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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 24, 2021 10:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. pressure builds on the us to delay its withdrawal from afghanistan — to allow more time for those trying to flee the country. an emergency summit of g7 leaders will discuss the crisis in afghanistan later. we have to plan on the slst of august being the last moment. every day we get after that will be a big bonus, and we would like it. the reality is unless we get that agreement at the g7 today, many, many people will be left behind and face reprisals from the taliban. it comes as the un human rights chief warns of credible reports of human rights violations in areas
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under taliban control. we human rights violations in areas under taliban control.— under taliban control. we have received credible _ under taliban control. we have received credible reports - under taliban control. we have received credible reports of- received credible reports of violations _ received credible reports of violations of— received credible reports of violations of international l received credible reports of. violations of international law received credible reports of- violations of international law and human_ violations of international law and human rights— violations of international law and human rights abuses _ violations of international law and human rights abuses taking - violations of international law and human rights abuses taking place| violations of international law and . human rights abuses taking place in areas _ human rights abuses taking place in areas under— human rights abuses taking place in areas under effective _ human rights abuses taking place in areas under effective taliban - areas under effective taliban controh _ growing calls in australia for the country to ease its quarantine restrictions — to help open up international travel. despite concerns about covid — and a one year delay — the tokyo paralympics get under way today. and what happens when a hollywood star needs to land his helicopter in your back garden? we will be hearing from a family in warwickshire and how tom cruise, who is filming the latest mission impossible film landed in the home. hello and welcome if you're watching
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in the uk or around the world. us officials say president biden will decide within the next 2a hours whether to defy the taliban and keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the end of this month. the uk prime minister is to urge world leaders to step up support for refugees fleeing the taliban in afghanistan when he chairs a virtual g7 meeting later. it's expected that france and germany willjoin the uk in pushing president biden to delay the withdrawal of american troops from afghanistan. the delay calls come as the the head eu's executive commission ursula von der leyen announces the eu will ramp up humanitarian support for afghans in and around their country to over 200 million euros from over 50 million euros. as things stand, us troops depart in a week's time — even though evacuations from kabul�*s main airport may not be completed by then. the us has evacuated and facilitated
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the evacuation of roughly a8,000 people since an intense airlift started on m august, while the uk evacuation effort continues — this morning the defence secretary ben wallace said 8,600, people had been flown out since the 14th of august. the un human rights chief says she has received credible reports of human rights violations in areas under taliban control including summary executions and restrictions on women. helen catt has this report. as thousands continue to try to flee afghanistan, the leaders of the g7 nations, which include the us, france and germany, will hold an emergency virtual meeting to address the crisis. it is likely to be very different in tone from when they met in person in cornwall injune.
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the american presidentjoe biden is under pressure not to withdraw his troops from kabul airport on the 31st of august as planned. downing street said borisjohnson and mr biden agreed in a call last night to continue working together to enable people to leave, including after the first phase of the evacuation. it didn't say if moving the date had been discussed. but the prime minister is expected to ask him for more time to allow more people to get out. the government has already said british troops will have to leave when the us does. the white house has so far not said whether it will extend the deadline or not. we are in talks with the taliban on a daily basis through both political and security channels. we believe that we have time between now and the 31st to get out any american who wants to get out. the g7 won'tjust cover the situation at the airport. borisjohnson is expected to ask the other countries to match the uk's promises on sending aid and resettling refugees. the uk has said it will take in 20,000 afghans over the next five years. the leaders are also expected
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to recommit to safeguarding the rights of women and minorities and girls' education in afghanistan, and to making sure any new government sticks to its international obligations. speaking ahead of the meeting, borisjohnson said the taliban would bejudged by their deeds and not their words. the g7 may well face the same expectation. speaking before an emergency session on afghanistan, un human rights chief michelle bachelet urged the taliban to honour commitments to respect the rights of women and girls, and ethnic and religious minorities, and refrain from reprisals. the taliban has pledged to protect and respect human rights. taliban spokes people have made specific commitments to protect women's right to work and will girls rights to attend school within the interpretation of islamic law. they have said they will respect the rights of religious minorities and
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refrain from reprisals against those who work with the government or international community. the onus is now fully on the taliban to transfer this into reality, and in having effective control of much of the country they must ensure in those areas ongoing respect for international human rights and ongoing and indeed heightened provision of essential public services without discrimination, for all. international human rights law is immutable. enjoyment of human rights is not subject to changes of control of territorial —— territory, or de facto authority. 0ur correspondent secunder kermani is in kabul this morning, and has been following the situation at the airport — i spoke to him a short while ago. the situation when i was there yesterday was a little more ordered, less chaotic, than it has been in previous days although that is not saying much.
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there are still thousands of people camped outside various different gates, still forces, both american and british as well as taliban and a small contingent of afghan government forces that haven't surrendered, patrolling or guarding different parts of the airport, often firing into the air, to try and control the crowd, and also at times beating members of the crowd back with rubber hosing. many of the people who are there do not have travel documentation to be able to board an evacuation flight. they will not be taken out nor do they have a realistic chance of being taken out but they are so desperate to leave afghanistan that they have pitched up anyway. that is making it equally difficult for those who do have the correct permissions to get through. there is a real lack of information that has filtered down to ordinary afghans about what the process is, when this process will end,
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and everyone knows that this deadline is looming of the end of the month, and that is contributing to the sense of panic, the sense of frenzy, because people worry that after the end of the month, after this set of evacuations finishes, they don't know when they will next be able to fly out of afghanistan. it seems likely that for a period at least, the airport will not be functional, whilst the new taliban dominated government tries to arrange the technical staff and logistics around it. the taliban said yesterday that the 31st of august was a red line for them, that if international groups did not withdraw by then, then there would be "consequences", so do you think it is an absolute red line, and when they talk about consequences, what do they mean by that? it is hard to know exactly what to read into those words. we would not expect the taliban to say anything other than the fact
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that you have to leave by 31st of august, they said the same about the previous deadline, the 31st of may, they reluctantly accepted to push it back, the withdrawal of international forces at that stage. perhaps that could happen again, if it is only by a few days. there is suspicion among the taliban that despite the us president being quite clear that he wants to withdraw all american forces, some in the taliban believe that that is not the case. so the deadline being pushed back fuels those suspicions and makes it harder for the taliban leadership to convince their troops on the ground that they are really committed to kind of getting rid of foreign forces, which of course has been the primary goal for so long. so it does place the taliban in a difficult position. having said that, if it is just a number of days, perhaps they would consider it. they do want international legitimacy, they say, at least, good relations with the rest of the world and if this helps
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with that, then perhaps there could be some kind of negotiation that takes place. my sources had been telling me in previous days, that they did not believe that it was likely that the americans would seek to extend past the 31st of august. they wanted to keep to that deadline. we will have to wait and see of course what is decided. we await the outcome of those discussions at the g7 virtual summit today. you have spoken about the airport, what about the rest of kabul? what is life like there at the moment? it is much calmer. there is an uneasy sense of calm. more and more shops and restaurants are open, people are out on the streets, traffic is as bad as it usually is in kabul. there are fewer people than usual still walking around. at the market stallholders tell me that business is significantly down, because they believe people
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are still afraid of coming out of their homes, and unsure about how the situation will pan out. banks are still closed. that is a major issue for people. i have been speaking to a number of people in different provinces around afghanistan and they have been saying that schools in a number of places are open now, that girls are being allowed to go to school. universities remain closed across the country and schools in kabul remain closed also. and in some of those provinces teachers said that pupils were still afraid of coming in or their families were too afraid to send them in, but there is a gradual inching back to something like everyday life, although for many people it is still a period of deep uncertainty and anxiety. you touched there on other parts of the country. how difficult is it to get information about what life is like outside kabul at the moment?
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at the moment, it is difficult. a lot ofjournalists have fled the country in fear of their lives. we have seen attacks not claimed by the taliban but blamed on them, on journalists earlier this year and last year so, manyjournalists have left afg ha nista n, reluctantly, of course, because they felt it was their duty to report on here, but theyjust felt the situation was too dangerous, too uncertain, for them to stay on, so we are losing access to information. we know the taliban have claimed they are in favour of a free, independent press, but they have also talked about reporting being in the national interest, and not being against the spirit of islam, those kind of caveats are certainly things that worryjournalists here. they fear that if they say something critical of the taliban there could be repercussions. so getting access to information is much more difficult than it was.
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but people are still talking to us, when they can, even if it is not in the same way as before. secunder kermani in kabulfor us. with me now is imogen sudbery, senior director of policy & advocacy for europe at the global humanitarian aid organisation — international rescue committee. thank you forjoining us on bbc news and bbc world today. perhaps you could begin by telling us what involvement the organisation has in afghanistan at the moment. we have been working — afghanistan at the moment. we have been working in _ afghanistan at the moment. we have been working in afghanistan - afghanistan at the moment. we have been working in afghanistan since - been working in afghanistan since 1988, we work with thousands of communities across eight provinces including those previously taliban —controlled, through a range of programmes from emergency response, health, water, sanitation, through to education and economic recovery. current challenges are immense, even before the dramatic developments
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with covid—19, and an already fragile economy decimated, facing a major food security crisis in the country, so the immediate priority is to provide assistance through food and supplies for the thousands of internally displaced people who have moved into kabul in recent weeks. �* , ., have moved into kabul in recent weeks. �* ,, . , have moved into kabul in recent weeks. �* ., , ., have moved into kabul in recent weeks. �* ., , have moved into kabul in recent weeks. are you able to carry out that work— weeks. are you able to carry out that work as _ weeks. are you able to carry out that work as you _ weeks. are you able to carry out that work as you would - weeks. are you able to carry out that work as you would wish, - weeks. are you able to carry out that work as you would wish, or| weeks. are you able to carry out - that work as you would wish, or have there been any particular challenges, because of the taliban takeover? ' ' ' challenges, because of the taliban takeover? ' ' , ., ., , ., takeover? 9996 of our staff are afr han takeover? 99% of our staff are afghan nationals _ takeover? 99% of our staff are afghan nationals and - takeover? 99% of our staff are afghan nationals and our - takeover? 99% of our staff are | afghan nationals and our teams ability to operate in communities across the country is rooted in their expertise. we have had to navigate these challenges before and we are confident that we can do so again. at the moment we are focused on being able to provide critical support to the health system to ensure that health care clinics remain up and running and, in the longer term, we are committed to restarting all of our programmes
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across the full spectrum, but for that we really need the support of the international community and particularly humanitarian and diplomacy to make sure that we can safely access those most at need. the head of the eu commission ursula von der leyen, talking today about the eu increasing its humanitarian support for afghans from over 50 million euros, up to more than 200 million euros, up to more than 200 million euros, up to more than 200 million euros, but she said that that aid would be conditional on the respect of human and women's rights. what are your concerns about that flow of aid and how difficult it might be to confirm that these conditions are being met? the might be to confirm that these conditions are being met? the eu has a deep responsibility _ conditions are being met? the eu has a deep responsibility to _ conditions are being met? the eu has a deep responsibility to the _ conditions are being met? the eu has a deep responsibility to the afghan i a deep responsibility to the afghan people but it is also one of the international donors that is best placed to really influence the speed at which afghanistan can respond to the humanitarian crisis. we are calling on the eu to mount a comprehensive response that addresses on the one hand the immense humanitarian needs in the
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country while on the other ensuring protection for those who need to leave. clearly, with 18.5 million afghanistan if people relying on humanitarian aid it is critical that we have that scale of humanitarian support to address the needs in the country. we would like, we are pleased to see that the eu has made this announcement of increased humanitarian funding but so far we are early 38% funded and the funding available is still far from what is needed to match the scale of need. some politicians talking about the possibility of sanctions against the taliban. some humanitarian organisations like yourselves are very nervous about that idea, suggesting that any sanctions would hit ordinary afghans the most. would that be something that you would agree with? $5
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that be something that you would agree with? fissi that be something that you would agree with?— that be something that you would aaree with? �* , ., ., agree with? as i mentioned, we do really need — agree with? as i mentioned, we do really need to _ agree with? as i mentioned, we do really need to see _ agree with? as i mentioned, we do really need to see that _ agree with? as i mentioned, we do| really need to see that humanitarian funding channel immediately to the places most at need, and front line responders, who worked in these challenging situations across many decades. we are confident that we can continue to operate, and we will make sure that we work closely with local communities where we have built trust, to be able to do that in a way which respects their independence and critical human rights considerations, but in this context what we need is more engagement from international donors like the eu rather than less, and negotiating and navigating the challenges we are currently facing, in a way which ensures safety and access for our staff requires dialogue and cooperation from all parties. we need the european union to ensure that we have saved access to ensure that we have saved access to support us to get safe access for aid workers to those people most in
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need, and that particularly concerns ensuring that female staff are able to work and deliver critical services, particularly as we are very concerned about the humanitarian needs for women and children, who make up 75% of those most in need at the moment. female aid workers are critical to that response and the european union have an important role to play in that. thank you, imogen sudbery from the international rescue committee. earlier our political correspondent damian grammaticas explained the significance of the deadline. we have had 20 years of western powers, who will sit around the table today, building up afghanistan, getting afghanis to turn their back on the taliban and build an open society, and now the sudden fall, the failure to get people out there for that, and the scramble
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we see as desperate people in afghanistan try to get out, but the clock ticking with just a week now left in this airlift. the difficulty, i think, for european countries, the uk, borisjohnson chairing, is that they themselves have little power to achieve much and they don't want to have a big falling out i would guess with the us, but they do want to see the airlift extended. joe biden's administration have been very clear they don't think they want to see that drawn out any further and the taliban that ultimately it depends on also don't want to, so the uk today, the defence secretary saying, the last 2a hours, they have flown out another 2000, that is speeding up, but time is running out and they want to extend if possible. time matters more than anything. we have planned for the worst, the 315t of august, that is why we have flown in 1000 troops to access the system, to be there, to process these people, to make sure that we secure the airport. we flew them in through august.
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they have done an amazing job. i wish that we had more time. i think at the moment it is unlikely, having seen these public statements from president biden and from the taliban, but we have to plan on the 315t of august being the last moment. every day we get after that would be a big bonus. we would like it. we are only there to evacuate those people, not for any other ulterior motive, and the taliban and others should not fear that we are there, in any way, but we will see, and i know that at the moment they have said no, we saw that in interviews yesterday, but time is people. -- crucial. the defence secretary said he thought there were ways to pressure the taliban, they want to have open borders, trade, air links with other countries, they need access to international finance. that is something also that the labour party and shadow
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foreign secretary lisa nandy has been saying today, that there are ways that western powers can bring some influence to bear on the taliban. she said this is an important moment. borisjohnson chairing the g7, to try to get a common approach. the air bridge is about to close, on the 315t of august, and my office is in touch with hundreds of people still stuck in afghanistan who are eligible to come out on uk flights but simply cannot get onto them for lots of different reasons, so we have got to get an agreement at the g7 today that will make a common approach to the taliban to extend that deadline, and that relies on us support. it really does matter. there are few other options available to us, and the reality is, unless we get that agreement at the g7 today, many people will be left behind and face reprisals from the taliban. one interesting thing the uk government has said is that it is not putting on the table the idea of more sanctions on the taliban. perhaps that is a sign that
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what they're looking for at the moment is some sort of accommodation, relying on taliban help, to keep this airlift going smoothly, but the g7 is the critical moment to watch. damian grammaticas. tom tugendhat chairs the foreign affairs committe and served in afghanistan — he's spoken this morning about a friend travelling with his family to try to escape from the taliban. last night i was speaking to a guy that used to work with me over ten years ago, as an interpreter. he told me that he was going to risk a drive at night with his wife and his five children. i've got two kids and i can tell you that driving with kids isn't easy, but at night on a war zone, on potholed roads, you wouldn't do that unless you are desperate. he is doing that because he is
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looking for a way out. i spent a bit of a sleepless night this evening, last night, and i am very glad that he has checked in this morning. i'm glad that through the night the foreign office and home office staff have been working absolutely flat out, and have secured him quite rightly permission to come to the uk. he is one of the people has literally risked his life working with us, so i am delighted that he has now got permission to come. he still has obstacles, so this is a long way from being over, but i must say that i am a bit more relieved than i was last night. a person from afghanistan on the uk's no—fly watchlist was flown into birmingham as part of the evacuation of kabul, government officials have confirmed. the no—fly watchlist is used to stop people coming to the uk who are thought to be a security threat. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford joins me now. how did this happen? how the
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worthless _ how did this happen? how the worthless works _ how did this happen? how the worthless works in _ how did this happen? how the worthless works in normal- how did this happen? how the i worthless works in normal times, how did this happen? how the - worthless works in normaltimes, if worthless works in normal times, if you apply for a visa to come to britain, that is checked against the watch list and that might get refused at that point or if somehow you managed to get a visa on arrival in the uk, the border force will check your details against the watch list and if you're on the watch list you will be turned round and deported. it's the same system but operating in superfast time and under extreme stress at kabul airport, so you have foreign office and home office officials trying to deal with people that are making it into the airport and it looks as if one person on the watchlist slipped through. they managed to pick up four people on the watchlist and not allow them onto a plane but one person slip through. what is vaguely reassuring is that that was then undone on arrival at birmingham airport, that same person was picked up airport, that same person was picked up by airport, that same person was picked up by the border force officials as being on the watchlist. and in fact, after a period of quite deep concern last night, it became clear that,
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after further research into that person it was the right person, but further research into that person, that the concerns about them have gone away, so we don't know whether they were security terrorism or criminality concerns but in the end, the person was freed and allowed to go on their way. the person was freed and allowed to go on their way-— go on their way. which answers my next question. _ go on their way. which answers my next question, what _ go on their way. which answers my next question, what is _ go on their way. which answers my next question, what is going - go on their way. which answers my next question, what is going to - next question, what is going to happen to this individual? they can stay here? if happen to this individual? they can sta here? , . , ., stay here? if they concerns remained about that individual, _ stay here? if they concerns remained about that individual, there - stay here? if they concerns remained about that individual, there would . about that individual, there would have been quite a big problem because you could detain them but you cannot deport anyone to afghanistan in this current circumstance, because the court simply wouldn't allow that. in the end, what happened was that further research was done on the individual about the concerns that existed about the concerns that existed about them in the past and it was decided actually those concerns were no longer grave enough to say that they shouldn't be allowed to enter they shouldn't be allowed to enter the country so my understanding is, and of course, there was a great reluctance to discuss the details of individual cases, we don't even know whether this is a man or woman, we
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assume it is a man but we don't know that, this person has been allowed to go their way. that, this person has been allowed to go their way-— to go their way. daniel, thank you very much. _ to go their way. daniel, thank you very much, daniel— to go their way. daniel, thank you very much, daniel sandford, - to go their way. daniel, thank you | very much, daniel sandford, there. rescue crews are still looking for dozens of people missing in rural humphreys county, in the us state of tennessee, after devastating flash floods. at least 22 people have been killed, including two young children. emergency workers have been conducting door—to—door searches, as families wait for news of their loved ones. tanya dendrinos reports. as the water recedes in tennessee, the scale of destruction becomes all the more visible. piles of debris strewn across neighbourhoods, pieces of homes, lives and livelihoods. our people need help. we are going to be overwhelmed for the next 30 days, overwhelmed. but our people need help. record—breaking rainfall caused flash flooding on saturday. the torrent, swallowing
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everything in its reach, sweeping away cars, tearing up roads and forcing homes off their foundations. multiple lives were lost and dozens of people are still missing. their names are on notice boards, families desperately seeking information as emergency crews systematically comb through the wreckage. it's been a huge impact for this small community. the town will wear these scars for many decades. president biden has pledged government support while flood relief efforts have also begun. the community doing all it can to rally in the face of disaster. tanya dendrinos, bbc news. a study suggests the heavy rainfall that caused devastating floods in parts of europe last month was made more likely by climate change. more than 200 people died in germany, belgium, the netherlands and luxembourg.
