops to enable as many people to be brought out as possible, but the taliban saying that date is a red line and they will not allow any extension of it. they would see it as an illegal occupation after that date. should britain even ask america to extend in that case? the britain even ask america to extend in that case?— in that case? the situation in afghanistan _ in that case? the situation in afghanistan is _ in that case? the situation in afghanistan is paramount i in that case? the situation in afghanistan is paramount in | in that case? the situation in l afghanistan is paramount in all in that case? the situation in - afghanistan is paramount in all of our thoughts, especially for people like me representing constituencies that have seen many veterans serve in afghanistan and my worry is, we can see from the first—hand accounts, over the weekend. all i can say is we have to do everything to get as many people out as possible. we were clearly caught
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unprepared for the scale of which kabul has fallen and any avenue we can use to maximise the tremendous job our soldiers are doing 20 get as many people through kabul airport and out of the country is what we should do. on the government can have the requisite conversations with the americans that i think would be required to keep our presence on the ground. but would be required to keep our presence on the ground. but in the face of the — presence on the ground. but in the face of the taliban _ presence on the ground. but in the face of the taliban saying - presence on the ground. but in the face of the taliban saying they - face of the taliban saying they would regard any troops after the sist would regard any troops after the 31st of august as an illegal occupation, is it even worth thinking about keeping them there? it is worth thinking about any avenue that could get as many people out as possible. don't forget, that this is a new friendly caring taliban, any of that spin, they will face significant problems running the country. looking at the foreign reserves they can access, the economic crisis they are on the brink of, there may be some avenue of leverage, but as long as there is
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the potential, saving lives, getting people out of the country, people who have worked with us, we have a moral obligation to assist, if there is an opportunity to do that, we have to try the stuff you are talking about saving lives but potentially it could put lives at risk, the lives of british troops. we should be clear of the magnificentjob they are doing. they are at risk, the situation they are working in is like something i have never encountered before, so have because the risks exist, the soldiers will know that, i think we can be hugely proud of thejob they are doing and given where we have got to in afghanistan and how unprepared this country and other allies were for the situation we now face, if we can maximise and use this, any leverage at our disposal to get people out, we have to at least try. especially those that have worked with us.—
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least try. especially those that have worked with us. thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. it will be fairly quiet on the weather front, it will be fairly quiet on the weatherfront, high pressure in charge of the weather and is here to stay for the first able future. and the weather will be generally dry, lots of cloud at times, you can see on the satellite picture the recent one, a fair bit of cloud in the centre of that high, but not a uniform layer. we have seen hazy sunshine breaking through and through this afternoon and into this evening some places will have blue skies in some spots. tonight, not a lot changes, lot like last night, quiet, white winds, a bit of mist and fog forming early in the morning and fog forming early in the morning and tuesday starts off pretty bright across most of the uk, some areas a little on the cloudy side. the best of the weather in the centre of the high pressure so central parts of
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scotland, in glasgow temperatures could get up to 25 degrees. hello. this is bbc news. the headlines: the prime minister will ask joe biden to keep american troops in afghanistan beyond 31 august, amid fears the withdrawal could prevent further evacuation flights, but ministers say they'll need cooperation from the taliban. a member of the afghan security forces has been killed in a firefight at the gates of kabul airport. us and german troops were involved. as all 16 and 17—year—olds are offered their first coronavirus vaccine, a campaign is launched to encourage teenagers to getjabbed, warning of the effects long covid. and the changing of the guard returns to buckingham palace for the first time since the beginning of the pandemic. the uk has agreed a contract for 35 million more doses of the pfizer—biontech vaccine,
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to be delivered from the second half of next year. the order is part of the government preparations for booster shots and any new variants that could emerge. the health secretary sajid javid said the order would "future—proof" the uk's vaccine programme. 87.7% of over—16s in the uk have already had at least one dose of a covid vaccine. dozens of companies selling covid pcr travel tests are to be removed from the government's list of approved providers. the firms either no longer exist or don't provide all the tests required by holidaymakers. others have been warned they could also be removed if they advertise misleading prices. a widow who lost her husband to a gambling addiction is urging the government to stop online betting companies from giving away free bonuses, which allow you to bet without depositing any money. luke ashton took his own life in april after he started gambling again while on furlough during lockdown. jayne mccubbin has been speaking to his wife, annie.
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i looked out of the window and his van wasn't there. and then the panic set in. i rang the police and they came round and took a statement. around about four o'clock on the 22nd of april, i looked out the window and two policemen got out the car and the way they walked in, i knew what they were going to say. annie's husband luke had taken his own life. she had no idea why until police handed back his telephone. gosh, i can't even describe the shock. i saw betting activity that must have consumed him from morning till night. it just escalated. it became uncontrollable. and i knew — i knew why he'd done it.
