Skip to main content

tv   World Business Report  BBC News  August 25, 2021 5:30am-6:00am BST

5:30 am
this is bbc news with the latest business headlines more disruption for some of the uk's biggest brands — now amazon is offering a bonus to attract new staff as supply chains grinds to a halt. airbnb offers to house 20,000 afghan refugees globally, saying it needed to act in "one of the biggest humanitarian crises of our time". and it's game on for gamers — as the world's largest video gaming event kicks off berlin but without fans in the room will a virtual event prove to be as big a hit?
5:31 am
let's start here in the uk, where some of the country's biggest and well—known brands are facing supply chain headaches caused by a lack of workers. on tuesday, mcdonald's said it had run out of milkshakes and some bottled drinks at its restaurants. the fast—food chain said supply chain issues, such as a shortage of lorry drivers, had affected the availability at over a thousand of its outlets. elsewhere, amazon announced it was offering new warehouse workers a £1,000 joining bonus in a bid to attract new recruits. the online retail giant is advertising for "urgently needed" warehouse pickers and packers in the uk to meet demand. joining me now is craig erlam, senior market analyst at 0anda.
5:32 am
good senior market analyst at 0anda. morning. this is a that good morning. this is a problem that has been going on for weeks now, i have discussed this many times on the programme, but it is coming to a head with several businesses expressing the challenges? yes. expressing the challenges? yes, it seems each _ expressing the challenges? yes, it seems each week _ expressing the challenges? yes, it seems each week we - expressing the challenges? yes it seems each week we hear of a new business claiming shortages and having to take certain actions to offset them, either closing stores or reducing the menu. 0ther closing stores or reducing the menu. other businesses will have to make similar decisions in the weeks ahead if this issue isn't resolved. it is whether amazon can offer an incentive to join the warehouse is more difficult on the driver's side because you need development licenses. it is about encouraging more people to help those licences or to get people in who already hold them to get them working. it is something that is likely to continue for a number of weeks
5:33 am
to come. , , , to come. industry bodies appealed _ to come. industry bodies appealed to _ to come. industry bodies appealed to the - to come. industry bodies appealed to the uk - to come. industry bodies - appealed to the uk government to say, could you give european hgv drivers temporary work visas to sort out this short time problem. the uk government said no, we will invest in training british drivers. that could have been a short—term fix to alleviate this problem, couldn't it? it fix to alleviate this problem, couldn't it?— fix to alleviate this problem, couldn't it? it could have, but it is a politicised _ couldn't it? it could have, but it is a politicised issue - it is a politicised issue because of brexit and everything we have seen over the last five years. i think from the government's perspective, they want to seek more domestic people being trained to fill these roles in the longer term. they will always prioritise that given everything we have seen over the years, over a short—term solution. it doesn't help the rest of us and it doesn't help these businesses who are crying out for trained staff. but that is the issue we have and i don't expect the government will change its mind on that anytime soon.— will change its mind on that anytime soon. will change its mind on that an ime soon. ~ , ., anytime soon. when it comes to amazon's _
5:34 am
anytime soon. when it comes to amazon's call-out _ anytime soon. when it comes to amazon's call-out for _ anytime soon. when it comes to amazon's call-out for new - amazon's call—out for new recruits and attracting them with a £1000 bonus. amazon need to get people quickly because they are coming up to the christmas season when they need more staff than usual, because it gets extremely busy for them? ~ , ,., , , , them? absolutely. this is something _ them? absolutely. this is something we _ them? absolutely. this is something we will - them? absolutely. this is something we will see - them? absolutely. this is l something we will see from other businesses as well. the difficulty will come, not from the amazons of this well, but where these workers are going to come from and what shortages it creates for businesses that cannot afford to compete on that front. but this is another example of where a culmination of factors, brexit, the pandemic coming together to create these difficulties in filling these roles which hopefully will alleviate before christmas, given how busy this will become. but there seems there will be a lot of competition for staff in these particular areas.—
5:35 am
particular areas. good to talk to ou, particular areas. good to talk to you. thank _ particular areas. good to talk to you, thank you _ particular areas. good to talk to you, thank you for - particular areas. good to talk to you, thank you for getting | to you, thank you for getting up to you, thank you for getting up so early. let's get some of the day's other news. the world bank has announced it is halting financial support to afghanistan because of concerns about the fate of women under taliban rule. the news deals another blow to an afghan economy, which has received more than $5.3 billion from the bank over the past 19 years. the us congress has approved a $3.5 trillion budget blueprint, setting the stage for democrats to enact president biden�*s ambitious economic agenda. the rule that passed on tuesday allows democrats to move ahead with key policy proposals. biden�*s party hopes to devote significant resources to family support, health and climate schemes. goldman sachs has made it compulsory for its staff to be fully vaccinated against coronavirus in order to work in its us offices. the investment bank said from seven september all employees, along with clients and visitors, would need to be doubled jabbed to enter its buildings.