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the research from the world weather attribution initiative, an international team of climate scientists, concluded that extreme rainfall events are now up to nine times more likely to happen than in the late 1800s. today sees the opening ceremony of the tokyo 2020 paralympics, with sporting action due to kick off tomorrow. just as with the olympics, the event was delayed a year due to coronavirus. the paralympics feature athletes with disabilities competing in 539 events, across 22 different sports. 0ur correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes, reports from tokyo. the atmosphere here is very similar to the way it was with the opening of the olympics a month ago, except that the coronavirus situation has become much more serious in the intervening period, and so, this mixed emotions that people feel here about holding these games has, if you like, become even deeper. you can see from people tweeting from within the athletes' village,
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the excitement that is there amongst the athletes that this is finally taking place. they have waited an extra year, they are finally here, it is finally going to happen, and they can't wait to get into the arenas to start competing. 0utside, what we are seeing in the city of tokyo, because covid infections have grown so dramatically in the last few weeks, because hospital places are now under severe strain, many people are being told that they must stay at home, that they can't go to hospital, despite the fact that they are ill, means there is a sense, even more powerfully, of is this a good idea? why are we going ahead with this? and, of course, the other really sad thing about this is, it should be an opportunity for people to experience the paralympians close up, and to see these disabled athletes performing, but they are only going to be able to do that, once again, on television, because pretty much everyone is going to be excluded from the stadiums, including at the opening ceremony tonight, so there is this mixture of anticipation and excitement forsome, butapprehension and sadness for others.
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we can speak now to paralympian peter norfolk who has won two gold medals, two silver medals and a bronze medal in wheelchair tennis across three games. in 2012 he was the gb flag bearer at the opening ceremony. lovely to have you with us, thank you for your patience, i know you have been waiting for a while. you have been waiting for a while. you have been waiting for a while. you have been where the paralympians in tokyo are today. what is your advice for them as they are on the brink of competition?— competition? firstly, relax. it is a lona da competition? firstly, relax. it is a long day for— competition? firstly, relax. it is a long day for them, _ competition? firstly, relax. it is a long day for them, a _ competition? firstly, relax. it is a long day for them, a lot _ competition? firstly, relax. it is a long day for them, a lot of - competition? firstly, relax. it is a long day for them, a lot of sitting | long day for them, a lot of sitting around and waiting, the adrenaline going and it is exciting because you do not know what will happen, you do not know what they will do, what the ceremony will look all feel like, so there is sitting around, just try to calm your nerves, this is the beginning of the next ten days of
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amazing competition for them. so the ke advice amazing competition for them. so the key advice is — amazing competition for them. so the key advice is to _ amazing competition for them. so the key advice is to relax. _ amazing competition for them. so the key advice is to relax. as _ amazing competition for them. so the key advice is to relax. as we - amazing competition for them. so the key advice is to relax. as we saw - key advice is to relax. as we saw with the olympics, no crowds, such a different experience from your paralympics experience, what pa ralympics experience, what difference paralympics experience, what difference will that make, ultimately, do you think? it is difference will that make, ultimately, do you think? it is a real shame _ ultimately, do you think? it is a real shame they _ ultimately, do you think? it is a real shame they do _ ultimately, do you think? it is a real shame they do not - ultimately, do you think? it is a real shame they do not have . ultimately, do you think? it is a | real shame they do not have the crowds, london 2012, coming into the stadium with the crowds and the confetti and the noise was just completely amazing. i will never have that experience again. so to come into an empty stadium, i am sure they will have noise and the music very loud, they will have some applause, they will still get the excitement and the thrill of coming into a games, especially if it is your first games it is something you just don't get in normal life and it
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is thrilling. so i think they will, the athletes, totally enjoy it because it is completely different to anything you do in sport. take us back to when _ to anything you do in sport. take us back to when you _ to anything you do in sport. take us back to when you were _ to anything you do in sport. take us back to when you were the - back to when you were the flag—bearers for paralympics gb, that must be seared in your memory? i was showing my kids the photos this morning at breakfast. it is completely cut my second most famous... by best memory ever, apart from winning a gold in athens. i remember the waiting, the anticipation, the excitement, and then coming down the tunnel, through then coming down the tunnel, through the stadium, when you come out into the stadium, when you come out into the stadium, when you come out into the stadium, the crowd roaring, you get the vision of how big everything is, how many people are there, the
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tvs, cameras, the confetti. loved every second, it was totally brilliant. ., ., ., , ., brilliant. to what extent do you think all the — brilliant. to what extent do you think all the paralympics - brilliant. to what extent do you think all the paralympics gb - think all the paralympics gb athletes will be feeling the pressure to emulate the success of team gb in the olympics? you always do, that is team gb in the olympics? you always do. that is part _ team gb in the olympics? you always do, that is part and _ team gb in the olympics? you always do, that is part and parcel _ team gb in the olympics? you always do, that is part and parcel of - team gb in the olympics? you always do, that is part and parcel of the - do, that is part and parcel of the paralympics following the olympics, you always think that we will do one better. often we do, and after 2012 it has become very mainstream to the general public, they know how brilliant our athletes are and the standard of sport and professionalism. the athletes have to be aware, you will find anybody that has a competition starting immediately, they probably would not
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go. irrespective of how good the opening ceremony is, it is about the formants and about winning a gold medal. , ' . ., , ., ., medal. difficult to pick out, i am sure, but medal. difficult to pick out, i am sure. but who — medal. difficult to pick out, i am sure, but who are _ medal. difficult to pick out, i am sure, but who are you _ medal. difficult to pick out, i am sure, but who are you most - medal. difficult to pick out, i am i sure, but who are you most looking forward to seeing in action? goodness, lots. my sport, obviously i would love to seejordanne whiley, gordon reid, alfie hewett and the others, they are all gold medal potentials. then you havejonnie peacock, ellie simmonds, quad rugby, basketball, the list is endless. i shall be sitting glued, watching online order tv. i shall be sitting glued, watching online order tv.—
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shall be sitting glued, watching online order tv. i can't wait. that is our online order tv. i can't wait. that is your diary _ online order tv. i can't wait. that is your diary taken _ online order tv. i can't wait. that is your diary taken carole - online order tv. i can't wait. that is your diary taken carole ford . online order tv. i can't wait. that | is your diary taken carole ford the next ten days also, peter. thank you for speaking to us, peter norfolk, paralympian. let's get more now on our main story. the us is being pressed to delay its withdrawal from afghanistan to allow more time to evacuate those trying to leave the country. this morning, the european union has pledged to raise the amount of humanitarian support for afghans from 50 million euros to over 200 million euros. it comes as france says it's to end its evacuation efforts on thursday if the us continues with its plan to withdraw on the 31st august. joining me now is the european commission's lead spokesperson for foreign affairs and security policy, peter stano. thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news today. we know that france, germany and the uk are among the countries to press president biden today to extend the period for which us troops stay in afghanistan.
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will the eu as a body be doing that too? peter, idon't will the eu as a body be doing that too? peter, i don't know if you can hear me, unfortunately we can't hear you. great, we have you now. i was just asking if the eu was a body, irrespective of individual countries, will you be pressing president biden to extend the deadline for the withdrawal from afghanistan. deadline for the withdrawal from afghanistan-— deadline for the withdrawal from afuhanistan. , ., . afghanistan. sorry for the technical clitch afghanistan. sorry for the technical alitch and afghanistan. sorry for the technical glitch and hello. _ afghanistan. sorry for the technical glitch and hello. for— afghanistan. sorry for the technical glitch and hello. for the _ afghanistan. sorry for the technical glitch and hello. for the european. glitch and hello. for the european union it was a priority that couple airport remains operational for two reasons. it is a neck set point for eu citizens and local afghans who were working for the eu, secondly it is an important access point for the humanitarian assistance that will need to be delivered —— it is an
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exit point for eu citizens and local afghans. we are interested in keeping it open as long as possible, but since the us has no military presence on the ground and depends on co—operation among the eu member states, i will not go into details of all the ongoing efforts in order to ensure the airport remains operational and that the main priority is completed, the evacuation of eu citizens and local afghan staff working for the eu. if afghan staff working for the eu. if the deadline is not extended, what problems do you foresee in terms of people who want to leave afghanistan being able to get out in the future? are you concerned it may become more difficult? for are you concerned it may become more difficult? ., , difficult? for the eu it is important _ difficult? for the eu it is important that _ difficult? for the eu it is important that couple i difficult? forthe eu it is- important that couple airport remains operational for all those who need it, even beyond the originally set deadline of august the 31st. the representative of eu foreign policy has said clearly we
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will not be able to get everyone out of afghanistan, it is not thinkable that everybody would leave from afghanistan, the entire population. sorry to interrupt, contact with the taliban to try to ensure the future safe passage, others contact under way? we safe passage, others contact under wa ? ~ ., ., way? we are engaging with the taliban on _ way? we are engaging with the taliban on an _ way? we are engaging with the taliban on an operational - way? we are engaging with the taliban on an operational level| way? we are engaging with the l taliban on an operational level to make sure we can compete ongoing evacuations and can take care of all those people who need protection from the european union, and it is important to deliver our messages to the taliban and we hope they will not go to a situation where they will persecute everyone somehow related to the international community, we have operational contacts with the taliban to make sure the operations are completed but also to deliver our messages and expectations about what we are watching when having future engagement with afghanistan. 20c}
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engagement with afghanistan. 200 million euros _ engagement with afghanistan. 200 million euros from the eu want top of member states' contributions to help the people of afghanistan, is this for the immediate humanitarian need? ., ., this for the immediate humanitarian need? ., . . need? indeed, although we are sto -|n~ need? indeed, although we are stopping all— need? indeed, although we are stopping all the _ need? indeed, although we are stopping all the developmentsl need? indeed, although we are - stopping all the developments money being allocated to afghanistan until we see how the situation develops, humanitarian assistance is a priority and it will not be stopped, it will be increased. today the president of the european commission delivered on this. we want to cater to the immediate needs of the afghan people, the huge number of internally displaced within afghanistan and those in neighbouring countries who need humanitarian assistance. according to re orts, humanitarian assistance. according to reports. v8 _ humanitarian assistance. according to reports. v8 is — humanitarian assistance. according to reports, v8 is conditional- humanitarian assistance. according to reports, v8 is conditional on - humanitarian assistance. according to reports, v8 is conditional on thej to reports, v8 is conditional on the respective human and women's rights by the taliban —— this aid is conditional. how will you confirm whether they are respecting those rights in order that the age should flow? ladle rights in order that the age should flow? ~ ., ., , , ,
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flow? we have to distinguish between development — flow? we have to distinguish between development aid _ flow? we have to distinguish between development aid and _ flow? we have to distinguish between development aid and humanitarian . development aid and humanitarian aid. humanitarian aid has no condition, the only assertion —— conditioners people need the assistance. it is distributed on the spot through agencies and ngos on the ground, we rely on them to make sure the humanitarian assistance reaches the people who really need it. development assistance is more systematic and really conditioned by criteria like respect for international obligations and human rights, especially the rights of minorities, so we will be watching this. while we stand as the european union ready to continue our engagement with afghanistan in the future in terms of development assistance, we will decide about any payments based on the track record by the taliban, but the humanitarian aid is flowing and will be flowing to those who need it.— to those who need it. those
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charities _ to those who need it. those charities and _ to those who need it. those charities and ngos - to those who need it. those charities and ngos in - to those who need it. those charities and ngos in turn l to those who need it. those i charities and ngos in turn rely to those who need it. those - charities and ngos in turn rely on you, i spoke to someone from the international rescue committee a few minutes ago and she said we will rely on organisations like the european union to ensure we continue to size —— safe access. thus majority of their staff are afghan nationals and what message do you have full groups like the ioc today? we insist on people who need it having access to humanitarian assistance, which is why i said one of the priorities was to keep couple airport operational not only for evacuations but deliveries of humanitarian assistance. couple airport is a main entry point. we insist on humanitarian access and we delivered this message to the taliban, it needs to be provided and guaranteed because it is very crucial for us as an international community to be able to reach all the afghan people in need and you
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need immediate humanitarian assistance. need immediate humanitarian assistance-— assistance. peter stano, the european — assistance. peter stano, the european commission's - assistance. peter stano, the european commission's lead spokesperson forforeign european commission's lead spokesperson for foreign thousands security policy, thank you. —— foreign affairs and security policy. it's almost 18 months since australia shut its borders to try to control the spread of coronavirus. with limits on how many travellers can come in, tens of thousands of australians are still unable to return home. as shaimaa khalil reports, a slow vaccination rollout means unrestricted international travel is still a long way off for australians. happy memories in a time of grief. christina's mum ilva died just a month ago in sweden. do you remember when she was here? and twice she was refused permission to travel for the funeral. because of australia's strict covid—19 rules about who can come in and out, christina had to watch the service online. it is weird when you see it on a small screen on a phone, and just, the translation of peace doesn't come, so i felt a lot of guilt. i felt like i left my brother alone.
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but also in respect of being there, as her daughter, you know... it's a level of respect that i think she should have been given. we have been hearing many stories of separation, of missed weddings and funerals, of new mums and dads struggling without family support, ofjust wanting to give their loved ones a hug. about one third of people living in australia were born overseas so travelling freely is an integral part of their lives. but the pandemic has changed all of that, with no real prospect of the borders s reopening anytime soon. anyone who arrives here must do two weeks in hotel quarantine, but there is limited space. this may have worked well for australia during the first year of the pandemic, but the delta strain is forcing the government to give up on its zero covid strategy and there are now growing calls for more international travel, and for people
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to quarantine at home. anyone who's fully vaccinated is going to be no significant risk to australia. i just don't understand the conservatism around this at the moment. denying thousands and thousands of people those connections, when you look at the risk level, itjust beggars belief. are about 30% of adults in australia are fully vaccinated. nowhere near the 80% target the government has set for more freedom of movement. many have decided not to wait. marissa and her family sold their house and are moving to the uk. we are doing this with a heavy heart. we have made a life here, we have a beautiful home, our daughter was born here, we never really thought we would leave, but we haven't seen ourfamilies for 18 months now, and it is not at all clear when we are going to have that opportunity again. she needs to know her grandparents. she literally thinks her
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grandparents live in the computer. even with sydney's outbreak, covered cases and deaths remain very low compared with other countries and, despite the complaints, tight border policies are still largely popular. —— covid—19 cases and deaths remain very low. but, even if australia has been a lucky place to be during the pandemic, that feeling of being locked in a huge toll. that is grandma. shaimaa khalil, bbc news, sydney. the headlines on bbc news... pressure builds on the us to delay its withdrawal from afghanistan, to allow more time for those trying to flee the country. growing calls in australia for the country to ease its quarantine restrictions, to help open up international travel. despite concerns about covid — and a one—year delay — the tokyo paralympics get under way today. people in england who need
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care are having to pay thousands of pounds extra a year to fund it, according to bbc research. in half of the 83 areas which responded to a bbc request, bills for people needing support had risen 10 per cent or more over two years. the government says it has put extra money into the care system. our social affairs correspondent alison holt has more. these are the things that make a huge difference to saskia's life — her football and her own flat. she has a learning disability and to live independently, she relies on help from her local council. i get support workers coming in to support me and cook. if it wasn't for them coming in, i would have struggled big time. her mum looks after her finances. this was my appeal against the increased charges. she was horrified when the amount saskia was expected to contribute to her care from her benefits suddenly increased from £92 a month to more than £500 a month.