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the gambling commission estimate there are around 350,000 problem gamblers here in the uk. luke had previously beaten an addiction but, when lockdown hit, the 40—year—old was furloughed. that's when annie says the first of many free bets landed in his e—mails, and luke was drawn back in. there's no doubt about it. the only people that knew about luke's addiction were luke and the company. and at no point did they step in and do anything about it. there was a free bet that dropped into his account the day he disappeared. by that point, he had already, you know, decided on what he was doing. last year, a house of lords report found that for every person with a problem, six more were harmed. that's 2 million people harmed by divorce, crime, loss of work, of homes and, ultimately, loss of life.
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that report found that 60% of gambling companies' profits come from the 5% of customers who have a problem. and studies show that covid made online gambling numbers soar. search "free bets" online and you will find a staggering number. onjust one page, offers from 54 companies. £1,700 worth of free bets, if you were to sign up. and that's just the first page that pops up on the internet. it's terrifying. there is no other word for it. it's terrifying. they are inducements, so they are the free cigarette, or the free shot of heroin. it's your first shotl of heroin, isn't it? liz and charles ritchie set up the charity gambling with lives after their 24—year—old son jack took his own life in 2017. they and annie want to
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see free bets banned. for some people, that. will be the start of their journey into addiction. we set up gambling with lives to warn other parents, because nobody warned us, because there is no messaging. and i've spoken to so many mums and dads who say to me, "i warned them about road safety, i warned them about sexual predators, i warned them about drugs. i didn't know there was another predator out there to warn them about." annie is pushing for change in the name of her husband just as the government reviews current legislation to make sure it is fit for the digital age, the government told us. legislation was passed in 2005 and was quickly outdated by technology, which put a casino and a bookmaker in the palm of everybody�*s hand. the betting and gaming council told us... "promotions are an issue for individual operators,"
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but added, "the industry is determined to protect people. and the rate of problem gamblers has remained stable for the past 20 years." free bets, they are not designed to give anyone anything, they are not designed to be free. they are enticing people to open accounts and, potentially, they cost lives. more than 200,000 people in the uk are waiting for medical assessments so that they can renew their driving licences. that's according to doctors' union, the bma. they say health issues could be missed or played down as drivers try to avoid the wait at their gp and turn to other medical practitioners, who don't have their full medical records. they're warning that road safety could be at risk and are calling for a safety—first approach from the government. the dvla say they're bringing in extra staff to help process applications. dr peter holden, from the bma, explains why they're so concerned. the first issue is there is a huge backlog which was foreseen nearly a year ago and not a lot has been about it by the government. the second issue is that at the moment a driver can go to any
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doctorfor the medical. now, the government has said we're going to build back better after the pandemic, and what we're saying is there has always been this hole in driver licensing, and there have been well—publicised cases of people who have obtained a licence who shouldn't have a licence medically, and the result has been a disaster for another road user or a pedestrian. and so we have the twin problem of we've got to crack the backlog, and it's time we plugged the hole. the government have just plugged the hole on firearms — or are about to — that's been long in the pipeline, it's not from last week's dreadful event. it's the same now with driver licensing. you need to have the full record, otherwise it becomes a case of "the driver tells me so". and there are a small number who will not say accurately what is necessary because it could cost them their licence. i think there is an expectation—management thing here, but actually i'm almost getting
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to the view now where we've got 90,000 shortage of hgv drivers, we've lost roughly 20,000 because of brexit — you've all seen the supermarket shelves the way they are, we depend on these people. actually the government needs to take a concerted effort to crack this once and for all. it's peak music festival season, or it should be. over half of all the major festivals in the uk have been cancelled this year, many because they couldn't afford the insurance to cover the risk of last minute cancellations. a new government scheme has been announced that's designed to help. but will it? ben thompson reports. last year, there wasn't much to dance about. covid wiped out most festivals. but with more vaccines, more tests and a return to something more normal this year, organisers felt more confident to stage events and sell tickets. but one by one, many of those have been forced to cancel. glastonbury was one of the first. in normal times, it welcomes nearly 200,000 people. but despite the uncertainty, some smaller events did get
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the go—ahead, like this music festival in birmingham. after the first lockdown, we did glastonbury on the back lawn, so we set all our lights up and stayed in a tent in the garden and had the screens up. and just basically pretended we were at a festival. this is the first gig that i've been to since obviously it all shut down two years ago now, was our last festival. so, yeah, it's good to have this as a first one and just get back into the music scene again. we came last time pre—pandemic, and this one was super—tiny- so it was her first ever festival. so it's lovely being able to be back, isn't it? - yeah. for the traders here,
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it's their first taste of work in 18 months. we was nearly two years out of actually being on events, which was heartbreaking. and it's my mainstay of income. so it's difficult, it was very difficult. i ended up being a scaffolderfor a year. i know, got these! previously, we've done a lot of pop—ups and click and collects so we've had to adapt, to adjust to the market. but it'sjust been really nice to just get backjust talking to the customers and engaging, it's been really good. but others are still reluctant to put on events. they're worried that a surge in infections could force them to cancel, leaving them to count the cost. and so the government has launched an insurance scheme to reassure the industry that it is safe to reopen. but the group representing festival organisers says it's too little, too late. and many, they say, have already lost millions. and with the summer break nearly over, time is running out. the success of the next few weeks will determine whether there is really anything to celebrate.