5:36 am
fifa will receive $201 million in forfeited funds seized during a corruption probe, the us department of justice has announced. more than 50 defendants have been criminally charged since the department ofjustice unveiled its corruption probe in 2015. more now on afghanistan and as you were hearing president biden says the us is "on pace" to meet an end of august deadline for evacuations, despite calls from allies for an extension. with thousands of afghan�*s airlifted out of the country so far, many have been asking where will they go? well, one company that has stepped forward is airbnb, it says it will house 20,000 refugees to help them resettle around the world. michelle fleury spoke to the chief executive — brian chesky and began by asking him how it would work.
5:37 am
0ur housing will be free to afghan refugees. 0n 0ur housing will be free to afghan refugees. on our side, some hosts will offer them for free, but by and large most of the funding is coming from airbnb, my co—founders and i. how long can people stay in these properties? where are these properties? where are these properties? where are these properties going to be and how are you vetting them? vetting is a huge concern, we have seen a security breach in the uk where someone on the no—fly list was able to enter britain? no-fly list was able to enter britain? �* , ., .,, no-fly list was able to enter britain? �* , . ., no-fly list was able to enter britain? �* , ., ., ., britain? as far as how long they can — britain? as far as how long they can stay. _ britain? as far as how long they can stay, that - britain? as far as how long they can stay, that is - britain? as far as how long i they can stay, that is really up they can stay, that is really up to how long our hosts can house them. also they need. people are not looking for long—term housing, just temporary housing before they decide where they want to live and there is an extensive protocol to figure out where they want to start the lies. we want to make sure we can go as
5:38 am
big as possible for these people. much of the vetting is through partner organisations, church world service, the international rescue committee, but we also have an extensive capability as well. [30 but we also have an extensive capability as well.— capability as well. do you see that most _ capability as well. do you see that most of _ capability as well. do you see that most of them _ capability as well. do you see that most of them will- capability as well. do you see that most of them will be - capability as well. do you see that most of them will be in l that most of them will be in the united states or will some of them be with your hosts around the world?- of them be with your hosts around the world? they will be all over the _ around the world? they will be all over the world. _ around the world? they will be all over the world. a _ around the world? they will be all over the world. a few - around the world? they will be all over the world. a few of - all over the world. a few of them will be in the united states because quite a few are coming here. we have been in touch with the body administration and other government officials, but we have been with government officials around the world. i do expect we will provide housing for refugees around the world. ~ , , ., ., housing for refugees around the world. ~ , ,, ., ., . world. why did you feel a moral obliuation world. why did you feel a moral obligation to — world. why did you feel a moral obligation to step _ world. why did you feel a moral obligation to step up _ world. why did you feel a moral obligation to step up at - world. why did you feel a moral obligation to step up at this - obligation to step up at this moment? i obligation to step up at this moment?— moment? i think a moral obligation _ moment? i think a moral obligation comes - moment? i think a moral obligation comes from i moment? i think a moral- obligation comes from knowing you can do something and not doing it. and realising, cut high after more? have been providing... we provide housing to millions of people around the world. they struck us as
5:39 am
one of the greatest humanitarian crises of my lifetime and at least from housing displacement point of view. the business community is generally to step up, sometimes they need to feel compelled to do it. if this provides a few of the company is the inspiration to look inside themselves and they have their own superpower. 0ur superpower, we can provide housing more than any other organisation in the world. that is how we can help. every business can help in their own way and the time is now. it is notjust helping, it is helping quickly.- it is helping quickly. that is the chief — it is helping quickly. that is the chief executive - it is helping quickly. that is the chief executive of - it is helping quickly. that is l the chief executive of airbnb. staying with afghanistan, the western region of herat is home to farmers who grow the world's most expensive spice — saffron. us company, rumi spices, was set up by military veterans who served in the country to help afghanistan farmers by providing a fair and secure
5:40 am
income from agriculture. there are concerns the upcoming saffron harvest will be disrupted by the recent turmoil, with any further sanctions having a devastating effect on the ordinary afghanistan people. patti doyle is chief executive of rumi spices. welcome to the programme. i am assuming things are extremely challenging right now, because you have not been able to go and visit these farms for some time because of covid—19, let alone the recent crisis? exactly. a lot of the technology we have, it makes it easier to communicate, but still not the same as being there in person. in still not the same as being there in person.— still not the same as being there in person. in terms of those who _ there in person. in terms of those who work _ there in person. in terms of those who work for - there in person. in terms of those who work for you, - there in person. in terms of those who work for you, i l there in person. in terms of. those who work for you, i know many workers are women, they choose to work for you because you choose to work for you because y°u pay choose to work for you because you pay them directly, you pay them well and you do look after these women. what are your