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it will mean that her life is far from fulfilled or enriched. it will mean that she has to make difficult choices, or i have to make difficult choices for her. that she can't take a train to where she plays football with her team. when mum told me, she just burst out into tears, and i was like... i hate seeing my mum cry. the family also says £1500 was taken from saskia's account without warning to cover backdated charges. without my intervention, she would not have had any food that week, she would have not been able to pay her gas, electricity or water bills. the bbc asked councils in england about increases in care charges. 83 responded. in the past two years, they have increased the money they collect from people needing care by £51 million, the equivalent of a 13% rise in costs for each person getting support. and six councils have doubled the money they raised from community—based
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learning disability services. this is another sign social care is in crisis and it needs more money, it needs proper reform. this is simply wrong, that people who are the least well off in society are being expected to make up the shortfall, when this money should come from government. directors of council care services say after years of austerity, their finances are so tight they face really tough decisions. it is not what local authorities would choose to do, but increasingly we are just running out of options. we need to stay solvent, we want to continue to be able to provide services and levelling charges isjust one way of doing that. the government says it has put extra money into supporting people like saskia and will publish plans for reform soon. alison holt, bbc news. mcdonalds says it's run out of milkshakes and bottled drinks in its outlets in england, wales and scotland after supply chain issues. the firm has apologised for the inconvenience and says they're "working hard to return
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the items to the menu as soon as possible." they're the latest firm to be hit by problems, after similar issues at nandos and kfc. the industry says there's currently a shortage of 90,000 hgv drivers, blamed on older drivers retiring, new immigration rules after brexit, and covid restrictions that stopped new recruits taking tests. the webb family from warwickshire were given a mission. and they chose to accept it. and the mission led to an encounter with hollywood royalty. what seemed even more impossible was to expect that her children would be given a ride in tom cruise's helicopter. yes, the a—lister is filming the latest mission: impossible and so tom needed to land his chopper nearby. he hooked up with alison webb and the rest is... well, let's find out from alison and her family. alongside alison is her daughter merle and alison's partner neil.
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i think he somewhat serve at the helicopter landed but not today. how did this happen? —— i think your son was there. we did this happen? -- i think your son was there-— was there. we were outside, en'oying the sunshine — was there. we were outside, en'oying the sunshine on i was there. we were outside, en'oying the sunshine on a i was there. we were outside, en'oying the sunshine on a weekend, _ was there. we were outside, enjoying the sunshine on a weekend, two - was there. we were outside, enjoying the sunshine on a weekend, two of i the sunshine on a weekend, two of tom's team had been looking around the area. where to land the helicopter because the airport was closing early, so my initial thoughts were, cool for the kids to watch the helicopter land, why not? at that point i had no... taste watch the helicopter land, why not? at that point i had no. . ._ at that point i had no... we 'ust lost our at that point i had no... we 'ust lost your sound. i at that point i had no... we 'ust lost your sound. did i at that point i had no... we 'ust lost your sound. did you i at that point i had no... we just lost your sound. did you know l at that point i had no... we just i lost your sound. did you know when you were asked to allow the helicopter to land in your garden that tom cruise was going to be in it? ., ., ., ., ., it? not at all, no idea. neil, described — it? not at all, no idea. neil, described the _ it? not at all, no idea. neil, described the moment i it? not at all, no idea. neil, j described the moment when it? not at all, no idea. neil, i described the moment when tom it? not at all, no idea. neil, _ described the moment when tom cruise got out and you realised it was him? i think the initial thoughts were,
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wow _ i think the initial thoughts were, wow the — i think the initial thoughts were, wow. the helicopter was probably 50 metres— wow. the helicopter was probably 50 metres from the house, we did not know— metres from the house, we did not know who — metres from the house, we did not know who it— metres from the house, we did not know who it was until tom got in picture _ know who it was until tom got in picture shot, really, quite surprised to say the least. merle, ou are surprised to say the least. merle, you are nine. _ surprised to say the least. merle, you are nine. l— surprised to say the least. merle, you are nine, i believe _ surprised to say the least. merle, you are nine, i believe your- surprised to say the least. merle, i you are nine, i believe your parents were getting really excited about tom cruise being in your garden, but did you have any idea who he was? no. ., ., ., , ., no. none at all? i believe you had to ask the — no. none at all? i believe you had to ask the question, _ no. none at all? i believe you had to ask the question, who - no. none at all? i believe you had to ask the question, who is - no. none at all? i believe you had to ask the question, who is tom . to ask the question, who is tom cruise? is that right?— to ask the question, who is tom cruise? is that right? yes. i knew he was famous, _ cruise? is that right? yes. i knew he was famous, i _ cruise? is that right? yes. i knew he was famous, i recognised i cruise? is that right? yes. i knew he was famous, i recognised his i he was famous, i recognised his name, _ he was famous, i recognised his name. but — he was famous, i recognised his name. but i _ he was famous, i recognised his name. but i was— he was famous, i recognised his name, but i was not _ he was famous, i recognised his name, but i was not sure - he was famous, i recognised his name, but i was not sure why. i| he was famous, i recognised his. name, but i was not sure why. i am“ name, but i was not sure why. i am sure your — name, but i was not sure why. i am sure your parents _ name, but i was not sure why. i am sure your parents filled _ name, but i was not sure why. sure your parents filled you in on that? did they tell you about his movies? , that? did they tell you about his movies?- then _ that? did they tell you about his movies?- then can - that? did they tell you about his movies? yes. then can you tell us about what — movies? yes. then can you tell us about what happens _ movies? yes. then can you tell us
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about what happens next? we i movies? yes. then can you tell us. about what happens next? we were invited to go — about what happens next? we were invited to go on _ about what happens next? we were invited to go on the _ about what happens next? we were invited to go on the helicopter, i about what happens next? we were invited to go on the helicopter, but| invited to go on the helicopter, but my mum _ invited to go on the helicopter, but my mum was — invited to go on the helicopter, but my mum was too _ invited to go on the helicopter, but my mum was too scared. - invited to go on the helicopter, but my mum was too scared. but i invited to go on the helicopter, but my mum was too scared.— invited to go on the helicopter, but my mum was too scared. but you and our my mum was too scared. but you and your brother — my mum was too scared. but you and your brother went? _ my mum was too scared. but you and your brother went? yes. _ my mum was too scared. but you and your brother went? yes. wow, i my mum was too scared. but you and your brother went? yes. wow, what i your brother went? yes. wow, what was that like? _ your brother went? yes. wow, what was that like? it _ your brother went? yes. wow, what was that like? it was _ your brother went? yes. wow, what was that like? it was really - your brother went? yes. wow, what was that like? it was really cool, i was that like? it was really cool, when we went _ was that like? it was really cool, when we went to _ was that like? it was really cool, when we went to a _ was that like? it was really cool, when we went to a helicopter i was that like? it was really cool, | when we went to a helicopter the driver— when we went to a helicopter the driver stopped _ when we went to a helicopter the driver stopped in _ when we went to a helicopter the driver stopped in midair- when we went to a helicopter the driver stopped in midair and i when we went to a helicopter the driver stopped in midairand it. when we went to a helicopter the i driver stopped in midair and it was really— driver stopped in midair and it was really scary — driver stopped in midair and it was really scary. lt— driver stopped in midair and it was really scary-— really scary. it sounds scary, but very exciting- — really scary. it sounds scary, but very exciting. alison, _ really scary. it sounds scary, but very exciting. alison, what i really scary. it sounds scary, but very exciting. alison, what was i really scary. it sounds scary, but i very exciting. alison, what was tom cruise like, what did you chat about? .. . cruise like, what did you chat about? ., , .., about? he was delightful, he came over, he about? he was delightful, he came over. he was _ about? he was delightful, he came over, he was very _ about? he was delightful, he came over, he was very covid _ about? he was delightful, he came over, he was very covid aware i about? he was delightful, he came over, he was very covid aware so i about? he was delightful, he came | over, he was very covid aware so he kept his distance, kept his mask on, elbow pump us, just thanked us very much for allowing them to use the field. he chatted with the children. just a really nice guy. bud
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field. he chatted with the children. just a really nice guy.— just a really nice guy. and i imaaine just a really nice guy. and i imagine a _ just a really nice guy. and i imagine a pretty _ just a really nice guy. and i imagine a pretty surreal- just a really nice guy. and i - imagine a pretty surreal experience, neil? , ., , , , ., imagine a pretty surreal experience, neil? , i, ., not neil? just a bit. very surreal. not our neil? just a bit. very surreal. not your typical _ neil? just a bit. very surreal. not your typical weekend! _ neil? just a bit. very surreal. not your typical weekend! thank i neil? just a bit. very surreal. not your typical weekend! thank you | neil? just a bit. very surreal. not i your typical weekend! thank you so much, alison, nealand your typical weekend! thank you so much, alison, neal and merle for talking to me. much, alison, neal and merle for talking to me-_ it's two years since brighton and hove council banned the use of toxic weed killers. the council, which is led by the green party, took the decision after a petition from residents, but critics say it's led to nuisance weeds on pavements. james dunn has more. the cityscape going green. and though few disagree with the admirable aim of protecting the environment, many feel this is not a sensible alternative. the first problem is a growing cost bill on compensation and pavement repairs that is going to be a long—lasting issue. then it is safety and then there is just general accessibility issues. the council has pledged to stop using all pesticides by 2022,
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with weed clearances reduced from twice to once a year. but there are mixed feelings on the results. i think it is disgusting. i have been a brighton resident for years. i have never seen it so bad in all my lifetime. it is a dangerous chemical, so we can't do that, so it has to be done physically and it needs to be kept on top of. i'm not very keen on the grass i and weeds growing in the cracks in the paving slabs, - because it is obviously not very good for people i who have limited mobility. as well as the obvious trip hazard caused by these weeds growing out of the pavement, there are also the spiky grasses that can cause a real problem if they get stuck in a dog's paw. i spoke to one couple who said they had been to the vet numerous times over the last couple of years, spending hundreds of pounds getting it sorted out. but the council say the pandemic has exacerbated the problem. at a time when we are facing
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an ecological emergency throughout the planet, the least we can do is to stop using such harmful pesticides in our city. the impact of this, of course, is that we get weeds. and we get a lot of weeds, especially after hot, wet weather like we have had this summer. it has created a growth spurt. city clean remove the weeds manually. obviously that is a much more environmentally friendly way of doing things, but very labour—intensive. due to covid, we have had an enormous staff crisis. councillors say they are trying to organise extra weed clearances. in the meantime, many residents have had to find their own solution to this growing problem. latest figures just in from the ministry of defence in the uk on the numbers of people evacuated by uk forces since august 13, 8458 people in total, 5171 of those people in
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the afghan relocation and assistance policy programme, nine uk military flights leaving kabul in the last 24 hours but time is thought to be running out on that evacuation operation. you were watching bbc news. joanna will be here with you next. now it's time for a look at the weather with carole. hello again. high pressure still firmly in charge of our weather at the moment and will be as we go through the rest of this week. but there will be areas of cloud at times, and generally it's going to be warmer and sunnier in the west, but by the time we get to the weekend, temperatures will be slipping a little bit. now, the high pressure across us today will be with us, as i mentioned, for the rest of the week. but it is slap bang across us at the moment. the air coming around it in a clockwise direction, so chillier across the north—east of england and breezier too across, for example, the english channel. we also have a fair bit of cloud draped across the northern ireland, the far north of mainland scotland and the western isles, but come inland, this morning's mist
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and fog lifting quite rapidly, leaving us with some sunshine. —— draped across the northern isles. highs of up to 25 in glasgow. brightening up in northern ireland and northern england where we've got this swathe of cloud across parts of northern england and wales, which could be thick enough here and there for the odd spot of drizzle. for west wales, southern england, the south midlands and east anglia, it should stay dry with sunny spells. now, through this evening and overnight we should still have some of this cloud, it will sink a bit further south and we've got a weather front coming in across the north—east of scotland, introducing some more cloud here as well, with temperatures falling away between 12 and 14 degrees. so tomorrow our high pressure area, instead of being slap bang across us, just drifts to the north—west. here is our weatherfront coming in, introducing more cloud. so not only is it going to be cloudy, it is going to be breezy down the north sea coastline so it will feel cooler here, but you can see where we've got the cloud draped across the north and the west, today's cloud sinking a little bit further south and breaking up a touch as well, so more of us seeing some sunshine. temperatures in the south 20 or 21,
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but we could hit 24 or 25, for example, around the glasgow area. now, wednesday you can see how that weather front continues to sink southwards through the evening and overnight, by thursday it's going to continue to do so, allowing a chilly northerly wind to follow on behind it. and it will drag in a lot of moisture from the north sea in the shape of cloud. so the brightest skies will be out towards the west, here we'll see the lion's share of the sunshine and temperatures 22 in glasgow, 22 in cardiff, so the temperatures going down just a little bit. the average at this time of the year, by the way, is roughly 19 to 22 north to south. but the weather remains settled as we go through into the weekend.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11. pressure builds on the us to delay its withdrawal from afghanistan — to allow more time for those trying to flee the country. an emergency summit of g—7 leaders will discuss the crisis in afghanistan later. we have to plan on the 3ist of august being the last moment. every day we get after that will be a big bonus, and we would like it. the reality is unless we get that agreement at the g7 today, many, many people will be left behind and face reprisals from the taliban. it comes as the un human rights chief warns of credible reports of violations in areas of afghanistan controlled by the taliban we have received credible reports i of violations of international lawi
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and human rights abuses taking place in areas under effective _ taliban control. disabled and vulnerable adults in england are facing steep rises in charges for their care, bbc research finds. despite concerns about covid — and a one year delay — the tokyo paralympics get under way today. good morning. us officials say president biden will decide within the next 24 hours whether to defy the taliban and keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the end of this month. the prime minister is to urge world leaders to step up support for refugees fleeing the taliban in afghanistan when he chairs a virtual g7 meeting later.
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it's expected that france and germany willjoin the uk in pushing president biden to delay the withdrawal of american troops from afghanistan the calls for a delay come as the head of the eu's executive commission —ursula von der leyen — announces the eu will ramp up humanitarian support for afghans in and around their country to over 200 million euros from over 50 million euros. as things stand — us troops depart in a week's time — even though evacuations from kabul�*s main airport may not be completed by then. the us has evacuated and facilitated the evacuation of roughly 48,000 people since an intense airlift started on 14 august while the uk evacuation effort continues — this morning the ministry of defence say 8,458 have been evacuated from the uk since the 13 august. the pressure on the us ahead of the g7 summits comes as the un human rights chief says she's received credible reports of violations in areas of afghanistan under taliban control , including summary executions and restrictions on women.
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our correspondent secunder kermani is in kabul this morning, and has been following the situation at the airport... there was a lot of confusion amongst the people at the airport, really. i don't think that level of information is filtering through. many of them don't even know what they need to do in order to get out of the country. many have just pitched upholding documents that they printed out proving that they or their close relatives worked with international troops, with foreign forces and they're trying to get to the front of this cloud, these huge crowds at times, where soldiers firing above their head just to try and weigh the documents on the faces of the soldiers. thing is, even if they manage to do that, then vast majority of them will not be allowed through to the airport because they've not got the right permissions yet. they haven't gone through the process of being granted permission to board an evacuation
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flight. very full view of those at the airport do have that. some do and they are also struggling to get through the clouds, of course, as well, but, really, it was mike a quite chaotic scene and people are... you know, every time i go there we arejust are... you know, every time i go there we are just inundated with people desperate for any kind of information showing their documents to me, asking if i can help, asking if i can tell them what they need to do. it's's... it's's very... it's's a heartbreaking situation, really, because there is very little we can tell them and what we can tell them is not what they want to hear. i saw very chaotic scenes on friday outside a british —controlled date. there was no taliban there. the entire, many people were struggling to get through. people were in very dire conditions. that was nothing to do with the taliban, that was to do with the sheer volume of people there and the fact that the only way for someone to get three was to push their way to the front and source their way to the front and source their documents in the face of
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british soldiers. in fact, i'm told, that since then the taliban have set “p that since then the taliban have set up some kind of filtration system aimed at preventing those who do not have the right paperwork from being in the crowd and, kind of comic getting in the way of others who do have the correct permissions. we have the correct permissions. we have had reports in times of the taliban stopping or preventing or harassing some of those afghans who do have the right paperwork because they worked with international forces of foreign troops and preventing them from getting through to the airport but that does not seem to be the predominant issue from what i have seen. it's more just the sheer number of people who were there and, in many places, the lack of any real filtration system which we are those who are eligible and who aren't. it's just a kind of freefall. —— free for all.
