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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 25, 2021 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm jane hill. the headlines... britain promises to use "every hour that's left" to evacuate as many people as it can from afghanistan, as america refuses to extend its airlift deadline beyond next tuesday. the troops will be withdrawn by the end of the month and what we will do is use every remaining hour and day to get our national such as we can, the afghans who work for us, out. so far the raf has brought out more than 10,000 people, including over 6000 afghans — but many still remain. we'll report on the afghan families here in britain — desperately worried about loved ones who are stranded. inside, ifeel like i'm broken into
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many pieces and my body is here. my soul is in afghanistan. researchers say protection against covid from two doses of the vaccine starts to wane within six months. it's a golden start in tokyo for paralympics gb — as cyclist dame sarah storey takes the 15th gold of her career — in her eighth games. and once they were hunted to near extinction but now there are plans to release beavers back into the wild to help save the english countryside. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news.
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the government says it will use every hour that's left to evacauate as many people as it can from afghanistan. the raf has flown more than 10,000 people out of kabul — including 6300 afghans but more than 2000 people who are eligible for relocation are still waiting. last night president biden rejected pleas from borisjohnson to extend the operation from kabul airport beyond the current deadline of next tuesday. uk troops will have to leave in advance of that, possibly by this weekend, so it's now a race against time to evacuate those who remain. paul adams reports. time is running out and they know it. outside the airport, no letup in the crash —— crush of people desperate to leave, too afraid to stay, prepared to put
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up with heat and filth just for a chance. inside, the operation chance on around—the—clock. planes leaving every 45 minutes. here the government says it is using every hour available to get people out. the danger is rising, says the man ultimately in charge. starting with the growing risk of attack from isis k, a sworn enemy of the taliban as well. everyday we are on the ground is another day we know isis k is to target the airport and attack us and allied civilians and forces. the taliban continue to project control. elements of a special commando unit visible at key areas around the city as the country's new willis stamped their authority, western government of figuring out how and when to deal with the taliban. the reality for us is to be able to engagement not recognise, not confer legitimacy back to engage and test whether they
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are serious about wanting to live up to those assurances and being very clear about what the international community will do if they are and what they will not do if we see the barbaric practices of the past. one major concern in europe and beyond, just how many more refugees will flee this latest phase of afg hanistan�*s long agony. in eastern turkey, some have already arrived, leaving their dreams behind. i was deciding to have mining bitcoin. i was planning a big business in kabul. the situation suddenly got changed and i decided to leave afghanistan. muhammad was a product of the new afghanistan, a youtuber and web designer, now part of the latest brain drain, on the run, trying to avoid the authorities at the mercy of people smugglers.
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for those who cannot or will not leave afghanistan, a myriad of desperate challenges, instability, drought and now rising food prices. the currency hitting a new low. aid agencies appealing for help to avoid disaster. paul adams, bbc news. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in kabul and told us what the news that there was not going to be an extension past the end of august to evacuation flights from the capital's airport means for those still in the city. it is a race against the clock and a race so fraught with risk. we are hearing today from london they will use all the hours which remain to get out all of the people, the british nationals, the afghans at risk, who and other capitals. there simply are not enough hours left. there are those afghans
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who tell us the taliban came knocking at the door. they are terrified and know this may be their last chance out. there are those afghans, including university graduates, people who had been on british scholarships, even those with british passports, who are trying, trying without success to actually get from a point in kabul to the airport. since yesterday it is ever harder to reach the airport. then, much less, even to get through that crush of people to make it to the last gate, to make it on the airfield, to make it on a flight out of afghanistan. we spoke to the taliban spokesperson this morning. he was unequivocal and unsympathetic. he said, we have an agreement with americans. only those afghans with documents can leave, the rest have to stay.
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0ur washington correspondent barbara plett usher is also with us. there was an overwhelming consensus that cannot be done by the end of the month, there is a real risk of leaving afghan allies aside and republicans have expressed outrage that the caliban are setting the agenda. your two congressmen, one from each party, go on a secret mission to kabul to see for themselves. they've been criticised roundly for causing a dangerous distraction to the operation but they came away with a grim reality check with one saying even if you extend the deadline a bit, we cannot get everyone out as the evacuation just started too late. they are military veterans and there is pressure more broadly from veterans who say the anger and the sense of betrayal is just off the charts, they are trying to meet biden officials this week to press the case for an extension and there is pressure from refugee advocates as well. president biden has emphasised a security risk of staying longer as you've heard, his administration is
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emphasising the task of this extraordinary operation of the airlift which it is but it is failing to change the subject. that was barbara plett usher talking about addressjoe that was barbara plett usher talking about address joe biden that was barbara plett usher talking about addressjoe biden made. purity is. about address joe biden made. purity is. ., , ._ about address joe biden made. purity is. ., , , ., is. the longer we stay starting with the acutely growing _ is. the longer we stay starting with the acutely growing risk— is. the longer we stay starting with the acutely growing risk of - is. the longer we stay starting with the acutely growing risk of a - the acutely growing risk of a terrorist threat growing by isis k, which is a sworn enemy of the caliban as well, we know isis k are seeking to target the airport and attack both us and allied forces and innocent civilian. that attack both us and allied forces and innocent civilian.— innocent civilian. that was a fraction of _ innocent civilian. that was a fraction of what _ innocent civilian. that was a fraction of what the - innocent civilian. that was a l fraction of what the president innocent civilian. that was a - fraction of what the president said. let's talk to our security correspondent, frank gardner. fairto fair to say fairto saya fair to say a lot of people listening to that will not have even held of isis k but you can explain. sure, this is the americanised
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version of the group that calls itself islamic state in... province, which is iskp. —— islamic state of iraq and the levant —— khorasan province. they have concentrated on the east of the country. they have lost a lot of territory in recent years. they are rivals to al-qaeda and the caliban which is —— and taliban. they have been putting out their own propaganda playing down their own propaganda playing down the taliban takeover saying it's not really a victory and the americans handed to them, criticising the fact that this entire situation derived out of the lohan preece break peace
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talks. —— derived from peace talks. they are hell—bent on making trouble and there was clearly some threat intelligence over the past few days picked up by the americans and their allies that isis, isis k or iskp are going to carry out an attack at the airport and you have to look at the pictures and imagine what a single mortar round, suicide bomber, truck, or attack were due to the incredibly volatile situation in the airport which is why no amount of g7 pressure on president biden will change the fact that if the caliban say august 31 is the deadline, that is the deadline and if the us were to stay on beyond that and to no longer be in a compliant situation with the caliban, you're into a completely different war fighting situation with the risk of huge casualties, civilian as well as military. —— with taliban. if the ——
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if the taliban say. military. -- with taliban. if the -- if the taliban say.— if the taliban say. what about the occasional suggestions _ if the taliban say. what about the occasional suggestions of - if the taliban say. what about the occasional suggestions of could . occasional suggestions of could there be another way out of the country now? it's a big landmass but could be any other sort of option? well, britain mooted and then largely forgot about a suggestion that there would be regional hubs set up in neighbouring countries like uzbekistan for example where if those afghans who wanted to get out but could not get out on the air evacuation, airlift, they should somehow make their way overland to these hubs but that has been quietly dropped. turkey was mooted as one, nobody consulted the turks, at least thatis nobody consulted the turks, at least that is what turkey said and they said no thanks, we are closing our border with iran so it's not really an option and it would be incredibly
