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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 23, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines: the race against time to evacuate people from afghanistan — the british government may ask president biden to delay the date of the final withdrawal of american troops. we are really down to hours now, not weeks, and we have to make sure we exploit every minute to get people out. a clamp down on so called cowboy firms offering pcr travel tests — nearly 60 companies are removed from the official list. young people warn of the debilitating effects of long covid, as part of a campaign to encourage teenagers to get vaccinated. flash floods in the american state of tennessee have claimed more
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than 20 lives with dozens of people still missing — more than 15 inches of rain has fallen. queuing to reach snowdon�*s summit — walkers are urged to "respect the mountain" as the number of visitors soars. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. britain and america have "hours not weeks" to evacuate people from afghanistan, according to the defence secretary. pressure's growing on us presidentjoe biden to delay the withdrawal of american troops beyond his august 31 deadline. we will have continuing coverage now on the crisis in afghanistan.
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welcome to a country turned upside down by this sudden and surprising turn of events, just one week ago here in kabul the taliban took over and one week on, they are still trying to consolidate their control across the city. afghans across the country are still coming to terms with the country turned upside down and their lives turned inside out. we spent the last 2a hours at the international airport in kabul where some of these scenes are very surreal, the dramatic and desperate scenes of thousands of afghans pressing against the airport gate, hoping against hope that they can find a way to escape their country as soon as possible. leaving not just their home is the lives they built behind. on the perimeter of the airport today we saw it is the taliban fighters who have replaced afghan security forces but the
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changing of the guard is not complete. the taliban who are now in charge around the airport, they are wearing american—made uniforms and they are carrying us made m4 rifles and they are holding them in the same way that american soldiers would have taught them to. these are symbols of this time and what a time it is. let's have a look at the latest developments with this report. this is a vast, multinational operation. kabul airport full of military planes ferrying foreigners and afghans to safety all around the clock. but for how long? the taliban have said again that western troops must be out of the country by the end of the month. without their cooperation and america's huge presence, none of this can continue. but international pressure to keep it going is mounting. the defence secretary visiting scottish troops, who could be sent to
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join the effort, says the clock is ticking. the prime minister is, at g7, going to try and raise the prospect of seeing if the united states will extend. i don't think there is any likelihood on staying on after the united states. if their timetable extends even by a day or two, that will give us a day or two more to evacuate people. we are down two hours, not weeks, and we have to make sure we exploit every minute to get people out. overnight the latest raf flight to arrive at brize norton. the ministry of defence says it has evacuated almost 6,000 people so far, the foreign office sending more staff to kabul to help process those who remain. america has flown 30,000 out, but no sign yet of an extension. my heart aches for those people you see. we are proving that we can move thousands of people a day out of kabul. we're bringing our citizens,
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nato allies, afghans who have helped us in the war effort, but we have a long way to go and a lot could still go wrong. with vast crowds still descending on the airport every to control expectations. with vast crowds still descending on the airport every day, america is trying to control expectations. do not come here. but the atmosphere remains volatile. one afghan was killed early this morning in a gun battle involving american and german troops. at another entrance, one former interpreter, who we are not naming to protect his security, said he, his wife and young daughter were stuck. in kabul, signs of normal life, but this is still a city on edge. ministries are not yet functioning, uncertainty about the next government.
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functioning, uncertainty but amid the fear, some of those who have the most to lose are, for now, determined to stay. if all of us leave with our bags, who is going to give people the hope that we will be with you? that we are going to go through the same situation, the same circumstances that you are going through? all the afghans are not the 20,000 people you see at the airport. in this valley north of kabul signs of resistance. the taliban have never really conquered this place. leaders here say they want peace, but are prepared to fight for a different kind of afghanistan. what we are standing for right now is for the whole country, for sovereignty, for peace, for people, for inclusivity, intolerance and moderation. the taliban also speak of a negotiated solution, but say they have the valley surrounded. paul adams, bbc news.
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a different kind of afghanistan that you are hearing about in that report. 20 years on it since the taliban were ousted by a us led invasion, could events in afghanistan, could afghanistan have turned out differently? we are joined by a close observer, former un senior official who also served in washington and in kabul. what is your reaction to what you are seeing unfolding in afghanistan? i’m unfolding in afghanistan? i'm horrified. like many observers. the afghanistan — horrified. like many observers. the afghanistan i knew in the 1960s was not a _ afghanistan i knew in the 1960s was not a perfect place but it was reasonably peaceful and reasonably secure _ reasonably peaceful and reasonably secure it _ reasonably peaceful and reasonably secure. it was a beautiful country
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and wonderful people. you cannot watch _ and wonderful people. you cannot watch what is going on now without horror_ watch what is going on now without horror and — watch what is going on now without horror and some shame.— horror and some shame. president biden is under _ horror and some shame. president biden is under fire _ horror and some shame. president biden is under fire now _ horror and some shame. president biden is under fire now but - horror and some shame. president biden is under fire now but he - horror and some shame. president biden is under fire now but he is i biden is underfire now but he is defending his position, saying that 20 years is a long time. four us presidents wanted to take the troops home from afghanistan and he said we should have expected this chaos. if he called you up, what advice would you give him at the 11th hour as the sist you give him at the 11th hour as the 31st of august deadline approaches to end the us military mission? i don't think the policy of the united states_ don't think the policy of the united states and nato leaving can be changed — states and nato leaving can be changed now. it is too late for that — changed now. it is too late for that that _ changed now. it is too late for that. that pass was sold by donald trump _ that. that pass was sold by donald trump in _ that. that pass was sold by donald trump in february 2020 and president biden— trump in february 2020 and president biden broadly confirmed it. i don't biden broadly confirmed it. idon't think— biden broadly confirmed it. i don't think you — biden broadly confirmed it. i don't think you can go back on that. as to
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the humanitarian situation, i would hope _ the humanitarian situation, i would hope that— the humanitarian situation, i would hope that it — the humanitarian situation, i would hope that it might be possible to -et hope that it might be possible to get very— hope that it might be possible to get very wide international support for a purely exclusively humanitarian effort to get out of afghanistan people who fear for their lives and who probably fear for them — their lives and who probably fear for them with good reason. i think if it is_ for them with good reason. i think if it is done — for them with good reason. i think if it is done in that way, i would be hopeful— if it is done in that way, i would be hopeful and especially if the un security— be hopeful and especially if the un security council could take the lead in trying _ security council could take the lead in trying to — security council could take the lead in trying to sponsor such a purely exclusively— in trying to sponsor such a purely exclusively humanitarian operation, that then _ exclusively humanitarian operation, that then that could be achieved, but it— that then that could be achieved, but it is— that then that could be achieved, but it is not a sure thing.- that then that could be achieved, but it is not a sure thing. there is of course — but it is not a sure thing. there is of course the _ but it is not a sure thing. there is of course the urgent _ but it is not a sure thing. there is| of course the urgent humanitarian side but there is of course the political side as well as the new tella bandleaders set about re—establishing their emirate —— the
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new taliban leaders. it is the neighbours and the near neighbours who are going to have a much more decisive role in afghanistan's future and they don't all agree on the way forward. how do you see this playing out in terms of who will be taking the leading role? i do playing out in terms of who will be taking the leading role?— taking the leading role? i do think that ou taking the leading role? i do think that you are _ taking the leading role? i do think that you are absolutely _ taking the leading role? i do think that you are absolutely right - taking the leading role? i do think that you are absolutely right and i that you are absolutely right and others _ that you are absolutely right and others are — that you are absolutely right and others are right to put an emphasis on the _ others are right to put an emphasis on the regional dimension. afghanistan's neighbours have in the past 200 _ afghanistan's neighbours have in the past 200 years done untold harm to that country by meddling in its affairs — that country by meddling in its affairs. we were one of them when we ruled india _ affairs. we were one of them when we ruled india. the russians when they with the _ ruled india. the russians when they with the soviet union, and then the more _ with the soviet union, and then the more recent— with the soviet union, and then the more recent events. but i do think that those — more recent events. but i do think that those neighbours now, however pleased _ that those neighbours now, however pleased they must be to see the us and nato _ pleased they must be to see the us and nato getting a bloody nose, they
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must realise that they are at risk as nruch— must realise that they are at risk as much as — must realise that they are at risk as much as anyone, perhaps more, and i as much as anyone, perhaps more, and iwouid _ as much as anyone, perhaps more, and iwouid hope _ as much as anyone, perhaps more, and i would hope that it would be possible _ i would hope that it would be possible to talk to iran and pakistan, to talk to uzbekistan and others, _ pakistan, to talk to uzbekistan and others, and — pakistan, to talk to uzbekistan and others, and to the russian federation, and china, and to see whether— federation, and china, and to see whether in— federation, and china, and to see whether in some sort of way the major— whether in some sort of way the major humanitarian rescue operation could _ major humanitarian rescue operation could be _ major humanitarian rescue operation could be carried out. and also, the future _ could be carried out. and also, the future of— could be carried out. and also, the future of afghanistan could cease to be a plaything for its neighbours. lord hannay, thanks forjoining us. there has been decades of involvement in this region, including afghanistan itself, and the future of afghanistan, that is very much on afghan minds at the
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moment and all of the neighbours. individual afghans are thinking about their own future as they leave in their thousands amid such great uncertainty if not fear. we can now go to washington to dulles international airport tojoin my colleague —— dallas. he has been meeting the afghans arriving in the united states, those who have got the special visas offered to those who work with the american military and other american organisations. what have you been hearing and seeing? i’m what have you been hearing and seeinu ? �* ., . seeing? i'm here at the expo centre in dallas and _ seeing? i'm here at the expo centre in dallas and today _ seeing? i'm here at the expo centre in dallas and today the _ seeing? i'm here at the expo centre in dallas and today the deck- seeing? i'm here at the expo centre in dallas and today the deck -- - in dallas and today the deck —— today— in dallas and today the deck —— today in — in dallas and today the deck —— today in a _ in dallas and today the deck —— today i'm a bit further back, but yesterday — today i'm a bit further back, but yesterday i was able to get into the centre _ yesterday i was able to get into the centre and — yesterday i was able to get into the centre and see people coming from afghanistan i was able to talk to
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one of— afghanistan i was able to talk to one of them and this person was here with his _ one of them and this person was here with his wife — one of them and this person was here with his wife and children. i asked him what — with his wife and children. i asked him what he brought with him to the united _ him what he brought with him to the united states because this is a huge immigration, travelling across two continents — immigration, travelling across two continents. i asked immigration, travelling across two continents. iasked him immigration, travelling across two continents. i asked him a couple of questions. — continents. i asked him a couple of questions, do you have this and that, _ questions, do you have this and that, and — questions, do you have this and that, and then i realised that was not the _ that, and then i realised that was not the right question because then they started boarding buses which were taking them from here back to dallas _ were taking them from here back to dallas airport to go to virginia, to an army— dallas airport to go to virginia, to an army base. and then i noticed that these — an army base. and then i noticed that these people, 39 of them at work— that these people, 39 of them at work boarding that bus, and one of the buses, — work boarding that bus, and one of the buses, the storage compartment was not _ the buses, the storage compartment was not even half full, so these people — was not even half full, so these people have nothing with them. i only saw— people have nothing with them. i only saw one small carry on luggage out of— only saw one small carry on luggage out of this— only saw one small carry on luggage out of this 39, nothing else. they only had — out of this 39, nothing else. they only had plastic bags with blankets
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and nray— only had plastic bags with blankets and may be a toothbrush, something like that, _ and may be a toothbrush, something like that, and these things were mostiy— like that, and these things were mostly stuff that people were donating here. just across the street— donating here. just across the street there is an afghan business here and _ street there is an afghan business here and this person turned his business — here and this person turned his business to a place to sort out donations— business to a place to sort out donations that afghan americans are bringing _ donations that afghan americans are bringing here and to other organisations around the neighbourhood. they are processing them _ neighbourhood. they are processing them and _ neighbourhood. they are processing them and that person here, he told me that _ them and that person here, he told me that us— them and that person here, he told me that us officials are going to -et me that us officials are going to get some — me that us officials are going to get some screening devices here so they can _ get some screening devices here so they can see what is inside the things— they can see what is inside the things that people are donating but i’ilht things that people are donating but right now— things that people are donating but right now until then, they said they only need _ right now until then, they said they only need stuff for babies like baby formula. _ only need stuff for babies like baby formula, diapers, and he said apparently according to their knowledge, lots of kids are coming to the _ knowledge, lots of kids are coming
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to the states. i�*m knowledge, lots of kids are coming to the states.— to the states. i'm sure that now that ou to the states. i'm sure that now that you are _ to the states. i'm sure that now that you are based _ to the states. i'm sure that now that you are based in _ to the states. i'm sure that now that you are based in the - to the states. i'm sure that now| that you are based in the united states and you are already mentioning the afghans who are already living there, those who fled earlier on, who fled earlier wars, and you have been describing the outpouring of support for afghans as yet again they are forced to flee their country. yet again they are forced to flee their country-— their country. yes, that is right. the are their country. yes, that is right. they are not — their country. yes, that is right. they are not happy _ their country. yes, that is right. they are not happy with - their country. yes, that is right. they are not happy with what i their country. yes, that is right. l they are not happy with what the their country. yes, that is right. - they are not happy with what the us government did. i interviewed many afghans _ government did. i interviewed many afghans who came to this country 20 years— afghans who came to this country 20 years ago. _ afghans who came to this country 20 years ago, 30 years ago, ten years ago, _ years ago, 30 years ago, ten years ago, five _ years ago, 30 years ago, ten years ago, five years ago, maybe six months — ago, five years ago, maybe six months ago, and they were not happy with what— months ago, and they were not happy with what the us did, to their country. _ with what the us did, to their country, because they see that the us was— country, because they see that the us was not— country, because they see that the us was not behaving responsibly to afghanistan and they were complaining about what happened, but at the _ complaining about what happened, but at the end. _ complaining about what happened, but at the end, some of them were hopeful— at the end, some of them were hopeful that this could lead to a
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more _ hopeful that this could lead to a more inclusive government in afghanistan and some of them were telling _ afghanistan and some of them were telling me, one of them was a woman in education. — telling me, one of them was a woman in education, working in education policies _ in education, working in education policies in — in education, working in education policies in afghanistan, and she told me — policies in afghanistan, and she told me that all these years, the tatiban— told me that all these years, the taliban and their mentality was present— taliban and their mentality was present in rural afghan areas and she was— present in rural afghan areas and she was hoping that now that the tatiban— she was hoping that now that the taiiban is— she was hoping that now that the taliban is going to be in charge, they— taliban is going to be in charge, they can — taliban is going to be in charge, they can see some changes and it can lead to— they can see some changes and it can lead to good — they can see some changes and it can lead to good things.— lead to good things. thanks for “oininu lead to good things. thanks for joining us- _ lead to good things. thanks for joining us. interesting - lead to good things. thanks for i joining us. interesting perspective from what is happening in the united states and in capital after capital around the world. others are opening their hearts and homes to afghans in what is one of the darkest hours for a country which has been through too many dark hours. there is an echo of the past in so much of this, and so
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much uncertainty about the future. we will continue with our special coverage from afghanistan and places around the world but for now, that is it from me and the team in kabul. let's stay with this subject. let's get more from our political correspondent nick eardley — the clock is ticking according to the defence secretary? is britain managing expectations? ben wallace has said there is so little time left to do with the people you want to get out. hours not weeks was — people you want to get out. hours not weeks was the _ people you want to get out. hours not weeks was the phrase - people you want to get out. hours not weeks was the phrase used i people you want to get out. hours not weeks was the phrase used in | people you want to get out. hm; not weeks was the phrase used in an this morning. that is in part realism —— used in an interview this morning. they know that the situation at the airport is not going to last for ever and it is also about politics because the uk is going to try and put pressure on the united states tomorrow to extend
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its own deadline over how long it is prepared to keep troops at the airport in kabul, so we know president biden has said he wants the us operation to be completely over by the end of the month. the uk wants that to last a bit longer, to allow more people to get on flights out of afghanistan if they so wish. the view in london is that the biden administration is prepared to listen to those requests and when the president spoke last night he did not completely rule out the prospect of staying a few days into september but the context for this is that the uk has got about 6600 people out over the last ten days and we think there are still at least 4000 left who are eligible to come to the uk and potentially now thousands more because of the changing criteria which uk ministers announced last week. the truth is, there isn't much
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that uk ministers think they can do without the backing of the us and we note the us has several thousand troops on the ground at the airport and we know they are largely responsible for the infrastructure at kabul airport so the view of the government in london is that without those boots on the ground from the us and without that infrastructure that the americans have put in place, uk cannot stay, so time it really is running out to get those final people on airlift out of afghanistan in the coming days. the g7 conversations tomorrow, they will also turn to how do we how's everyone and where do these people go? these people who are desperate to get out, they need to live somewhere, what we do about that internationally? that somewhere, what we do about that internationally?— internationally? that is bound to dominate the _ internationally? that is bound to dominate the discussion - internationally? that is bound to l dominate the discussion tomorrow internationally? that is bound to - dominate the discussion tomorrow and although the immediate evacuation will be on everyone's mind, a lot of
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the agenda is due to be about the medium term future for afghanistan, so there has been a lot of talk about the humanitarian crisis which could develop over the weeks and months and there will be conversations about where refugees should be housed and how they can get to respective countries because once the air bridge and there is a question over where people who want to flee the taliban especially people who are not in kabul at the moment, where they go? the uk has talked about this idea of setting up hubs in the wider regions, not in afghanistan, but in the wider region around afghanistan, but i have got to say, there is very little detail coming from the uk government about what that actually would entail. they are difficult questions to answer about where those hubs would be based, given the fractious nature of the uk's relationship with some of the uk's relationship with some of those countries around the area. one other thing to bear in mind from
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the g7 discussions tomorrow, boris johnson has talked about waiting to recognise any new government in afghanistan and there seems to be an acceptance amongst world leaders that the taliban will have a considerable amount of power and will probably form the new government with some others but borisjohnson has been urging world leaders in a series of because he has made, not to recognise that government until there has been a big discussion about what that would entail —— a series of calls. he wants conditions to be attached to my condition is about human rights in particular, about rights for women, and trying to tie the taliban to some of the promises that have been made and the talks in qatar over the last few months, but a complex few days ahead in the airport in kabuland complex few days ahead in the airport in kabul and a complex few weeks and months ahead when it comes
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to the immediate future of afghanistan.— to the immediate future of afuhanistan. ., ., ., , afghanistan. thanks for “oining us. now to some t afghanistan. thanks for “oining us. now to some of the _ afghanistan. thanks forjoining us. now to some of the other - afghanistan. thanks forjoining us. now to some of the other stories l now to some of the other stories here this afternoon. dozens of companies that sell covid pcr travel tests are to be removed from the government's list of approved providers. the firms either no longer exist or don't provide all the tests required by holidaymakers. our transport correspondent caroline davies can explain more. these are the tests you have when you come back from a foreign country to the uk. you need to have either one or two tests. the government lists these providers on their website with the cheapest at the top down to the most expensive. it has come under criticism for not keeping a close enough eye as to what is going on. some say a particular price on the website and when you go to them they are more expensive
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or not available at all. some people have said they have paid for tests and not received results or have received them very late. even as test providers have complained there are cowboys operating in this market. the government has said now that 82 providers will be given what they call a two strike warning. that is for misleading prices, their prices will have to be updated, and they could be removed from the list entirely if they are found to be doing this again. 57 companies have been removed because they no longer exist or because they don't provide these tests. the government says it will also conduct regular spot checks. this has been welcomed, but there has been criticism it has taken so long, particularly by the consumer group, upper case which? they also point out the fact that so many of these companies being given these warnings or removed suggests it has been difficult for travellers over the summer to find realiable testing sites.