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speaking before an emergency session on afghanistan, un rights chief michelle bachelet urged the taliban to honour commitments to respect the rights of women and girls, and ethnic and religious minorities, and refrain from reprisals. the taliban has pledged to protect and respect human rights. taliban spokes people have made specific commitments to protect women's right to work and will girls rights to attend school within the taliban's interpretation of islamic law. they have also said they will respect the rights of ethnic and religious minorities and refrain from reprisals against those who work with the government or international community. the onus is now fully on the taliban to translate this committment into reality, in having effective control of much of the country they must ensure in those areas ongoing respect for international human rights and ongoing and indeed heightened provision of essential public services without discrimination to all. international human rights law is immutable. enjoyment of human rights is not
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subject to changes in control of territory or de facto authority. our political correspondent ione wells is at westminster. over to you. might make that's right. figs over to you. might make that's riuht. �* . .. . over to you. might make that's riuht. a ., , ,. ,, right. as we have been discussing, latest neighbours _ right. as we have been discussing, latest neighbours leaders - right. as we have been discussing, latest neighbours leaders of- right. as we have been discussing, latest neighbours leaders of the i right. as we have been discussing, j latest neighbours leaders of the g7 are meeting to discuss the situation in afghanistan and we are expecting that the uk, france and germany are trying to push the us to extend the sist trying to push the us to extend the 31st of august deadline to withdraw their troops to afghanistan and it is important to remind ourselves why does this whole matter, really, because the uk has been very clear that without the us those evacuations currently going on from that international airport in parable can't continue in the way that they have been and that is because the us is not only securing the airport with their 6000 troops and theirjets patrolling the skies but they also quite literally operating the airport, in charge of things like air traffic control which are keeping those planes going, keeping those evacuations running as well. now, with thousands more uk citizens but also afghans
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who are eligible for resettlement in the uk still to evacuate that is the reason why uk defence secretary ben wallace has been quite clear that with that deadline still in place we now really happy hour not weeks to get everyone out and it is pretty much a race against time. —— we now really have hours not weeks. he is not optimistic that the us is going to extend that deadline. time matters more than anything. we have planned for the worst, the 3ist of august, that is why we have flown in 1000 troops to access the system, to be there, to process these people, to make sure that we secure the airport. we flew them in midway through august. they've done an amazing job. i wish that we had more time. i think at the moment it is unlikely, having seen these public statements of president biden and from the taliban, but we have to plan on the 3ist of august being the last moment. every day we get after that would be a big bonus.
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we would like it. not for any other ulterior motives. the taliban should not fear that we are there, in any way, but we will see, and i know that at the moment they have said no, we saw that in the interviews yesterday, but time is people. in the interviews in the media yesterday, but time is people. ben wallace has also been very upfront about the fact that in the past he has admitted that not everyone will be to get out in time something that has made a very emotional interviews as well but the us are currently quite adamant that they are sticking to that deadline and a tell a banner saying will be repercussions of the deadline is extended the question is now turning to what kind of leaders could be used against the taliban to try and convince them to let that deadline be extended so this is something that the shadow foreign secretary lisa nandy said that the uk under the nation should be using every possible either to try and push for an extension to this average. —— every possible lever to push for an
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extension to this air bridge. the air bridge is about to close, it's due to close on august 31, and my office is in touch with hundreds of people who are still stuck in afghanistan, who are eligible to come out on uk flights but just simply can't get onto them for lots of different reasons. so we've got to get an agreement at the g7 today that we will make a common approach to the taliban to extend that deadline, and that relies on us support. it really does matter — there's very few other options available to us, and the reality is unless we get that agreement at the g7 today, many, many people will be left behind and face reprisals from the taliban. well, the uk defence secretary ben wallace has also talked about certain levers like afghanistan's reliance on international finance that could possibly be used to try and convince the tell have a need for some kind of extension but the question is at the moment is there anything else that could be done. for example, numberten anything else that could be done. for example, number ten seem to have ruled out any idea of possible sanctions against the taliban, even
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though this is something which previously the foreign secretary dominic bao had said in interviews that the uk may be considering. —— dominic raab. at the moment it looks like dermot, street aren't currently considering they may be using any sanctions on at the taliban. the reason this all matters is because the taliban said they want to share and the 31st we have to think not just as i had deadline but actually the fact that evacuations in the ukmy perspective need to start mapping before then because it is not like we can just get to the 31st of august and suddenly anyone remaining will be ale to get out so time is the defence secretary has stressed is really looking like matters of hours and days rather than weeks but i think our lives are going to be in the g7 summit this afternoon to confirm what a progress has been made in extending that deadline. we are expecting to hear from the present as was the finest after that to him a little bit more about what was concluded. with me now is jack straw, the former labour foreign secretary under tony blair, from 2001 to 2006.
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welcome. as foreign secretary you are the first minister from a foreign government to go into kabul after the fall of the taliban. if you are in government now what would you are in government now what would you be doing? i you are in government now what would you be doing?— you be doing? i think there are very limited options _ you be doing? i think there are very limited options for _ you be doing? i think there are very limited options for the _ you be doing? i think there are very limited options for the british i limited options for the british government right now and ben wallace, the defence secretary i think has spelt those out that it is frankly not practical for the british to try to hold the airport without support of the us. we have got 1000 troops which is the second largest contingent at the airport for the us has got 5000 troops and they have also got surveillance and other crucial support which we don't have. you could get it in but i think it is fanciful to think that we could do this by ourselves but there would be an incredible loss of life and we may not ever get them anyway. planes might destroyed meanwhile so it is not practical. i think there have been many missteps
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on the way, without any question, missteps by obama, trump and nowjoe biden administration i am afraid in these negotiations with the taliban which gave them what they wanted without anything coming back. obviously, that was an absolutely key step, wasn't it, that agreement between the trump administration and the taliban in 2000. negotiations that happened without the afghan government being involved but it doesn't seem at the time that there was much of the open outcry from the international community but was it a failure of others as well? it international community but was it a failure of others as well?— failure of others as well? it may have been _ failure of others as well? it may have been but _ failure of others as well? it may have been but bear— failure of others as well? it may have been but bear in _ failure of others as well? it may have been but bear in mind i i failure of others as well? it may i have been but bear in mind i don't know what secret or confidential traffic there was between us and the us but they have been but bear in mind i don't know what secret or confidential traffic there was between us and the us but bear in mind that president trump was impervious to representations both from people within his administration who disagreed with him and still more with so—called
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allies. joe biden is cut from a different cloth. he follows the international approach of previous us administrations, including, to some extent, obama and certainly george bush and bill clinton but it isjust worth george bush and bill clinton but it is just worth bearing this in george bush and bill clinton but it isjust worth bearing this in mind that the us have always been completely ruthless in pursuit first of their own self interest and i've always personally avoided like the plague of the term special relationship because it is a conceit by oars and, frankly, when it is used in the us it is kind of patronising. all countries seek to have special relationships with other countries, you know? so we have a closer relationship with the us on some issues but if you are going to try to move on administration and i saw tony blair do this with the bush administration and i played my part you have to get very close indeed to key us players,
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in that case george bush and in my case... and congolese of ice and with both i was talking to in the middle east to a three times a week and often every day —— condoleeza rice. in that sort of situation you can exert a considerable amounts of influence what this is going back and by the way this is not a criticism of ben wallace who been doing astonishing job but if you go back i think that you can see that mrjohnson has not had the traction that a british prime minister ought to have built up with an american president. in to have built up with an american resident. . to have built up with an american resident. , ., ., president. in terms of where we are now with the _ president. in terms of where we are now with the taliban _ president. in terms of where we are now with the taliban saying - president. in terms of where we are now with the taliban saying that i now with the taliban saying that they see any extension be on the sist they see any extension be on the 31st of august as being a foreign occupation and there would be consequences of that, in that
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context, does that, sort of, vindicate joe context, does that, sort of, vindicatejoe biden in saying that that agreement once it was in train meant that he didn't really have an alternative and would it be a sensible move for the government is to remain and keep their forces sensible move for the government is to remain and keep theirforces in the line of danger in against such a vocalised threat? the the line of danger in against such a vocalised threat?— vocalised threat? the answer that ruestion vocalised threat? the answer that question is _ vocalised threat? the answer that question is no _ vocalised threat? the answer that question is no it _ vocalised threat? the answer that question is no it wouldn't - vocalised threat? the answer that question is no it wouldn't be i vocalised threat? the answer that question is no it wouldn't be and i vocalised threat? the answer that| question is no it wouldn't be and it begs the question we have discussed which is water under the bridge and about such an agreement both by president trump and then by president trump and then by president biden was sensible. now, it is always possible that in the last moment the taliban who don't want an international bloodbath, which will damage their very carefully crafted pr operation which they are following at the moment may allow a couple of days extension and implicit anyway in this is that it
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is going to take more than the 31st of august before all foreign troops have left but of course the taliban are keeping their allies feet in the fire about this and i can see exactly why they�* re fire about this and i can see exactly why they're doing this and of course what we cannot contemplate is the possibility that we are staying there without tacit approval of the taliban because that would lead to both substantial loss of life and probably loss of key equipment, including aeroplanes in f but which are ours. jack equipment, including aeroplanes in f but which are ours.— but which are ours. jack straw, thank you _ but which are ours. jack straw, thank you very _ but which are ours. jack straw, thank you very much. - but which are ours. jack straw, thank you very much. joining i but which are ours. jack straw, i thank you very much. joining me but which are ours. jack straw, - thank you very much. joining me now. lewis lukens is the former acting us ambassador to the uk, and deputy chief of the mission at the us embassy in london until 2019. he's now a senior partner with signum global advisors — welcome. thank you forjoining us. do you think there's any real prospect of an extension to the deadline? h0.
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think there's any real prospect of an extension to the deadline? ho. i an extension to the deadline? no, i thinkjoe biden _ an extension to the deadline? no, i thinkjoe biden has _ an extension to the deadline? no, i thinkjoe biden has very _ an extension to the deadline? no, i thinkjoe biden has very well- an extension to the deadline? iirr, i thinkjoe biden has very well made up thinkjoe biden has very well made up his mind that august 30 versus the date. it is possible it will slip by a day or two but i don't see any substantial revision of the deadline but my guess i hope is that the g7 really focuses beyond that and how to establish relations, if to establish relations with the taliban, how to address some of the humanitarian issues that will be coming out afghanistan but i think the question extending the deadline is probably decided already. just to look back from _ is probably decided already. just to look back from one _ is probably decided already. just to look back from one more _ is probably decided already. just to look back from one more another i look back from one more another moment before we turn to the future? do you thinkjoe biden could have done things differently? i do you thinkjoe biden could have done things differently?— done things differently? i think time will tell— done things differently? i think time will tell but _ done things differently? i think time will tell but my _ done things differently? i think time will tell but my sense i done things differently? i think time will tell but my sense as i done things differently? i think| time will tell but my sense as it has been quite a successful and historic evacuation of thousands of people with minimal loss of life. i mean, any loss of life obviously is tragic but it has been overall a very successful evacuation under very successful evacuation under very difficult circumstances so as joe biden has said they would never have been a perfect time to leave
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and to carry about this evacuation and to carry about this evacuation and i think he felt strongly that it was now or never and there was no reason to extend it and i think all indications are in the readout of the phone call last night between joe biden and borisjohnson also indicates that he is not really open to an extension.— indicates that he is not really open to an extension. looking ahead and at how the international _ to an extension. looking ahead and at how the international community engages with the taliban, how do you think that should be handled? ihell. think that should be handled? well, these countries _ think that should be handled? well, these countries and _ think that should be handled? well, these countries and the _ think that should be handled? well, these countries and the g7 - these countries and the g7 especially have to make a decision as to whether they will recognise the taliban as the legitimate government of afghanistan and it is a hard decision to make given some of the taliban's history and as my friend jack straw just of the taliban's history and as my friend jack strawjust mentioned the taliban are reinventing themselves and putting out a friendlier face to the world... and putting out a friendlier face to the world- - -_ the world... sorry, they say they are but obviously _ the world... sorry, they say they are but obviously we _ the world... sorry, they say they are but obviously we are - the world... sorry, they say they are but obviously we are hearing| are but obviously we are hearing that they there is evidence to the contrary. big mac exactly, right, my point is that they say they every
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invented but the evidence is starting to trickle in that at least pockets for them and not gotten the message so it puts the international community in a rather difficult commission because if you don't address the taliban how to address some of the humanitarian crisis certainly coming —— if you don't accept the taliban. refugees and food aid which you have to get to get to the taliban down the afghan people so my hope is that the g7 will be able to come to a consensus on that today may think that is the more important issue than extending the deadline for the evacuation. do you understand why the deal that was donein you understand why the deal that was done in 2020 was between the us government and the taliban and the afghan government wasn't involved at all? ~ ., ., ., �* all? well, no. i mean, i don't understand — all? well, no. i mean, i don't understand that _ all? well, no. i mean, i don't understand that ennis - all? well, no. i mean, i don't understand that ennis was . all? well, no. i mean, i don't- understand that ennis was donald trump's initiative and mike pompeo but in hindsight uncertainly at the time it seems evidence that excluding the afghan government from those talks would, salsa, deem them to fail eventually. i those talks would, salsa, deem them to fail eventually.— to fail eventually. i mean, are there any _ to fail eventually. i mean, are there any other _ to fail eventually. i mean, are there any other examples - to fail eventually. i mean, are there any other examples of l to fail eventually. i mean, are. there any other examples of an agreement like that being done
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without the government that is in charge of being involved? it doesn't seem like there was much scrutiny of another scrutiny of that even at the time? i another scrutiny of that even at the time? . ., ., ~ another scrutiny of that even at the time? h, ., ~ ., ., , another scrutiny of that even at the time? ., ~ ., ., , ., , time? i cannot think of any example of eace time? i cannot think of any example of peace talks _ time? i cannot think of any example of peace talks that _ time? i cannot think of any example of peace talks that do _ time? i cannot think of any example of peace talks that do not _ time? i cannot think of any example of peace talks that do not involve i of peace talks that do not involve a, sort of, the elected or the legitimate government of the country in question and i think in donald trump's mind he wanted a deal, he wanted a deal quickly and it was more complicated and more difficult and time—consuming to have to do have tripartite talks with the taliban and the government and the us and hejust made taliban and the government and the us and he just made a taliban and the government and the us and hejust made a decision, of mike pompeo decided to, that it was faster and easier regardless of the consequences down the vote to cut the fm government out of the talks and i think we are seeing the consequences of that now. lewis, thank ou consequences of that now. lewis, thank you for— consequences of that now. lewis, thank you forjoining _ consequences of that now. lewis, thank you forjoining us. - and for more on the evacations from afghanistan and the background to them, go to our live bbc news
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website — bbc.co.uk/news. you'll find all the latest developments and background such as a special report on trump's deal with the taliban. a person from afghanistan on the uk's no—fly watchlist was flown into birmingham as part of the evacuation of kabul, government officials have confirmed. the no—fly watchlist is used to stop people coming to the uk who are thought to be a security threat. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford explained how this person was able to board the flight. if you imagine how the watchlist works in normal times, if you apply for a visa to come to britain then that is checked against the watchlist and that might get refused at that point. or if somehow you manage to get a visa, on arrival in the uk the border force will check your details against the watchlist, and if you're on the watchlist you'll then be turned round and deported. well, it's the same system, but operating in superfast time and under extreme stress at kabul airport. so you've got foreign office and home office officials trying to deal with the people that
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are making it into the airport, and it does look as if one person on the watch list slipped through. they managed to actually pick up four people on the watchlist and not allow them onto a plane, but one person slipped through. i suppose what's vaguely reassuring is that was then undone. on arrival at birmingham airport, that same person was picked up by the border force officials as being on the watchlist. and, in fact, after a period of quite deep concern last night, it became clear that after further research into that person — it was the right person, but after further research into that person, the concerns that there had been about them actually have gone away. so we don't know whether they were security terrorism type concerns or criminality concerns, but in the end the person was freed and allowed to go on their way. daniel stamford reporting. the number of online grooming crimes recorded by police in england and wales hasjumped to an all—time high. figures obtained by the children's charity, the nspcc, show that instagram —
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which is owned by facebook — was the platform most commonly used by suspected paedophiles. legislation aimed at reducing online harms is due to be scrutinised in the lords next month. elaine — which is not her real name — was 13 when she met the man online who would go on to rape her. i was groomed online by a much older man who was 31 at the time. he started off by telling me he was younger than he was, but as the grooming went on, he would tell me he was slightly older, and then he was slightly older than that, but by that point i trusted him that much that it didn't matter, it didn't register. it went on for quite some time. we met in person. he sexually assaulted me and then went on to rape me twice. i didn't realise that that's what it was at the time. i thought that he loved to me and that's what you do. it wasn't until i was probably about 16 or 17 that it really hit home about what happened.