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dangerous for a family, for example, and most people fleeing our families, they are not single young males in the way that most migrants who cross the sahara to get across the mediterranean are, these are afghan families in fear of their lives. very difficult for them especially with young children to cross the very rugged and in some cases extremely inhospitable terrain of afghanistan to get across the border so it was not really an option which is why the g7 has said it is incumbent upon the taliban to provide safe passage for anyone who still want to leave after that date and they have not really worked it out but frankly other than money, the g7 doesn't have a great deal of levers left on afghanistan. they are not the big players left, china, russia, afghanistan, pakistan will have the greatest influence over the taliban. . , ., , , ., taliban. even that phrase, when you say incumbent _ taliban. even that phrase, when you say incumbent upon _ taliban. even that phrase, when you say incumbent upon the _ taliban. even that phrase, when you say incumbent upon the taliban, - taliban. even that phrase, when you say incumbent upon the taliban, it l say incumbent upon the taliban, it seems extraordinary because would
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they say, well, we've won this? what is incumbent on us? this is our country. i is incumbent on us? this is our count . ~ ., is incumbent on us? this is our count . ~' ., . is incumbent on us? this is our count . ~ ., ., , ., ., country. i know and it smacks of a certain kind _ country. i know and it smacks of a certain kind of _ country. i know and it smacks of a certain kind of presumptuous - country. i know and it smacks of a i certain kind of presumptuous nurse. the taliban are far more aware of world opinion this time round and they were in the 1990s, they do not want the kind of pariah status they had then been only countries recognise them. they would like to an economically successful and accessible country according to their interpretation of islamic law and they will call the islamic emirate of afghanistan and they want that recognition but only up to a point. these people have spent 20 years out in the field fighting a brutal civil war. years out in the field fighting a brutal civilwar. in years out in the field fighting a brutal civil war. in many cases, inflicting horrific civilian casualties but never the less, this is the reality of where they are, they are in charge now, not america, not britain, not the g7 and they will make their own alliances and
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china is one of those countries reaching out to them that will probably get a lot of investment from china. pakistan will have a huge influence over them, there is still a lot of money that is being withheld so 9.5 william dollars being frozen in bank accounts, us bank accounts, belonging to the us government that they would like obviously, nearly half $1 million that has been held in loans which they would like. it has been unwelcome to see the taliban, for them to see this amount of people leaving the country who are educated, professional and do not want to belong to the new taliban afghanistan. it's not good optics for them which is another reason why they want to close down this airlift is quick as they can.— the taliban's takeover
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of afghanistan has caused anxiety for afghan families settled in the uk, who are desperate to help their loved ones still in the country. many fear their relatives are now trapped. our special correspondent ed thomas has been speaking to people here and in kabul. is he 0k, can he talk to us? right now, we're scared and we can't talk properly. and what should we do over here? they are going to kill us. we don't want that. the phone calls to kabul. the anguish, uncertainty of what comes next. inside, ifeel like i am broken into many pieces. my body is here, my soul is in afghanistan. and so is the rest of her family — uncles, aunties, in—laws. most of them work for the afghan government or western forces. this is the picture of the taliban they have taken secretly, my brother—in—law. we blurred these images not to reveal the family home. so this is them in the house. this is the taliban. they want a female member of ourfamily.
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they want to know where they are. they were just sitting there. is that a rifle? yeah. she says all the women in the family have been moved to a safe house. this is the problem they have, because they are in hidden places. we have to ring so many times. she is not feeling well, she cannot go to the doctor. she is saying she is really ill and she cannot go to the doctor or anything. they are eligible under the resettlement scheme, but we have heard nothing. what do you think will happen to yourfamily? they will get killed, they will get killed. 100% they will get killed. if i leave them and something happens to them, i will never be able to forgive myself. from manchester to kabul. it's extremely difficult, if not impossible. is that gunfire behind you? that's right. it's not so bad now, actually. at night, it was really bad. this is sher shah, a british citizen hiding in kabul with young children
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and elderly parents. my father is in his 80s, my mother is elderly and ill and frail. i can send you pictures. they cannot survive without me. a family isolated, with decisions to make. going to the airport with young children is extremely difficult, if not impossible. the four gates to kabul airport are mobbed by thousands of people. i really wonder how many of them are genuine and how many are opportunists. documents are being faked all over the place. at the cost of a few pounds. i wouldn't be surprised if some people managed to get onto flights to the uk with fake documents. but there are lucky ones. officially flown out of kabul, now in quarantine. the kids are sleeping in another room. this is amazing. khasrow is thankful, safe and alive with his family. kabul has collapsed. in the hands of the taliban.
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it was shocking for us. what have you left behind? my home, my friends. my ambitions, my future, my country. everything. we worked for nothing, i think. our special correspondent ed thomas there speaking to people here and in kabul. the headlines on bbc news... —— other news now and researchers believe protection against covid from two doses of the vaccine may start to wane within six months. a study looked at data on more than a million people who'd been double jabbed with the pfizer and astrazeneca vaccines. the government is expected to begin offering some people a third covid boosterjab next month — as sophie hutchinson now reports. how were you after your first vaccination? i was all right. i was just a bit fatigued. just how long vaccines offer protection and whether we need boosters is a crucial question ahead of the winter.
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today's study adds to growing evidence that over time covid vaccines become less effective at stopping infections. it examined 1.2 million positive test results between may and july this year and found that protection from the pfizer vaccine seemed to reduce from 88% to 74% over five to six months and astrazeneca from 77% to 67% over four to five months. importantly, this is about preventing a covid infection. hospital figures suggest that both vaccines have continued to protect against severe illness in many people. all the evidence points to good, sustained protection against hospitalisation at the moment. but obviously, we're having to watch that very carefully during the current wave and seeing if there are any signs that people who received the vaccines earliest, that is the elderly, the health care workers, are beginning to lose their protection against serious illness.
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public health england estimates that nearly 85,000 deaths have been prevented as a result of the covid—19 vaccination programme in england so far. however, the study�*s lead investigator said vaccine efficacy could drop to 50% by the winter and boosters would be needed. it is bringing into focus this need for some action. we can'tjust sit by and see the protectiveness slowly waning while cases are still high and a chance of infection is still high as well. the government has said there will be boosterjabs sometime in september, starting with those most at risk of severe covid—19. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. there was a big rise in young adults taking up smoking during the first lockdown in england. according to a study by cancer research uk, the number of 18 to 3a—year—olds who classed themselves as smokers increased by a quarter. it's thought many turned to cigarettes in response to stress.
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deborah arnott, chief executive of the charity action on smoking & health, explained the increase may be due to stress experienced by younger people during the pandemic. it is not completely surprising, because we all know how stressful particularly young people have found covid—19 and the impact it has had on their lives. i think what is more important is how we address it, because the lessons for the future are extremely worrying because we know that smoking, once started, is highly addictive. currently, of every three young people who start smoking, only one will quit before they die. so we need to get more investment by the government in helping people to quit, in motivating them to realise that smoking is not the solution to stress they think it is.