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i will be talking to which? at about 330, we will talk more about those travel pcr tests. an nhs video featuring younger people who suffer the debilitating effects of covid has been released as part of a drive to encourage young adults to get a vaccine. the government says it has met its target of offering a jab to all 16— and i7—year—olds in england by today. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. as an a&e doctor, i've seen a lot during this pandemic but nothing has shocked me more than seeing younger people being admitted to our hospitals with covid—i9. and as well as their age, many of them have one other thing in common, they were unvaccinated. the video's message is simple. covid vaccines protect against not just the virus but the debilitating effects of long covid, too. my lungs, out of nowhere, just kind of stopped. i struggled to breathe, sitting, lying down, obviously, sitting upright.
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i couldn't breathe. my energy levels dropped so walking of any kind of distance i would get automatically tired. this is part of a new push on vaccinations aimed particularly at younger people. one of those who took part is 25—year—old megan higgins. she initially fell ill injanuary and then struggled for months. i used to be a horse rider, i used to run, i used to walk the dog a lot, and it got to the point where sort of working in a school as well, i couldn't even do head, shoulders, knees and toes, or the hokey cokey with the kids, i was so tired just doing anything physical. the video comes as the government announced all 16 and i7—year—olds in england have now been offered a vaccine. in the three weeks since they became eligible, around a million letters and texts have been sent inviting teenagers to get a jab. so far, more than 360,000 to 16 and i7—year—olds have had theirfirst dose. all 12 to 15—year—olds in england thought to be at risk have also been
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invited to get a vaccine. infection rates are currently highest among younger adults but so, too, is vaccine hesitancy. i would urge people to get a vaccine. adults might be unable to work but children may be prevented from learning and i think it's such an important time in your life, you don't want months in bed, you don't want months when you are unable to do your sport or go out dancing or do anything you want. you want to be in the prime of your life. meanwhile, the government has announced a contract for 35 million more doses of the pfizer vaccine, the one being offered to younger people, to be delivered from the second half of next year. today's message is that being young, fit and otherwise healthy is not enough to protect you from the virus or long covid, but being vaccinated can make a big difference. dominic hughes, bbc news. the changing of the guard has returned to buckingham palace. band plays
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it's the first time since the pandemic began 18 months ago that the ceremony has taken place at the palace. it usually happens at three different locations in london — buckingham palace, stjames's palace and wellington barracks. more than 20 people have been killed by flash floods in the us state of tennessee — with dozens still missing. record rainfall of more than 15 inches in some areas sparked widespread flooding over the weekend. roads and bridges were washed away and power cuts have affected thousands of people. daniela relph reports. those living here described a wall of water coming in hard and fast. flash floods overwhelming parts of tennessee. the rain and wind tore through communities with a ferocity few had predicted. it was a terrifying experience as residents tried to save their homes
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and theirfamilies. i'm trying to get them out of the door but the water is so high and it's pushing against the door that i'm having a hard time pushing to open the door to get them out, i'm holding two babies. the aftermath is a landscape strewn with floodwaters, wrecked vehicles and severely damaged homes. in many counties, there is bewilderment at how quickly the storm took hold and this remains both a recovery and a search and rescue operation with many still missing, including children. tremendous loss of life, a number of missing people on the ground, homes washed off their foundations, cars strewn around the community, it is a devastating picture of loss and heartache. the worst hit area was humphreys county, west of nashville. here, the floodwaters rose so quickly many people just couldn't escape their homes. the plight of those living
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here recognised in last night's presidential address. i want to begin by expressing my deepest condolences for the sudden and tragic loss of life due to this flash flood. i know we have reached out to the community, we stand ready to offer them support. i asked the administrator to speak to governor lee of tennessee right away and we will offer any assistance they need for this terrible moment. tens of thousands of people are still without power. roads and bridges remain impassible in some places, hampering rescue efforts. there were hurricane warnings in the north—east of the united states over the weekend but it was here, further south in tennessee, where the extreme weather really hit and took lives. daniela relph, bbc news. world trade centre one has been hit by lightning — as tropical storm henri battered new york. a bolt can be seen striking the top of the building in lower manhattan,
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connecting with the spire, 550 metres above ground level. more than 120,000 homes in rhode island were left without power because of the storm. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. it will be fairly quiet on the weather front this week — high pressure in charge of the weather and is here to stay for the foreseeable future. and the weather will be generally dry, lots of cloud at times, you can see on the satellite picture the recent one, a fair bit of cloud in the centre of that high, but it's not a uniform layer. we have seen hazy sunshine breaking through and through this afternoon and into this evening some places will have blue skies in some spots.
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through tonight, not a lot changes, a lot like last night, quiet, light winds, a bit of mist and fog forming early in the morning and tuesday starts off pretty bright across most of the uk, some areas a little on the cloudy side. the best of the weather in the centre of the high pressure so central parts of scotland, for example, in glasgow temperatures could get up to 25 degrees.
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hello this is bbc news with jane hill. the latest headlines: britain and america have �*hours not weeks' to evacuate people from afghanistan, according to the defence secretary, as pressure grows on president biden to delay withdrawing american troops from the country. we are we a re really we are really down to hours now, not weeks, and we need to make sure we exploit every minute to get people
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out. the government clamps down on "cowboy" firms offering pcr travel tests, by removing nearly 60 companies from its website young people warn of the debilitating effects of long covid, as part of a campaign to encourage teenagers to get vaccinated. flash floods in the american state of tennessee have claimed more than 20 lives, with dozens of people still missing — more than 15 inches of rain has fallen. 45—minute queues, litter and erosion — walkers on mount snowdon in north wales are urged to respect the landscape, as the number of visitors soars. more to come on many of those stories. sport now, and for a full round—up from the bbc
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sport centre, here's gavin. hello, nice to see. swimmer ellie simmonds and archerjohn stubbs will be the great britain flag—bearers at the tokyo paralympic opening ceremony, which takes place tomorrow. both athletes are competing in their fourth games injapan. chef de mission penny briscoe's selections mean simmonds will be the first woman to carry the flag for gb at a summer games since fellow swimmer maggie mceleny 21 years ago. stubbs is the oldest member of the team at 56 years old. there are literally no words to describe it. i mean, this is my fourth paralympics and i've never actually been to an opening ceremony! so to go to an opening ceremony but also have the privilege of carrying the flag withjohn, it's going to be so exciting. when penny said that i was called for a meeting with her, i thought it was a general meeting. when she announced that me and john were both flag—bearers, i think we were both in awe and didn't really know how to respond! wonderful. the action at the paralympic games begins on wednesday — a year after originally planned
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owing to the covid—19 pandemic. it takes place despite the tokyo 2020 official hidemasa nakamura saying last week that the "infection situation" injapan had deteriorated since the olympics. the international paralympic comittee president andrew parsons admits preparations haven't been easy. it's been really difficult, but we believe working together with health experts, the ioc and the japanese government and the organising committee, we came up with a very good set of countermeasures which prove to be efficient during the olympics, some were encouraged by that, but still something we have only seen in practice and we need to make sure that the things that are working are in place and at the same time we can still have the same atmosphere in the games. even without spectators. the team for the solheim cup has been announced and there are three english players selected for europe's defence of the title against the united states next month. georgia hall and charley hull made the team automatically, while mel reid is one of six picks — from captain catriona matthew. georgia hall makes the team
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after finishing second in the women's open, and will be making her third appearance in the competition. charley hull meanwhile will be playing the event for the fifth time. but it's especially significant for mel reid, who was picked after missing out on the selection in 2019... it was a tough phone call two years ago, to say, you know, she hadn't quite made it and were asked to be vice captain. i think that shows how much she loves it. she didn't think for an instant and said she would do it. it was a much nicer phone call this time. i think she will be a great addition. she has the experience and has the passion for team play. they have been trying for two years to make the team and to finally get that confirmation you are in the team, obviously, the players are very excited, especially the rookies, i think, when you are
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playing in your first one. but i managed to catch mel, just before she took off in atlanta, and as you can imagine she wasjust delighted. the england bowler mark wood is out of the third test against india, which begins this week after suffering a shoulder injury. hejarred his right shoulder in the last test at lord's, which england lost by 151 runs, having drawn the first match in the series. the third test takes place at headingley, starting on wednesday. how things turned out there, a bit of a freak injury. i think it is frustrating because he is bowling so well. frustration more for him than anyone else. he is bowling really well, bowling at great pace, seems to be managing his body a lot better, and it is not through bawling or anything other than a freak incident that found himself missing this test match. yes. freak incident that found himself missing this test match. yes, lots of work for — missing this test match. yes, lots of work for england _ missing this test match. yes, lots of work for england to _ missing this test match. yes, lots of work for england to do - missing this test match. yes, lots of work for england to do to - missing this test match. yes, lots of work for england to do to get i of work for england to do to get backin of work for england to do to get back in the series. that's all the sport for now, jane. thanks, gavin. we will see you later on. let's talk about the story dominating
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everything. as we've been hearing, pressure is growing on the us to delay its final withdrawal from afghanistan in order to allow more people to be evacuated. earlier, however, the taliban warned they wouldn't agree to move the deadline from august 31. speaking to bbc world's yalda hakim, an official spokesman for the taliban, suhail shaheen, reiterated that foreign forces should leave the country by that date. the foreign military withdrawal shoutd — the foreign military withdrawal should be complete until the 31st of august _ should be complete until the 31st of august. this is their commitment which _ august. this is their commitment which they— august. this is their commitment which they had announced, which they had already— which they had announced, which they had already announced. if they doubt abide _ had already announced. if they doubt abide by— had already announced. if they doubt abide by their commitment —— if they do not _ abide by their commitment —— if they do not abide — abide by their commitment —— if they do not abide by their commitment we
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are awaiting the decision of our leadership. we have a new phase of reconstruction. i think they should all come _ reconstruction. i think they should all come together to build our country— all come together to build our country in _ all come together to build our country in a peaceful way. but still it is not _ country in a peaceful way. but still it is not something to compel the afghans, — it is not something to compel the afghans, but only our advice to them that it _ afghans, but only our advice to them that it is _ afghans, but only our advice to them that it is better for them to stay here _ that it is better for them to stay here they— that it is better for them to stay here. they can lead a normal life in their— here. they can lead a normal life in their country— here. they can lead a normal life in their country rather than going to other— their country rather than going to other countries. that their country rather than going to other countries.— other countries. that was the taliban spokesman _ other countries. that was the taliban spokesman they - other countries. that was the taliban spokesman they are i other countries. that was the - taliban spokesman they are speaking on bbc world news. —— that was the taliban spokesman there speaking on bbc world news. several thousand afghan interpreters and other staff who worked for british forces are eligible to come to the uk, but many are stuck at kabul airport. a former army interpreter trapped in kabul has contacted the bbc, with an appeal to the uk government.
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they've been speaking to us on condition we would protect their identity. so their words are spoken by an actor. the situation in kabul is not good. it's in a very critical situation. the taliban are coming into every house, looking for the people who worked for the nato, isaf and british forces. there are more than 50 interpreters who are eligible for the relocation scheme to the uk that are still left. they didn't get the biometric visas and they are waiting for theirflights. we hope and can request the uk government and mod and local stops team to process the visa and biometric flights of these people as soon as possible, because the taliban are just finding these people who worked for nato and isaf. we are so scared. we are scared that if the process stops or if the british forces just withdraw from afghanistan it'll be really hard for us leave afghanistan. that is just one man's experience are used to work as an interpreter.
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—— who used to work as an interpreter. our security correspondent frank gardner told us more about the taliban's refusal to allow american and british troops to remain in afghanistan beyond the end of this month. that debt of the 31st of august. —— that date. at the moment it's looking very unrealistic because of what the taliban have said. they view the presence of foreign forces there as an occupation and they have said august the 31st is a red line. that's only days away. if they are going to be persuaded to extend that they will almost certainly want something in return. ideally, they would like recognition — it's probably a bit early for that. if the us — and britain's not going to stay there without the us — if the us decided they were going to stay on beyond that, without taliban compliance, that brings extreme risk, at worst case an aircraft being shot down out of the sky, and more likely clashes at the gate, some kind of harassment. you are entering a completely different paradigm at that stage. the compliant evacuation would end. it would become a hostile situation. nehra security correspondent frank gardner, and of course much more
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about the situation in afghanistan throughout the afternoon —— that was our security correspondent. the doctors' union the bma has written to the government to raise concerns about road safety caused by the backlog in dealing with medical assessments for driving licence applications. the union warns that people are by—passing queues at their local gps and going instead to independent practioners, who might not have full access to their medical histories. two former sex pistols have won a high court battle with former frontman johnny rotten. it's all about the use of the punk band's songs in a new tv series directed by danny boyle. drummer paul cook, and guitarist stevejones, argued that the group had an agreement that decisions would be made on a "majority rule basis" but lydon rejected the deal, likening it to "slave labour". with me now is our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba.