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well, andy burrows is head of child online safety at the nspcc — he says while it's positive that the government has committed to introduce an online safety bill, the charity is concerned it won't go far enough... really, what we want to see is a comprehensive and proactive set of requirements on tech firms to identify all of the potential risks that children can face when using their services, and then to take reasonable and proportionate steps to address them. there's some key areas where we think that the proposals are falling short. this is about modelling and responding to the way in which child abuse is happening. so, an obvious example of that is that grooming doesn't happen on a particular site. groomers will look to contact children on large sites, like facebook or instagram, but then migrate them across to a livestreaming platform, or perhaps to an encrypted messaging platform. and one of the key areas where the legislation is falling short is only asking platforms to address the risks on their own site, rather than working together to identify the emerging threats to share intelligence, to share best practice.
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andy burrows from the nspcc. mcdonalds says its run out of milkshakes and bottled drinks in its outlets in england, wales and scotland — after supply chain issues. let's get more on this with our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith. what's happening, then, with the situation, collector? hi. what's happening, then, with the situation, collector?— what's happening, then, with the situation, collector? hi, joanna. we have heard — situation, collector? hi, joanna. we have heard from _ situation, collector? hi, joanna. we have heard from mcdonald's - situation, collector? hi, joanna. we have heard from mcdonald's today i have heard from mcdonald's today that across 1250 is doors across as you say england and wales they are having problems with their supplies from milkshake and for certain bottled drinks so of course mcdonald's is notjust famous for the big mac in the quarter pounder, it is often for milkshakes and make love as well and most of those are made via fresh milk supplies coming into their stores across the uk and what mcdonald's are saying today is that they like lots of restaurants
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and food businesses across the uk have been having supply chain issues. you may well remember last week we heard that nando's had issues across about 50 of their stores getting hold of chicken that they had to shop for a good few days until those supply issues were worked out. now, a lot of that was caused because of a shortage of hgv drivers, so there's big delivery lorry drivers and that is caused because of a whole number of reasons that have piled together over recent weeks and that is because of brexit, of course, with many eu national drivers leaving the uk are not returning to the uk after covid—19. there have also been real problems because of covid—19 that there haven't been as many driving tests that have been able to take place over the last year and that is really caused a bottleneck in the system for hgv drivers and of course covid—19 itself. many are perhaps sick and are pinged from having to self—isolate. when you get those
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kind of supply chain issues in the system is a home you do get gluts in certain areas and when you are making decisions across the whole big wide system like mcdonald's do across all of the restaurants in the uk they have got to prioritise things that are fresh you need to get out quickly so if you have fresh meat sitting somewhere that need to be out in the restaurants and you have only got a limited number of hgv drivers or lobbies that can do that then the likelihood is that that then the likelihood is that thatis that then the likelihood is that that is what is doing at the moment so they are leaving the bottled drinks potentially sitting in the warehouses because they can sit and wait a lot longer. the milk issues are perhaps because of the supplier so a la are involved in the supply chain for all of mcdonald's restaurants across england, scotland and wales and they seem to be having issues as well with hgv drivers. so this is a common issue, an increasingly common issue that we are seeing across the food sector at the moment but it is something that is really coming to a head at mcdonald's at the moment. they are saying they are hoping these issues will be paid out quickly and they will be paid out quickly and they will be paid out quickly and they will be to get back to full menu in
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a moment but for those people heading out to mcdonald's today they are if you're expecting to take the kids out in the summer holidays were milkshake you may well put a pause in it and see what happens. hello again. over the next few days, with high pressure firmly in charge of our weather, we'll be seeing sunny spells but also areas of cloud, and we've got that scenario today. you can see this big lump of cloud across parts of england and wales, thick enough for the odd spot of drizzle, and we've got another area of cloud draped across the north and the west of scotland. at times we'll see some cloud coming in from the north sea. breezy here, breezy across the south—east as well and the english channel, we are talking temperatures up to 25, maybe 26 around the glasgow area. now, this cloud sinks a little bit further south tonight, we've got more cloud sinking south also across scotland, quite a keen breeze as well and temperatures overnight falling away, between 12 and 1a degrees. into tomorrow, then, we still will have all this cloud across the north and the west, still breezy down the north sea coastline so feeling fresher here, our cloud syncing south and breaking up a bit so there will be some
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sunshine for many of us tomorrow, top temperatures of 2a or 25. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: pressure builds on the us to delay its withdrawal from afghanistan — to allow more time for those trying to flee the country. an emergency summit of g7 leaders will discuss the crisis
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in afghanistan later. we have to plan on august 31 being the last moment. every day we get after that will be a big bonus, and we would like it. the reality is unless we get that agreement at the g7 today, many, many people will be left behind and face reprisals from the taliban. it comes as the un human rights chief warns of credible reports of violations in areas of afghanistan controlled by the taliban. we have received credible reports | of violations of international lawi and human rights abuses taking place in areas under effective _ taliban control. disabled and vulnerable adults in england are facing steep rises in charges for their care bbc research finds. despite concerns about covid and a one year delay — the tokyo paralympics get under way today. sport — and for a full round—up
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from the bbc sport centre. here's gavin. the paralympics opening ceremony takes place in tokyo in the next half an hour. swimmer ellie simmonds and archer john stubbs will carry the great britain flag, with the action getting under way tomorrow. rachael latham has been following the build—up from tokyo. the paralympics games in tokyo set to begin tonight with the opening ceremony. carry only five or great britain will be ellie simmonds and john stubbs, mo selected not only for their sporting achievements but for their sporting achievements but for their sporting achievements but for their commitment to the team as well. ellie has already won five gold medals for great britain in at the swimming pool and john won the gold in beijing in actually. this is at their fourth paralympics games, john is the oldest member of the
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team for great britain. ellie simmonds is a role model and inspiration from many. we have an increase of women increasing here in tokyo, an 11% increase compared to the real paralympics games. these sports start tomorrow. she is hoping to get her 15 tomorrow. we will also be seeing action in the swimming pool british sprinter zharnel hughes says he wants the doping investigation into team—mate cj ujah to be allowed to take place without prejudice. ujah has been provisionally suspended after a positive drugs test, just a week after he won olympic silver in the 4x100 metre relay alongside hughes. hughes said on social media to "let the process run its course." he said athletes need "a clean sport. the authorities are there to protect sport — something every athlete needs for fair competition. we also need to ensure that athletes finding themselves under the spotlight must have a fair hearing in their case, without prejudice."
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michail antonio will very happy this morning after becoming west ham's top premier league scorer and helping his club to the top of the table in the process. they beat leicester city 4—1 at the london stadium, with antonio scoring two of the goals. he's now passed paulo dicanio's club record. known for his creative celebrations, antonio had a carboard cut out of himself ready and waiting by the side of the pitch so he could re—create the lift from the film, dirty dancing. i'm really pleased for him because he got a few choice words at half—time and he certainly knew how to shut the manager up with what he donein to shut the manager up with what he done in the second half. i thought he needed few decisions in the first half that were at the wrong choices, but he played really well in at the second half. if we can keep him in good condition he is always going to be a big threat. maybe if i could run to someone, and someone could pick me up, and i could be cut like a
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baby. i wanted to be cut like a baby, but i realise i'm 94 kilograms, so i decided to do it to myself. england captainjoe root says england can still win the series against india ahead of their third test at headingley, despite being 1—0 down after a poor performance at lords. england drew the first test and were criticised after a dismal batting performance in the second. they've had a further blow with bowler mark wood being ruled out of the third test with a shoulder injury. 1-0 1—0 down, three games to play. we have found ourselves in at the situation before and we have come out the other side of it. even last time we played india, or two times ago, we found ourselves in exactly the same situation, having lost at lord's, and then going on to win it 3-1. lord's, and then going on to win it 3—1. more recently in cape town, coming back in that series against south africa. this group of players
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have had experience of colin behind from a in a series and winning. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. her majesty's inspector of constabulary has told police forces in england and wales they need to do more to protect women and girls from violence and harm. zoe billingham was responding to a complaint by the centre for women'sjustice, that police were failing to use measures at their disposal more effectively, such as pre—charge bail. nogah ofer is a solicitor from the centre for women's justice who wrote the super complaint in 2019. thank you forjoining us. the report shows some pretty stark statistics in terms of the number of prosecutions, falling by 50% from 2017 to at last year. in 2017, only 80 been sent of reported cases lead to prosecutions. —— 18%. it was 9%
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last year. what is your reaction? our super complaint was actually about not using protective borders. domestic violence protection orders, lamela station protection orders and so on. at a time when there are fewer and fewer prosecutions, women are also not having protection orders put in place to protect them, which is what we were really concerned about. it which is what we were really concerned about.— which is what we were really concerned about. it has been said that sometimes _ concerned about. it has been said that sometimes police _ concerned about. it has been said that sometimes police are - concerned about. it has been said that sometimes police are not - concerned about. it has been said i that sometimes police are not aware of the powers available to them and the processes can be confusing. does that answer why the situation is why it is as it is?— it is as it is? there are lots of reasons for— it is as it is? there are lots of reasons for that. _ it is as it is? there are lots of reasons for that. we - it is as it is? there are lots of reasons for that. we believe l it is as it is? there are lots of- reasons for that. we believe under resourcing is a huge problem, which is the sort of elephant in at the rim and this report. if officers don't seem to know what their powers are and are not using them, there
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needs to be clear measures in place to increase training, the number of specialist officers, ring fenced funding and so on. can specialist officers, ring fenced funding and so on.— specialist officers, ring fenced funding and so on. can you tell us more about _ funding and so on. can you tell us more about how _ funding and so on. can you tell us more about how this _ funding and so on. can you tell us more about how this has - funding and so on. can you tell us more about how this has been - more about how this has been affecting the women who have come across your radar? women who clearly feel they are in danger and they are just not able to get protection? aha, just not able to get protection? lot of women that we are from and also front line domestic workers report, for example, that when you go to the civil court they get a non—molestation order. when at that is breach, the police do not take action to arrest those perpetrators even though it is a criminal offence. we hear about lots of cases when other types of protections aren't used, for example, bail conditions on use when someone has been arrested, which tell the person not to count the women, the survivor who reported. across the board, we
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see a four see all these different laws and powers the news on paper. this is acknowledged in this report, which describes an ever epidemic of violence and abuse. so it is confirming what you have obviously never win. confirming what you have obviously neverwin. but confirming what you have obviously never win. but in terms of anything changing, what is the situation? we changing, what is the situation? - welcome the fact that they report upholds our complaint. mostly. and that there are some positive recommendations, but we are a bit concerned that the recommendations are very general and they're not ready concrete and specific, and whether they will actually do any real change on the ground. so often that they are general recommendations of things and they disappear into the ether. we were hoping for a more concrete specific changes that would actually force police forces change what they're doing day to day. police forces change what they're doing day to day-— police forces change what they're doing day to day. what would those that look like? —
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doing day to day. what would those that look like? for _ doing day to day. what would those that look like? for example, - doing day to day. what would those that look like? for example, the i that look like? for example, the re ort that look like? for example, the report says _ that look like? for example, the report says it — that look like? for example, the report says it is _ that look like? for example, the report says it is is _ that look like? for example, the report says it is is not _ that look like? for example, the report says it is is not feasible i that look like? for example, the| report says it is is not feasible to use all offices to use the laws, we have laws that they are in order to protect vulnerable people but there aren't even recommendations to help more specialist officers or specialist units so that those officers dealing with the mystical bees know what the powers are that they could use. —— dealing with domestic abuse know what the powers are. people in england who need care are having to pay thousands of pounds extra a year to fund it, according to bbc research. in half of the 83 areas which responded to a bbc request, bills for people needing support had risen 10 per cent or bills for people needing support had risen 10% or more over two years. the government says it has put extra money into the care system. our social affairs correspondent, alison holt has more. these are the things that make a huge difference to saskia's life — her football and her own flat. she has a learning disability and to live independently, she relies on help from her local council. i get support workers coming
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in to support me and cook. if it wasn't for them coming in, i would have struggled big time. her mum looks after her finances. this was my appeal against the increased charges. she was horrified when the amount saskia was expected to contribute to her care from her benefits suddenly increased from £92 a month to more than £500 a month. when mum told me, shejust burst out into tears. i hate seeing my mum cry. the family also says £1500 was taken from saskia's account without warning to cover backdated charges. without my intervention, she would not have had any food that week, she would have not been able to pay her gas, electricity or water bills. the bbc asked councils in england about increases in care charges. 83 responded. in the past two years, they have increased the money they collect from people needing care by £51 million,
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the equivalent of a 13% rise in costs for each person getting support. and six councils have doubled the money they raised from community—based learning disability services. this is another sign social care is in crisis and it needs more money, it needs proper reform. this is simply wrong, that people who are the least well off in society are being expected to make up the shortfall, when this money should come from government. councils acknowledge that the lives of people like saskia are being squeezed, but insist their finances are so tight, they have few options. the government says it had put extra money into adult social care and will publish plans for reform soon. over the last week, we've seen chaotic and desperate scenes at kabul airport, as people try to flee afghanistan. one of those trying to leave was a young woman from nottingham, who was visiting relatives with her mother and two young siblings when the taliban took control. they've now managed to make it back to the uk — as our correspondent,
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navtej johal, reports. glad to see you again. lovely to see you. you look so handsome! thank you! the sound ofjoy and relief. rageeb has spent the past week worrying about his wife, adult daughter and two small children who have been trying desperately to leave afghanistan. they travelled there last month from their home in nottingham to visit sick elderly grandparents, and never expected to be caught up in the taliban takeover. these images were filmed by rageeb's 24—year—old daughter last week as they tried to get through to the airport in kabul. rageeb, a taxi driver, said he feared for their lives. now they've finally returned to the uk. how are you feeling today? i'm very happy, very happy. just so happy and glad. just obviously, they are so tired at the moment, just landing at the airport. i'm very overjoyed because i
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didn't even know that. in the morning, i felt so angry and annoyed, but then when i heard that, like, when i heard they were here, my emotions, like, immediately changed. his daughter spoke to me from inside the airport. watching the taliban on tv was, it was just like a horror movie for me. but seeing them face—to—face, it was something like — i can't describe it at all. it has been really, really tough. because everywhere you go, you see them. with their guns, and they're really, really rude, there's no respect for women. much relieved to see my siblings here, really happy, oh, we are home, back, we're going to see dad. so they're really happy. seeing them happy, mum happy, it's just everything for me. and i'm just waiting to see my dad and my brothers. the family who have
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returned from afghanistan will need to complete a ten—day hotel quarantine before they can be reunited with the rest of the family in nottingham. and although they are still worried about their relatives that remain in the country, this family are looking forward to putting the anxiety of the last few days behind them. navteonhal, bbc news, nottingham. the headlines on bbc news: pressure builds on the us to delay its withdrawal from afghanistan — to allow more time for those trying to flee the country. disabled and vulnerable adults in england are facing steep rises in charges for their care, bbc research finds. despite concerns about covid — and a one year delay — the tokyo paralympics get underway today. rescue crews are still looking for dozens of people missing in rural humphreys county, in the us state of tennessee, after devastating flash floods. at least 22 people have been killed,
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including two young children. emergency workers are now searching door—to—door, as families face a harrowing wait for news of their loved ones. tanya dendrinos reports. as the water recedes in tennessee, the scale of destruction becomes all the more visible. piles of debris strewn across neighbourhoods, pieces of homes, lives and livelihoods. our people need help. we are going to be overwhelmed before the next 30 days, overwhelmed. but our people need help. record—breaking rainfall caused flash flooding on saturday. the torrent, swallowing everything in its reach, sweeping away cars, tearing up roads and forcing homes off their foundations. multiple lives were lost and dozens of people are still missing. their names are on notice boards, families desperately seeking
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information as emergency crews systematically comb through the wreckage. it's been a huge impact for this small community. the town will wear these scars for many decades. president biden has pledged government support while flood relief efforts have also begun. the community doing all it can to rally in the face of disaster. a study suggests the heavy rainfall that caused devastating floods in parts of europe last month was made more likely by climate change. more than 200 people died in germany, belgium, the netherlands and luxembourg. the research from the world weather attribution initiative — an international team of climate scientists — concluded that extreme rainfall events are now up to nine times more likely to happen than in the late 1800s. visitors to cumbria in england are being asked to take a lateral flow test before travelling there. the advice from the county's head of public health follows a sharp increase in the number of coronavirus cases in the region.