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two former sex pistols have won a high court battle with former frontmanjohnny rotten over the use of the punk band's songs in a new tv series, directed by danny boyle. drummer paul cook, and guitarist stevejones, argued that the group had an agreement that decisions would be made on a "majority rule basis" but lydon rejected the deal likening it to "slave labour". with me now is our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba. tell us more. they were fighting over themselves whether the music used in this tv series?— used in this tv series? yes, as the 'ud . ment used in this tv series? yes, as the judgment pointed _ used in this tv series? yes, as the judgment pointed out, _ used in this tv series? yes, as the judgment pointed out, there - used in this tv series? yes, as the judgment pointed out, there have | judgment pointed out, there have been a long history of disagreements in the band dating back to their time together many decades ago. at this centred on the band management agreement, drawn up many years ago. in the basic idea of this was how they would decide how their music and other things could be used outside of the pure releasing pattern and touring schedule that they once had. now, according to the
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claimants, paul cook and steve jones, they said the band management agreement clearly indicated that when there was a disagreement within the band, when there was a disagreement within the hand, then the majority view should be the prevailing one. johnny rotten, john leyden as he was talked about in court, disagreed with us. it went to a small trial earlier this year and the upshot of that was that the judge agreed with paul cook and steve jones that the judge agreed with paul cook and stevejones in that the majority view should prevail. now, this all came back to it wanting to be used in a new tv series by danny boyle called pistol, about the days of punk and the sex pistols when they were at their height many decades ago. and the feeling was that it might be an interesting series but without the music it might not be able to go ahead. they felt it was a
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crucial decision to be made. the court agreed that the band management agreement majority view should prevail and thatjohn leyden disagreed with the way that music should be used, but he could be outvoted by the others. teeth? should be used, but he could be outvoted by the others. why didn't the want outvoted by the others. why didn't they want to _ outvoted by the others. why didn't they want to use? _ outvoted by the others. why didn't they want to use? there _ outvoted by the others. why didn't they want to use? there has - outvoted by the others. why didn't they want to use? there has been | outvoted by the others. why didn'tl they want to use? there has been a long-standing _ they want to use? there has been a long-standing history _ they want to use? there has been a long-standing history of— long—standing history of disagreements within the band. long—standing history of disagreements within the hand. he felt he was consulted too late and wasn't provided with a script and it appeared in many ways he might have just agreed in principle —— disagreed on principle. he is very protective, as are the others, of the legacy of the sex pistols and the legacy of the sex pistols and the way the are portrayed over the years. they were only together for a very short time, but their influence and fame exists to this day. many decades later. and while not making a judgment on his particular reasoning for not wanting it to be used,it reasoning for not wanting it to be used, it was something that was respected but in the context of the
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agreement between the members of the band, which wasn'tjust the three of them, it also included representatives of the estate of sid vicious, but whatever the motivations ofjohn leyden not wanting the music of the sex pistols to take part in this, you could be outvoted by the others, and he has been. . ~ outvoted by the others, and he has been. ., ~ i. the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister will ask joe biden to keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the 31st of august, amid fears the withdrawal could prevent further evacuation flights — but ministers say they'll need cooperation from the taliban. a member of the afghan security forces has been killed in a firefight at the gates of kabul airport — us and german troops were involved. as all 16 and 17 year olds are offered their first coronavirus vaccine,
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a campaign is launched to encourage teenagers to getjabbed — warning of the effects long covid the 2020 paralympic games kick off in tokyo tomorrow. more than 4,000 athletes will take part, but those with intellectual disabilities are still competing under the shadow of a cheating scandal that happened 21 years ago. in sydney the spanish basketball team won gold — only to have to give back their medals when it was revealed only two of the team members were genuinely disabled. one of those two is ray torres — here's his story. we won all the games and the final we won russia and i didn't believe it. it was something that i think everybody would say, it's a dream come true.