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he has been following this far more closely than many of us might. people may be aware of the danny boyle work going on in this area. can you explain what is really happening here and what this case is about? , , . , , happening here and what this case is about? , , about? this is a series about the sex pistols, _ about? this is a series about the sex pistols, the _ about? this is a series about the sex pistols, the impact - about? this is a series about the sex pistols, the impact of - about? this is a series about the sex pistols, the impact of punk, | sex pistols, the impact of punk, being directed of course by danny boyle, famous for so many films from slum dog millionaire to directing and producing the olympics opening ceremony in london. they wanted to use music of course by the sex pistols, it was about the sex pistols, it was about the sex pistols and the rise of punk, and then there was a disagreement. as then there was a disagreement. as thejudge pointed out in the judgment, not an unusual thing between the members of the sex pistols. he observed they have been disagreeing about lots of things going back to the 1970s. in this case, john leyden, of course better known to many asjohnny rotten, said he didn't want the sex pistols music used in this new series —— john liden. in retaliation the former
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drummer and guitarist, the drummer paul cook, and stevejones, they said they had a band member agreement, and as part of this the majority view on anything, their music, merchandise, whatever, that would hold and one member couldn't go against the wishes of all the others. john leyden said he didn't really recognise this should have effect in this case, so it all went to court, and of course there we saw paul cook and steve jones to court, and of course there we saw paul cook and stevejones bringing this action againstjohn liden, also supporting them in their action was another original member of the sex pistols, and the estate of sid vicious, and after many days of any trial, thisjudgment has emerged and the has agreed with paul cook and steve jones that this was a legally binding agreement and their majority should win out even though
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binding agreement and their majority should win out even thouthohn lydon didn't want the music to be used. studio: i'm sorry, this is how it has gone in court, so in terms of danny boyle and what he is trying to do here, have we heard from him? what do we know about the final product? what do we know about the final roduct? ., ., ., ., ., product? no, we have heard from paul cook and steve — product? no, we have heard from paul cook and steve jones, _ product? no, we have heard from paul cook and steve jones, not _ product? no, we have heard from paul cook and steve jones, not danny - cook and stevejones, not danny boyle. they say they welcome the court's ruling, say it brings clarity to the decision and upholds the band's agreement on collective decision—making. they said it wasn't a pleasant expense but allows them to move forward and hopefully work together in the future with better relations. we have not heard anything from johnny rotten, john lydon, at this stage, but this court case has now concluded and the judge has given hisjudgment and it looks like a green light for the tv series and the majority viewpoint has won out despite the feelings ofjohn lydon. it must be said, you know, we don't quite know what his
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motivations where for not wanting this to go ahead, but nobody doubts he is a fierce guardian of the sex pistols's impact and legacy and feels it should be used carefully, so many believe that is undoubtedly a part of it, but in a purely legal sense thejudge pointed out a part of it, but in a purely legal sense the judge pointed out when a part of it, but in a purely legal sense thejudge pointed out when he signed this agreement he had a british lawyer, us attorney and a manager who all would have explained the impact of this agreement and what it might mean in the future, that, you know, it was in the terms of the judgment the majority of you winning out. so sex pistols fans can almost certainly look forward to seeing this new series directed by danny boyle and, crucially, featuring the music of the sex pistols. , ~ pistols. interesting! well, we will see what emerges _ pistols. interesting! well, we will see what emerges when - pistols. interesting! well, we will see what emerges when it - pistols. interesting! well, we will see what emerges when it is - pistols. interesting! well, we will. see what emerges when it is finally produced. thanks for now. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba there on that story and that legal battle involving the sex pistols.
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the uk has agreed a contract for 35 million more doses of the pfizer/biontech vaccine, to be delivered from the second half of next year. the order is part of the government preparations for booster shots and any new variants that could emerge. the health secretary sajid javid said the order would "future—proof" the uk's vaccine programme. 88% of over—16s in the uk have already had at least one dose of a covid vaccine. just a reminder of the headlines on bbc news... britain and america have "hours not weeks" to evacuate people from afghanistan, according to the defence secretary, as pressure grows on president biden to delay withdrawing american troops from the country. here, the government clamps down on "cowboy" firms offering pcr travel tests, by removing nearly 60 companies from its website. and young people warn of the debilitating effects of long covid, as part of a campaign to encourage teenagers to get vaccinated.
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a widow who lost her husband to a gambling addiction is urging the government to stop online betting companies from giving away free bonuses — which allow you to bet without depositing any money. luke ashton took his own life in april after he started gambling again while on furlough during lockdown. jayne mccubbin has been speaking to his wife, annie. i looked out of the window and his van wasn't there. and then the panic set in. i rang the police and they came round and took a statement. around about four o'clock on the 22nd of april, i looked out the window and two policemen got out the car and the way they walked in, i knew what they were going to say. annie's husband luke
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had taken his own life. she had no idea why until police handed back his telephone. gosh, i can't even describe the shock. i saw betting activity that must have consumed him from morning till night. it just escalated. it became uncontrollable. and i knew — i knew why he'd done it. the gambling commission estimate there are around 350,000 problem gamblers here in the uk. luke had previously beaten an addiction but when lockdown hit the 40—year—old was furloughed. that's when annie says the first of many free bets landed in his e—mails, and luke was drawn back in. there's no doubt about it. the only people that knew about luke's addiction were luke and the company. and at no point did they step in and do anything about it.
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there was a free bet that dropped into his account the day he disappeared. by that point, he had already, you know, decided on what he was doing. search "free bets" online and you'll find a staggering number. they are inducements, so they are the free cigarette or the free shot of heroin. it's your first shot| of heroin, isn't it? liz and charles ritchie set up the charity gambling with lives after their 24—year—old son jack took his own life in 2017. they and annie want to see free bets banned. i've spoken to so many mums and dads who say to me, "i warned them about road safety, "i warned them about sexual predators, "i warned them about drugs. "i didn't know there was another predator out there to warn them about." annie's pushing for change
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in the name of her husband just as the government reviews current legislation to make sure it is fit for the digital age, the government told us. the betting and gaming council told us... "promotions are an issue for individual operators," but added, "the industry is determined to protect people. and the rate of problem gamblers has remained stable for the past 20 years." free bets, they are not designed to give anyone anything, they are not designed to be free. they are enticing people to open accounts and, potentially, they cost lives. that report was from our correspondent jayne that report was from our correspondentjayne mccubbin. snowdon in north wales has long been a magnet for hikers wanting to reach its summit — the highest point in england and wales. around 700,000 people now visit the mountain annually — up from 500,000 in 2018. but the impact of so many visitors takes its toll,
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and this summer has seen 45—minute queues to reach the top — as chris dearden reports. hundreds of people queueing in the mist for 45 minutes. not a shopping centre, a football match or a big gig, but the highest mountain in wales. snowden has always been a busy place in august, but locals say this year it has been busier than ever, and not everyone is dressed or prepared for weather conditions like these at the top. you can't stop anybody but you can see they are not used walking the mountain with the clothing they've got on and things, you know. sometimes i've seen a few, you won't believe this, in flip—flops and things, you know. and you give them advice and they don't want to know either. we can't say anything any more, there's no point, you know? flip—flops or walking boots, the authorities estimate that around 700,000 pairs of feet will have gone up snowdon by the end of this year. they say the increase is because more british people are taking their holidays
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in the uk at the moment. but it's putting strain on mountain rescue volunteers who were called to three casualties in three hours last saturday lunchtime, and campaigners say it is putting strain on the mountain itself. litter, footpath erosion, wild camping, traffic, parking. these are all... in a sense, none of these are new but they have all acquired a really sharp edge in the last 18 months. that is definitely thunder. and the authorities have been trying to spread the message with videos like this on social media, to remind people to be prepared before they head to the top. no flip—flops, no trainers, nothing stupid _ no flip—flops, no trainers, nothing stupid like — no flip—flops, no trainers, nothing stupid like that. they say this summer was always likely to be busy and lots of plans are in place to manage the traffic lower down and the footfall higher up. chris dearden, bbc news. now, british boxer ben whittaker won a silver medal at the olympics
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in tokyo — a huge achievement — but his dream was actually something else, and now it's come true, as liz copper explains. it's a golden accolade, a political honour, a source of civic pride — becoming the mayor of wolverhampton. boxer ben whittaker donned the official regalia of the first citizen. this had been ben's manifesto after his olympic quarterfinal. i want to go back with a gold medal and i want to become the mayor of wolverhampton. i want one of those nice chains on my neck and i'll be calling all the shots. everybody in wolverhampton will have a nice ice grill, and a nice big chain, courtesy of ben whittaker. after trying on that nice big chain, it was time to get to work with some official engagements, amongst them, a visit to a city centre youth club.
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it's a dream come true, i keep saying this, when i was a kid, with my coach i said, "i'm going to be the mayor, i'm going to be the mayor." went to the olympics, "i'm going to be the mayor." come back, i'm the mayor! so dream's a reality, really. the role of the mayor involves encouraging young people and this group seemed impressed. we both do boxing. together and itjust... that's our dream, so we're - going to hopefully reach them. this inspired me a lot, and i can't believe he won the medal, a silver. i was proud, he should be proud of himself. i he made everyone else proud, it was the best he could do. i everywhere we've been today with ben, he's been inundated with people wanting to wish him well, telling him how proud they are, having pictures with him. and he's so good with the local community. he's happy to meet everybody. there were celebrations as ben met the crowds at wolves, time also for some new policies. i've told people that the kids can have monday to wednesday, have a couple of playstations and a bottom grill, so i think i'm winning with the kids. the mum and dads, things like that, they're not agreeing, but if you can get the kids to vote, i think i'll get a couple of votes
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and you might see me there with the chain on, with the robes permanently. it could be a while before he swaps the boxing ring for the political fray, but this honorary mayor seems to have secured the popular vote. liz copper, bbc news, wolverhampton. laughter let's catch up with the weather prospects, shall we? here's tomasz schafernaker. well, the week ahead is looking quiet on the weather front. nothing dramatic happening over the next few days. there will be some sunshine around, but also, at times, it is going to be fairly cloudy and the reason for it is a big area of high pressure has decided to park itself over us and it is not going to budge. so it is here today, it will be here through tuesday, wednesday, thursday, friday and probably through the weekend and into next week. so all we are going to be doing is forecasting areas of cloud across the country, and which areas will be sunny and which areas will be overcast.
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so this is what it looks like through this evening. just the chance of a couple of spots of rain where the clouds gather and clump, but on the whole, it is actually a mostly bright if not sunny afternoon for many central and eastern areas of the uk. temperatures early evening will be around the high teens, maybe up to 22 in glasgow. i think a little bit fresher on the north sea coast because there is more of a breeze coming off the north sea. so tonight, a bit like last night, it is steady as she goes on the weather front, clear skies across more western areas whereas central and eastern parts of the country are probably turning overcast by early morning as the north sea wind drags in the cloud. now, what weather you will get on tuesday or the subtleties on the weather will depend on where you are within this area of high pressure. so, the thinking is in the centre
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of the high pressure, so across scotland, i think that is where the best of the sunshine is going to be, and here temperatures could actually hit the mid 20s, whereas around the high, with the breeze blowing around it, there will be, at times, more cloud. but then again, you get to the south coast and then there is more sunshine again. so, the distribution of cloud within this high pressure will be variable. here is a look at the weather map for wednesday, and notice there is a very weak cool front moving across the north sea, it is just going to graze eastern parts of the uk later on wednesday and into thursday, so that does mean slightly fresher conditions along these north sea coasts. but further towards the west, the weather is going to be fine, i think the best of the sunshine again in the north—western portion of the british isles, for example glasgow up to around 24 degrees. so, here is the summary for the week ahead, you can see by the weather symbols and the temperatures, it is pretty much settled across most of the uk and actually not feeling too bad at all.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the race against time to evacuate people from afghanistan — the british government may ask president biden to delay the date of the final withdrawal of american troops. we are really down to hours now, not weeks, and we have to make sure we exploit every minute to get people out. but the taliban say foreign troops will not be permitted to stay beyond the deadline. a clamp down on cowboy firms offering pcr travel tests — nearly 60 companies are removed from the official list. young people warn of the debilitating effects of long covid, as part of a campaign to encourage teenagers
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to get vaccinated. flash floods in the us state of tennessee have claimed more than 20 lives with dozens of people still missing — more than 15 inches of rain has fallen. queuing to reach snowdon's summit — walkers are urged to "respect the mountain" as the number of visitors soars. the government says it will ask the united states to keep its soldiers at kabul airport beyond the current deadline of next tuesday. but the taliban say they are opposed to any extension. borisjohnson will make the request
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at an emergency meeting of leaders from the g7 countries tomorrow. us troops are due to leave kabul airport in just over week. but several thousand people remain there, desperate to flee the country and escape the taliban. they include afghans who worked for the british military. the taliban spokesman, suhail shaheen, told the bbc that it would be a clear violation if foreign forces did not withdraw on the august 31st deadline. the uk says it has evacuated more than 1,800 people from afghanistan on eight flights in the last 24 hours. nine more flights are expected in the next 24 hours. president biden has warned of a risk of attacks from so—called islamic state militants, and says he hopes he won't have to delay the airlift. this morning the german military said a member of the afghan security
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forces has been killed in an exchange of fire with unidentified gunmen at the north gate of kabul airport. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet reports from kabul. welcome to kabul, to a country turned upside down by this sudden and surprising turn of events, just one week ago here in kabul the taliban took over and one week on, they are still trying to consolidate their control across the city. afghans across the country are still coming to terms with the country turned upside down and their lives turned inside out. we spent the last 24 hours at the international airport in kabul where some of the scenes are surreal, the dramatic and desperate scenes of thousands of afghans pressing against the airport gate, hoping against hope that they can find a way to escape their country as soon as possible.
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leaving notjust their homes but the lives they built behind. on the perimeter of the airport today we saw it is the taliban fighters who have replaced afghan security forces but the changing of the guard is not complete. the taliban who are now in charge around the airport, they are wearing american—made uniforms and they are carrying us made m4 rifles and they are holding them in the same way that american soldiers would have taught them to. these are symbols of this time and what a time it is. let's have a look at the latest developments with this report from paul adams. this is a vast, multinational operation. kabul airport full of military planes ferrying foreigners and afghans to safety all around the clock. but for how long? the taliban have said, again, that western troops must be out of the country by the end of the month.
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without their cooperation and america's huge presence, none of this can continue. but international pressure to keep it going is mounting. the defence secretary visiting scottish troops, who could be sent to join the effort, says the clock is ticking. the prime minister is, at g7, going to try and raise the prospect of seeing if the united states will extend. i don't think there is any likelihood of staying on after the united states. if their timetable extends even by a day or two, that will give us a day or two more to evacuate people. we are down to hours, not weeks, and we have to make sure we exploit every minute to get people out. overnight, the latest raf flight to arrive at brize norton. the ministry of defence says it's evacuated almost 6,000 people so far, the foreign office sending more staff to kabul to help process those who remain. america has flown 30,000 out, but no sign yet of an extension.
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my heart aches for those people you see. we are proving that we can move thousands of people a day out of kabul. we're bringing our citizens, nato allies, afghans who have helped us in the war effort, but we have a long way to go and a lot could still go wrong. with vast crowds still descending on the airport every day, america is trying to control expectations. do not come here until you have been contacted. but the atmosphere remains volatile. one afghan was killed early this morning in a gun battle involving american and german troops. at another entrance, one former interpreter, who we are not naming to protect his security, said he, his wife and young daughter were stuck.