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the mother of claudia lawrence, who disappeared more than a decade ago, has said she's in shock after detectives revealed they've begun a new search for her. claudia lawrence was 35 when she was disappeared in 2009. 0ur correspondent alison freeman is at the scene and sent this update. yes, well, it is to be expected that claudia's mum would be deeply shocked by this latest turn of events. in the 12 years since a 35—year—old daughter claudia went missing, nine people have been questioned but so far the police have not said what has led them here to carry out these searches but claudia's mum has told us that she is upset that she did not originally receive enough information before the searches began yesterday. i’m in the searches began yesterday. i'm in total... the searches began yesterday. i'm in total- -- i'm — the searches began yesterday. i'm in total--- i'm in— the searches began yesterday. i'm in total. .. i'm in another— the searches began yesterday. i'm in total... i'm in another world. - the searches began yesterday. i'm in total... i'm in another world. i'm - total... i'm in anotherworld. i'm in total shock. i wish i'd been
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prepared a bit more for it other than on the day. because i am certain this did notjust happen on the day. it must have been known about. and i had a telephone call saying there was nothing to worry about and... had the same so did not bother ringing the police back. she said she cannot think of a link between claudia and this area but they hope sunlight will be shed on they hope sunlight will be shed on the situation. a report into the use of tasers by police in england & wales says the use of them risks �*losing legitimacy�* in the eyes of the public. the report by the independent office for police conduct was commissioned after a series of taser incidents involving black men and people with mental health concerns.
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with me is our home affairs correspondent, sean dilley. you have been reading this report, firstly can you explain the essence of this? ~ �* , ., of this? we've been reading the reort, of this? we've been reading the report. speaking _ of this? we've been reading the report, speaking to _ of this? we've been reading the report, speaking to police - of this? we've been reading the l report, speaking to police officers anonymously and having all sorts of conversations because the concerns firstly, they are quite concerning, the independent 0ffice firstly, they are quite concerning, the independent office for police conduct, we should point out, investigate wrongdoing in the most serious or controversial cases and their concerns in this case as they found examples from the complaints that have gone to them about police and found examples where tasers have been used for noncompliance are not just a physical threat. they found there is a disproportionate use of taser against people who are black but in particular we should say a use of taser does not mean discharge, you're more likely to have one discharged against you if you're white but to be on the wrong end of one, the unfortunate business end of one, the unfortunate business end of one if you like if you are
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black and they have said half of cases involve people with mental health concerns.— health concerns. those are the findinas, health concerns. those are the findings, what _ health concerns. those are the findings, what are _ health concerns. those are the findings, what are the - health concerns. those are the i findings, what are the responses health concerns. those are the - findings, what are the responses to this? ., , findings, what are the responses to this? .,, , .., findings, what are the responses to this? , ., _, , this? the most significant one comes from the chief _ this? the most significant one comes from the chief counsel— this? the most significant one comes from the chief counsel which - this? the most significant one comes from the chief counsel which looks i from the chief counsel which looks after officers across england and wales and they say they are the pointed and the report is vague, lacks detail, the point out it accounts for a fraction, 0.01% they say of taser uses in the five year period at the iop sea has looked at from 2015 to 2020. just to give you an idea of context your. —— the iopc has looked at. there were figures that are looked at by the iopc are the most serious or controversial cases they have looked at and the national police chiefs council have been very critical because they say the iopc did not attend taser courses and they save they are was not sufficient engagement with leasing stakeholders.—
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not sufficient engagement with leasing stakeholders. thank you. for now, thank leasing stakeholders. thank you. for now. thank yon _ at least a dozen people have been treated in hospital after catching salmonella from pork scratchings made by a food company in bolton. this involves six pork scratchings and crackling products made by a company called mr porky here in bolton. the bags all have a best before date of the 19th of february or earlier and the food standards agency say the advice is unsurprisingly not to eat any of these product. it says that tests have linked 176 cases of salmonella poisoning to products made here at this factory between september last year and now. salmonella can make you nauseous, give you vomiting and diarrhoea, fever, and it can be more serious in the very young and those with a weakened immune system. and as you say, at least 12 people have
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eaten products linked to the outbreak here who have had to be taken to hospital. sharon graham has been elected the first female leader of unite, one of britain's biggest unions. she'll succeed len mccluskey, a prominent critic of the labour leader, sir keir starmer. 0n the campaign trail, sharon graham argued that the union should focus more on the workplace — and less on westminster politics. now it's time for a look at the weather. and it's another fine day across the uk. sky is probably looking something like this. the best of the weather, sunny skies across the north—west of the uk, northern ireland, and central scotland with the centre of the high pressure here and this is where the highest temperatures will be this afternoon as we are peaking at 26 celsius in
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glasgow, blue skies. elsewhere cooler because we have more clout. note a cold front will be just raising eastern parts of the uk during the course of the night, introducing a somewhat stronger breeze coming off the north sea and temperatures first thing in the morning will be more or less the same everywhere, 1a celsius, 13 celsius but the cool front by day tomorrow will introduce a lot more clout to eastern areas and some of that cloud will drift further north, too. so a chill in the air on the north sea coast tomorrow from newcastle all the way to norwich but remaining warm in the west.
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hello, this is bbc news. i'm jane hill. the headlines: britain promises to use "every hour that's left" to evacuate as many people as it can from afghanistan, as america refuses to extend its airlift deadline beyond next tuesday. the troops will be withdrawn by the end of the month and what we will do is use every remaining hour and day to get our nationals, such as we can, the afghans who work for us, out. so far the raf has brought out more than 10,000 people, including over 6,000 afghans, but many still remain.
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we'll report on the afghan families here in britain, desperately worried about loved ones who are stranded. inside, ifeel like i'm broken into many, many pieces. my body is here, my soul is in afghanistan. researchers say protection against covid from two doses of the vaccine starts to wane within six months. it's a golden start in tokyo for paralympics gb, as cyclist dame sarah storey takes the 15th gold of her career in her eighth games. and once they were hunted to near extinction, but now there are plans to release beavers back into the wild to help save the english countryside.
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paralympics gb, very important and not that hard to say! we have all the news from tokyo to come, but first we will start with some big football news. well, after a summer of intense speculation about his future, the england captain harry kane has revealed that he will be staying at tottenham. he's been linked with a move to manchester city, who confirmed their interest in him just a few weeks ago, but he says he's committed to spurs. kane was absent throughout their pre—season campaign and missed their first two games of the new season, but he came on as a substitute in the 1—0 win at wolves on sunday. he said...
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meanwhile, the paralympics are under way in tokyo and the brits got off to the perfect start thanks to dame sarah storey. she beat her team—mate crystal lane—wright in the final of the c5 3000 metres individual pursuit to win gold. it's the 15th paralympic title of storey�*s career, and she's nowjust one behind mike kenny's british record of 16. she smashed her world record by over four seconds in qualifying and caught lane—wright after 1750 metres of their race. she's now won medals at each of the eight games she's attended. for lane—wright, who also set a personal best in the heats, it's the second silver medal at consecutive games in the event. there was also a silver for steve bate and adam duggleby in the men's b 4000 individual pursuit. they were defending champions but the dutch caught the britons in the final. so a solid start to
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the games for the brits. 0ur paralympics reporter rachel lathem rounds up day 1 from tokyo. to round up today's action, seven athletes that paralympics gb qualified from the heat into the finals this evening and three of them one medals. let's start with toni shaw, making her paralympics debut in 400 metres freestyle and took the bronze medal. also making his paralympic debut is reece dunn who went in the 100 metres butterfly, did one better and took da silva. all eyes were then on tully kearney he led the race of the whole way and it was not until the final five metres that she was pipped by the chinese and took the da silva medal as well. —— took the silver medal. now to cricket and england
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are firmly in control on day one of their third test against india at headingley. the visitors chose to bat first and probably regretted that decision ever since because jimmy anderson was on fire this morning. he took three ealy wickets, including the prize scalp of captain virat kholi. 0llie robinson has since taken two more, with craig 0verton taking the sixth and seventh wicket in the last few minutes to leave the indians on 67—7. you can listen to full ball by ball commentary right now over on five live sports extra. great start for england there. six—time us open champion serena williams has pulled out of next week's tournament, saying she needed time to allow her body to "heal completely" from a torn hamstring. the 39 year old becomes the latest high—profile player to pull out following the withdrawal of defending men's champion dominic thiem as well as roger federer and rafael nadal. williams said on social media that she'll "miss seeing the fans but will be cheering on from afar". that's all the sport for now. i will have more in the next hour.