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dave guest has been to a misty ullswater to find out more. welcome aboard the lady of the lake. a mist has descended on ullswater this morning, sadly, however i am assured by the locals that it will burn off as the day goes on and they hope to many more tourists during what has become a bumper tourism season here in the lake district. my goodnes, they have needed it after the last 18 months of restrictions. however, those tourists are being reminded covid has not gone away and they should exercise caution. here is the director of public health. if you're coming to cumbria, please come, it is a beautiful place and you will have a lovely time, but please take a lateral flow test before you travel to make sure as you are coming here that you are clear of the virus, we would really appreciate it if you did that. so, lateral flow tests, maintain social distancing — the advice to people coming to cumbria. i am joined by the managing
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director of cumbria tourism, how do you react to that advice? we have been encouraged to expect some fluctuations throughout the last 18 months, businesses and our customers have been fantastically adept at managing situations. it is important we all continue to be vigilant and responsible. he has issued that advice following an increase in cases in some areas where we are here, the number of cases has doubled in the last week also, so the advice has some foundation? absolutely, we are all here to look after our businesses and communities here. it's a rural area, we are part those communities. we're also here to look after our customers, and equally our customers have a responsibility to look after everybody else. it is all working together, we have done that brilliantly during the last 18 months, businesses and customers have adapted and we will continue to do so to provide covid—safe experiences. he has also stressed
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there's no proven link between tourism and rising cases, particularly here in eden. we recently saw the case in cornwall of the boardmasters festival, following that a couple of weeks ago authorities are looking at about 5000 cases they think may be linked to that festival, does this concern you up in cumbria? i genuinely believe businesses in cumbria and visitors have worked brilliantly together, and we have not had links between tourism, hospitality and covid in the county. where we have had siginificant increases, they have been in areas away from tourism, so as long as everybody stays vigilant and behaves responsibly, we have a beautiful, wide—open county. you can't quite see it at the moment. what we have seen this year is people choosing to visit lots of different places in the county, not necessarily all coming to the same favourite places, so that has worked very well. we have also seen changes in behaviour, people
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wanting to stay in bubbles, spend, but in less places, so visitors really adapting behaviour and supporting communities. the people operating the lake cruises have themselves imposed limits on numbers. would it have helped if the government had kept some restrictions so you had firm guidance to work to? everyone will have different opinions, but throughout the county businesses and customers are being responsible, we will need that for some time. we have had a really good few weeks during the summer, but the businesses have lost half of their income through the lockdown so it is important we have a strong autumn, winter and 2022 to get a full recovery. and not to mention the upcoming bank holiday weekend. what would be your advice to people coming to cumbria? please come, be responsible, follow the advice, always book ahead.
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bank holiday weekend in cumbria and the lake district will always be busy, so book ahead and make sure you get the best possible experience. gill haigh from cumbria tourism, sound advice. the advice is to come to cumbria — honestly, you do get fantastic views — but be cautious because, as we all know, covid has not gone away. the paralympic games officially gets under way in tokyo today. double paralympic champion steve bate is one of the 227 competitors from great britain. despite being registered blind, steve has won a host of medals for cycling and climbed the notoriously difficult el capitan mountain in california. let's take a look at his story. if you want to be the best in the world, you've got to work harder than everyone else.
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paralympic champion steve bate is chasing after one thing — gold in tokyo. ten years ago, steve was diagnosed with a rare eye disorder. my eyesight is getting narrower and narrower, my field of vision is getting smaller and smaller. if i hold my hands there, i can't see them, you know, which is really bizarre. before his diagnosis, steve had spent his life in the mountains. at that time in my life, that was everything to me. all of a sudden, that wasjust like gone. within a few sentences of getting an eye check, like, "you can't drive, i don't think you should climb any more." living the dream up here. check out that view. but instead of giving up, steve took on the climb of his life,
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ascending over 900 metres. this is the really scary bit. in 2013, steve became the first visually impaired person to solo climb el capitan, one of the hardest ascents in the world. i always said that was the missing piece of the puzzle, for me to reach that full potential, like go into overdrive and try and achieve stuff. within four years of picking up a road bike, steve and his co—pilot adam had won two gold paralympic medals. riding in tandem, they are called the power and the pilot. but hang on a minute. is the person on the back doing more work? ask adam that.
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no, that's not really how it works. on the tandem, we've both have powers that power each other. we have to pedal together at the same time. i don't just steer anyway, but people do sometimes think that. "oh, you just steer then, you don't do any peddling?" everyone says, "yeah, really talented." i'm not. maybe my talent is just that i can focus on something and block everything else out. maybe the tunnel vision eyesight helps with that. now it's time for a look at the weather with carole hello again. high pressure still firmly in charge of our weather at the moment and will be as we go through the rest of this week. but there will be areas of cloud at times, and generally it's going to be warmer and sunnier in the west, but by the time we get to the weekend, temperatures will be slipping a little bit. now, the high pressure across us
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today will be with us, as i mentioned, for the rest of the week. but it is slap bang across us at the moment. the air coming around it in a clockwise direction, so chillier across the north—east of england and breezier too across, for example, the english channel. we also have a fair bit of cloud draped across the northern ireland, draped across the northern isles, the far north of mainland scotland and the western isles, but come inland, this morning's mist and fog lifting quite rapidly, leaving us with some sunshine. highs of up to 25 in glasgow. brightening up in northern ireland and northern england where we've got this swathe of cloud across parts of northern england and wales, which could be thick enough here and there for the odd spot of drizzle. for west wales, southern england, the south midlands and east anglia, it should stay dry with sunny spells. now, through this evening and overnight we should still have some of this cloud, it will sink a bit further south and we've got a weather front coming in across the north—east of scotland, introducing some more cloud here as well, with temperatures falling away between 12 and 14 degrees. so tomorrow our high pressure area, instead of being slap bang across us, just drifts to the north—west.
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here is our weatherfront coming in, introducing more cloud. so not only is it going to be cloudy, it is going to be breezy down the north sea coastline so it will feel cooler here, but you can see where we've got the cloud draped across the north and the west, today's cloud sinking a little bit further south and breaking up a touch as well, so more of us seeing some sunshine. temperatures in the south 20 or 21, but we could hit 24 or 25, for example, around the glasgow area. now, wednesday you can see how that weather front continues to sink southwards through the evening and overnight, by thursday it's going to continue to do so, allowing a chilly northerly wind to follow on behind it. and it will drag in a lot of moisture from the north sea in the shape of cloud. so the brightest skies will be out towards the west, here we'll see the lion's share of the sunshine and temperatures 22 in glasgow, 22 in cardiff, so the temperatures going down just a little bit. the average at this time of the year, by the way, is roughly 19 to 22 north to south. but the weather remains settled as we go through into the weekend.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... pressure builds on the us to delay its withdrawal from afghanistan — to allow more time for those trying to flee the country. an emergency summit of g—7 leaders will discuss the crisis in afghanistan later. we have to plan on the 31st of august being the last moment. every day we get after that will be a big bonus, and we would like it. the reality is unless we get that agreement at the g7 today, many, many people will be left behind and face reprisals from the taliban. it comes as the un human rights chief warns of credible reports of violations in areas of afghanistan controlled by the taliban. in particular, we have also received credible reports of serious -
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violations of international law and human rights abuses taking place in many areas under effective - taliban control. disabled and vulnerable adults in england are facing steep rises in charges for their care, bbc research finds. despite concerns about covid — and a one year delay — the paralympic games are getting under way in tokyo. and — what do you do if a hollywood a—lister wants to [and his helicopter — in your back garden? we hearfrom the family in warwickshire who hosted tom cruise — who was making his latest mission: impossible film nearby. us officials say president biden will decide within the next 24 hours whether to defy the taliban and keep american troops in afghanistan beyond the end of this month. the prime minister is to urge world leaders to step up support
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for refugees fleeing the taliban in afghanistan when he chairs a virtual g7 meeting later. it's expected that france and germany willjoin the uk in pushing president biden to delay the withdrawal of american troops from afghanistan. the calls for a delay come as the head of the eu's executive commission — ursula von der leyen — announces the eu will ramp up humanitarian support for afghans in and around their country to over 200 million euros from over 50 million euros. as things stand — us troops depart in a week's time — even though evacuations from kabul�*s main airport may not be completed by then. the us has evacuated and facilitated the evacuation of roughly 48,000 people since an intense airlift started on 14 august while the uk evacuation effort continues — this morning the ministry of defence say 8,458 people have been evacuated from the uk since the 13 august. the pressure on the us ahead of the g7 summits comes as the
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un human rights chief says she's received credible reports of violations in areas of afghanistan under taliban control, including summary executions and restrictions on women. our correspondent secunder kermani is in kabul this morning, and has been following the situation at the airport... there was a lot of confusion amongst the people at the airport, really. i don't think that level of information is filtering through. many of them don't even know what they need to do in order to get out of the country. many have just pitched up holding documents that they've printed out proving that they or their close relatives worked with international troops, with foreign forces, and they're trying to get to the front of this croud — these huge crowds at times, where soldiers are firing above their head, just to try and wave the documents on the faces of the soldiers. thing is, even if they manage to do that, the vast majority
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of them will not be allowed through to the airport because they've not been... they've not got the right permissions yet. they haven't gone through the process of being granted permission to board an evacuation flight. very few of those at the airport do have that. some do, and they are also struggling to get through the crouds, of course, as well, but, really, it's a quite chaotic scene and people are... you know, every time i go there we're just inundated with people desperate for any kind of information, showing their documents to me, asking if i can help, asking if i can tell them what they need to do. it's very... it's's a heartbreaking situation, really, because there is very little we can tell them and what little we can tell them is not really what they want to hear. i saw very chaotic scenes on friday outside a british—controlled date. there was no taliban there. the entire, many people were struggling to get through. people were in very dire conditions. that was nothing to do with the taliban — that was to do with the sheer volume of people
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there and the fact that the only way way for someone to get through was to push their way to the front and source their documents in the face of british soldiers. way for someone to get through was to push their way to the front and source their documents in the face of british soldiers. in fact, i'm told that since then the taliban have set up some kind of filtration system aimed at preventing those who do not have the right paperwork from being in the crowd and, kind of, getting in the way of others who do have the correct permissions. we have had reports at times of the taliban stopping or preventing or harassing some of those afghans who do have the right paperwork because they worked with international forces or foreign troops and preventing them from getting through to the airport, but that does not seem to be the predominant issue, from what i've seen. it's more just the sheer number of people who were there and, in many places, the lack of any real filtration system triaging people between those who are eligible and who aren't.
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it's just a kind of free—for—all. speaking before an emergency session on afghanistan, un rights chief michelle bachelet urged the taliban to honour commitments to respect the rights of women and girls, and ethnic and religious minorities, and refrain from reprisals. the taliban has pledged to respect and protect human rights. taliban spokes people have made specific commitments to protect women's right to work and girls' rights to attend school within the taliban's interpretation of islamic law. they have also said they will respect the rights of members of ethnic and religious minorities and refrain from reprisals against those who have worked with the government or international community. the onus is now fully on the taliban to translate this commitment into reality. in ensuring effective control of much of the country they must ensure in those areas ongoing respect for international human rights and ongoing and indeed heightened provision of essential public
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services without discrimination to all. international human rights law is immutable. enjoyment of human rights is not subject to changes in control of territory or de facto authority. but first here's the defence secretary ben wallace on the governments plans to evacuate as many people as possible from afghanistan. time matters more than anything. we have planned for the worst, the 31st of august, that is why we have flown in 1000 troops to access the system, to be there, to process these people, to make sure that we secure the airport. we flew them in midway through august. they've done an amazing job. but i wish that we had more time. i think at the moment it is unlikely, having seen these
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public statements of president biden and from the taliban, but we have to plan on the 31st of august being the last moment. every day we get after that would be a big bonus. and we would like it. we are only there to evacuate those people, not there for any other ulterior motives. the taliban and others should not fear that but we will see what they do. and i know that at the moment they have said no, we saw that in the interviews in the media yesterday, but time is people. the shadow foreign secretary lisa nandy urged the g7 countries to come to an agreement on extending the us withdrawal deadline. the air bridge is about to close, it's due to close on august 31, and my office is in touch with hundreds of people who are still stuck in afghanistan, who are eligible to come out on uk flights but just simply can't get onto them for lots
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of different reasons. so we've got to get an agreement at the g7 today that we will make a common approach to the taliban to extend that deadline, and that relies on us support. it really does matter — there's very few other options available to us, and the reality is unless we get that agreement at the g7 today, many, many people will be left behind and face reprisals from the taliban. lisa nandy. tom tugendhat chairs the foreign affairs committe and served in afghanistan — he's spoken this morning about a friend travelling with his family to try to escape from the taliban... last night i was speaking to a guy he used to work with me over ten years ago as an interpreter and he told me that he was going to risk a divide at night with his wife and his five children and i've only got two kids and i can tell you travelling with kids isn't easy but to drive at night in a war zone on potholed roads, i mean, you wouldn't do that unless you are desperate and he's doing it because he is looking for a way out and dine, you will understand i spent a bit of a sleepless night this evening or rather last night and i am very glad that he has checked in this morning
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and i am also very glad that through the night for the novice and home of the night for the novice and home of the staff have been working absolutely flat out and have secured him, quite rightly, the permission to come to the uk. he is one of the people who has quite literally risked his life working with us and so i am delighted that he has now got permission to come. he has still got, obviously, this is a long way from being over and i must say i am a bit more relieved than i was last time. lord dannatt was was head of the british army between 2006 and 2009. hejoins me now. thank you forjoining us. would you like to see that deadline extended in the face of what the taliban obviously says about it being a red line and there will be consequences? well, in theory one would like to see the deadline extended but i think in practise i'm afraid it is not going to be. if read the text of
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the doha agreement agreement of 2020 the doha agreement agreement of 2020 the date of the 31st of august to say very clearly, clearly. that is what the americans agreed with the taliban in february of last year and hit the taliban are going to insist on that and much as i don't agree with that i do understand it and i think that is a reality we are going to have to work with.— think that is a reality we are going to have to work with. british and us government — to have to work with. british and us government have _ to have to work with. british and us government have made _ to have to work with. british and us government have made clear- to have to work with. british and us government have made clear that i government have made clear that sticking to that deadline will mean that people who want to leave, people who have put their lives at risk by working for the allied forces will be left behind. how does that make you feel?— forces will be left behind. how does that make you feel? well, it doesn't make me feel— that make you feel? well, it doesn't make me feel good _ that make you feel? well, it doesn't make me feel good at _ that make you feel? well, it doesn't make me feel good at all. _ that make you feel? well, it doesn't make me feel good at all. i - that make you feel? well, it doesn't make me feel good at all. i and i make me feel good at all. i and others have been working for quite some time to try and get the government to go faster on this evacuation plan. there is no point looking out but we have been on this with us for years and certainly over the last few weeks. what needs to happen now is maximum effort in the days available to get the maximum number of entitled people out of kabul. and also for the government
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to think more laterally about how it can encourage and inform people how to make other ways out of afghanistan perhaps using other land afghanistan perhaps using other [and routes but i think we have to accept that the deadline would be extended and we got to make maximum use of the time available. just and we got to make maximum use of the time available.— the time available. just a big up on what ou the time available. just a big up on what you said _ the time available. just a big up on what you said about _ the time available. just a big up on what you said about the _ the time available. just a big up on what you said about the pressure l what you said about the pressure that there was to get the government is moving faster on the evacuation plan, it was mike not something that was discussed publicly. what was going on behind—the—scenes because now looking at the situation it does seem to be extraordinary knowing that the deadline was the 31st of august that there wasn't an effort to get people out. august that there wasn't an effort to get people out-— to get people out. while i can remember — to get people out. while i can remember all _ to get people out. while i can remember all of _ to get people out. while i can remember all of the - to get people out. while i can remember all of the effort i to get people out. while i can l remember all of the effort that to get people out. while i can i remember all of the effort that is going on at the moment and i don't want to take anything away from that particularly the service people on the ground in kabul. it hasn't been issued publicly in the past you said but i'm afraid it has in the media. if you are month ago 45 retired senior officers wrote an open letter to the government saying, we got to do more for our interpreters and