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in kabul, signs of normal life, but this is still a city on edge. ministries are not yet functioning, uncertainty about the next government. but amid the fear, some of those who have the most to lose are, for now, determined to stay. if all of us leave with our bags, who is going to give people the hope that we will be with you? that we are going to go through the same situation, the same circumstances that you are going through? all the afghans are not the 20,000 people you see at the airport. in this valley north of kabul signs of resistance. the taliban have never really conquered this place. leaders here say they want peace, but are prepared to fight for a different kind of afghanistan. what we are standing for right now is for the whole country, for sovereignty, for peace,
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for people, for inclusivity, and tolerance and moderation. the taliban also speak of a negotiated solution, but say they have the valley surrounded. paul adams, bbc news. a different kind of afghanistan that you are hearing about in that report. a question that is being asked here in afghanistan and in capitals around the world. 20 years on since the taliban were ousted by a us led invasion, could events in afghanistan, could afghanistan, have turned out differently? we are joined by a close observer, lord david hannay, former un senior official who also served in washington and in kabul. what is your reaction to what you are seeing unfolding in afghanistan? well, i'm horrified.
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like many observers. the afghanistan i knew in the 1960s was not a perfect place but it was reasonably peaceful and reasonably secure. it was a beautiful country and wonderful people. you cannot watch what is going on now without horror and some shame. president biden is underfire now but he is defending his position, saying that 20 years is a long time. four us presidents wanted to take the troops home from afghanistan and he said we should have expected this chaos. if he called you up, what advice would you give him at the 11th hour as the 31st of august deadline approaches to end the us military mission? i don't think the policy of the united states and nato leaving can be changed now.
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it is too late for that. that pass was sold by donald trump in february 2020 and president biden broadly confirmed it. i don't think you can go back on that. as to the humanitarian situation, i would hope that it might be possible to get very wide international support for a purely exclusively humanitarian effort to get out of afghanistan people who fear for their lives and who probably fear for them with good reason. i think if it's done in that way, iwould be hopeful, especially if the un security council could take the lead in trying to sponsor such a purely exclusively humanitarian operation, then that could be achieved,
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but it is not a sure thing. there is of course the urgent humanitarian side but there is of course the political side as well as the new taliban leaders set about re—establishing their emirate. there is a sense that it's the neighbours and the near neighbours who are going to have a much more decisive role in afghanistan's future and they don't all agree on the way forward. how do you see this playing out in terms of who will be taking the leading role? i do think that you're absolutely right and others are right to put an emphasis on the regional dimension. afghanistan's neighbours have, in the past 200 years, done untold harm to that country by meddling in its affairs. we were one of them when we ruled india. the russians when they
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were the soviet union, and then the more recent events. but i do think that those neighbours now, however pleased they must be to see the us and nato getting a bloody nose, they must realise that they are at risk as much as anyone, perhaps more. i would hope that it would be possible to talk to iran and pakistan, to talk to uzbekistan and others, and to the russian federation, and china, and to see whether in some sort of way the major humanitarian rescue operation could be carried out. and also, the future of afghanistan could cease to be a plaything for its neighbours. lord hannay, thanks forjoining us.
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there has been decades of involvement in this region, including afghanistan itself, and the future of afghanistan, that is very much on afghan minds at the moment and all of the neighbours. individual afghans are thinking about their own futures as they leave in their thousands amid such great uncertainty if not fear. we are going to continue with our coverage but for now, that is it for now. we have some news coming out of paris. the foreign minister in france has said that more time is needed to complete those evacuations from afghanistan. the french foreign minister saying that time is needed beyond the date of the 31st of august, to get everybody out. that
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just emerging in the last few moments and that will play into the g7 virtual meeting tomorrow. pressure growing on the us delay that final withdrawal. earlier, however, the taliban warned they wouldn't agree to move the deadline from august 31. speaking to bbc world's yalda hakim — an official spokesman for the taliban, suhail shaheen, reiterated that foreign forces should leave the country by that date. the foreign military withdrawal should be complete until the 31st of august. this is their commitment which they had announced. they had already announced. if they do not abide
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by their commitment we are awaiting the decision of our leadership. we have a new phase of reconstruction. i think all afghans should come together to build our country in a peaceful way. but still, it is not something to compel the afghans, but only our advice to them that it is better for them to stay here. they can lead a normal life in their country rather than going to other countries. that was the taliban speaking on bbc world news. earlier, i spoke to our political correspondent nick eardley, who described the uk's evacuation plan set out by the defence secretary ben wallace. "hours not weeks" was the phrase he used in an interview this morning.
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that is in part realism. they know that the air bridge at the airport is not going to last forever and it is also about politics because the uk is going to try and put pressure on the united states tomorrow to extend its own deadline over how long it's prepared to keep troops at the airport in kabul. so, we know president biden has said he wants the us operation to be completely over by the end of the month. the uk wants that to last a bit longer, to allow more people to get on flights out of afghanistan if they so wish. the view in london is that the biden administration is prepared to listen to those requests. when the president spoke last night he did not completely rule out the prospect of staying a few days into september but the context for this is that the uk has got about 6,600 people out over the last
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ten days and we think there are still at least 4,000 left who are eligible to come to the uk and potentially now thousands more because of the changing criteria which uk ministers announced last week. the truth is, there isn't much that uk ministers think they can do without the backing of the us. we know the us has several thousand troops on the ground at the airport and we know they are largely responsible for the infrastructure at kabul airport so the view of the government in london is that without those boots on the ground from the us and without that infrastructure that the americans have put in place, then the uk cannot stay, so time really is running out to get those final people on airlift out of afghanistan in the coming days. the g7 conversations tomorrow, they will also then turn to how do
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we house everyone and where do these people go? these people who are desperate to get out, they need to live somewhere, and what we do about that internationally? yes, that is bound to dominate the discussion tomorrow and although the immediate evacuation will be on everyone's mind, a lot of the agenda is due to be about the medium term future for afghanistan, so there has been a lot of talk about the humanitarian crisis which could develop over the weeks and months. there will be conversations about where refugees should be housed and how they can get to respective countries because once the air bridge ends there is a question over where people who want to flee the taliban, especially people who are not in kabul at the moment, where do they go? the uk has talked about this idea of setting up hubs in the wider regions, not in afghanistan, but in the wider region around afghanistan.
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i have got to say, there is very little detail coming from the uk government about what that actually would entail. there are difficult questions to answer about where those hubs would be based, given the fractious nature of the uk's relationship with some of those countries around the area. one other thing to bear in mind regarding the g7 discussions tomorrow — borisjohnson has talked about waiting to recognise any new government in afghanistan. there seems to be an acceptance amongst world leaders that the taliban will have a considerable amount of power and will probably form the new government with some others but borisjohnson has been urging world leaders in a series of calls he has made, not to recognise that government until there has been a big discussion about what that would entail.
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frankly, he wants conditions to be attached, conditions about human rights, in particular about rights for women, and trying to tie the taliban to some of the promises that have been made and the talks in qatar over the last few months, but a complex few days ahead in the airport in kabul and a complex few weeks and months ahead when it comes to the immediate future of afghanistan. we will talk more about afghanistan throughout the afternoon. a teenager who worked as a steward at wembley has been given a suspended sentence after stealing high vis jackets and official lanyards for the euro 2020 final. our correspondent charlotte gallagher is at willesden magistrates court. explain what has happened. yusuf amin explain what has happened. yusuf ami . , explain what has happened. yusuf ami ., , ., ,, explain what has happened. yusuf ami ., ,, .,, ., .,
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amin was working as a steward at the final at wembley _ amin was working as a steward at the final at wembley and _ amin was working as a steward at the final at wembley and he _ amin was working as a steward at the final at wembley and he stole - amin was working as a steward at the final at wembley and he stole the - final at wembley and he stole the high viz jackets final at wembley and he stole the high vizjackets and put them on sale on facebook for £4500. woman saw this and they told the police and they set up a meeting where she met yusuf amin but he was arrested by police and he pleaded guilty and today was the sentencing here. six months in a young offenders institute, suspended for 12 months and £85 costs. the magistrate heard he was incredibly remorseful for what he had done and he had never beenin what he had done and he had never been in trouble before and he had actually stolen the items in order to pay off his mother's rent arrears it was a victim of domestic violence and the magistrate felt there was a real opportunity of rehabilitation for yusuf amin. the magistrate said he was incredibly concerned by wembley stadium and the training and the vetting for such young people doing importantjobs like stewarding during these massive tournaments, and of course we know this wasn't
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the only security incident during this tournament. we had fans without tickets breaking into the stadium and there was violence and chaotic scenes and the fa is doing an investigation into what exactly went wrong during the tournament, because there are concerns the scenes were broadcast around the world and that could put in danger any chance britain could have of holding a major tournament in the future. charlotte, thanks forjoining us. dozens of companies that sell covid pcr travel tests are to be removed from the government's list of approved providers. the firms either no longer exist or don't provide all the tests required by holidaymakers. our transport correspondent caroline davies can explain more. these are the tests you have when you come back from a foreign country to the uk. you need to have either one or two tests. depending on which country you are travelling from and whether you are vaccinated or not.
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the government lists these providers on their website with the cheapest at the top down to the most expensive. it has come under criticism for not keeping a close enough eye as to what is going on. some say a particular price on the website, when you go to them they are more expensive or not available at all. some people have said they have paid for tests and not received results or have received them very late. even some test providers have complained there are cowboys operating in this market. the government has said now that 82 providers will be given what they call a two strike warning. that is for misleading prices, so their prices will have to be updated, and they could be removed from the list entirely if they are found to be doing this again. 57 companies have been removed because they no longer exist or because they don't provide these tests. the government says it will also conduct regular spot checks. this has been generally welcomed, but there has been criticism it has taken so long, particularly by the consumer group, which?
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they also point out the fact that so many of these companies being given these warnings or removed suggests it has been difficult for travellers over the summer to find realiable testing sites. she mentioned which magazine and i will be talking to them after 330 about those pcr travel tests. an nhs video featuring younger people who suffer the debilitating effects of covid has been released as part of a drive to encourage young adults to get a vaccine. the government says it has met its target of offering a jab to all 16 and 17—year—olds in england by today. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. as an a&e doctor, i've seen a lot during this pandemic but nothing has shocked me more than seeing younger people being admitted to our hospitals with covid—19. and as well as their age, many of them had one other thing in common, they were unvaccinated. the video's message is simple. covid vaccines protect against not just the virus but the debilitating
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effects of long covid, too. my lungs, out of nowhere, just kind of stopped. i struggled to breathe, sitting, lying down, obviously, sitting upright — i couldn't breathe. my energy levels dropped so walking of any kind of distance i would get automatically tired. this is part of a new push on vaccinations aimed particularly at younger people. one of those who took part is 25—year—old megan higgins. she initially fell ill injanuary and then struggled for months. i used to be a horse rider, i used to run, i used to walk the dog a lot, and it got to the point where sort of working in a school as well, i couldn't even do head, shoulders, knees and toes, or the hokey cokey with the kids, i was so tired just doing anything physical. the video comes as the government announced all 16 and 17—year—olds in england have now been offered a vaccine. in the three weeks since they became eligible, around a million letters and texts have been sent inviting teenagers to get a jab.
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so far, more than 360,000 to 16 and 17—year—olds have had theirfirst dose. all 12 to 15—year—olds in england thought to be at risk have also been invited to get a vaccine. infection rates are currently highest among younger adults but so, too, is vaccine hesitancy. i would urge people to get a vaccine. adults might be unable to work but children may be prevented from learning and i think it's such an important time in your life, you don't want months in bed, you don't want months when you are unable to do your sport or go out dancing or do anything you want. you want to be in the prime of your life. meanwhile, the government has announced a contract for 35 million more doses of the pfizer vaccine, the one being offered to younger people, to be delivered from the second half of next year. today's message is that being young, fit and otherwise healthy is not enough to protect you from the virus or long covid, but being vaccinated can make a big difference. dominic hughes, bbc news.
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the uk has agreed a contract for 35 million more doses of the pfizer/biontech vaccine, to be delivered from the second half of next year. the order is part of the government preparations for booster shots and any new variants that could emerge. the health secretary sajid javid said the order would "future—proof" the uk's vaccine programme. 87.7% of over 16s in the uk have already had at least one dose of a covid vaccine. more than 20 people have been killed by flash floods in the us state of tennessee — with dozens still missing. record rainfall of more than 15 inches in some areas sparked widespread flooding over the weekend. roads and bridges were washed away and power cuts have affected thousands of people. daniela relph reports. those living here described a wall of water coming in hard and fast. flash floods overwhelming parts of tennessee. the rain and wind tore through communities with a ferocity few had predicted.
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it was a terrifying experience as residents tried to save their homes and theirfamilies. i'm trying to get them out of the door but the water is so high and it's pushing against the door that i'm having a hard time pushing to open the door to get them out, i'm holding two babies. the aftermath is a landscape strewn with floodwaters, wrecked vehicles and severely damaged homes. in many counties, there is bewilderment at how quickly the storm took hold and this remains both a recovery and a search and rescue operation with many still missing, including children. tremendous loss of life, a number of missing people on the ground, homes washed off their foundations, cars strewn around the community, it is a devastating picture of loss and heartache. the worst hit area was
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humphreys county, west of nashville. here, the floodwaters rose so quickly many people just couldn't escape their homes. the plight of those living here recognised in last night's presidential address. i want to begin by expressing my deepest condolences for the sudden and tragic loss of life due to this flash flood. i know we have reached out to the community, we stand ready to offer them support. i asked the administrator to speak to governor lee of tennessee right away and we will offer any assistance they need for this terrible moment. tens of thousands of people are still without power. roads and bridges remain impassible in some places, hampering rescue efforts. there were hurricane warnings in the north—east of the united states over the weekend but it was here, further south in tennessee, where the extreme weather really hit and took lives. daniela relph, bbc news.
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world trade centre one has been hit by lightning — as tropical storm henri battered new york. a bolt can be seen striking the top of the building in lower manhattan, connecting with the spire, 550 metres above ground level. more than 120,000 homes in rhode island were left without power because of the storm. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. it will be fairly quiet on the weather front this week — high pressure in charge of the weather and is here to stay for the foreseeable future. and the weather will be generally dry, lots of cloud at times, you can see on the satellite picture, the recent one, a fair bit of cloud in the centre of that high, but it's not a uniform layer. we have seen hazy sunshine breaking through, and through this afternoon and into this evening some places
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will have blue skies in some spots. through tonight, not a lot changes, a bit like last night, quiet, light winds, a bit of mist and fog forming early in the morning and tuesday starts off pretty bright across most of the uk, some areas a little on the cloudy side. the best of the weather is in the centre of the high pressure so central parts of scotland, for example, in glasgow temperatures could get up to 25 degrees.
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hello, this is bbc news with jane hill. the latest headlines: the race against time to evacuate people from afghanistan — the british government asks president biden to delay the date of the final withdrawal of american troops. but a taliban spokesman tells
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the bbc that foreign troops won't be allowed to stay beyond that deadline. a clamp down on "cowboy" firms offering pcr travel tests — nearly 60 companies are removed from the official list. young people warn of the debilitating effects of long covid, as part of a campaign to encourage teenagers to get vaccinated. flash floods in the american state of tennessee have claimed more than 20 lives, with dozens of people still missing — more than 15 inches of rain has fallen. people are queuing to reach the summit of snowden — walkers are urged to "respect the mountain" as the number of visitors is soaring. sport, and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin ramjaun. good afternoon.