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super, thanks very much, austen, see you a bit later on. more now on the government�*s pledge to use �*every hour�* that�*s left to evacuate as many people as it can from afghanistan. last night president biden rejected pleas from borisjohnson to extend the operation from kabul airport beyond the current deadline of next tuesday. uk troops will have to leave in advance of that, possibly by this weekend, so it�*s now a race against time to evacuate those who remain. speaking to my colleague joanna gosling, our chief international correspondent lyse doucet said that for many afghans, the choice between remaining in the country they know and leaving everything behind is impossible. it is amazing how words can be so powerful to convey the fear, the panic, the terror that so many art
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feeling here. i�*mjust panic, the terror that so many art feeling here. i�*m just one person amongst millions and the world over are getting sos messages. 0n amongst millions and the world over are getting sos messages. on my phone there are please, the taliban came a knocking at my uncle�*s door, please, my life is in danger, my father is too old and is not at home, cannot get to be a port and those who say i have all the documents i need, i have a british passport, need to get my family to the gate, we have been stuck for days. my children have not drink any water. there are people too who have no documents at all, all they have is the e—mail address of a british or american consulate and they see that there is rest to the airport, they absorb this panic, they think that now this moment is the only way out and so they are also begging for help to escape. out and so they are also begging for help to escape-— help to escape. what is the situation — help to escape. what is the situation with _ help to escape. what is the situation with people - help to escape. what is the situation with people trying help to escape. what is the i situation with people trying to help to escape. what is the - situation with people trying to get to the airport? art many trying after that warning from the taliban that they simply should not? we were
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at the airport — that they simply should not? we were at the airport yesterday, _ that they simply should not? we were at the airport yesterday, in _ that they simply should not? we were at the airport yesterday, in that - at the airport yesterday, in that long acute that i i�*m sure all the viewers will have seen by now. that long queue. cut through by a sewage channel, people had to walk through this sewage channel. we saw the crush of people yesterday, crushed together as they tried to reach the very last points where they will meet someone from the british embassy or american embassy to process their visas, process the documents, so they can finally get onto that airfield where there is this easy kind of calm, the engines are humming of the transport helicopters to take them out of afghanistan. but after the announcement was made, i think the panic is rising. before, it was hard to get through at a huge queue to get to the end, the gate. now it is even hard to get to the airport.
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people are trying and are being turned back. there was a whole bus that left in the early hours of the morning full of afghans who had all at the right documents, all at the right permissions and passports and they were turned back. and so they join the many others are trying, hoping against hope, racing against the clock, to get out of here before the clock, to get out of here before the gates are slammed shut with the departure of the us and even before the us, the british, french and others are likely to depart even sooner. ~ ~ ., ., others are likely to depart even sooner. ~ ., ., ., ., , others are likely to depart even sooner. ~ ~ ., ., ., ., , , sooner. we know that already this mornin: sooner. we know that already this morning poland _ sooner. we know that already this morning poland has _ sooner. we know that already this morning poland has taken - sooner. we know that already this morning poland has taken its - sooner. we know that already this morning poland has taken its last| morning poland has taken its last two flights out of the airport, it says it is simply too dangerous to put its people at risk there any more. what are the concerns around the specific threat? this more. what are the concerns around the specific threat?— the specific threat? this is a time when rumours — the specific threat? this is a time when rumours raise _
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the specific threat? this is a time | when rumours raise speculations, the specific threat? this is a time i when rumours raise speculations, in a moment of panic there are groups who will try and exploit the situation. there are even the risks of the security that is in place, we saw yesterday how quick the taliban, who are in control of the outside of the airport, how quick they were to shoot a gun, use a whip, to push back the crowds. now images, terrible images, are emerging on social media. i looked on them just before i came on air, someone filming himself with his face bloodied as he tried to make his way through the crowd that the taliban had been hitting him. there are those risks and there are bigger risks, intelligence reporting is that we have had for many days now that we have had for many days now that groups like the islamic state in this region could try to exploit the situation, to have a last attack on the americans as they are going out. i think we have to be very careful not to dramatise what is already a dramatic situation. the
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airort is already a dramatic situation. the airport is very — already a dramatic situation. the airport is very much the focus and obviously it is the most straightforward way out if people can get there, they can get the right documents and get on a flight, but there will be people who simply cannot get on a flight out. what will they do? what are people saying? because it is a long way to have to go on foot and i will obviously be fraught with other dangers. —— that will obviously be fraught. dangers. -- that will obviously be frau:ht. , , ., ., fraught. yes, it is one of those moments _ fraught. yes, it is one of those moments where _ fraught. yes, it is one of those moments where all _ fraught. yes, it is one of those moments where all attention, | fraught. yes, it is one of those i moments where all attention, fears are telescoped on this one at last moment, the last week of the presence of american and other nato armies. but once they leave, afghanistan it will be in the hands of afghans, in this case under taliban control. what we expect will happen is that neighbours like pakistan, allies like the gulf state of qatar, they are already in urgent
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talks with the taliban leaders. are going to want to get commercial flights going again, they will want to put in place an air traffic control system that can reassure airlines that it is it safe to fly in and out of afghanistan. the roads were open to neighbouring countries, including pakistan. —— the roads will open. it�*s sound like it is the last escape, but the doors will not completely shut and there are other doors and windows which will open after this moment passes, but i think for many afghans, even those who have not been directly threatened, they fear that the restrictions that the taliban are likely to impose, to reimpose. they feared for the future of their children, that the girls and boys will not be given the same opportunities which were offered in the last 20 years. so they see that this could be the last ticket possibly to a western country and it is not surprising that they want to
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try to grab it. but life will go on in afghanistan, it even though it is so uncertain now, and tens of billions of afghans have no way out, they have no choice. some of them do not want to go. i�*m meeting educated afghans, journalists, other professionals, who have decided they do not want to be a refugee, they do not want an even more uncertain life abroad, they are going to stay here and see if it works. and in rural areas across afghanistan, people will stay. they will wait to find out what it is like to live again under taliban rule. the united states says at least 30,000 afghans may be resettled in the united states in the coming weeks. several hundred are heading to austin texas. laura trevelyan reports. haroun leads a protest in austin, texas, by afghan americans who work for the us military and are calling for theirfamilies to be evacuated from afghanistan. peoplejust want to
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bring theirfamily here because they are in danger, so that is why we�*re here. i work, and because of my work, my family is going to be butchered or killed. haroun was an interpreter for the us army and settled here seven years ago. now he is desperately worried about his parents in kabul. they left our house, they locked the door, the only thing they took with them was some food items and one pair and one pair of clothes, so they locked the door and they are sleeping outside the airport. they are afraid if they go back, of course, the taliban have already found out that their son was a translator, so they cannot go back. for the afghans who are being evacuated and are about to arrive here in texas, volunteers are unpacking the donations which have been pouring in. despite the polarised politics of immigration in the us, staff believe that afghans will be welcome here. the people who helped us overseas, there is a special category that