5:41 am
thoughts with regards to women working for your company in herat and what the taliban says about they have to do this under the sharia law system? yes, obviously our concern is for their safety and that will be first and foremost. my wish is that we can continue to operate, pay them those direct rages, but pay them fairly and above market value. that is what i want to see happen. we do operate the processing facility with respect to the law. the hope is we will be able to continue to do so, but i think the phrase, as we all talk is, time will tell. i think as we come to the upcoming harvest, that is when we will see the impact of what is happening now. presumably, ou ma is happening now. presumably, you may have _ is happening now. presumably, you may have to _ is happening now. presumably, you may have to change - is happening now. presumably, you may have to change your. you may have to change your work practices to abide by what the taliban deems as the right way to work for women and men,
5:42 am
separation and that kind of thing? separation and that kind of thin ? ., . , ., thing? correct, we will try to ad'ust thing? correct, we will try to adjust in _ thing? correct, we will try to adjust in any _ thing? correct, we will try to adjust in any way _ thing? correct, we will try to adjust in any way we - thing? correct, we will try to adjust in any way we can - thing? correct, we will try to adjust in any way we can to l thing? correct, we will try to l adjust in any way we can to do that so we can keep operating with the people who have been part of the team for so long. this harvest, how are lacko? it is a very delicate process, we have just seen images of some your workers. have just seen images of some yourworkers. —— how have just seen images of some your workers. —— how will that go? your workers. -- how will that no? . your workers. -- how will that io? . ., ., , , ., ., go? we have a very short window in terms of _ go? we have a very short window in terms of when _ go? we have a very short window in terms of when the _ go? we have a very short window in terms of when the flowers - in terms of when the flowers are ready. pulling those out of the field, we have about 48 hours once those flowers are told to get the threads out. that is a lot of laborious work, it is a very fine skill to pull those out and then also to pull those out and then also to dry them. there is no mechanical way to do it, no chemicals involved and it is a very hands—on and labour—intensive process that has to happen in a very short window. in has to happen in a very short window. , ., . .,
5:43 am
window. in terms of continuing our window. in terms of continuing your operation, _ window. in terms of continuing your operation, still— window. in terms of continuing your operation, still running i window. in terms of continuing your operation, still running a l your operation, still running a business in afghanistan in a regime run by the taliban, what are your concerns? we have talked about women workers, but in terms of allowing you to trade, allowing an american company to run a business in afghanistan, what are your thoughts on that? $5 afghanistan, what are your thoughts on that?- afghanistan, what are your thoughts on that? as the days and weeks _ thoughts on that? as the days and weeks unfold, _ thoughts on that? as the days and weeks unfold, seeing - thoughts on that? as the days| and weeks unfold, seeing what plays out will be key to where we go. we are committed to this. myself and everyone in our company firmly believe in the ability to create a modern day spice route so farmers can have a reliable source of income, we are really committed to making this work. to the extent there is no other violations and things we cannot work around.— work around. you mainly exported _ work around. you mainly exported united - work around. you mainly exported united states l work around. you mainly | exported united states or work around. you mainly - exported united states or other countries as well?— countries as well? right now, 'ust the
5:44 am
countries as well? right now, just the united _ countries as well? right now, just the united states. - countries as well? right now, just the united states. the i just the united states. the primarily we focus on spices, also other spices, like cumin, fennel, coriander. we want to grow the portfolio and create even more demand for the afghan products. even more demand for the afghan roducts. ., , , ,, products. your business was founded by _ products. your business was founded by us _ products. your business was founded by us military - founded by us military veterans. unfortunately, we vetera ns. u nfortu nately, we don't veterans. unfortunately, we don't have any time left, but thank you. as ever, i want so much more time, but we haven't got it. stay with us on bbc news, still to come. we'll be hearing from the uk's minister for investment on why foreign takeovers could be good news for the country's economy. he's the first african—american to win the presidential nomination of a major party,
5:45 am
and he accepts exactly 45 years ago to the day that martin luther king declared, "i have a dream." as darkness falls tonight, and unfamiliar light will appear in the southeastern sky — an orange glowing disc that's brighter than anything save the moon — our neighbouring planet, mars. there is no doubt that this election is an important milestone in the birth of east timor as the world's newest nation. it'll take months and billions of dollars to repair— what katrina achieved injust hours. - three weeks is the longest the great clock has been off—duty in 117 years, so it was with great satisfaction that clockmaker john vernon swung the pendulum to set the clock going again. big ben chimes this is bbc news — the latest headlines:
5:46 am
president biden says the us is on course to complete the evacuation mission in afghanistan by his deadline of next tuesday. in kabul — there are desperate scenes at the airport as the taliban say no more afghans will be allowed there. many uk companies perform better when owned by foreign investors according to business minister gerry, lord grimstone, who said the uk had nothing to fear from a recent flood of private foreign takeover bids for uk listed companies. his comments come along with an announcement that the uk will hold a major international investment summit in october to attract overseas investment in post—brexit britain. lord grimstone has been telling our business editor simonjack what he hopes to achieve. we intend to keep the uk as
5:47 am
being one of the most attractive investment destinations in the world. we thought at the moment to be in that position, but it is a competitive environment. i like to think as investment being a globally competitive sport and we determine to win in it. you have people sitting in boardrooms all over the world are set in one place against another. what we are trying to do is look through the whole 0ffaly have in the uk, skills, innovation, research and development, our commitment to net zero, that this is producing an environment which investors want to be part of. what is more attractive about a market of people than a market of when we were in the eu full of when we were in the eu full of five hundred million people. we are exporting to the eu, of course. what is happening post—pandemic, what is happening on the march to net zero is the creation of new
5:48 am
industries and new opportunities. to win in that space, you have to be very conscious of your competitive strengths. in conscious of your competitive strengths-— strengths. in one way, you could argue _ strengths. in one way, you could argue what - strengths. in one way, you could argue what we - strengths. in one way, you could argue what we have l strengths. in one way, you - could argue what we have seen recently is an example that the uk is attractive. we have seen in the last eight months of this year, more uk publicly listed companies being bought by foreign, private equity than we have in the past five years. that is before you count morrisons, potentially sainsburys, some would say there is a fire sale going on of uk plc, are you comfortable with that? it of uk plc, are you comfortable with that?— with that? it is not 'ust a one-way fl with that? it is not 'ust a one-way trade. h with that? it is notjust a one-way trade. british i one—way trade. british companies are expanding overseas, overseas companies expanding here, buying businesses here. it would be a sad day for this country if we put the shutters up so we went a mercantile, entrepreneurial country where our companies are doing as well overseas as they
5:49 am
are in the uk.— are in the uk. how is it in the national interest _ are in the uk. how is it in the national interest for- are in the uk. how is it in the national interest for a - are in the uk. how is it in the i national interest for a company like morrisons, founded in the late 19th century, for decisions about that company to be made in new york or los angeles, who ever wins the bidding war?— bidding war? people buy companies _ bidding war? people buy companies to _ bidding war? people buy companies to make - bidding war? people buy| companies to make them successful, make them expand. all our research shows overseas investor companies in the uk are more productive. the last figures, 79% more productive than uk companies. they generate morejobs than uk companies, they generate more intellectual property and they export more. so overseas investment is vital for the uk's economic performance. i don't think we should be fearing overseas investment, we should be grasping it because of the economic impact it has
5:50 am
on our country. craft beer is big business these days, with many new brands becoming household names. the brooklyn brewery from new york has benefited from that boom, though it's been going for many decades. its ceo has been sharing some of his business secrets with us. iam ceo i am ceo of the brooklyn brewery. the advice i wish i had when i was first starting out was not be too wedded to any one particular business plan. if anything, the pandemic has really showed the need to be nimble on your feet, really showed the need to be nimble on yourfeet, think quickly and adjust your business plan and strategy on the fly, at a moment's notice. i remember when i started, i
5:51 am
had written a business plan and i thought this would take me through to an ipo in ten years. about six months into the business, i tore it up and realised it was not going to work. but i wish i had known that soon. cheers. today sees the start of gamescom, the world's largest video game event. pre—covid it was the place to be to see and experience the new games heading to market with retailers and developers showcasing their wares to nearly 400,000 people. this year, for the second time it will be a virtual event, so what can we expect? felix falk is the managing director of the german games industry association. how did it go last year in the covid environment when it had to be virtual only? thanks for having me. it was quite a lot
5:52 am