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swimmer ellie simmonds and archerjohn stubbs will be the great britain flag—bearers at the tokyo paralympic opening ceremony, which takes place tomorrow. both athletes are competing in their fourth games injapan. chef de mission penny briscoe's selections mean simmonds will be the first woman to carry the flag for gb at a summer games since fellow swimmer maggie mceleny 21 years ago. stubbs is the oldest member of the team at 56 years old. there are literally no words to describe it. i mean, this is my fourth paralympics and i've never actually been to an opening ceremony! so to go to an opening ceremony but also have the privilege of carrying the flag withjohn, it's going to be so exciting. when penny said that i was called for a meeting with her, i thought it was a general meeting. when she announced that me and john were both flag—bearers, i think we were both in awe and didn't really know how to respond! a special day for her, no doubt. the england bowler mark wood is out of the third test against india, which begins this week after suffering a shoulder injury. hejarred his right shoulder in the last test at lord's,
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which england lost by 151 runs, having drawn the first match in the series. the third test takes place at headingley, starting on wednesday. with mark, how things turned out there, a bit of a freak injury. i think it is frustrating because he is bowling so well. frustration more for him than anyone else. he is bowling really well, bowling at great pace, and he seems to be managing his body a lot better, and it is not through bowling or anything other than a freak incident that found himself missing this test match. well, england's opponents india are on a roll — though the last three times they've toured england, they've lost comprehensively. despite being ahead in the series, and looking convincing at lord's, they aren't getting too ahead of themselves. what happened in the last game, it was special, but we have moved on, we are _ was special, but we have moved on, we are focusing on this test match. in we are focusing on this test match. in the _ we are focusing on this test match. in the first — we are focusing on this test match. in the first press conference, and we are _ in the first press conference, and we are taking one test match at a time _ we are taking one test match at a time. whether we win or lose it is important — time. whether we win or lose it is important to stay in the present. as
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i important to stay in the present. as i said. _ important to stay in the present. as i said, 2014... well, we are not thinking — i said, 2014... well, we are not thinking about that. we have been playing _ thinking about that. we have been playing some good cricket. so it is all playing some good cricket. so it is at! about _ playing some good cricket. so it is all about staying in the moment and focusing _ all about staying in the moment and focusing on— all about staying in the moment and focusing on dispatch. —— on this match — the team for the solheim cup has been announced and there are three english players selected for europe's defence of the title against the united states next month. georgia hall and charley hull made the team automatically, while mel reid is one of six picks — from captain catriona matthew. georgia hall makes the team after finishing second in the women's open, and will be making her third appearance in the competition. charley hull meanwhile will be playing the event for the fifth time. but it's especially significant for mel reid, who was picked after missing out on the selection in 2019... it was a tough phone call two years ago, to say, you know, she hadn't quite made it and asked her to be vice captain. i think that shows how much she loves it. she didn't think for an instant and said she would do it. it was a much nicer
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phone call this time. i think she will be a great addition. she has the experience and has that passion for the solheim cup and team play. they have been trying for two years to make the team and to finally get that confirmation you are in the team, obviously, the players are very excited, especially the rookies, i think, when you are playing in your first one. but i managed to catch mel, just before she took off in atlanta, and as you can imagine she wasjust delighted. that's all the sport for now. more for you in the next hour or so, jane _ more for you in the next hour or so, jane. thanks — more for you in the next hour or so, jane. thanks very much, gavin. see you later— jane. thanks very much, gavin. see you tater on~ — several thousand afghan interpreters and other staff who worked for british forces are eligible to come to the uk, but many are stuck at kabul airport. a former british army interpreter trapped in kabul has contacted the bbc, with an appeal to the uk government. they spoke to us on condition we would protect their identity. their words are spoken by an actor.
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the situation in kabul is not good. it's in a very critical situation. the taliban are coming into every house, looking for the people who worked for the nato, isaf and british forces. there are more than 50 interpreters who are eligible for the relocation scheme to the uk that are still left. they didn't get the biometric visas and they are waiting for theirflights. we hope and can request the uk government and mod and local stops team to process the visa and biometric flights of these people as soon as possible, because the taliban are just finding these people who worked for nato and isaf. we are so scared. we are scared that if the process stops or if the british forces just withdraw from afghanistan it'll be really hard for us to leave afghanistan. one interpreter who used to work for the british army. under taliban rule in the 1990s, women were not allowed to work or get an education. the militants say things will be different now, but many are sceptical.
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fawzia koofi is a prominent women's rights campaigner and former mp, who was also part of the government's team negotiating with the taliban. she spoke to our afghanistan correspondent secunder kermani, about her concerns. i am very worried about the future of the country, as a whole. women being part of that. at this stage the situation is very uncertain and very chaotic, there is no government, and given the taliban's history from the past women are the most probably concerned citizens these days. there is uncertainty about what will happen to the country and what will happen to them, whether they will lose theirjobs, whether they will be safe, whether they will be pressed to stay home, whether their husbands will lose jobs, whether there will be another war. a lot of women have actually contacted me, they've come
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to see me or messaged me. they are trying for a way out or looking for something different. not only in terms of security, but in terms of hope — for a better country. they don't have it any more. but in the meantime i think i'm very proud to see them getting ready to resist, getting ready to protest, if the situation gets worse for them. and from what you have seen from the taliban so far, does it give you heart that perhaps they will respect women's rights, or do you think that we are going to see a return to what we saw in the 1990s? at this stage, i think they are trying to pretend that it will be ok. but whether that is something that will be expected across afghanistan by all their foot soldiers, because in the meantime we have
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received reports of still house searching and executions, still taking hostages, we still have these reports. in some rural places, we still have reports of very young taliban armed men forcing women to wear a burka, which is not even islamic. so the foot soldiers have different practice. in general, i think we have to really wait on how everything will evolve. we often talk about the fragile gains have been made over the last 20 years in afghanistan. do you see them slipping away, or are you hopeful that they can be retained? well, everything collapsed very rapidly. we all know the institutions we have invested blood and treasure to build them. now, i'm hopeful because i think women today are different than they were 21 years back. i think they know how to inform the world about something that goes wrong to them. they are educated,
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which is the best weapon. there will be resistance — it's not going to be a silent country as it was in 1996. fawzia koofi talking there to our afghanistan correspondent, secunder kermani. more on afghanistan at the top of the hour but let's talk now about covid. covid and travelling. dozens of companies that sell covid pcr travel tests are to be removed from the government's list of approved providers. the firms either no longer exist or don't provide all the tests required by holiday—makers. more than 80 providers will be issued two—strike warnings over misleading prices. the health secretary said the move was designed to clamp down on "cowboy behaviour". rory boland is travel editor of the consumer group which? they have been investigating this for some time. hello, they have been investigating this forsome time. hello, rory. good afternoon. firstly, in terms of what
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the government is doing now, is this welcome? it the government is doing now, is this welcome? , ., , welcome? it is of course welcome the government — welcome? it is of course welcome the government is — welcome? it is of course welcome the government is taking _ welcome? it is of course welcome the government is taking action, - welcome? it is of course welcome the government is taking action, taking . government is taking action, taking some responsibility, auditing its list of test providers, but i think when you explain what is going on most people find it extraordinary that many of these companies which didn't even exist were allowed on the government website list in the first place. they will find it even more extraordinary that this has been going on for the best part of half a year. which?, as well as other organisations, have told the government about these problems over several months, so it has taken a long time to act, and we really are talking about the most basic of checks. "does the company exist? " talking about the most basic of checks. "does the company exist? "does the price it says it will sell the test at exist? " and there are lots of other problems behind this, so good news the government is taking action but, my goodness, it has really ta ken taking action but, my goodness, it has really taken a long time. share taking action but, my goodness, it has really taken a long time. are we talkin: has really taken a long time. are we talking about _ has really taken a long time. are we talking about really _ has really taken a long time. are we
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talking about really basic— has really taken a long time. are we talking about really basic things - talking about really basic things like someone thinking, i have found this company, they say they can do a test for £25, or £30, then they actually follow the link through to that company and find the price is way higher than that? that that company and find the price is way higher than that?— that company and find the price is way higher than that? that is it, no more complex _ way higher than that? that is it, no more complex than _ way higher than that? that is it, no more complex than that. _ way higher than that? that is it, no more complex than that. that - way higher than that? that is it, no more complex than that. that was | more complex than that. that was which? �*s first investigation and is what the government several months later is proposing to do today. i checked the government website this morning and clicked on some of the cheapest links, the first one said £20, and the price was £60. no smoke and mirrors, they werejust advertising a misleading price. the second one, the more typical one, i found the £20 price when i went through, but i would have had to drive to stockport and there was only availability for six days over a three—month period. well, that is not practical for a three—month period. well, that is not practicalfor 99.9% a three—month period. well, that is not practical for 99.9% of the population. that is what you will find when you use the government lists. that will hopefully be sorted out in quick order. it is hard to understand why we need to strike system or simply why it would need
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to take any longer period than a couple of days —— two strike system. hopefully those providers will be gone by the end of this week. your assessment _ gone by the end of this week. your assessment of _ gone by the end of this week. your assessment of the _ gone by the end of this week. your assessment of the overall situation, because we know certain tests are important, you have to have them depending on which country you are going to come all the rules we know about, which are extreme the complicated at the best of times. could there have been from the outset, from your investigations, a simpler system devised or a more transparent system? because clearly it was obvious from the beginning that people were going to have to get these tests. i've never been quite sure why the system has been quite sure why the system has been quite so byzantine. lats quite sure why the system has been quite so byzantine.— quite so byzantine. lots of these roblems quite so byzantine. lots of these problems were — quite so byzantine. lots of these problems were obvious - quite so byzantine. lots of these problems were obvious from - quite so byzantine. lots of these problems were obvious from the | problems were obvious from the start. the lack of government oversight was going to lead to some of these problems. of course you should not be listing on the government website companies that don't exist. that is also very simple check to carry out. which? has done it several times. there is also a problem about pricing, on—time delivery, and those were flagged to the government at the start as well. on pricing there are
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solutions available. there are solutions available. there are solutions that have been pursued in other countries, such as capping the price of tests. i think the greatest problem we are now seeing and the government is not proposing any solutions to that in this current announcement is what about tests coming back on time? if they don't, the consequences of that can be very serious. if you are flying out of the country and you require a pcr test and you don't get that back on time, you can't get on your flight, you can't take your holiday, well, that could lead to you that might lead to you losing thousands of pounds if your family are set to going abroad and your travel insurance won't help. the government needs to make sure the providers on its list, its website, for the government mandated tests, that they are not providing the price they say they will but they are getting that test back on time as well. i hope the next step for the government will be to look at that and i hope it will take place quite quickly because what i know from talking to travellers at the moment, this is putting them off. nearly everybody
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now knows somebody who has tried to go abroad or has gone abroad and had a bad explains with a test provider. they hear the stories and think, well, i'm not putting myself through that stress or the potential financial loss involved, so we do need to see solutions and they do need to see solutions and they do need to see solutions and they do need to come from government. right. need to come from government. right, that is interesting. _ need to come from government. right, that is interesting. a _ need to come from government. right, that is interesting. a quick _ need to come from government. right, that is interesting. a quick closing thought. if someone is looking at travel websites today and thinking about trying to get away the restrictions we know are there, do you feel they would be able to find out more quickly than before and more accurately than before how they go about getting the test and what the true cost of it will be? it is the true cost of it will be? it is marginally _ the true cost of it will be? it is marginally better _ the true cost of it will be? it 3 marginally better today than it was yesterday. hopefully it will continue to improve through the week. if you are looking for a test provider, look at two things. will the test provider give you a refund if there is a problem with the test? that is a good indication they will try to provide it on time. look for test providers that limit the number of tests as well. lots of the problems we are seeing at the moment
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is larger test providers for the most part overextending themselves, selling lots of tests. they don't have the lab capacity to process them, people don't get them back on time. well then i look for those, those couple of providers who say they will limit the number of tests they will limit the number of tests they sell. that is an indication you will get a good service as well. tram will get a good service as well. two really useful— will get a good service as well. two really useful pieces of advice. thank you, rory boland, the travel editor at the consumer group, which?. let's give you a reminder this afternoon of the latest headlines... the race against time to evacuate people from afghanistan — the british government asks president biden to delay the date of the final withdrawal of american troops. as we've just been discussing, there's to be a clampdown on "cowboy" firms offering pcr travel tests — nearly 60 companies are removed from the official list. and young people warn
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of the debilitating effects of long covid, as part of a campaign to encourage teenagers to get vaccinated. two former members of the sex pistols have won a high court battle with former frontmanjohnny rotten over the use of the punk band's songs in a new tv series directed by danny boyle. the drummer paul cook and the guitarist stevejones argued that the group had an agreement that decisions would be made on a "majority rule basis", butjohn lydon rejected the deal, likening it to "slave labour". earlier i spoke to our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba, for the latest on the story. the impact of punk, being directed of course by danny boyle, famous for so many films from slum dog millionaire to directing and producing the olympics 2012 opening ceremony in london. they wanted to use music of course by the sex pistols —
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it was about the sex pistols and about the rise and impact of punk — and then there was a disagreement. as thejudge pointed out in thejudgment, not an unusual thing between the members of the sex pistols. he observed they have been disagreeing about lots of things going back to the 1970s. in this case, john lydon, of course better known to many asjohnny rotten, said he didn't want the sex pistols' music used in this new series. in retaliation, the former drummer and guitarist, paul cook and steve jones, they said they had a band member agreement, and as part of this the majority view on anything — their music's use, merchandise, whatever — that would hold, and one member couldn't go against the wishes of all the others. john lydon said he didn't really recognise this should have effect in this case, so of course it all went to court, and of course there we saw paul cook and stevejones bringing this action againstjohn lydon. also supporting them
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in their action was another original member of the sex pistols, glen matlock, and the estate of sid vicious, and after many days of a mini—trial, this judgment has emerged and the judge has agreed with paul cook and steve jones that this was a legally binding agreement and their majority should win out even thouthohn lydon didn't want the music to be used. i'm so sorry — so it gets all the way to court, this is how it has gone in court, so in terms of danny boyle and what he is trying to do here, have we heard from him? what do we know about the final product? no, we have heard from paul cook and stevejones, not danny boyle. they said they welcome the court's ruling, say it brings clarity to the decision—making and upholds the band's agreement on collective decision—making. they said it wasn't a pleasant
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expense but allows them to move forward and hopefully work together in the future with better relations. we have not heard anything from johnny rotten, john lydon, at this stage, but this court case has now concluded and the judge has given hisjudgment, and it looks like a green light for the tv series and the majority viewpoint has won out, despite what the feelings ofjohn lydon might be. it must be said, you know, we don't quite know what his motivations were for not wanting this to go ahead, but nobody doubts he is a fierce guardian of the sex pistols' impact and legacy and feels it should be used carefully, so many believe that is undoubtedly a part of it, but in a purely legal sense thejudge pointed out when he signed this agreement he had a british lawyer, a us attorney and a manager who all would have explained the impact of this agreement and what it might mean in the future, that, you know, it was in the terms of the judgment the majority of you winning out. so sex pistols fans can almost certainly look forward to seeing this new series directed by danny boyle and, crucially, featuring
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the music of the sex pistols. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba. please don't treat me. i know i said it wrong. lydon, not segment. then lizo managed to mention his name about 27 times to make me feel worse. nothing against him. we might talk more about that in the next hour if we can possibly bear it. ok, let's talk more about snowden in north wales. that has long been a magnet for hikers wanting to reach its summit — the highest point in england and wales. around 700—thousand people now visit the mountain annually — —— around 700,000 people now visit the mountain annually — up from 500,000 in 2018. but the impact of so many visitors takes its toll, and this summer has seen 45—minute
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queues to reach the top — as chris dearden reports. hundreds of people queueing in the mist for 45 minutes. not a shopping centre, a football match or a big gig, but the highest mountain in wales. snowden has always been a busy place in august, but locals say this year it has been busier than ever, and not everyone is dressed or prepared for weather conditions like these at the top. you can't stop anybody, but you can see they are not used walking the mountain with the clothing they've got on and things, you know. sometimes i've seen a few, you won't believe this, in flip—flops and things, you know. and you give them advice and they don't want to know either. we can't say anything any more, there's no point, you know? flip—flops or walking boots, the authorities estimate that around 700,000 pairs of feet will have gone up snowdon by the end of this year. they say the increase is because more british people are taking their holidays in the uk at the moment. but it's putting strain on mountain rescue volunteers who were called to three casualties in three hours last saturday lunchtime, and campaigners say it is putting
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strain on the mountain itself. litter, footpath erosion, wild camping, traffic, parking. these are all... in a sense, none of these are new but they have all acquired a really sharp edge in the last 18 months. that is definitely thunder. and the authorities have been trying to spread the message with videos like this on social media, to remind people to be prepared before they head to the top. no flip—flops, no trainers, nothing stupid like that. they say this summer was always likely to be busy and lots of plans are in place to manage the traffic lower down and the footfall higher up. he speaks welsh chris dearden, bbc news. the changing of the guard has returned to buckingham palace. it's the first time
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since the pandemic began that the ceremony has taken place at the palace. it usually happens at three different locations in london — buckingham palace, stjames's palace and wellington barracks. that takes us a —— into a look at the weather prospects with tomasz schafernaker. well, the week ahead is looking quiet on the weather front. nothing dramatic happening over the next few days. there will be some sunshine around, but also, at times, it is going to be fairly cloudy and the reason for it is a big area of high pressure has decided to park itself over us and it is not going to budge. so it is here today, it will be here through tuesday, wednesday, thursday, friday and probably through the weekend and into next week. so all we are going to be doing is forecasting areas of cloud across the country, and which areas will be sunny and which areas will be overcast. so this is what it looks like through this evening. just the chance of a couple of spots of rain where the clouds gather and clump, but on the whole, it is actually a mostly bright if not sunny afternoon for many central and eastern areas of the uk.