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really does speak across political boundaries and rural, urban, and people understand that these are people who we really need to help. andy of the local republican party agrees, but he says the biden administration has bungled the withdrawal so far and things may get even worse. i hope they make a decision that does not result in a tectonic shift of afghanis coming to the united states. i�*m hoping it will result in those who need to be here for safety reasons to be here and those that need to stay and fight fair afghanistan are saying put. the last thing we want is a brain drain in afghanistan where the best and brightest are either being silenced by terroristic activities or are being flighted to america. amid this debate over who gets to come here from afghanistan, tim kennedy is deploying from texas to the middle east to support the evacuation of the afghans who work for the us military. he is a us army sniper and veteran of the war. what is it that you hope you will achieve on this
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mission to afghanistan? that is hard. it is a hard question. i hope that i can preserve and protect human life. as many people that want to live and not to have to live under the tyranny of the taliban, that want to be contributors to a free world and free society, then i will fight for that. i will die for that. that is the america that these former translators believe in, but theirfaith in us might has been tested. now they can only wait and pray theirfamilies make it out of afghanistan alive. laura trevelyan, bbc news, texas. we will talk more about the situation in afghanistan at the top of the hour. just some covid needs to bring you which has come through in the last little while, new figures from scotland. we are
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hearing that the number of daily cases in scotland has hit a record high. can find daily cases now at 5021 and that is the first time the recorded figure has gone above 5000. it is a 16% increase on yesterday, but crucially the first time the recorded figure has gone above 5000. that is through from scotland on the covid figures there. extinction rebellion protesters have gathered in central london, on the third day of a fortnight of demonstrations around the capital. the campaign group wants the government to stop all new investments in fossil fuels. it is calling this to week—long protest the impossible rebellion. 0ur chief correspondentjustin rowlatt is there for us now. the protesters look as if they are right in the heart of the shopping
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district down in oxford circus. yes. district down in oxford circus. yes, riaht in district down in oxford circus. yes, right in the — district down in oxford circus. yes, right in the middle _ district down in oxford circus. yes, right in the middle of— district down in oxford circus. 1a: right in the middle of oxford circus here, 40 or 50 came in here with a van and began erecting the structure you can see behind me, this pink structure. that was designed to be a table and they were going to have a slogan, come to the table, on it. the idea is to encourage people to discuss the issues around what they describe as the climate emergency. the police came quite quickly and it was quite an enthusiastic police response. they came in to encircle the protest and so they did not get to finish the table, but there are a couple of hundred protesters here and another ring of the police just outside the middle of oxford circus stopping people getting on a. so a very big police operation to restrict to limit the protest happening here in oxford circus. justin, at the moment we are looking at pictures from cambridge circus,
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just a little further away from where you are, and oxford circus, the point is that the group wants to do this day after day and because so much disruption that there will be some sort of political response? yes, it has kind of graduated. they work out the junctions where there will be some disruption but not a huge disruption, so it is quite carefully done and done with some discussion with the police, but the idea is really to cause disruption, make it difficult for example for the police to move them, so there are little structures outside of the table and people have chained themselves with steel tubes inside a steel tubes, very hard for the police to get in there and cut the padlocks. there are also a ring of women who have glued themselves with super glue to the floor and to each other and that you can see there are a couple of women glued to the side of that structure. all of which is time and effort for the police when it finally the crowds dispersed to
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come in here and begin to peel them apart from each other and take them away from the obstructions they have made. it is to begin discussions for the climate emergency and this comes in the run—up to this really important climate conference that is happening in glasgow in november, so they are saying a look, it is really important that everyone engages with this issue which after all, relates to the future of us all on a planet earth and they say this is an effort to draw attention to the urgency of the issue. of course, lots of people do say it is arrogant of them to cause this sort of disruption to ordinary people�*s lives. that is a debate that goes on every time extension rebellion hold these kind of events. they say it is proportionate to the scale of the problem in the climate emergency we all face. ., ~ , .,
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it�*ll soon be time for children in england to go back to school, but for some pupils in leicestershire, the new term has already begun. the county has the earliest start in england, and with covid restrictions now relaxed, the authorities are watching their progress closely. jo black reports. it�*s a new school year for the pupils at stokes wood primary in leicester. and with covid restrictions now relaxed, just how much of a fresh start will this academic year be? a little bit worried about what is happening now, if the numbers are rising up. and the kids are going back to school and everything is back to normal. what can you do? i am just glad we have a bit of normality back, i think we need it. i think as parents we have done the home—schooling. i am a stay—at—home mum so i was just focused on her and she has done really well, i don't think she has missed much, but i think i'm ready now, she is ready now. last year assemblies at this
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school were on zoom, with children dialling in from their classrooms. today, pupils sat side—by—side. head teacherjane gadsby has worked all through the pandemic and is cautiously optimistic about the new way she and her team will be running the school. we have found that some of the covid routines were quite good, people aren�*t looking over their shoulders all the time, they are not thinking, "am i allowed to do this, am i allowed to do that?" there are still some concerns obviously, because we do know that covid hasn�*t gone away. how much of a fantastic summer you have had. this academic year, school leaders have more flexibility — bubbles have been relaxed so head teachers can decide what crowd control systems suit their schools. and close contacts of a confirmed case will be asked to take a pcr test and will not have to self—isolate unless they also test positive. for now, even in these uncertain times, staff and pupils are trying to focus on teaching and learning.
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a new term brings another new normal. jo black, bbc news, leicester. the government is proposing to reintroduce beavers into the wild in england. the plans would also give beavers legal protection, making it an offence to deliberately capture, kill or injure them. many experts say beavers would help restore natural habitats. sarah ransome is in ladock in cornwall. yes, i am on a farm here in ladock and this is where, a few years ago, a number of beavers were released into the wild. as much as anything really to check the pros and cons of what happens when you do that and the data from here, along with other trials in england, will be fed into that consultation that has been announced today. a spot of breakfast after dam building the night before. since these beavers arrived on the farm, they�*ve helped regulate water flow and reduce flooding locally. this is their lodge, which they built for themselves,
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and they will be inside there now, getting ready to sleep or even sleeping. hunted almost to extinction, they are making a comeback. they are often described as eco—engineers, offering a natural solution to some of nature�*s problems. there is no doubt with climate change, we are getting more intensive rain and more flooding incidents, so holding water in our headwaters is going to be really, really important going forward. we can do it ourselves, but beavers do it much cheaper and much better, so we ought to be enlisting them as a primary ally in climate change. the beavers here have been making themselves at home for years. they�*ve been cutting down trees and making new water courses. but however cute these creatures might be, their presence in the countryside is still controversial. the national farmers�* union says it will work with the government, but is urging caution, warning of potential damage to trees and drainage fields from these
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mammals that know no borders. we need to make sure that it's properly funded and that where damage does occur, that there is going to be adequate compensation as well. so, the issue is mainly around coming to this with a balanced, open mind, that it is not necessarily all going to be a bed of roses. this project here in cornwall and others in england have already been looking at the impact on the environment. this new consultation will help to decide if, when and where the wider release of beavers should go ahead. and that consultation document has already landed in some conservationists�* inbox. anyone who wants to take part in it, well you have got three months to make your views known.