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these people went to sydney without doing no tests and not being special. for me, we are special. and we earned that. and these people didn't fight nothing and didn't earn it. i had to give back my gold medal. and that was the bit that is very difficult, even now, to think about it. earlier i spoke to one of the athletes excluded from the games when intellectual disability sports was removed from the competition. dan pepper was the british
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swimmer turned presenter for the fake paralympians, a bbc podcast which investigates what happened in 2000, the podcast�*s producer simon maybin. i started by asking dan to share his story. so, i missed out on athens in 2004 and beijing in 2008, when i was at my prime. i was one of the fortunate athletes that managed to make london 2012, but in the swimming world, i was kind of walking out with a zimmerframe, i was an old man by that stage. i was thankful to make my dreams come true by making it to the paralympics, but it was bittersweet because at my prime i was kind of untouchable in my events. you could never say i was guaranteed a medal, because that sport, you could never say i was guaranteed a medal, because that's sport,
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but it's hard to think that wouldn't at least have made the podium. so how has it been for you, now speaking to some of those who are involved in it? yeah, it's kind of been eye—opening, really. i knew bits about the story, but how in—depth it was and how this was a planned event about cheating, it didn'tjust kind of happen, there was a thought around and we spoke to people about how long this thought process went on, and simon in his research found out about how this process all came about, really. so, simon, tell us more about what you have learned. one episode has been broadcast so far and there is obviously more to come, but how much of an eye opener has it been for you? huge, really. so many twists and turns in the story. i found it really fascinating and quite shocking because i think the story in itself is really
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fascinating, but it tells you so much about the world of disability sport and how people with different disabilities are seen in wider society. so one of the really surprising things i found out was that there was another team, another basketball team in 2000, where there were allegations of cheating. and we get into that and explore that. and then i think the most fascinating character, really, we talk to in the series is the guy who was accused of being the mastermind of the whole thing. and one of the most surprising things about him was that he was actually instrumental in introducing intellectual disability sport to the paralympics in the first place, and he deserves credit for that. and yet because of the scandal that he was accused of being behind, there's a huge impact on athletes
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like dan pepper and we still are feeling that at the paralympics today. an extraordinary twist. what's the ongoing legacy of this? intellectual disability sports were reintroduced in 2012, which is why dan got to compete again but past his best years. but it wasn't at the same level as in sydney 2000. a few new events were added in rio and tokyo, but the numbers are still way down on 2000. and there is still no basketball. dan, what do you think about that? it's great they are getting more events in, but there are no more sports coming in, so it's still only the three sports that were at london 2012. so there is no inclusion for people in these different sports. so you just kind of always feel like on the outside. and there is also no choice. if you want to compete at the paralympic games, you have those three sports to choose from. so you just don't always feel part of it.
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simon, what is the reason behind introducing some sports but not others? so, the argument from the international paralympic committee was they wanted to reintroduce athletes with a learning disability gradually. there was some anxiety around whether there could be further cheating and a whole new system of testing was introduced at london 2012. that includes a sports—specific element and so for each sport you want to reintroduce they have to establish thissports—specific part of the testing. and that is taking time. to include more events, they would have to exclude others because they can'tjust expand the games. so that's their perspective on it.
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firefighters in the us state of california say they've failed to contain a vast wildfire that has spread over nearly a hundred thousand acres. the caldorfire, which has been burning out of control for more than a week in el dorado county, has destroyed hundreds of homes and forced thousands of people to evacuate. officials closed the main highway as winds pushed the flames across the road. visitors have flocked to the acropolis in athens and more than 120 museums and archaeological sites across greece late into the night to take advantage of the last full moon of the summer. to mark the occasion, people could visit the sites for free and many used it as an opportunity to grab that perfect photo of some of greece's most famous landmarks bathed in the orange glow of the full moon. olympic silver medallist ben whittaker has spent the day as mayor of wolverhampton — something he said was a dream come true. it came about after he joked that he wanted to be mayor if he won gold in tokyo. he won a silver mdeal — but still got his day in office, as liz cooper reports. it's a golden accolade, a political honour, a source of civic pride. becoming the mayor of wolverhampton.