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temperatures early evening will be around the high teens, maybe up to 22 in glasgow. i think a little bit fresher on the north sea coast because there is more of a breeze coming off the north sea. so tonight, a bit like last night, it is steady as she goes on the weather front, clear skies across more western areas whereas central and eastern parts of the country are probably turning overcast by early morning as the north sea wind drags in the cloud. now, what weather you will get on tuesday or the subtleties on the weather will depend on where you are within this area of high pressure. so the thinking is in the centre of the high pressure, so across scotland, i think that is where the best of the sunshine is going to be, and here temperatures could actually hit the mid 20s, whereas around the high, with the breeze blowing around it, there will be, at times, more cloud. but then again, you get to the south coast and then there is more sunshine again. so the distribution of cloud within this high pressure will be variable. here is a look at the weather map for wednesday, and notice there is a very weak cool front moving across the north sea,
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it is just going to graze eastern parts of the uk later on wednesday and into thursday, so that does mean slightly fresher conditions along these north sea coasts. but further towards the west, the weather is going to be fine, i think the best of the sunshine again in the north—western portion of the british isles, for example glasgow up to around 24 degrees. so here's the summary for the week ahead — you can see by the weather symbols and the temperatures it is pretty much settled across most of the uk and actually not feeling too bad at all.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the race against time to evacuate people from afghanistan — the british government asks president biden to delay the date of the final withdrawal of american troops. we are really down to hours now, not weeks, and we have to make sure we exploit every minute to get people out. but a taliban spokesman tells the bbc that foreign troops will not be permitted to stay beyond the deadline. a clamp down on cowboy firms offering pcr travel tests — nearly 60 companies are removed from the official list. flash floods in the american state of tennessee have claimed more than 20 lives with dozens of people still missing — more than 15 inches of rain has fallen.
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queuing to reach snowdon's summit — walkers are urged to "respect the mountain" as the number of visitors soars. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. britain and america have "hours, not weeks" to evacuate people from afghanistan, according to the defence secretary. pressure's growing on us presidentjoe biden to delay the withdrawal of american troops beyond his august 31 deadline. he'll have talks with the leaders of the g7 group of nations tomorrow. a spokesman for the taliban said they wouldn't allow any more time for the evacuation mission. in kabul, there's been a gun battle at the airport and a member
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of the afghan security forces has been killed. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in kabul. welcome to our special coverage of the crisis in afghanistan. just over a week since base fell to the taliban. the taliban are now in control of much of afghanistan, apart from a small last place of resistance where some commanders are still vowing to resist taliban rule but in kabul the taliban staged another of their press conferences, saying they are now formulating new rules and regulations including how the schools and universities and the islamic institutions of afghanistan would now be organised. at the international airport in kabul and urgent evacuation still continues with thousands of afghans desperate to leave however they can, as the us
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deadline for the end of their us military mission draws a clear. —— draws near. president biden said it would be the 31st of august but there have been calls including from there have been calls including from the uk to extend the deadline, a move the taliban have said would have consequences. we will speak to the pakistan minister of information or reaction to these events but now we can have a look at the latest developments today with this report from our diplomatic correspondent paul adams. this is a vast, multinational operation. kabul airport full of military planes ferrying foreigners and afghans to safety all around the clock. but for how long? the taliban have said, again, that western troops must be out of the country by the end
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of the month. that is a clear violation, one thing, but also, if this happens, it is up to our leadership how to proceed and what decision they take. then that decision will be implemented. without the taliban's cooperation and america's huge presence, none of this can continue. but international pressure to keep it going is mounting. the prime minister is at g7 and is going to raise the prospect if the united states will extend. there is no likelihood of staying on after the united states. if their timetable extends by a day or two that will give us more time to evacuate people because we are down two hours now and not weeks and we have to make sure we exploit every minute to get people out. with vast crowds still descending on the airport every day, america is trying to control expectations.
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the atmosphere remains volatile. one afghan was killed early this morning in a gun battle involving american and german troops. at another entrance, one former interpreter, who we are not naming to protect his security, said he, his wife and young daughter were stuck. in kabul, signs of normal life, but this is still a city on edge. ministries are not yet functioning, uncertainty about the next government. but amid the fear, some of those who have the most to lose are, for now, determined to stay. if all of us leave with our bags, who is going to give people the hope that we will be with you? that we are going to go through the same situation, the same circumstances that you are going through? all the afghans are not the 20,000
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people you see at the airport. in this valley, north of kabul, signs of resistance. the taliban have never really conquered this place. leaders here say they want peace, but are prepared to fight for a different kind of afghanistan. what we are standing for right now is for the whole country, for sovereignty, for peace, for people, for inclusivity, tolerance and moderation. the taliban also speak of a negotiated solution, but say they have the valley surrounded. paul adams, bbc news. there are millions of people who are staying in afghanistan, of course,
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who have no choice but to stay. we can now listen to a press conference at the pentagon. this is major taylor. abs. at the pentagon. this is ma'or ta lor. �* , ., ., at the pentagon. this is ma'or ta lor. . , ., ., taylor. a question on the vaccine, pfizer, that _ taylor. a question on the vaccine, pfizer, that will _ taylor. a question on the vaccine, pfizer, that will be _ taylor. a question on the vaccine, pfizer, that will be mandatory? i taylor. a question on the vaccine, | pfizer, that will be mandatory? we are pfizer, that will be mandatory? are focused on that vaccine pfizer, that will be mandatory?“ are focused on that vaccine because of the approval that came in this morning. of the approval that came in this morninu. ., ., , ~ ., , morning. how many afghan soldiers who remain — morning. how many afghan soldiers who remain in _ morning. how many afghan soldiers who remain in the _ morning. how many afghan soldiers who remain in the perimeter, - morning. how many afghan soldiers who remain in the perimeter, 500, | who remain in the perimeter, 500, 600? _ who remain in the perimeter, 500, 600? l— who remain in the perimeter, 500, 600? , ., , , 600? i believe that is the number. how many americans _ 600? i believe that is the number. how many americans have - 600? i believe that is the number. how many americans have been i how many americans have been evacuated? _ how many americans have been evacuated? 2500? _ how many americans have been evacuated? 2500? we - how many americans have been evacuated? 2500?— how many americans have been evacuated? 2500? we think that overall, evacuated? 2500? we think that overall. we _ evacuated? 2500? we think that overall, we have _ evacuated? 2500? we think that overall, we have been _ evacuated? 2500? we think that overall, we have been able - evacuated? 2500? we think that overall, we have been able to i overall, we have been able to evacuate several thousand americans. i would be reticent to get more
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specific but since the 14th we believe we have been able to evacuate several thousand americans. the last exercise for a new operation _ the last exercise for a new operation was _ the last exercise for a new operation was about - the last exercise for a new operation was about three | the last exercise for a new- operation was about three weeks the last exercise for a new— operation was about three weeks ago. it operation was about three weeks ago. it was _ operation was about three weeks ago. it was three _ operation was about three weeks ago. it was three weeks _ operation was about three weeks ago. it was three weeks ago, _ operation was about three weeks ago. it was three weeks ago, certainly- it was three weeks ago, certainly before kabul fell, it was three weeks ago, certainly before kabulfell, and i have talked about this before, this was something that the pentagon had been thinking about for a long time, as far back as late april, when we held a concept exercise at the pentagon looking at the retrograde and how that was going to pass out and through the summer. part of the conversation was the potential for a evacuation of operations and what that would look like. nancy. thank ou. that would look like. nancy. thank you- studio: _ that would look like. nancy. thank you. studio: that— that would look like. nancy. thank you. studio: that is _ that would look like. nancy. thank you. studio: that is the _ that would look like. nancy. thank you. studio: that is the pentagon ress you. studio: that is the pentagon press conference _ you. studio: that is the pentagon press conference taking _ you. studio: that is the pentagon press conference taking place, - you. studio: that is the pentagon | press conference taking place, such great interest in the media all over the world. some think major taylor
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said about the evacuation now under way at the international airport at kabul. ~ ., , ., , kabul. within the last 24 hours 25 us military _ kabul. within the last 24 hours 25 us military c _ kabul. within the last 24 hours 25 us military c 17s, _ kabul. within the last 24 hours 25 us military c 17s, three _ kabul. within the last 24 hours 25 us military c 17s, three us - kabul. within the last 24 hours 25| us military c 17s, three us military c 1305 us military c 17s, three us military c 130s and a combination of 61 charter commercial and military flights departed kabul. the total passenger count for those flights was approximately 16,000. of that number, the us military transported just under 11,000 personnel. our mission remains focused on making sure a steady flow of evacuees out of kabul to the intermediate stage in basis and safe havens at our installations, continue to rapidly build out capacity as needed to make sure reception and providing humanitarian assistance. the use of temporary safe haven locations across europe and the middle east in
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areas that include us installations in qatar, uae, kuwait, bahrain, italy, spain, and germany. we deeply appreciate the support from these countries. this is truly a testament to the importance of our alliances and our partnerships.— to the importance of our alliances and our partnerships. ma'or taylor outlinin: and our partnerships. ma'or taylor outlining the h and our partnerships. major taylor outlining the arrangements - and our partnerships. major taylor outlining the arrangements under| and our partnerships. major taylor i outlining the arrangements under way to give refuge to thousands of afghans who are now arriving in cities around the world, waiting to be processed for possible new life in another country including the united states. but millions of afghans of course will remain in afghanistan and their future is very much here. the future of afghanistan will have a huge impact on all of its neighbours and most of all pakistan. i'm joined now by chaudhary fawad hussain, pakistan's minister of information and broadcasting in islamabad. thank you very much forjoining us
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on the bbc. thank you very much for “oining us on the sac.— thank you very much for “oining us on the sec.— thank you very much for “oining us on the bbc. ., ,, i. , . ., on the bbc. thank you very much for havint on the bbc. thank you very much for having me- — on the bbc. thank you very much for having me. pakistan _ on the bbc. thank you very much for having me. pakistan like _ on the bbc. thank you very much for having me. pakistan like all- on the bbc. thank you very much for having me. pakistan like all of - on the bbc. thank you very much for having me. pakistan like all of the i having me. pakistan like all of the neighbours _ having me. pakistan like all of the neighbours of— having me. pakistan like all of the neighbours of afghanistan, - having me. pakistan like all of the neighbours of afghanistan, they i having me. pakistan like all of the i neighbours of afghanistan, they have emphasised in the last crucial weeks to the taliban that there should be no military solution and that they should be an inclusive government and a negotiated solution. it was a military solution which prevailed. what is pakistan's main concern about this moment in afghanistan now? ., ~ , , , about this moment in afghanistan now? ., , , ., ., now? frankly, this is not a new position- _ now? frankly, this is not a new position. ashraf _ now? frankly, this is not a new position. ashraf ghani - now? frankly, this is not a new position. ashraf ghani and - now? frankly, this is not a new position. ashraf ghani and the | now? frankly, this is not a new- position. ashraf ghani and the prime minister imran khan have spoken about an inclusive government and even before this event in kabul we were emphasising on an inclusive government but unfortunately everyone knew we were heading towards a military solution, except president ashraf ghani who was in
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some kind of euphoria, i don't know what he was thinking, what was the thought process in his mind. if elections had been played as prime minister imran khan had suggested earlier and we had worked on an inclusive government before these elections, things might have been different today, but unfortunately the former president did not heed pakistan's advice and now here we are, but even now, we firmly believe that the stability can only come in afghanistan by including everyone, because you know better than anybody else that afghanistan is a hugely divided in terms of ethnicity, and we have got to have the ethnicity is represented in the government. again, ourfilm is not —— theme is
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not different, we are in touch with the usa and uk and with the powers in afghanistan and we will do everything we can for an inclusive government. tats everything we can for an inclusive government-— government. as you know, the s . otli . ht government. as you know, the spotlight has — government. as you know, the spotlight has been _ government. as you know, the spotlight has been on - government. as you know, the| spotlight has been on pakistan. government. as you know, the - spotlight has been on pakistan. with many believing that you are not only trying to find a diplomatic political solution but you have also been for many years providing military support to the taliban with whom you are believed to have very strong relationships and can exercise a lot of influence. what specifically are you trying to do now to prevent any spiral into further chaos?— now to prevent any spiral into further chaos? ., ., , , . ., further chaos? you will appreciate, over the years _ further chaos? you will appreciate, over the years we _ further chaos? you will appreciate, over the years we have _ further chaos? you will appreciate, over the years we have been - further chaos? you will appreciate, over the years we have been a - further chaos? you will appreciate, i over the years we have been a victim of this whole story of afghanistan, we have lost 80,000 people and billions of dollars in economy because of the conflict in
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afghanistan and the reason that pakistan is conveniently blamed by the others is that frankly, they should have heeded pakistan's advise earlier but they have not done that and unfortunately we are the ones who bear the heaviest price for this conflict. as for the future of afghanistan, as i said earlier, we believe that we have to work with the regional powers and international players for an inclusive government. our influence, it's not the control we exercise on the taliban, but we have a certain degree of influence, and in the past we have been able to bring the taliban to the table with the usa and we even tried our best for a
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solution of the taliban government but we don't control them. our advice to them, like the previous government, hold your horses, and have an inclusive government if you want stability and the same thing we are trying to bring with the taliban. ., ., ., , ., are trying to bring with the taliban. ., ., ., i. ., taliban. how worried are you about still-over taliban. how worried are you about spill-over into _ taliban. how worried are you about spill-over into pakistan? _ taliban. how worried are you about spill-over into pakistan? the - spill—over into pakistan? the pakistani taliban have welcomed the taliban rise to power in afghanistan and spoken of their eventual victory, are you worried this will have an impact across the border? latte have an impact across the border? we are have an impact across the border? - are capable of taking on the pakistan taliban, and the primary reason we had a problem with this is because india was using afghanistan soil for funding because india was using afghanistan soilforfunding it, but that because india was using afghanistan soil for funding it, but that will effectively be over and we can deal
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with them, but at the same time we believe that the taliban statement that the land will not be used against any other country is a firm statement. they have assured us and assured the world that they will not help these organisations but the problem right now is that if the stability continues, hundreds and thousands of migrants will come to pakistan, we have a long border with afghanistan and if thousands of people try to come to pakistan, obviously we have a problem, and we are trying our best for the stability of afghanistan and this is one reason why we do not want instability in afghanistan. minister, thanks forjoining us. thank you for your observations and also underlining what happens in
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afghanistan has an impact far beyond its borders. it affects neighbours like pakistan as we just heard of but of course the warning is this could have wide ranging repercussions in countries and capitals far beyond. that is why there's so much focus today on what decisions be taken by the us. will the 31st of august deadline be extended? we can hear a bit more of what has been said in this press conference now taking place at the pentagon. the conference now taking place at the pentaton. , ., .,, ., , pentagon. the goal is to get as many --eole out pentagon. the goal is to get as many people out as — pentagon. the goal is to get as many people out as fast _ pentagon. the goal is to get as many people out as fast as _ pentagon. the goal is to get as many people out as fast as possible - pentagon. the goal is to get as many people out as fast as possible and i people out as fast as possible and while we are glad to see the numbers we got yesterday, we are not going to rest on our laurels. the focus is on trying to do this as best we can by the end of the month. as the secretary said, if we need good if he needs to have additional conversations with the commander—in—chief about that timeline, he will do that, but we are not at that point right now. has the taliban —