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now it�*s time for a look at the weather with tomasz shafernaker. hello. forecasters are going to be probably running out of things to say over the next few days. there are going to be so little change in the weather brought by this high pressure which has anchored itself across the uk. it is really established now and it is here to stay for the next few days but noticed there was a cold front he had just across the north sea and if you look at the motion of the cloud comments coming from the north, moving southwards and i will introduce a slightly fresher air come tomorrow. but today, the best of the weather so far has been across the north—west of the uk, you are a winner here, it has been so fine for the past couple of days. because of that cloud across east anglia, the midlands into wales. that cloud will give way to some sunshine, but the sunniest weather will be in the south—west and west of scotland, up to 26 degrees today
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in a glasgow. mid 20s possible that northern ireland too. he was that cold front moving across the uk overnight, fresher conditions to the north coast initially and then the cloud and pressure conditions will spread further inland as we go through the course of the day on thursday. here it is, not much rain on this weather front. mostly cloud from say the north—east of england through yorkshire, intojust from say the north—east of england through yorkshire, into just about the midlands and south—east. the best of the weather i think on thursday again it will be across western areas. 23 degrees could well be the warmer spots in wales, in cardiff. friday, the cool front is out of the way, back in high pressure which is essentially still here and not moving an awful lot, just a little bit and that also changes the wind direction across the uk and the areas of cloud will just move to different parts of the country over the coming days and thatis country over the coming days and that is actually a really difficult thing to forecast, card amount. the different layers through the
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atmosphere overlapping, bright weather, in some areas at sunny conditions likely as, on saturday lots of sunshine across western parts of the uk, perhaps a bit of cloud there are little further east. that is it saturday, sunday will be no different and it will stick on to a bank holiday monday and probably beyond as well. that high pressure is certainly here to stay for now. bye—bye.
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this is bbc news. i�*m jane hill. the headlines... britain promises to use "every hour that�*s left" to evacuate as many people as it can from afghanistan, as america refuses to extend its airlift deadline beyond next tuesday. the troops will be withdrawn by the end of the month and what we will do is use every remaining hour and day to get our national such as we can, the afghans who work for us, out. so far the raf has brought out more than 10,000people, including over 6,000 afghans — but many still remain we�*ll report on the afghan families here in britain — desperately worried about loved ones who are stranded inside, ifeel like i�*m broken into many pieces and my body is here. my soul is in afghanistan. researchers say protection against covid from two doses of the vaccine starts to wane
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within six months the number of confirmed daily cases of coronavirus in scotland hits another record high — with 5021 cases today. a golden start in tokyo for paralympics gb — as cyclist dame sarah storey takes the 15th gold of her career — in her eighth games and once they were hunted to near extinction — but now there are plans to release beavers back into the wild — to help save the english countryside. the government says it will use �*every hour�* that�*s left
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to evacauate as many people as it can from afghanistan. so far the raf has flown more than 10,000 people out of kabul — including 6,300 afghans. but more than 2000 people who are eligible for relocation are still waiting. last night president biden rejected pleas from borisjohnson to extend the operation from kabul airport beyond the current deadline of next tuesday. uk troops will have to leave in advance of that, possibly by this weekend, so it�*s now a race against time to evacuate those who remain. paul adams reports. time is running out and they know it. outside the airport, no letup in the crush of people desperate to leave, too afraid to stay, prepared to put up with heat and filth just for a chance. inside, the operation chance on around—the—clock. planes leaving every 45 minutes. here the government says it is using every hour available to get people out. the danger is rising, says the man ultimately in charge. starting with the growing risk of attack from isis k, a sworn
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enemy of the taliban as well. everyday we are on the ground is another day we know isis k is to target the airport and attack us and allied civilians and forces. the taliban continue to project control. elements of a special commando unit visible at key areas around the city as the country�*s new willis stamped their authority, western government of figuring out how and when to deal with the taliban. the reality for us is to be able to engagement not recognise, not confer legitimacy back to engage and test whether they are serious about wanting to live up to those assurances and being very clear about what the international community will do if they are and what they will not do if we see the barbaric practices of the past. one major concern in europe and beyond, just how many more refugees will flee this latest phase of afghanistan�*s long agony. in eastern turkey, some have already arrived, leaving their dreams behind.
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i was deciding to have mining bitcoin. i was planning a big business in kabul. the situation suddenly got changed and i decided to leave afghanistan. muhammad was a product of the new afghanistan, a youtuber and web designer, now part of the latest brain drain, on the run, trying to avoid the authorities at the mercy of people smugglers. for those who cannot or will not leave afghanistan, a myriad of desperate challenges, instability, drought and now rising food prices. the currency hitting a new low. aid agencies appealing for help to avoid disaster. paul adams, bbc news. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in kabul, she told us what the news about no us extension means for people still in the country.
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aid agencies appealing for help to avoid disaster. paul adams, bbc news. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in kabul, she told us what the news about no us extension means for people still in the country. it is a race against the clock and a race so fraught with risk. we are hearing today from london they will use all the hours which remain to get out all of the people, the british nationals, the afghans at risk, who want to make their way to britain and other capitals. there simply are not enough hours left. there are those afghans who tell us the it is a race against the clock and a race so fraught with risk. we are hearing today from london they will use all
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the hours which remain to get out all of the people, the british nationals, the afghans at risk, who want to make their way to britain and other capitals. there simply are not enough hours left. there are those afghans who tell us the taliban came knocking at the door. they are terrified and know this may be their last chance out. there are those afghans, including university graduates, people who had been on british scholarships, even those
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with british passports, who are trying, trying without success to actually get from a point in kabul to the airport. since yesterday it is ever harder to reach the airport. our north america correspondent barbara plett usher is in washington. how has the announcement gone down in the us? our washington correspondent barbara plett usher is also with us. gave us this update a little earlier.
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there was an overwhelming consensus that cannot be done by the end of the month, there is a real risk of leaving afghan allies aside and republicans have expressed outrage that the taliban are setting the agenda. your two congressmen, one from each party, go on a secret mission to kabul to see for themselves. they�*ve been criticised roundly for causing a dangerous distraction to the operation but they came away with a grim reality check with one saying even if you extend the deadline a bit, we cannot get everyone out as the evacuation just started too late. they are military veterans and there is pressure more broadly from veterans who say the anger and the sense of betrayal is just off the charts, they are trying to meet biden officials this week to press the case for an extension and there is pressure from refugee advocates as well. president biden has emphasised a security
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risk of staying longer as you�*ve heard, his administration is emphasising the task of this extraordinary operation of the airlift which it is but it is failing to change the subject. the taliban�*s takeover of afghanistan has caused anxiety that�*s what it has been up until now so there will be an date on how well the airlift is working, this is something the administration at all levels has tried to emphasise that this is an extraordinary operation which indeed it is and the latest numbers that they had moved out in more than 82,000 people in just over
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a week in the pace of evacuations continues to pick up and is holding fairly steady, so they continue to emphasise those numbers. i think they will also get a lot of questions about this deadline and just how firm it is, and why the administration is sticking to it. there have been reports saying the pentagon had recommended that president biden stick to the deadline and if that is the case, it would seem that security concerns notjust from possible attacks by islamic state group which is something they are talking about more publicly now, but also concerning the arrangement with the caliban would get very fragile —— the taliban would be very fragile because the arrangement is being spoken about being kept so those would be the concerns.— spoken about being kept so those would be the concerns. thank you, more from — would be the concerns. thank you, more from you _ would be the concerns. thank you, more from you and _ would be the concerns. thank you, more from you and it _ would be the concerns. thank you, more from you and it was - would be the concerns. thank you, more from you and it was a - would be the concerns. thank you, more from you and it was a little i more from you and it was a little while. thank you. we will keep an eye on that because the pentagon briefing due at around half past. more details to come out
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of that. we will keep an eye on those for you. the taliban�*s takeover of afghanistan has caused anxiety for afghan families settled in the uk, who are desperate to help their loved ones still in the country. many fear their relatives are now trapped. our special correspondent ed thomas has been speaking to people here and in kabul. is he ok, can he talk to us? right now, we're scared and we can't talk properly. and what should we do over here? they are going to kill us. we don't want that. the phone calls to kabul. the anguish, uncertainty of what comes next. inside, ifeel like i am broken into many pieces. my body is here, my soul is in afghanistan. and so is the rest of her family — uncles, aunties, in—laws. most of them work for the afghan government or western forces. this is the picture of the taliban they have taken secretly, my brother—in—law. we blurred these images not to reveal the family home. so this is them in the house. this is the taliban. they want a female member of ourfamily. they want to know where they are. they were just sitting there. is that a rifle?