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boxer ben whittaker donned the official regalia of the first citizen. this had been ben's manifesto after his olympic quarterfinal. i want to go back with a gold medal and i want to become the mayor of wolverhampton. i want one of those nice chains on my neck and i'll be calling all the shots. everyone in wolverhampton will have an ice grill, and a nice big chain, courtesy of ben whittaker. after trying on that nice big chain, it was time to get to work with some official engagements. amongst them, a visit to a city centre youth club. it's a dream come true, i keep saying this, when i was a kid, with my coach i said, "i'm going to be the mayor, "i'm going to be the mayor." went to the olympics, "i'm going to be the mayor." come back, i'm the mayor! so dream is a reality, really. the role of the mayor involves encouraging young people. this group seemed impressed. we both do boxing together. |and itjust, that's our dream, so|
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we're going to hopefully reach it. it inspired me a lot, and i can't believe he won the medal, the silver. i was proud, he should be proud of himself. i he made everyone else proud, it was the best he could do. i everywhere we've been today, he's been inundated with people wanting to wish him well, telling him how proud they are, having pictures with him. and he's so good with the local community. he is happy to meet everybody. celebrations as ben met the crowds at wolves, time also for some new policies. i told them that the kids can have monday to wednesday, have a couple of playstations and a bottom grill, so i think i'm winning with the kids. the mum and dads, things like that, they're not agreeing. but if you can get the kids to vote, i think i'll get a couple of votes and you might see me there with the chain on, with the robes permanently! it could be a while before he swaps the boxing ring for the political fray but this honorary mayor seems to have secured the popular vote. the changing of the guard is back again at buckingham palace. it's the first time since the pandemic began that the ceremony has taken place at buckingham palace. it usually takes place
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at three different locations in london: buckingham palace, stjames's palace and wellington barracks. guardsmen began performing the ceremony again at windsor castle injuly earlier this year. the gogglebox star mary cook, who appeared alongside her friend marina wingrove in the series, has died at the age of 92. channel 4 said she died in hospital at the weekend with family by her side. the cheeky bristolian pair were among the most popular members of the show�*s line—up. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz shafernaker. well, the week ahead is looking quiet on the weather front. nothing dramatic happening over the next few days. there will be some sunshine around, but also, at times, it is going to be fairly cloudy and the reason for it is a big area of high pressure has decided to park itself over us and it is not
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going to budge. so it is here today, it will be here through tuesday, wednesday, thursday, friday and probably through the weekend and into next week. so all we are going to be doing is forecasting areas of cloud across the country, and which areas will be sunny and which areas will be overcast. so, this is what it looks like through this evening. just the chance of a couple of spots of rain where the clouds gather and clump, but on the whole, it is actually a mostly bright if not sunny afternoon for many central and eastern areas of the uk. temperatures early evening will be around the high teens, maybe up to 22 in glasgow. i think a little bit fresher on the north sea coast because there is more of a breeze coming off the north sea. so tonight, a bit like last night, it is steady as she goes on the weather front, clear skies across more western areas whereas central and eastern parts of the country are probably turning overcast by early morning as the north sea wind drags in the cloud. now, what weather you will get on tuesday or the subtleties
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on the weather will depend on where you are within this area of high pressure. so, the thinking is in the centre of the high pressure, so across scotland, i think that is where the best of the sunshine is going to be, and here temperatures could actually hit the mid 20s, whereas around the high, with the breeze blowing around it, there will be, at times, more cloud. but then again, you get to the south coast and then there is more sunshine again. so, the distribution of cloud within this high pressure will be variable. here is a look at the weather map for wednesday, and notice there is a very weak cool front moving across the north sea, it is just going to graze eastern parts of the uk later on wednesday and into thursday, so that does mean slightly fresher conditions along these north sea coasts. but further towards the west, the weather is going to be fine, i think the best of the sunshine again in the north—western portion of the british isles, for example glasgow up to around 24 degrees. so, here is the summary for the week ahead, you can see by the weather symbols and the temperatures, it is pretty much settled across most of the uk and actually
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not feeling too bad at all.
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hours not weeks — it's a race against time to evacuate people from afghanistan. pressure is growing on the us president to delay withdrawing american troops from the country, including from the uk. we are really down to hours now, not weeks, and we have to make sure we exploit every minute to get people out. we'll bring you the latest. also this lunchtime... the government clamps down on "cowboy" firms offering pcr travel tests by removing nearly 60 companies from its website. young people warn of the debilitating effects of long covid as part of a campaign to encourage teenagers to get vaccinated. flash floods in the american state of tennessee have claimed more than 20 lives with dozens of people still missing. more than 15 inches of rain has fallen.
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45—minute queues, litter and erosion —

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