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are not at that point right now. has the taliban told you that the 31st of august— the taliban told you that the 31st of august is— the taliban told you that the 31st of august is the _ the taliban told you that the 31st of august is the deadline - the taliban told you that the 31st of august is the deadline and - the taliban told you that the 31st| of august is the deadline and that you must— of august is the deadline and that you must leave _ of august is the deadline and that you must leave then? _ of august is the deadline and that you must leave then? are - of august is the deadline and that you must leave then? are those l you must leave then? are those communications _ you must leave then? are those communications happening? - you must leave then? are those| communications happening? we you must leave then? are those communications happening? we have seen the public _ communications happening? we have seen the public statements _ communications happening? we have seen the public statements from - communications happening? we have seen the public statements from the l seen the public statements from the spokesperson for the taliban and their views on the 31st of august and i think we all understand that view. ., ., , . ., _ and i think we all understand that view. ., ., , i ., ,i view. that was john kirby, the pentagon _ view. that was john kirby, the pentagon spokesperson - view. that was john kirby, the pentagon spokesperson in - view. that was john kirby, the - pentagon spokesperson in washington. we can bring in our correspondence. we can bring in our correspondence. we have seen time and time again, president biden emphasising that he stands by his decision and he stands by his deadlines. could he be persuaded at the 11th hour to extend the 31st of august deadline simply because, well, there are consequences for the evacuation? he: has intimated, he has insisted it should be possible by the end of the month but we have heard from the military that they have left open the space to be able to extend the deadline and the issue is, what kind of leverage does he have when the
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taliban are saying you have got to end things by that point? they don't want be deadline extended. you can issue as many statements as you want about what we tell a man might do but they are in control of everywhere outside that base that america controls —— about what the taliban might do. so the leverage thatjoe biden has is questionable, but you are right to say, he addressed the nation for the third time in a week and he once again stood by the decisions he had made over the withdrawing from afghanistan, saying that in essence, the chaotic heartbreaking scenes you have been witnessing on the ground were unavoidable, but people are saying, why couldn't the evacuations have happened earlier? not only in recent weeks but over months and even years, because there were obstacles to a lot of those people who have worked with the americans in afghanistan coming to the united
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states, for example, even during the trump administration years, so a lot of those criticising the biden administration are saying that a lot of this could have been resolved in months and notjust in the weeks leading up to this point but that isn't the only problem that people have with the biden administration when it comes to the withdrawing from afghanistan. latte when it comes to the withdrawing from afghanistan.— when it comes to the withdrawing from afghanistan. we will be coming back to ou from afghanistan. we will be coming back to you in _ from afghanistan. we will be coming back to you in the _ from afghanistan. we will be coming back to you in the last _ from afghanistan. we will be coming back to you in the last few _ from afghanistan. we will be coming back to you in the last few days - from afghanistan. we will be coming back to you in the last few days of i back to you in the last few days of the us led military mission in afghanistan but we will leave it there for now. it has been a week and a day since the collapse of kabul, an event many expected would happen but nobody expected it would happen but nobody expected it would happen with that speed and with these kind of consequences. we will continue to keep a close eye on developments with our special coverage from afghanistan but for now back to london. here, the defence secretary,
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ben wallace, has said the uk's operation to evacuate people from afghanistan would end when the us withdrew. our political correspondent nick eardley, gave me his view of the government's reasoning. they know that the air bridge at the airport is not going to last forever and it is also about politics because the uk is going to try and put pressure on the united states tomorrow to extend its own deadline over how long it's prepared to keep troops at the airport in kabul. so, we know president biden has said he wants the us operation to be completely over by the end of the month. the uk wants that to last a bit longer, to allow more people to get
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on flights out of afghanistan if they so wish. the view in london is that the biden administration is prepared to listen to those requests. when the president spoke last night he did not completely rule out the prospect of staying a few days into september but the context for this is that the uk has got about 6,600 people out over the last ten days and we think there are still at least 4,000 left who are eligible to come to the uk and potentially now thousands more because of the changing criteria which uk ministers announced last week. the truth is, there isn't much that uk ministers think they can do without the backing of the us. we know the us has several thousand troops on the ground at the airport and we know they are largely responsible for the infrastructure at kabul airport so the view of the government in london is that without those boots on the ground from the us and without that infrastructure that the americans have put in place, then the uk cannot stay,
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so time really is running out to get those final people on airlift out of afghanistan in the coming days. we are keeping a close eye on everything surrounding afghanistan, of course, the attempt to get people out and we will also be building up tomorrow to the g7 virtual meeting that boris johnson tomorrow to the g7 virtual meeting that borisjohnson has convened to discuss this, as well. much more coverage of all of that of course. we are going to look at coronavirus now.
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76.9% of people above the age of 16 have now had two doses of a covid vaccine. we have also been talking today about pcr tests. dozens of companies that sell covid pcr travel tests are to be removed from the government's list of approved providers. the firms either no longer exist or don't provide all the tests required by holidaymakers. joining me now is gemma antrobus, chair of aito specialist travel agents and managing director of haslemere travel in surrey. good afternoon. there is going to be considerable changes to this list, is that welcome?— considerable changes to this list, is that welcome? yes, absolutely. in theory they — is that welcome? yes, absolutely. in theory they should _ is that welcome? yes, absolutely. in theory they should never _ is that welcome? yes, absolutely. in theory they should never have - is that welcome? yes, absolutely. in theory they should never have been l theory they should never have been on there in the first place because
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the list should have been heavier vetted in the first place and we are now learning there are companies on here who did not provide the right tests in the first place and did not even exist at all and the government were very specific with consumers and travellers that when they travelled they must have a test from one of the providers on this list so in theory you would hope they would have done their homework beforehand to make sure that those companies were the right ones for our consumers to be booking with. so many issues and cost is one of them and i spoke to the consumer group which and they have done a lot of work in this area and of course they said there were so many examples of a company advertising a test for what looks like a reasonable sum of money and then the minute the holiday—maker clicks through and goes to the website it transpires that it goes to the website it transpires thatitis goes to the website it transpires that it is way more expensive than that it is way more expensive than that and i'm interested from your perspective, as someone who runs a travel agency, and who talks to holiday—makers, were you on the receiving end of some frustration with all of that?—
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with all of that? absolutely. you are completely _ with all of that? absolutely. you are completely correct, - with all of that? absolutely. you are completely correct, there i with all of that? absolutely. you i are completely correct, there were tests advertised in the £20 region, but if you click so you had to either drive a huge distance for a tiny slot at a very specific day of the week and it obviously wasn't possible, but they were doing it to entice people into get them to book the test. as a business and as a company we make sure we only work with the providers we have vetted ourselves who we have tested, within ourselves who we have tested, within our travel associations who have tested, as well, and we know if we have any issues we can get through to them and ask any questions we may haveit to them and ask any questions we may have it so we make sure we do only provide those recommendations to our clients just to cut down on the necessity of checking and double checking with companies that actually the government did not vet and only 10% are accredited as it is. it's a minefield out there but we have made sure we keep the list as concise as possible and keep on top of it to make sure that the
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standards are being met that we expect they should be. so standards are being met that we expect they should be.— standards are being met that we expect they should be. so you have done our expect they should be. so you have done your own _ expect they should be. so you have done your own vetting _ expect they should be. so you have done your own vetting of— expect they should be. so you have done your own vetting of firms - expect they should be. so you have l done your own vetting of firms which provide tests, and was that for you about a question of giving confidence to people who wanted to book with you? that must be a lot of work for you. it is book with you? that must be a lot of work for yon-— work for you. it is about confidence, _ work for you. it is about confidence, yes, - work for you. it is about | confidence, yes, because work for you. it is about. confidence, yes, because it work for you. it is about - confidence, yes, because it has work for you. it is about _ confidence, yes, because it has been really important that as travel designers we are giving the best advice we can to our clients when it comes to travelling and the entry requirements to countries and the requirements to countries and the requirements to countries and the requirements to come back into the uk so we need to make sure we are making it as straightforward as possible because it is so confusing. if you give a traveller a list of hundreds of suppliers and say, pick your own, you never know what you are getting, so it was really important for us as a small independent travel company to give that kind of service to our clients to order these tests and to see what they looked like to have them and travel them, —— travel with them, and to make sure we could say it, we
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know how to do this, these are the steps you have to take and we have been happy with them and we are confident so far.— been happy with them and we are confident so far. given the changes the government _ confident so far. given the changes the government is _ confident so far. given the changes the government is talking - confident so far. given the changes the government is talking about, i confident so far. given the changes the government is talking about, if| the government is talking about, if someone comes to your firm tomorrow and says, i have heard there are changes, i'm thinking of now trying to get away if i can, do you feel that things are any more straight forward, clear, for the customer than they were? flat forward, clear, for the customer than they were?— forward, clear, for the customer than they were? not really. they are onl takint than they were? not really. they are only taking 57 _ than they were? not really. they are only taking 57 companies _ than they were? not really. they are only taking 57 companies off- than they were? not really. they are only taking 57 companies off and - only taking 57 companies off and these are companies out of hundreds. there was no due diligence done in the first place and these tests were brought in to monitor the variants of concern, that is what we were told, and we have already seen that these tests are not being sequenced in the number they should be so they are not monitoring the variants of concern and only a very small percent are even looking at sequencing so i'm not sure what we
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are using the tests for now but they are using the tests for now but they are too expensive and they have vat added on which they shouldn't, they should be much cheaper in line with our counterparts across europe who are charging may be 20 euros, 15— 20 euros, and is it necessary that we are jumping through the hoops of lateralflow are jumping through the hoops of lateral flow tests and pcr tests when we are not doing anything with the results? what would be better to do and what we believe is an industry is the way forward, is to use the lateral flow system and if a positive result is taken from that, then move forward to the pcr test, in which case obviously you are looking for the variants of concern which the government says what the tests are four in the first place. really interesting to hear from you. that is the managing director of haslemere travel in surrey, torque testing and everything that has to
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be done if you are going to go abroad —— talking about testing. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. it will be fairly quiet on the weather front this week — high pressure in charge of the weather and is here to stay for the foreseeable future. and the weather will be generally dry, lots of cloud at times, you can see on the satellite picture, the recent one, a fair bit of cloud in the centre of that high, but it's not a uniform layer. we have seen hazy sunshine breaking through, and through this afternoon and into this evening some places will have blue skies in some spots. through tonight, not a lot changes, a bit like last night, quiet, light winds, a bit of mist and fog forming early in the morning and tuesday starts off pretty bright across most of the uk, some areas a little on the cloudy side. the best of the weather is in the centre of the high pressure so central parts of scotland, for example, in glasgow temperatures
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could get up to 25 degrees. hello, this is bbc news with jane hill. the headlines: the race against time to evacuate people from afghanistan — the british government asks president biden to delay the date of the final withdrawal of american troops. but a taliban spokesman tells the bbc that foreign troops will not be permitted to stay beyond the deadline. a clampdown on "cowboy" firms offering pcr travel tests — nearly 60 companies are removed from the official list. flash floods in the american state of tennessee have claimed more than 20 lives, with dozens of people still missing — more than 15 inches of rain has fallen. queuing to reach snowdon's summit — walkers are urged to "respect the mountain" as the number of visitors soars.
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sport news coming injust sport news coming in just a sport news coming injust a moment and before i send sport news coming injust a moment and before i send you sport news coming injust a moment and before i send you over sport news coming injust a moment and before i send you over to sport news coming injust a moment and before i send you over to gavin let me give you an update in terms of covid because we have just had a few comments through from health leaders in cornwall, relating to the music festival that you may well be aware of. essentially, and i will try to summarise quite a long briefing, but cornwall�*s health leaders saying that music festival has led to a spike in covid cases. about 400,000 cases around the country that experts believe could be linked to that festival in newquay. so those are the stats being given. it is quite detailed information on quite a lengthy press release here, so that is the essence of that, that there are indeed
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thousands of cases they think have indeed been to that boardmasters music festival. we may well bring you more on that in the next few minutes. right now, as promised, we will look at the sport news. here's gavin.... thanks very much indeed, jane. a moment for swimmer ellie simmonds to remember. she's a flagbearer for great britain at tomorrow's paralympic opening ceremony — alongside the oldest member of the team. member of the team — archerjohn stubbs, who's 56. both athletes are competing in their fourth games injapan. chef de mission penny briscoe's selections mean simmonds will be the first woman to carry the flag for gb at a summer games since fellow swimmer maggie mceleny 21 years ago. there are literally no words to describe it. i mean, this is my fourth paralympics and i've never actually been to an opening ceremony! so to go to an opening ceremony but also have the privilege
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of carrying the flag withjohn, it's going to be so exciting. when penny said that i was called for a meeting with her, i thought it was a general meeting. when she announced that me and john were both flag—bearers, i think we were both in awe and didn't really know how to respond! well, the action at the paralympic games begins on wednesday — a year after originally planned owing to the covid—19 pandemic. it takes place despite the tokyo 2020 official hidemasa nakamura saying last week that the "infection situation" injapan had deteriorated since the olympics. the international paralympic committee president andrew parsons admits preparations haven't been easy. it's been really difficult, but we believe working together with health experts, the ioc and the japanese government and the organising committee, we came up with a very good set of countermeasures which prove to be efficient during the olympics, some were encouraged by that, but still something we have only seen in practice and we need to make sure that the things that are working are in place and at the same time we can still have the same atmosphere in the games. even without spectators.
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the england bowler mark wood is out of the third test against india, which begins this week after suffering a shoulder injury. hejarred his right shoulder in the last test at lord's, which england lost by 151 runs, having drawn the first match in the series. the third test takes place at headingley, starting on wednesday. you can't put any fault on mark for how things turned out there, a bit of a freak injury. i think it is frustrating because he is bowling so well. frustration more for him than anyone else. he is bowling really well, bowling at great pace, and he seems to be managing his body a lot better, and it is not through bowling or anything other than a freak incident that found himself missing this test match. and the team for europe's solheim cup has been announced, and there are three english players selected for their defence of the title against the united states next month.
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georgia hall and charley hull made the team automatically, while mel reid is one of six picks — from captain catriona matthew. georgia hall makes the team after finishing second in the women's open, and will be making her third appearance in the competition. charley hull meanwhile will be playing the event for the fifth time. but it's especially significant for mel reid, who was picked after missing out on the selection in 2019... it was a tough phone call two years ago, to say, you know, she hadn't quite made it and asked her to be vice captain. but i think that shows how much she loves the solheim and her passion, that she didn't think for an instant and said she would do it. it was a much nicer phone call this time. i think she will be a great addition. she has the experience and has that passion for the solheim cup and team play. they have been trying for two years to make the team and to finally get that confirmation you are in the team, obviously, the players are very excited, especially the rookies, i think, when you're playing in your first one.