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she says all the women in the family have been moved to a safe house. this is the problem they have, because they are in hidden places. we have to ring so many times. she is not feeling well, she cannot go to the doctor. she is saying she is really ill and she cannot go to the doctor or anything. they are eligible under the resettlement scheme, but we have heard nothing. what do you think will happen to yourfamily? they will get killed, they will get killed. 100% they will get killed. if i leave them and something happens to them, i will never be able to forgive myself.
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from manchester to kabul. it's extremely difficult, if not impossible. is that gunfire behind you? that's right. it's not so bad now, actually. at night, it was really bad. this is sher shah, a british citizen hiding in kabul with young children and elderly parents. my father is in his 80s, my mother is elderly and ill and frail. i can send you pictures. they cannot survive without me. a family isolated, with decisions to make. going to the airport with young children is extremely difficult, if not impossible. the four gates to kabul airport are mobbed by thousands of people. i really wonder how many of them are genuine and how many are opportunists. documents are being faked all over the place. at the cost of a few pounds. i wouldn't be surprised if some people managed to get onto flights to the uk with fake documents. but there are lucky ones. officially flown out of kabul, now in quarantine. the kids are sleeping in another room. this is amazing. khasrow is thankful, safe and alive with his family. kabul has collapsed. in the hands of the taliban. it was shocking for us.
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what have you left behind? my home, my friends. my ambitions, my future, my country. everything. we worked for nothing, i think. our special correspondent ed thomas there speaking to people here and in kabul. other news now; researchers believe protection against covid from two doses of a vaccine start to wane within six months. a study looked at data on more than a million people who�*d been double jabbed with the pfizer and astrazeneca vaccines. the government is expected to begin offering some people a third covid boosterjab next month — as sophie hutchinson reports. how were you after your first vaccination? i was all right. i was just a bit fatigued.
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just how long vaccines offer protection and whether we need boosters is a crucial question ahead of the winter. today�*s study adds to growing evidence that over time covid vaccines become less effective at stopping infections. it examined 1.2 million positive test results between may and july this year and found that protection from the pfizer vaccine seemed to reduce from 88% to 74% over five to six months and astrazeneca from 77% to 67% over four to five months. importantly, this is about preventing a covid infection. hospital figures suggest that both vaccines have continued to protect against severe illness in many people. all the evidence points to good, sustained protection against hospitalisation at the moment. but obviously, we�*re having to watch that very carefully during the current wave and seeing if there are any signs that people who received the vaccines earliest, that is the elderly, the health care workers, are beginning to lose their protection against serious illness.
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public health england estimates that nearly 85,000 deaths have been prevented as a result of the covid—19 vaccination programme in england so far. however, the study�*s lead investigator said vaccine efficacy could drop to 50% by the winter and boosters would be needed. it is bringing into focus this need for some action. we can�*tjust sit by and see the protectiveness slowly waning while cases are still high and a chance of infection is still high as well. the government has said there will be boosterjabs sometime in september, starting with those most at risk of severe covid—19. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. the number of confirmed daily cases
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of coronavirus in scotland has hit another record high today with 5021 cases — a big jump from yesterday. our scotland correspondent, alexandra mackenzie, has more on this. yes, more than 5000 daily cases. the second time this has happened in a row, the total is more than the daily cases yesterday so concerning there. there have also been five deaths in the last 24 hours and also hundred and 91 people. that was an increase from yesterday so a bit of a rise they are what the total number of people in hospital is still far lower than it was at the beginning of the year. nhs services and staff have been under intense pressure throughout pandemic. many
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operations and appointments cancelled. they have been delayed as services get back to normal, hums a use of health secretary said that —— nicola sturgeon and humza yousaf announced a recovery lan today. that was part of their election pledge. this is money in addition to the already nhs annual budget and they have admitted it was going to be a big challenge to the nhs on a road to recovery but they�*ve said they�*re confident it can be done and we spoke to the first minister nicola
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early today. the nhs has continued to be under severe pressure because of covid which aside backlog of treatment and diagnosis. we have to put the nhs onto a sustainable path. the here and now is... that him summary so it invests in additional £1 billion into the nhs, into targeted investments and diagnostic with more inpatients, procedures, getting primary care, gps at the art of that, back to normal operation but side by side with that is a big focus on innovation, reforming how
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patients are seen and improving patients are seen and improving patient outcomes as well. some of the key points _ patient outcomes as well. some of the key points of— patient outcomes as well. some of the key points of this _ patient outcomes as well. some of the key points of this recovery i patient outcomes as well. some ofj the key points of this recovery plan as patients should go into the surgery to see gps face to face and the number of gps is to be increased. it was great to see this by 10%. this will enable elective surgeries and be carried out. elective surgery has been heard by the pandemic and there have also been additional investments in mental health and the recovery plan is also including additional support for staff in the nhs to ensure their recovery and recuperation.
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thank you. the mother of claudia lawrence, who disappeared more than a decade ago, has said she�*s in shock, after detectives revealed they�*ve begun a new search for her. claudia lawrence was 35 when she was last seen in york in 2009. our correspondent alison freeman is at the area being searched, sand hutton gravel pits which is about 8 miles from york. yes, well, it is to be expected that claudia�*s mum would be deeply shocked by this latest turn of events. in the 12 years since her 35—year—old daughter claudia went missing, nine people have been questioned but so far the police have not said what has led them here to carry out these searches but claudia�*s mum has told us that she is upset that she did not
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originally receive enough information before the searches began yesterday. i�*m in total... i�*m in another world. i�*m in total shock. i wish i�*d been prepared a bit more for it other than on the day. because i am certain this did notjust happen on the day. it must have been known about. and i had a telephone call saying there was nothing to worry about and allie had the same so did not bother ringing the police back. she said she cannot think of a link between claudia and this area but they hope the new searches mean light will be shed on the situation. there was a big rise in young adults taking up smoking during the first lockdown in england. according to a study by cancer research uk, the number of 18 to 34—year—olds who classed themselves as smokers
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increased by a quarter. deborah arnott, chief executive of the charity action on smoking & health, explained the increase may be due to stress experienced by younger people during the pandemic. it is not completely surprising, because we all know how stressful particularly young people have found covid—19 and the impact it has had on their lives. i think what is more important is how we address it, because the lessons for the future are extremely worrying because we know that smoking, once started, is highly addictive. currently, of every three young people who start smoking, only one will quit before they die. so we need to get more investment by the government in helping people to quit, in motivating them to realise that smoking is not the solution to stress they think it is.