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local engaged civilians. i'm afraid the government didn't pick that one up the government didn't pick that one up fast enough and is now having to make up for lost time so i commend them for the efforts they are making at the present moment. we have got to get as many people out as we possibly can but i think we cannot expect that the taliban and it is not down to the americans, it is down to the taliban, they won't extend that deadline, i feel certainly. like to said about other ways of signposting how people can leave the country. there was talk of a plan for hubs to process how people want to leave the country but that seems to have now followed by the wayside. what are the practical steps that you want to see taken. it is difficult to say seeing him in the uk and us on the ground. the obvious way is to get people back out through kabul and to the airport but people who genuinely fear for their lives may have to get themselves out of the country by
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losing land themselves out of the country by losing [and routes and crossing over whether it is a van or into pakistan not of these are very attractive option is that it is probably better to take and try to explore those options rather than give up and trust to fate because that is what is going to happen once the air bridge and the airlift is over. could it have been different? yes. there is no _ could it have been different? yes. there is no point _ could it have been different? yes. there is no point trying _ could it have been different? jazz there is no point trying to use hindsight but we could have and should have done this operation differently and once we knew that the americans were going to end their mission by the 20th anniversary of nine slash 11 —— 911. it would have made much more sense to get british interpreters and local engaged civilians out of the country before the remaining troops left. instead, what we have had to do is those troops left, we have now inserted some fresh ones, commit the gun on air bridge and we are against this very tight timescale. everyone is working jolly hard. i congratulate them for doing that but this is in the way it should have
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been. they should have made a better plan and that is why i and others say we have got to have a full enquiry notjust into this extraction put into the whole campaign over the last 20 years. to many strategic errors had been made... despite the fact our service people have done fantastically in the band four and 20 years and are doing fantastically on the go now. do you think it is so important to have an enquiry? got do you think it is so important to have an enquiry?— do you think it is so important to have an enquiry? got to learn when ou make have an enquiry? got to learn when you make mistakes _ have an enquiry? got to learn when you make mistakes to _ have an enquiry? got to learn when you make mistakes to make - have an enquiry? got to learn when you make mistakes to make sure i have an enquiry? got to learn when| you make mistakes to make sure we don't repeat them at some point in the future. there probably isn't time to going to some of the major strategic errors now but there is a catalogue of major strategic errors over the last 20 years and we have got to learn lessons from them. thank you very much forjoining us. thanks very much. the online rental company, airbnb , says it'll provide free housing for 20,000 afghan refugees. the firm says it'll work closely with resettlement agencies to make
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sure places are offered where they're needed most. the company's boss said the move was in response to "one of the biggest humanitarian crises of our time". the headlines on bbc news... pressure builds on the us to delay its withdrawal from afghanistan — to allow more time for those trying to flee the country disabled and vulnerable adults in england are facing steep rises in the charges for their care, according to bbc research. despite concerns about covid — and a one year delay — the paralympic games are getting under way in tokyo sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. the opening ceremony of the tokyo 2020 paralympics is under way, with sporting action due to kick off tomorrow. the theme of the opening ceremony is "we have wings"— to raise awareness of the courage of paralympians who are trying to spread their wings "no matter which way the wind blows".. swimmer ellie simmonds and archer john stubbs will carry
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the great britain flag, with the action getting under way tomorrow. rachael latham has been following the build up from tokyo. carrying the flag for great britain will be ellie simmonds and john stubbs. both of them have been selected not only for their sporting achievements but for the commitments of the team as well. ellie has already won five gold medals for great britain in the swimming pool and john won a gold in beijing in the actually but they have also been bringing a lots of the team. this is their fourth bringing a lots of the team. this is theirfourth paralympic bringing a lots of the team. this is their fourth paralympic games. john is the oldest member of the team for great britain and ellie simmonds is a role model and inspiration to many. we have also got an increase of women competing at him in tokyo from around the world. in fact, it is an 11% increase compared to rio paralympic games. the sport starts tomorrow and we have sever going for great britain in the velodrome. she has already won 14 paralympic gold medals. she is hoping to get her 15th tomorrow and we will also be seeing gna in the swimming pool and she will be making her paralympic debut and hopes to get a gold medal as well. —— kearney in the swimming
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pool british sprinter zharnel hughes says he wants the doping investigation into team—mate cj ujah to be allowed to take place without prejudice. ujah has been provisionally suspended after a positive drugs england captainjoe root says england can still win the series against india ahead of their third test at headingley, despite being 1—0 down after a poor performance at lords. england drew the first test and were criticised after a dismal batting performance in the second. they've had a further blow with bowler mark wood being ruled out of the third test with a shoulder injury. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. see event. you, gavin. the opening ceremony of the tokyo 2020 paralympics is under way,
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with sporting action due to kick off tomorrow. just as with the olympics the event was delayed a year due to coronavirus. the paralympics feature athletes with disabilities competing in 539 events, across 22 different sports. we can speak now to danny crates, the former athletics paralympian and gold medalist and flag bearer at the opening ceremony of the beijing 2008 paralympic games. thank you forjoining us. i imagine memories are being stirred today. how much of a privilege was it to be picked and how to get picked? is a picked and how to get picked? is a list of names _ picked and how to get picked? is —. list of names that go to the team in the team pick left flag bearer and i was announced that they i would be the one for the ageing so as the game is a building in the semis just getting under way it does bring back many, memory memories of competing and that honour of walking out in front of the whole british team, leading them out into the opening
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ceremony. it was like something very, very special as an athlete. and, obviously, such a build—up and obviously there must be a lot of excitement and so much pressure and this year in particular because of what has happened with covid—19 has been really tough for the athlete with so much on predictability. how much will that increase the pressure on them? ~ . ., , much will that increase the pressure on them? ~ _, , ., much will that increase the pressure on them? ~ , ., ., on them? when it comes to game time there is always — on them? when it comes to game time there is always stuff _ on them? when it comes to game time there is always stuff going _ on them? when it comes to game time there is always stuff going on _ there is always stuff going on either individually or around the teams or games but obviously this is unprecedented but athletes have a job to do and that is to perform in their arena being on the track and pool their arena being on the track and pool. there has been a big build—up and it has been well over a year for this one for most athletes i think they will just be this one for most athletes i think they willjust be glad that it is going ahead. they will be glad to be there and just like any games when you get to this point it is all very, very nervous and tense. you just want to get under way so some
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athletes will be straightaway tomorrow and it will be competing with others who have to wait six, seven, 89 days before they get the competition so their opening ceremony is a very, very special time for the athlete because that brings it to life, makes it real and is alive in the games have started. then they're going to go and obviously there is no crowd at the opening ceremony watching them or any family. what difference will that make? it any family. what difference will that make?— any family. what difference will that make? , ., ., , ., that make? it is going to be tough. what i think— that make? it is going to be tough. what | think they _ that make? it is going to be tough. what i think they need _ that make? it is going to be tough. what i think they need to _ that make? it is going to be tough. what i think they need to do i that make? it is going to be tough. what i think they need to do is... l what i think they need to do is... friends and family. i had 30 out there and that in itself brings pressure but you have a job to do as an athlete and as a sports person and that is to deliver a performance at a set time and that won't change. we saw from the olympics that the athletes were putting on some phenomenal performances. i think the
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sad part comes afterwards. that bit where you achieve your expectations and get to go and see your family afterwards in the stadiums or outside and that is the bit that the athletes will miss but the most important part is for them to perform and that is what they will focus on. it is sad for the families being left at home, the ones who would have travelled and had their tickets booked but, you know, we can't control what is going on at the minute. we can only do what we need to do and for then they will be having watch parties at home in the middle of the night to support their athletes and their loved ones. there is obviously — athletes and their loved ones. there is obviously an _ athletes and their loved ones. there is obviously an added _ athletes and their loved ones. there is obviously an added dimension with the paralympics because watching any athlete at the top of their game is phenomenal but these are people who have overcome their game and we are always aware what the story is or has been but it is humbling at times when you learn about someone's journey has been. how much of a
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factorfor is that? journey has been. how much of a factor for is that? in seeing the games and understanding what people had injured? just games and understanding what people had in'ured? . .. games and understanding what people had in'ured? , ~ i. had in'ured? just like everyone in life had injured? just like everyone in life we have _ had injured? just like everyone in life we have all _ had injured? just like everyone in life we have all got _ had injured? just like everyone in life we have all got back- had injured? just like everyone in life we have all got back stories l life we have all got back stories and stuff going on. some going to the games in the best shape of their life, some going to the games with injuries, illness, things going back at home and that is no difference from anybody but some people have been born with impairments, some acquire them on the way i was flippantly say there is not a way to hurt yourself or lose part of your body that a paralympian hasn't found. we have all found ways of hurting ourselves that most people can't even think of so we have been through stuff but for lots of people for other sport is our passion, our drive, the paralympics is at such a dry level nowjust drive, the paralympics is at such a dry level now just to drive, the paralympics is at such a dry level nowjust to make your national teams is such an achievement in them to get onto the podium is and to be the champions is just to another level so the athletes, it isjust just to another level so the athletes, it is just about competing and for them, you know, this is
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everything they have worked towards. we always say that you have been working towards it for four years but of course these have been working towards it for five years. some will have been in fantastic shape last year and not in such great shape this year with injury, illness and life. some were struggling last year an extra year has given them the extra benefit of an extra year to train and now they are in great shape. like everything in life there are always people that benefit from it and people that don't benefit from its, not the benefit from what has happened in the world but some athletes that extra year is going to help them and their performance in tokyo. thank ou so their performance in tokyo. thank you so much _ their performance in tokyo. thank you so much for— their performance in tokyo. thank you so much forjoining _ their performance in tokyo. thank you so much forjoining us. - their performance in tokyo. thank| you so much forjoining us. danny. more now on afghanistan — and borisjohnson is preparing to chair a virtual meeting of g7 leaders this afternoon,
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at which the uk, france and germany are all expected to press president biden to extend his deadline of the end of this month to complete the withdrawal of us forces. the taliban have warned of consequences if foreign troops are not withdrawn by the deadline. with me now is ibraheem bahiss, a taliban expert with the international crisis group, a brussels—based conflict—resolution think tank. it is an independent organisation that works to prevent wards and to shape policy is to build a more peaceful world. shape policy is to build a more peacefulworld. —— shape policy is to build a more peaceful world. —— walls. welcome and thank you very much forjoining us. . do think there's any compromise on an extension to the withdrawal date? i compromise on an extension to the withdrawal date?— withdrawal date? i believe at this oint in withdrawal date? i believe at this point in time _ withdrawal date? i believe at this point in time it _ withdrawal date? i believe at this point in time it is _ withdrawal date? i believe at this point in time it is such _ withdrawal date? i believe at this point in time it is such a - withdrawal date? i believe at this point in time it is such a short i point in time it is such a short window of time that anything that the international community particularly the g7 wants to do, it is going to need at least taliban acquiescence if not outright cooperation. as you pointed out, the taliban so far have not been open to the idea and i think they are and
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have been actively discouraging people from leaving the country. i think they also seem to be cognisant of the fact that we're experiencing a brain drain the more skills padre at the society leaving so i think, as i said, it seems unlikely the taliban would want to extend the deadline because they want these people to stay in the less we were to acquiesce to it at least it seems unlikely president biden would want to take a risk and i would want to point out there are also security risks of extending the evacuation because its... , the local branch of isis, will be looking for an easy target such as airport to try and make a comeback and spoil the taliban's victory of taking over kabul. �* ,., ., ., ., kabul. and so on the one hand the taliban is trying — kabul. and so on the one hand the taliban is trying to _ kabul. and so on the one hand the taliban is trying to sound - taliban is trying to sound conciliatory, saying it is a
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different taliban from 20 years ago but on the other there is this absolute assertion that if the troops stay beyond the 31st of august there would be consequences and are also obviously reports on the ground of human rights abuses. do you believe the taliban have changed? to do you believe the taliban have chanced? ., ., , , ., ., changed? to answer the question of whether or why _ changed? to answer the question of whether or why they _ changed? to answer the question of whether or why they are _ changed? to answer the question of whether or why they are so - changed? to answer the question of whether or why they are so strict i changed? to answer the question of whether or why they are so strict on | whether or why they are so strict on the deadlines that they have, kind of, agreed to in many of these cases i think they do have a very... a rank and file that feels very strongly about foreign occupation and that has been one of there, kind of, main... one of their most consistent policies. we could see it when president biden extended the dell hart withdrawal date from may to september. they were quite upset with that and i think the more they accommodate the presence of international troops in afghanistan the less they are able to claim it
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as a military victory so they have a strong organisational incentive to try to be strict on the deadline and urge so they can almost make it an outright military victory. what urge so they can almost make it an outright military victory.— outright military victory. what are our outright military victory. what are your thoughts _ outright military victory. what are your thoughts on _ outright military victory. what are your thoughts on what _ outright military victory. what are your thoughts on what has - outright military victory. what are your thoughts on what has paved | outright military victory. what are i your thoughts on what has paved the way for this which was obviously that doha agreement that you referred to agreed by president trump with the seller ban excluding the afghan government? we trump with the seller ban excluding the afghan government?— trump with the seller ban excluding the afghan government? we have to kee and the afghan government? we have to keep and bear— the afghan government? we have to keep and bear in _ the afghan government? we have to keep and bear in mind _ the afghan government? we have to keep and bear in mind that _ the afghan government? we have to keep and bear in mind that the i the afghan government? we have to keep and bear in mind that the us i keep and bear in mind that the us had been trying since at least 2011 to try to hold a trilateral meeting between the afghan government, the taliban and the us but it was taliban and the us but it was taliban intransigent is that, kind of, when the day because for several years they held out and said that the main conflict is between the us and the taliban and once they resolve their disputes in the taliban would be willing to sit with
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the afghan government so at the end i think president trump became quite impatient and just gave in on that demand. impatient and 'ust gave in on that demand. ,., ., ., ., impatient and 'ust gave in on that demand. ., ., ., ., , demand. going forward, how does the world engage — demand. going forward, how does the world engage with _ demand. going forward, how does the world engage with the _ demand. going forward, how does the world engage with the taliban? i i world engage with the taliban? i think that would be one of the main discussion that the g7 virtual meeting will be discussing. the international community has consistently made it clear that they are unwilling to recognise a government that comes to power through force. now the worst nightmare has become a reality and they will have to decide. there is an ongoing humanitarian crisis in the country beyond what we're seeing on the screens of our televisions with the airport. according to the un secretary general 18 million people, which is roughly half the population is facing food insecurity so the task of the g7 would be how
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do they prevent humanitarian crisis that potentially have implications for an influx of refugees leaving afghanistan to go to neighbouring countries or even to europe? how do they manage that without necessarily giving the taliban that legitimacy that they seem to crave? thank you very much forjoining us. the weather is expected to remain settled over the uk for the foreseeable future. a bit like today. high pressure and clear skies across the northern part of the uk, but banks of cloud drifting off the north sea further south. here are maybe 20 degrees, but were at the sun comes up for any lengthy period of time, up to 24, for example up in glasgow, 24. tonight the banks of
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keep rolling off the north sea with the breeze. when the winds that in mild, there could be mist and murk, could be murky in the north of england, southern parts of scotland. wednesday, some cloud will give way to sunshine, some two hazy skies, but a fine day on the whole. glasgow in the sunshine up to 26 celsius. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: pressure builds on the us to delay its withdrawal from afghanistan — to allow more time for those trying to flee the country. an emergency summit of g7 leaders will discuss the crisis in afghanistan later. will discuss the crisis we have to plan on august 31 being the last moment. every day we get after that will be a big bonus, and we would like it. the reality is unless we get that agreement at the g7 today, many, many people will be left behind and face reprisals from the taliban.
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it comes as the un human rights chief warns of credible reports of violations in areas of afghanistan controlled by the taliban. we have received credible reports | of violations of international lawi and human rights abuses taking place in areas under effective _ taliban control. disabled and vulnerable adults in england are facing steep rises in charges for their care bbc research finds. despite concerns about covid and a one year delay — the tokyo paralympics get under way today. let's look now at that emergency meeting of leaders of the g7 nations this afternoon. borisjohnson is expected to press president biden to delay the withdrawal of american troops from afghanistan. boris johnson currently chairs the group —
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but does he really have the ability to influence his us counterpart? the phrase "special relationship" was first coined by wartime leader winston churchill during a speech after the allied victory in ww2. margaret thatcher and ronald reagan enjoyed perhaps the closest ties during the cold war years — but post 2000, tony blair and george w bush teamed up regularly, particularly post 9/11 and into the wars in afghanistan and iraq. there were some rocky patches when donald trump became president with a seemingly up and down relationship with theresa may. although he had a brighter view of borisjohnson. describing him a "britain's trump" during a rally. president biden first met with borisjohnson in person at the g7 summit in cornwall. the prime minister described the us president as a "breath of fresh air" despite concerns about a split over brexit, which the president had spoken out against, they committed to continuing to work together — but the situation in afghanistan could test the relationship.