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but i managed to catch mel, she was just about to take off in atlanta, and as you can imagine she wasjust delighted. that's all the sport for now. we will see you in the next hour, jane. thank you, gavin. as we've been hearing, pressure is growing on the us to delay its final withdrawal from afghanistan in order to allow more people to be evacuated. earlier, my colleague lyse doucet spoke to the former un diplomat, lord david hannay — who was previously stationed in kabul. among many roles. she asked lord hannay for his reaction to the escalating situation in the city. i think, like many observers, the afghanistan i knew back in the 1960s was not a perfect place, but it was reasonably peaceful and reasonably secure. it was a beautiful country, and wonderful people. and you cannot watch what is going on now without horror, and some shame. president biden, of course, is underfire now. but he is defending his position,
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saying that 20 years is a long time. four us presidents wanted to take the troops home from afghanistan, and he said we should have expected this chaos. if he called you up, what advice would you give him now at this 11th hour as the august 31 deadline approaches to end the us military mission? well, i don't think the policy of the united states and nato leaving can be changed now. it's too late for that. that pass was sold by president trump back in february 2020, and president biden broadly confirmed it. i don't think you can go back on that. as to the humanitarian situation, i think that... i would hope that it might be possible to get very wide international support for a purely,
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exclusively humanitarian effort to get out of afghanistan people who fear for their lives and who probably fear for them with good reason. and i think if it's done in that way, i would be hopeful, and particularly if the un security council could take the lead in trying to sponsor such a purely come exclusively humanitarian operation, that then that could be achieved. but it's not a sure thing. there is of course the urgent humanitarian side, but there is of course the political side too, as the new taliban leader set as the new taliban leaders set about re—establishing their islamic emirate. there is a sense, lord hannay, that as the us, the uk and other nato armies pull out, it is the neighbourhood, the neighbours and near neighbours, who are going to have a much more
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decisive role in afghanistan's future now. and they don't all agree on the way forward. how do you see this playing out in terms of who will be taking the leading role? well, i do think, lyse, that you're absolutely right, and others are right, to put an emphasis on the regional dimension. afghanistan's neighbours have in the past 200 years done untold harm to that country by meddling in its affairs. we were one of them when we ruled india. there were the russians when they were the soviet union. and then the more recent events. but i do think that those neighbours now, however pleased they must be to see the us and nato getting a bloody nose, must realise that they are at risk as much as anyone, perhaps more. and i would hope that it would be possible to talk to iran, to talk to pakistan, to talk to tajikistan,
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uzbekistan, turkmenistan, and to the russian federation, and to see... and china. ..and to see whether, in some sort of way, the major humanitarian rescue operation could be carried out, and also the future of afghanistan could cease to be a plaything for its neighbours. lord hannay, david hannay. around 200 soldiers from 3 scots the black watch have left their base near inverness in readiness to deploy to afghanistan. defence secretary ben wallace visited them earlier. iain macinnes reports. packed and prepared — an early morning call to depart for deployment. these soldiers from the black watch could be in kabul as early
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as the end of this week as the evacuation efforts in the country continue. around 200 soldiers from 3 scots are preparing to head south in readiness to head to kabul, many have never been before and many will return in the next few weeks but it should be a challenging deployment —— and many have returned in the past week. soldiers and staff work hard to make sure we are the best we can be and we can face the challenges but we are incredibly confident of our ability to go out and deliver humanitarian aid where it is needed. some of these soldiers wear the boots on the ground at the flag—lowering ceremony is in the afghan capital just last month, but a lot has changed since then. we were there last month, it was relatively calm compared to what it isjust now, obviously, all the troops are going back, ready to leave and leave kabul, so now obviously it has changed in the last month and we are going back again. we have to make sure _ we do our very best to get people we have an obligation to out. the defence secretary ben wallace, a former soldier himself, was there to see them off.
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i have seen the company- on the regiment set off on its way to forward to locate in brize norton to make sure they are ready- as the reserve for what might happen next in afghanistan. _ it's really important to see - the guys off and to set out to them what they maybe canj expect and what not. i so i think it is important to touchl base with one of the units in the 16 air assault brigade, . britain's ready brigade, to make sure they are ready, but also to understand - what's on their minds. farfrom their highland base, the situation in afghanistan changes by the hour. the opportunity to bring more afghans to safety diminishing. iain macinnes, reporting scotland, fort george. iain macinnes reporting. an nhs video featuring younger people who suffer the debilitating effects of long covid has been released as part of a drive to encourage
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young adults to get a vaccine. the government says it has met its target of offering a jab to all 16 and 17—year—olds in england by today. here's our health correspondent dominic hughes. as an a&e doctor, i've seen a lot during this pandemic but nothing has shocked me more than seeing younger people being admitted to our hospitals with covid—19. and as well as their age, many of them had one other thing in common, they were unvaccinated. the video's message is simple. covid vaccines protect against not just the virus but the debilitating effects of long covid too. my lungs, out of nowhere, just kind of stopped. i struggled to breathe. sitting, lying down, obviously, sitting upright — i couldn't breathe. my energy levels dropped so walking of any kind of distance i would get automatically tired. this is part of a new push on vaccinations aimed particularly at younger people. one of those who took part is 25—year—old megan higgins. she initially fell ill injanuary but then struggled for months. i used to be a horse rider, i used to run, i used
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to walk the dog a lot, and it got to the point where sort of working in a school as well, i couldn't even do head, shoulders, knees and toes, or the hokey cokey with the kids, i was so tired just doing anything physical. the video comes as the government announced all 16 and 17—year—olds in england have now been offered a vaccine. in the three weeks since they became eligible, around a million letters and texts have been sent inviting teenagers to get a jab. so far, more than 360,000 to 16 and 17—year—olds have had theirfirst dose. so far, more than 360,00016 and 17—year—olds have had theirfirst dose. all 12 to 15—year—olds in england thought to be at risk have also been invited to get a vaccine. infection rates are currently highest among younger adults but so, too, is vaccine hesitancy. i would urge people to get a vaccine. adults might be unable to work but children may be prevented from learning and i think it's such an important time in your life, you don't want months in bed, you don't want months when you are unable to do your sport or go out dancing or do anything you want. you want to be in the
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prime of your life. meanwhile, the government has announced a contract for 35 million more doses of the pfizer vaccine, the one being offered to younger people, to be delivered from the second half of next year. today's message is that being young, fit and otherwise healthy is not enough to protect you from the virus or long covid — but being vaccinated can make a big difference. dominic hughes, bbc news. the uk has agreed a contract for 35 million more doses of the pfizer/biontech vaccine, to be delivered from the second half of next year. the order is part of the government preparations for booster shots and any new variants that could emerge. the health secretary sajid javid said the order would "future—proof" the uk's vaccine programme. more than 87.7% of over—16s in the uk have already had at least one dose of a covid vaccine. a wembley steward has been given a suspended sentence after stealing high vis jackets and official lanyards for the euro 2020 final.
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18—year—old yusuf amin tried to sell the items on facebook for £4,500. he was trying raise money in order to pay off his mum's rent arrears. the magistrate criticised wembley stadium for their training and vetting process of stewards, and for employing them at such a young age. the headlines on bbc news: the race against time to evacuate people from afghanistan — the british government asks president biden to delay the date of the final withdrawal of american troops. a clamp down on "cowboy" firms offering pcr travel tests — nearly 60 companies are removed from the official list. queuing to reach snowdon's summit — from the official list. walkers are urged to "respect the mountain" as the number of visitors soars. more than 20 people have been
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killed by flash floods in the us state of tennessee — and dozens are still missing. record rainfall of more than 15 inches in some areas sparked widespread flooding over the weekend. roads and bridges were washed away and power cuts have affected thousands of people. daniela relph reports. those living here described a wall of water coming in hard and fast. flash floods overwhelming parts of tennessee. the rain and wind tore through communities with a ferocity few had predicted. it was a terrifying experience, as residents tried to save their homes and theirfamilies. i'm trying to get them out of the door, but the water is so high and it's pushing against the door that i'm having a hard time pushing to open the door to get them out. i'm holding two babies. the aftermath is a landscape strewn with floodwaters, wrecked vehicles and severely damaged homes. in many counties, there is bewilderment at how quickly
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the storm took hold, and this remains both a recovery and a search and rescue operation with many still missing, including children. tremendous loss of life, a number of missing people on the ground, homes washed off their foundations, cars strewn around the community. it is a devastating picture of loss and heartache. the worst hit area was humphreys county, west of nashville. here, the floodwaters rose so quickly many people just couldn't escape their homes. the plight of those living here recognised in last night's presidential address. i want to begin by expressing my deepest condolences for the sudden and tragic loss of life due to this flash flood. i know we have reached out to the community, and we stand ready to offer them support. i've asked the administrator to speak to governor lee of tennessee right away, and we will offer any assistance they need
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for this terrible moment. tens of thousands of people are still without power. roads and bridges remain impassible in some areas, hampering rescue efforts. there were hurricane warnings in the north—east of the united states over the weekend, but it was here, further south in tennessee, where the extreme weather really hit and took lives. daniela relph, bbc news. here, extinction rebellion has kicked off its fifth mass protest, as thousands descend on central london to demand the government stops using fossil fuels. protestors are screwing chairs to the ground and chaining themselves to one another to express solidarity with nations who are disproportionately affected by climate change. a heavy police presence surrounds the protest, which is due to disrupt london for days. two former sex pistols have won a high court battle with former
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frontmanjohn lydon — otherwisde known asjohnny rotten. it's all to do with the use of the punk band's songs in a new tv series directed by danny boyle. drummer paul cook, and guitarist stevejones, argued that the group had an agreement that decisions would be made on a "majority rule basis" but lydon rejected the deal — likening it to "slave labour". our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba, told me more about the case. the impact of punk, being directed of course by danny boyle, famous for so many films from slumdog millionaire to directing and producing the olympics 2012 opening ceremony in london. they wanted to use music of course by the sex pistols — it was about the sex pistols and about the rise and impact of punk — and then there was a disagreement. as thejudge pointed out in thejudgment, not an unusual thing between the members of the sex pistols. he observed they have been disagreeing about lots of things going back to the 1970s. in this case, john lydon, of course better known to many asjohnny rotten, said he didn't want the sex pistols'
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music used in this new series. in retaliation, the former drummer and guitarist, paul cook and stevejones, they said they had a band member agreement, and as part of this the majority view on anything — their music's use, merchandise, whatever — that would hold, and one member couldn't go against the wishes of all the others. john lydon said he didn't really recognise this should have effect in this case, so of course it all went to court, and of course there we saw paul cook and stevejones bringing this action againstjohn lydon. also supporting them in their action was another original member of the sex pistols, glen matlock, and the estate of sid vicious, and after many days of a mini—trial, this judgment has emerged and the judge has agreed with paul cook and stevejones that this was a legally binding agreement and their majority should win out even thouthohn lydon didn't want the music to be used.
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i'm so sorry — so it gets all the way to court, this is how it has gone in court, so in terms of danny boyle and what he is trying to do here, have we heard from him? what do we know about the final product? no, we have heard from paul cook and stevejones, not danny boyle. they said they welcome the court's ruling, saying it brings clarity to their decision—making and upholds the band's agreement on collective decision—making. they said it wasn't a pleasant expense but allows them to move forward and hopefully work together in the future with better relations. we haven't heard anything from johnny rotten, john lydon, at this stage, but this court case has now concluded and the judge has given hisjudgment,
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and it looks like a green light for the tv series and the majority viewpoint has won out, despite what the feelings ofjohn lydon might be. it must be said, you know, we don't quite know what his motivations were for not wanting this to go ahead, but nobody doubts he is a fierce guardian of the sex pistols' impact and legacy and feels it should be used carefully, so many believe that is undoubtedly a part of it, but in a purely legal sense thejudge pointed out when he signed this agreement he had a british lawyer, a us attorney and a manager who all would have explained the impact of this agreement and what it might mean in the future, that, you know, it was in the terms of the judgment the majority view winning out. so sex pistols fans can almost certainly look forward to seeing this new series directed by danny boyle and, crucially, featuring the music of the sex pistols. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba there. snowdon in north wales has long been a magnet for hikers
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wanting to reach its summit — the highest point in england and wales. around 700,000 people now visit the mountain annually — up from 500,000 in 2018. but the impact of so many visitors takes its toll — and this summer has seen 45—minute queues to reach the top — as chris dearden reports. hundreds of people queueing in the mist for 45 minutes. not a shopping centre, a football match or a big gig, but the highest mountain in wales. snowden has always been a busy place in august, but locals say this year it has been busier than ever, and not everyone is dressed or prepared for weather conditions like these at the top. you can't stop anybody, but you can see they are not used walking the mountain with the clothing they've got on and things, you know. sometimes i've seen a few, you won't believe this, in flip—flops and things, you know. and you give them advice and they don't want to know either. we can't say anything any more,
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there's no point, you know? flip—flops or walking boots, the authorities estimate that around 700,000 pairs of feet will have gone up snowdon by the end of this year. they say the increase is because more british people are taking their holidays in the uk at the moment. but it's putting strain on mountain rescue volunteers who were called to three casualties in three hours last saturday lunchtime, and campaigners say it is putting strain on the mountain itself. litter, footpath erosion, wild camping, traffic, parking. these are all... in a sense, none of these are new but they have all acquired a really sharp edge in the last 18 months. that is definitely thunder. and the authorities have been trying to spread the message with videos like this on social media, to remind people to be prepared before they head to the top. no flip—flops, no trainers, nothing stupid like that. they say this summer was always likely to be busy and lots of plans are in place to manage the traffic
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lower down and the footfall higher up. he speaks welsh chris dearden, bbc news. that takes us into a look at the weather prospects. here's tomasz schafernaker. well, the week ahead is looking quiet on the weather front. nothing dramatic happening over the next few days. there will be some sunshine around, but also, at times, it is going to be fairly cloudy and the reason for it is a big area of high pressure has decided to park itself over us and it is not going to budge. so it is here today, it will be here through tuesday, wednesday, thursday, friday and probably through the weekend and into next week. so all we're going to be doing is forecasting areas of cloud across the country, and which areas will be sunny and which areas will be overcast. so this is what it looks like through this evening. just the chance of a couple of spots of rain where the clouds gather and clump, but on the whole,
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it is actually a mostly bright if not sunny afternoon for many central and eastern areas of the uk. temperatures early evening will be around the high teens, maybe up to 22 in glasgow. i think a little bit fresher on the north sea coast because there is more of a breeze coming off the north sea. so tonight, a bit like last night, it is steady as she goes on the weather front, clear skies across more western areas whereas central and eastern parts of the country are probably turning overcast by early morning as the north sea wind drags in the cloud. now, what weather you'll get on tuesday or the subtleties on the weather will depend on where you are within this area of high pressure. so the thinking is in the centre of the high pressure, so across scotland, i think that is where the best of the sunshine is going to be, and here temperatures could actually hit the mid 20s, whereas around the high, with the breeze blowing around it, there will be, at times, more cloud. but then again, you get to the south coast and then there is more sunshine again. so the distribution of cloud within this high pressure will be variable. here is a look at the weather map
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for wednesday, and notice there is a very weak cool front moving across the north sea, it is just going to graze eastern parts of the uk later on wednesday and into thursday, so that does mean slightly fresher conditions along these north sea coasts. but further towards the west, the weather is going to be fine, i think the best of the sunshine again in the north—western portion of the british isles, for example glasgow up to around 24 degrees. so here's the summary for the week ahead — you can see by the weather symbols and the temperatures it is pretty much settled across most of the uk and actually not feeling too bad at all.
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this is bbc news, i'm victoria derbyshire. the headlines: the race against time to get people out of afghanistan safely — the british government asks president biden to delay the date of the final withdrawal of american troops. we are really down to hours now, not weeks, and we have to make sure we exploit every minute to get people out. we are really down to hours now, not weeks, and we have to make sure but a taliban spokesman tells the bbc that foreign troops will not be permitted to stay beyond the deadline. a clamp down on �*cowboy�* firms offering pcr travel tests — nearly 60 companies are removed from the official list. young people warn of the debilitating effects of long covid, as part of a campaign to encourage teenagers to get vaccinated. a wembley stadium steward is given a suspended sentence for stealing high—vis jackets and lanyards to sell on facebook ahead
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of the euro 2020 final.

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