of work last year because we had just had four months to prepare everything for a purely digital show. we were happy to do it because it was just great to have something for the community and to enjoy the games world and culture even in times like the pandemic. we set of something digital with a content hub and it went really well. we are taking this experience for this year and making it an even better show. in terms of numbers, if you are doing a virtual event, you are reaching around 100 million video views, you have 50 million people from all over the world joining in. million people from all over the worldjoining in. in million people from all over the world joining in. in some ways, is that not a better reach than an event where people just walk through the door? it people 'ust walk through the door? , ., . , people 'ust walk through the door? , ., door? it is not a better reach, but it is an — door? it is not a better reach, but it is an additional - door? it is not a better reach, but it is an additional reach. l but it is an additional reach. when we have people walking through the door, it is 370,000
5:53 am
normally and this is a very special experience. when we are reaching millions of people worldwide through the digital region of gamescom, many people from 180 countries, that is a great additional reach and it makes people possible to enjoy gamescom, when they can't be in germany. it is a great additional reach of gamescom and a great way to lift the game culture in an international and global way. gaming has had an incredible year and gaming has had an incredible yearand a gaming has had an incredible year and a half because of the pandemic, people stuck at home. they have been gaming and they have been connecting with their friends and making new friends, what will be the real standout game this time at gamescom, what is your thoughts on what is coming you to the market? that is hard to say. there are
5:54 am
so many games. today we will start of gamescom with the big show and the opening night life. more than 40 games will be in the show with new information about those and new releases, a very long awaited information, facts and trailers. we see some trends in the gaming market, like live streaming and also live subscription models. it is going to be interesting because the games market is always very dynamic. every year we do see new trends. we dynamic. every year we do see new trends-— new trends. we will have to leave it there, _ new trends. we will have to leave it there, but - new trends. we will have to leave it there, but felix, . new trends. we will have to leave it there, but felix, i. leave it there, but felix, i hope it goes well for you. thank you. hope it goes well for you. thank you-— hope it goes well for you. thank ou. ~ . ., ,, , thank you. we have wrapped up another programme _ thank you. we have wrapped up another programme and - thank you. we have wrapped up another programme and as - thank you. we have wrapped up another programme and as everj another programme and as ever it was packed. please stay with
5:55 am
us on the bbc, and on bbc one and bbc breakfast begins. if you are on bbc world, i will be back. hello there. western scotland was the warmest part of the country on tuesday and it will be again on wednesday. we had cooler, cloudier conditions in some parts of the country, mind you, particularly here in the midlands, and that cloud is still around in the same place at the moment. high pressure still in charge, keeping it dry, but we've got more cloud coming down across the north sea that'll push further inland during the day. but we start with some mist and fog patches in scotland and northern ireland, then the sunshine comes out in many areas. there's the cloud coming in off the north sea, into eastern england, through the midlands and towards parts of wales. and we'll have more cloud again across the northern isles of scotland, but also, cloudier skies in the northeast of mainland scotland, perhaps even into the borders as well. elsewhere in scotland, the sun will be out and it's going to be warm — 26 degrees again around glasgow. and in the sunshine in northern ireland, 24 celsius.
5:56 am
could make 24 in cumbria as well. cloudier, cooler weather, though, for northeast england through lincolnshire, the midlands, into east wales, but also for east anglia. sunshine more likely across southern counties of england, though in the southeast, it's still quite a chilly wind blowing, and we've got all this cloud coming further inland during the evening. so, a lot of cloud, i think, at headingley for the first day of the test match. it's going to be dry. it'll be dry for day two on thursday, but it will feel quite a bit cooler. now, we saw all the cloud in the north sea. it's actually on that weather front there, very weak. it's pushing inland during wednesday night. a little light rain or drizzle here and there, and by the time we get to thursday morning, it's cloudy and damp across wales and the southwest. but the cloud should thin and break. sunshine comes out across many western parts of the uk, but there'll be more cloud blown in by a strong wind off the north sea into eastern scotland for a while, but more especially across eastern parts of england. and here, temperatures may be no better than 16 or 17 degrees. further west in the sunshine, it will be warmer, although not quite as warm as wednesday. with that weather front out of the way by the end of the week, we still have high pressure in charge.
5:57 am
still a cool breeze coming in around some of those north sea coasts, and we'll see some cloud developing, particularly inland across england and wales on friday. more in the way of sunshine for scotland and northern ireland, and the weather should brighten up a bit more across east anglia and the southeast. but temperatures are going to be near 18—20 celsius at the end of the week.
5:58 am
5:59 am
6:00 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and sally nugent. 0ur headlines today. president biden refuses to extend the deadline for the us withdrawal from afghanistan and confirms troops will leave by august the 31st. the sooner we can finish, the better. each day of operations brings added risk to our troops. a new lead in the case of missing chef claudia lawrence — 12 years on, police start searching gravel pits near her home in york. are the food supply issues spreading? more big brands have been telling us they've been having problems. # it's all right now, now, that is a gas

46 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on