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lewis lukens is the former acting us ambassador to the uk, and deputy chief of the mission at the us embassy in london until 2019. he's now a senior partner with signum global advisors. earlier, he said he doesn't expect a substantial delay to the us exit from afghanistan due to what he believes to be a successful evacuation. no, i don't. i thinkjoe biden has very well up his mind that august 31 is the date. it's possible it will slip by a day or two, but i don't see any substantial revision of the deadline. so my guess and my hope is that the g7 today really focuses beyond that, how to establish relations, if to establish relations with the taliban. how to address some of the humanitarian issues that will be coming out of afghanistan. but i think the question of extending the deadline is probably decided already. i think time will tell, but my sense is that it's been quite a successful and historic evacuation of thousands of people,
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with minimal loss of life — any loss of life is tragic obviously — but it's been overall a very successful evacuation under very difficult circumstances. asjoe biden has said, there would never have been a perfect time to leave and to carry out this evacuation. i think he felt strongly it was now or never and there was no reason to extend it. all indications are and the readout of the phone call last night betweenjoe biden and borisjohnson also sort of indicates that he is not really open to an extension. i'm joined now by mark malloch—brown, president of the open society foundations, on the situation on afghanistan. he is also a former foreign office minister and un deputy secretary general. thank you forjoining us. what are your thoughts on how things have
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unfolded? we were talking there about the special relationship, we saw when the allies went into afghanistan, it was on a joint ticket, but haert has been very much been about america making the decisions now and the rest of the country is not really been able to do anything that deviates from america's decision making. i think it has expose _ america's decision making. i think it has expose over— america's decision making. i think it has expose over any _ america's decision making. i think it has expose over any unilateral. it has expose over any unilateral moment in american foreign policy, where people are making comparisons of biding to trump, as being as ignoring of his european and nato allies as president trump before him. —— of biden to trump. i think thatis him. —— of biden to trump. i think that is a bit unfair, i think president biden is a throwback to a much early generation of american politicians. because he is a throwback, he has kind of nourished this 40 year view from when he was a
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young senator that america should not get stuck in these extended overseas wars. his formative experience was the end of the vietnam war. he has been i think, if i can use this word, big headed about this. notjust i can use this word, big headed about this. not just with i can use this word, big headed about this. notjust with his european allies, even with his own colleagues in congress and even in his own administration in washington. he knew what he wanted to do. i remember talking to the former afghan president, ashraf ghani, who wryly acknowledge that maybe it was over when joe ghani, who wryly acknowledge that maybe it was over whenjoe biden won the democratic primaries, because of all at the democratic candidates, biden was the most in favour of exiting afghanistan. we are seeing that today. exiting afghanistan. we are seeing that toda . ~ ., , ., . , that today. what will be the legacy of this do you _ that today. what will be the legacy of this do you think? _
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that today. what will be the legacy of this do you think? in _ that today. what will be the legacy of this do you think? in terms i that today. what will be the legacy of this do you think? in terms of i of this do you think? in terms of the next steps with afghanistan, how constructive will the relationship be between the us and other countries?— be between the us and other countries? ., , , ., ., , countries? legacy, there is no doubt this is hugely — countries? legacy, there is no doubt this is hugely bad _ countries? legacy, there is no doubt this is hugely bad for _ countries? legacy, there is no doubt this is hugely bad for both _ countries? legacy, there is no doubt this is hugely bad for both us - countries? legacy, there is no doubt this is hugely bad for both us and i this is hugely bad for both us and why western influence in asia. i think asian neighbours watching this will recognise that afghanistan was exposed and difficult and you can't cross correlate to what the us might do in taiwan or other places where it is in the region. this is a real blow to the us and we shouldn't disguise that. i think in terms of the legacy for afghanistan itself, that's still very much hangs in the balance. the west could withdraw tail between legs, economically isolate afghanistan over time, get tempted to support armed opposition groups in the country, and the terrible cycle of instability in the
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country an armed insurgency in the countryside against a government in the cities of the country could repeat itself yet again. or there could be a member of statesmanship, and i hope that might start with the g7 meeting today, but we try to construct a set of incentives and disincentives for a taliban led government to broaden itself, become a wider coalition, achieve a position where a kind of has a licence to operate from the people of afghanistan, and a similar license to operate with the international community by showing respect for human rights, by winning the four might humanitarian and economic assistance to rebuild the country. in that sense, it is not a return to the taliban of the past. i think the best way to get a return to detail a ban of the past is not to detail a ban of the past is not to engage, to isolate the country and leave it any kind of dark corner
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where bad things happen and we don't even notice because we haven't got the human rights monitoring capacity to see them. —— a return to the taliban of the past. to see them. -- a return to the taliban of the past.— to see them. -- a return to the taliban of the past. when you look at the report _ taliban of the past. when you look at the report of— taliban of the past. when you look at the report of what _ taliban of the past. when you look at the report of what has _ taliban of the past. when you look| at the report of what has happened already of human rights abuses, they hold much hope of that second option actually been possible? i hold much hope of that second option actually been possible?— actually been possible? i think is a tall order. there _ actually been possible? i think is a tall order. there are _ actually been possible? i think is a tall order. there are very - actually been possible? i think is a tall order. there are very alarming j tall order. there are very alarming reports. we are taking out a lot of our grantees and those we have worked with, as well as our own staff because it is a very frightening, alarming situation. this refugee movement now of kabul airport is not a matter of life and death those trying to make it out. —— is now a matter of life and death. and it is a very negative side to this. but there is also a pragmatic political side, which is if they want support, they are going
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to have to change their ways. that ultimately is notjust western support. there is often a simplistic view in the west that the chinese and russians will turn a blind eye and russians will turn a blind eye and support a regime at any cost. both countries as being in the neighbourhood have an interest in a stable, relatively well governed country that engages constructively with its neighbours and isn't a producer of refugees or illegal narcotics, etc. so i think there is a basis for the un security council, maybe not at the moment but over time, to come together around a sensible way forward. it is worth saying that the only permanent member of the security council which is part of a un peacekeeping force to keep the peace in afghanistan and this recent period is the chinese, who also have quite a grand plan for the economic development of
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afghanistan within the context of their belt and rude initiatives. it is just wrong to think that it is forces of good aligned against forces of good aligned against forces of good aligned against forces of evil. that is a basis on which the un security council could, if pragmatic and sensible, come up with a framework for afghanistan. it is not going to make at this whistling of his region, but which may assure that at least for those who haven't had exposure in the eyes of the taliban, compromised by association of the west. —— not the switzerland of the region. that they can be the beginnings of a stable life going forward for them. some breakin: life going forward for them. some breaking news _ life going forward for them. some breaking news to _ life going forward for them. some breaking news to bring _ life going forward for them. some breaking news to bring you - life going forward for them. some breaking news to bring you coming from scotland. nicola sturgeon has announced that scotland will be holding its own public inquiry into the handling of the coronavirus pandemic, which will start by the end of the year. she made the
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announcement at the scottish briefing a few minutes ago. the scottish briefing a few minutes auo. ., , the scottish briefing a few minutes auo. , ago. the scottish government has reviousl ago. the scottish government has previously committed _ ago. the scottish government has previously committed to _ ago. the scottish government has previously committed to the i previously committed to the establishment of a statutory public inquiry into the handling of the pandemic. today we have started the process of getting such an inquiry up process of getting such an inquiry up and running. i can confirm that it will be established by the end of this year, as promised, and it will take a person centred human rights approach. this morning we have published draft aims and principles for the inquiry, following a period of consultation, which will take place between now and at the end of september, consultation with interested parties, including of course bereaved families. these aims and principles are intended to become the basis for the formal terms of reference of the inquiry. a copy of the draft and details of how you can contribute your views, if you can contribute your views, if you wish to do so, can be found on the scottish government website. i can also confirm that the lord
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advocate has begun discussions with the lord president about appointing a judge to lead the inquiry. it is fully our intention that this this will be a judge led inquiry. the inquiry will look at all matters of handling league at pandemic within our devolved competence, including the situation in our care homes. however we will also liaise closely with the uk government and other devolved governments on the likely terms of a uk wide inquiry where possible, not least to reduce the burden of those who will give evidence to these inquiries, it will be important to avoid duplication and overlap. however they need for cooperation with other governments is not, in my view, to delay the establishment of our own inquiry. i do believe that a full public inquiry has an extremely important role to play, both in scrutinising the decisions we took, and indeed contain to take in the course of the pandemic. but also of course in
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identifying and learning appropriate lessons for the future. i therefore believe it is important to establish that inquiry as soon as possible and now, and the process we have begun todayis now, and the process we have begun today is an important step towards that. the headlines on bbc news: pressure builds on the us to delay its withdrawal from afghanistan — to allow more time for those trying to flee the country. disabled and vulnerable adults in england are facing steep rises in charges for their care, bbc research finds. and despite concerns about covid — and a one year delay — the paralympic games are getting underway in tokyo. people in england who need care are having to pay thousands of pounds extra a year to fund it, according to bbc research. in half of the 83 areas which responded to a bbc request, bills for people needing support had risen 10% or more over two years. the government says it has put extra money into the care system. our social affairs correspondent,
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alison holt, has more. these are the things that make a huge difference to saskia's life — her football and her own flat. she has a learning disability and to live independently, she relies on help from her local council. i get support workers coming in to support me and cook. if it wasn't for them coming in, i would have struggled big time. her mum looks after her finances. this was my appeal against the increased charges. she was horrified when the amount saskia was expected to contribute to her care from her benefits suddenly increased from £92 a month to more than £500 a month. when mum told me, shejust burst out into tears. i hate seeing my mum cry. the family also says £1500 was taken from saskia's
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without my intervention, she would not have had any food that week, she would have not been able to pay her gas, the bbc asked councils in england about increases in care charges. 83 responded. in the past two years, they have increased the money they collect from people needing care by £51 million, the equivalent of a 13% rise in costs for each person getting support. and six councils have doubled the money they raised from community—based learning disability services. this is another sign social care is in crisis and it needs more money, it needs proper reform. this is simply wrong, that people who are the least well off in society are being expected to make up the shortfall, when this money should come from government. councils acknowledge that the lives of people like saskia are being squeezed, but insist their finances are so tight, they have few options. the government says it had put extra money into adult social care and will publish plans for reform soon. the number of online grooming crimes
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recorded by police in england and wales hasjumped to an all—time high. figures obtained by the children's charity, the nspcc, show that instagram — which is owned by facebook — was the platform most commonly used by suspected paedophiles. legislation aimed at reducing online harms is due to be scrutinised in the lords next month. elaine — not her real name — was 13 when she met the man online who would go on to rape her. i was groomed online by a much older man who was 31 at the time. he started off by telling me he was younger than he was, but as the grooming went on, he would tell me he was slightly older, and then he was slightly older than that, but by that point i trusted him that much that it didn't matter, it didn't register. it went on for quite some time. we met in person. he sexually assaulted me and then went on to rape me twice. i didn't realise that that's
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what it was at the time. i thought that he loved to me and that's what you do. it wasn't until i was probably about 16 or 17 that it really hit home about what had happened. andy burrows is head of child online safety at the nspcc — really, what we want to see is a comprehensive and proactive set of requirements on tech firms to identify all of the potential risks that children can face when using their services, and then to take reasonable and proportionate steps to address them. there's some key areas where we think that the proposals are falling short. this is about modelling and responding to the way in which child abuse is happening. so, an obvious example of that is that grooming doesn't happen on a particular site. groomers will look to contact children on large sites, like facebook or instagram, but then migrate them across to a livestreaming platform, or perhaps to an encrypted messaging platform. and one of the key areas where the legislation is falling short is only asking platforms to address the risks on their own site, rather than working together to identify the emerging threats to share intelligence,
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to share best practice. mcdonalds says its run out of milkshakes and bottled drinks in its outlets in england, wales and scotland after supply chain issues. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith has more. we have heard from mcdonald's today that across 1250 stores across england, socltand and wales, they are having problems with their supplies for milkshake and for certain bottled drinks. of course mcdonald's is notjust famous for the big mac and the quarter pounder, it is often for milkshakes and mcflurrys as well, and most of those are made via fresh milk supplies coming into their stores across the uk, and what mcdonald's are saying today is that they, like lots of restaurants and food businesses across the uk, have been having supply chain issues. you may well remember last week we heard that nando's had issues across about 50 of their stores getting hold of chicken, that they had to shut for a good few days until those supply issues
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were worked out. now, a lot of that was caused because of a shortage of hgv drivers, so those big delivery lorry drivers, and that is caused by a whole number of reasons that have piled together over recent weeks, and that is because of brexit, of course, with many eu national drivers leaving the uk or not returning to the uk after covid. there have also been real problems because of covid that there haven't been as many driving tests that have been able to take place over the last year, and that is really caused a bottleneck in the system for hgv drivers. and of course covid itself. many are perhaps sick and are being pinged from having to self—isolate. when you get those kind of supply chain issues in the system is a home in the system as a whole you do get gluts in certain areas, and when you are making decisions across a whole big wide system like mcdonald's do across all of the restaurants
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in the uk, they have got to prioritise things that are fresh that need to get out quickly, so if you have fresh meat sitting somewhere that need to be out in the restaurants and you have only got a limited number of hgv drivers or lorries that can do that, then the likelihood is that that is what is doing at the moment. so they are leaving the bottled drinks potentially sitting in the warehouses because they can sit and wait a lot longer. the milk issues are perhaps because of the supplier. so, arla are involved in the supply chain for all of mcdonald's restaurants across england, scotland and wales and they seem to be having issues as well with hgv drivers. so this is a common issue, an increasingly common issue that we are seeing across the food sector at the moment but it is something that is really coming to a head at mcdonald's at the moment. they are saying they are hoping these issues will be ironed out quickly and they will be to get back to full menu. but for people heading out to mcdonald's today, if you're expecting to take the kids out in the summer holidays for a milkshake, you may well put a pause in it and wait to see what happens. the webb family, from warwickshire, were given a mission. and they chose to accept it.
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and the mission led to an encounter with hollywood royalty. what seemed even more impossible was to expect that her children would be given a ride in tom cruise's helicopter. yes, the a—lister is filming the latest mission impossible, and so tom cruise needed to [and his chopper nearby. he hooked up with alison webb, who told annita mcveigh what happened. we were outside, enjoying the sunshine, it was a beautiful weekend, two of tom's team had been looking around the area where to land the helicopter because the airport was closing. sso my initial thoughts were, cool for the kids to watch so my initial thoughts were, cool for the kids to watch the helicopter land, why not? did you know when you were asked to allow this helicopter to land in your garden that tom cruise was going to be in it? not at all, no idea. neil, describe the moment when tom cruise got out and you realised it was him? i think the initial
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thoughts were, wow. the helicopter was probably 50 metres from the house, we did not know who it was until tom got in picture shot, really, quite surprised to say the least. merle, you are nine, i believe your parents were getting really excited about tom cruise being in your garden, but did you have any idea who he was? no. none at all? i believe you had to ask the question, who is tom cruise? is that right? yes. i knew he was famous, i recognised his name, j but i was not sure why. i am sure your parents filled you in on that? did they tell you about his movies? yes. then can you tell us about what happens next? we were invited to go on the helicopter, i but my mum was too scared.
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but you and your brother went? yes. wow, what was that like? it was really cool, when we wenti to a helicopter the driver stopped in midair and it was really scary. it sounds scary, but very exciting. alison, what was tom cruise like, what did you chat about? he was delightful, he came over, he was very covid aware so he kept his distance, kept his mask on, elbow bumped us, just thanked us very much for allowing them to use the field. he chatted with the children. just a really nice guy.
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a bunker built by german troops in northern france during the second world war has been turned into a guest—house. a bunker enthusiast named serge colliou bought up a plot of land on the breton seaside, and spent 18 months turning it into a fully—functioning rental spot. a night for 6 people will cost around £275, in case you're curious. little mix bandmates perrie edwards and leigh—anne pinnock have become mothers for the first time just days apart. pinnock had twins — and posted a photo of their feet along with the caption "we asked for a miracle, we were given two". on saturday, bandmate perrie edwards also welcomed her first child with footballer alex oxlade—chamberlain. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. the weather is expected to remain settle for the rest of august, lots of dry and bright weather on the way. the mornings could be a little bit misty and foggy for a time. as an area of
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high pressure has decided to anchor itself across the uk, its very centre is across scotland and northern ireland, where we are seeing the best of the weather. this is what we will have through the course of the afternoon and into the evening hours, sunshine at the western isles, the lowlands, northern ireland. further south, you can see these banks of clouds drifting off the north sea, tending to keep things a little grey in places and a touch cooler. when the sun comes up for any lengthy period of time, up to around 24 degrees. the wind are very light, they only push the cloud very slowly inland to affected parts of lincolnshire, may be the midlands. towards the centre of that high, it remains clear. temperatures first thing in the morning on wednesday around 14 degrees. tomorrow, that persistent area of cloud again, we will see
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some sunny spells in birmingham, but it could be on the fresh side in places around enough sea. take a look at glasgow, light winds, prolonged sunshine, 26 celsius. subtle change is expected on thursday, we are expecting this cold front to move across the uk. it is introducing thicker cloud and also a fresh breeze along the north sea coast. anywhere from aberdeenshire down towards east anglia, temperatures will a drop. towards the westward winds are lighter and there is more sunshine, temperatures well into the 20s. that same weather pattern continues into friday. areas of cloud but also lots of sunshine and it's still a little on the fresh side in newcastle with a breeze off the north sea. here is the outlook into the weekend and also a bank holiday weekend into monday. they
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were that remain settled. that high pressure is in no hurry to budge. bye—bye.
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today at one: pressure on america to keep troops in afghanistan longer so more people can escape the taliban. us and british forces have airlifted thousands out. now there's growing evidence, of taliban crimes... we have also received credible reports of serious violation of international humanitarian law and human rights abuses. the stories of some those who've escaped evacuated to safety... translation: esca ed evacuated to safe ~ ., , streets, translation: when i was in the streets, i could _ translation: when i was in the streets, i could see _ translation: when i was in the streets, i could see people i translation: when i was in the | streets, i could see people running and it was so... afraid. they told me that, "go home, the taliban is coming". a virtual summit of g7 leaders to discuss afghanistan,

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