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the time is 23 minutes passed. extinction rebellion protesters have gathered in central london, on the 3rd day of a fortnight of demonstrations around the capital. the campaign group wants the government to stop all new investments in fossil fuels — so let�*s head to central london. our chief correspondentjustin rowlatt is there for us now. it's it�*s right in the art of the shopping district, oxford circus. you might guess, started at upm, a group of 40—50 women running into the centre of the road junction here. a van pulled up and they dismantled the various components they used to build that structure you can see behind us. the idea was it would a giant table, the message they say is come to the table. everyone should come to the table to
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discuss the climate emergency as they described it, so... it�*s quite a complicated obstruction they�*ve created. as well as the main structure, you can see there is a ring of women you might be able to make out you have glued themselves together and also glued their feet together and also glued their feet to the floor and various structures you can see of people chaining themselves with steel in the centre of real tubes so all designed to make it as difficult as possible for the police to move them. it was very dramatic, minutes after they began to erect structure, a large number of police, probably the same number, 50-60 of police, probably the same number, 50—60 police, came in from oxford street and tried to encircle the protest which they did successfully but they�*ve been here ever since we are essentially in a stand—off now with a larger group test is outside the ring of lease can see behind me and all the various streets of london, iconic streets, regent street and oxford street, blocked by
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police officers to stop more protesters coming here. i wonder where your king —— i wonder whether you can get out there at all antsy about people out there trying to shop. whether they think it is on their side. to shop. whether they think it is on theirside. i5 to shop. whether they think it is on their side. , . ._ , to shop. whether they think it is on their side. , . , , , their side. is always with these rotests, their side. is always with these protests, there _ their side. is always with these protests, there will _ their side. is always with these protests, there will be - their side. is always with these | protests, there will be irritation at the disruption caused and although this is a majorjunction, it is not the busiest road in london so it�*s quite carefully calibrated. they are shutting down junctions that are not keyed to traffic in london so they try to create a new irritation but not major disruption and as you walk around the outside of the protest when you do hear people complaining and saying what are you doing this for my choir disrupting our lives? what gives you the right to do this? these sorts of complaints are very common around extinction rebellion operations and the response your from the protest this year is this is notjust a national but global emergency, we have to draw attention to the
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climate crisis and get people engaging because we have to remember we have this major landmark climate conference happening in glasgow in november where the nations of the world will come together in an attempt to raise ambition on cutting carbon emissions and they say it is crucial that we all engage with this issue and in create this to take bold decisions so that is the argument the protesters make and inevitably there are people who are just irritated and are wondering why people are blocking the streets, usual dispute. thank you. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with tomasz shafernaker. hello, forecasters will be running out of things to say over the next days. there will be so little change in the weather brought by this
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pressure that has anchored its way across the uk. it�*s your display and noticed there is a cold front across the north sea. you will notice it is coming out of the north, moving southwards and introduce fresh air come tomorrow but today the best of the weather is across the west of the weather is across the west of the uk, you are a winner here, fine over the past few days, look at the cloud from east anglia into the midlands into wales, the car breaks through and gives way to some sunshine but really the warmest of the sunniest weather will be in the south—west and the west of scotland, up south—west and the west of scotland, up to 26 celsius in glasgow, mid 20s possible for northern ireland, too. use the cold front moving across. and the cloud and conditions will spread further inland. not much rain in the weatherfront,
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spread further inland. not much rain in the weather front, most cloud from the north east of england through yorkshire into the midlands and south, the best of the weather across western areas at 23 celsius being the warm spot. back in high pressure which is essentially still here and still not moving an or what but it�*s changing shape a bit and that also changes the wind direction across the uk so areas of cloud which will move to different parts of the country over the coming days which is a very difficult thing to forecast cloud amounts, different layers. it will give sunny conditions it clears for example here on saturday lots of sunshine was western parts of the uk perhaps a bed of cloud the a little bit further east and that was saturday, sunday will be no different and we will see an account into bank
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holiday monday and yawned with the high pressure certainly here to stay for now. thank you. hello, this is bbc news. i�*m jane hill. the headlines: britain promises to use "every hour that�*s left" to evacuate as many people as it can from afghanistan, as america refuses to extend its airlift deadline beyond next tuesday.
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the troops will be withdrawn by the end of the month and what we will do is use every remaining hour and day to get our nationals, such as we can, the afghans who worked for us, out. so far, the raf has brought out more than 10,000 people, including over 6,000 afghans, but many still remain. researchers say protection against covid from two doses of the vaccine starts to wane within six months. the number of confirmed daily coronavirus cases in scotland hits another record high, with 5021 cases today. a golden start in tokyo for paralympics gb, as cyclist dame sarah storey takes the 15th gold of her career in her eighth games. sport and for a full round up,
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from the bbc sport centre, here�*s austin. hi jane, good afternoon. well, we start in tokyo because the paralympics are under way and the brits got their campaign off to the perfect start thanks to who else but dame sarah storey. she beat her team—mate crystal lane—wright in the final of the c5 3000 metres, individual pursuit, to win gold. it�*s the 15th paralympic title of storey�*s career, and she�*s nowjust one behind mike kenny�*s british record of 16. she smashed her world record by over four seconds in qualifying and caught lane—wright after 1750 meters of their race. she�*s now won medals at each of the eight games she�*s attended. for lane—wright, who also set a personal best in the heats, it�*s the second silver medal at consecutive games in the event. there was also a silver for steve bate and adam duggleby in
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the men�*s b 4000 individual pursuit. they were the defending champions but the dutch caught the britons in the final. they did set a personal best in qualifying and told us how the standard�*s improved. we were happy with apb, you cannot really knock it. we got six seconds pass them which is a pb and a strong field, it was 4.06 when you think we won with a 4.08 in rio and the standard is going up.— won with a 4.08 in rio and the standard is going up. there is a lot more on the _ standard is going up. there is a lot more on the paralympics _ standard is going up. there is a lot more on the paralympics on i standard is going up. there is a lot more on the paralympics on the i standard is going up. there is a lot i more on the paralympics on the bbc sport website. well, after a summer of intense speculation about his future, the england captain harry kane has revealed that he will be staying at tottenham. he�*s been linked with a move to manchester city, who confirmed their interest in him just a few weeks ago, but he says he�*s committed to spurs.
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kane was absent throughout their pre—season campaign and missed their first two games of the new season, but he came on as a substitute in the 1—0 win at wolves on sunday. he said... well, kane only referred to staying this summer, but his manager nuno espirito santo is confident the issue won�*t come up again injanuary. no, iam no, i am not worried at all. to is day by day, he has an option for tomorrow. this is the only thing, it is my only thought, try and make the best decisions to help the team tomorrow and he is one of the decisions for tomorrow. did tomorrow and he is one of the decisions for tomorrow. did he say he was committed? _ decisions for tomorrow. did he say he was committed? i _ decisions for tomorrow. did he say he was committed? i will - decisions for tomorrow. did he say he was committed? i will not i decisions for tomorrow. did he say he was committed? i will not say l he was committed? i will not say what we spoke —
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he was committed? i will not say what we spoke about, _ he was committed? i will not say what we spoke about, it - he was committed? i will not say what we spoke about, it is i he was committed? i will not say i what we spoke about, it is between us. a, what we spoke about, it is between us. �* ., ,,, , what we spoke about, it is between us. ., ,.,, ., us. a delight for spurs fans, i am sure. now to cricket and england have totally dominated the first day of their third test against india so far at headingley. india chose to bat this morning but they�*ve already been bowled out forjust 78. jimmy anderson was on fire this morning. he took three early wickets, including the prize scalp of captain virat kholi. and after lunch the other england bowlers did the rest. at one stage they took four wickets for no runs in the space ofjust six balls. england have just started their reply in the last half an hour — they�*re currently 21—0. and six—time champion serena williams has pulled out of next week�*s us open, saying she needed time to allow her body to "heal completely" from a torn hamstring. the 39 year old becomes the latest high—profile player to pull out, following the withdrawal of defending men�*s champion dominic thiem, as well as roger federer and rafael nadal. williams said on social media that she�*ll "miss seeing the fans but will be cheering on from afar".
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it will not quite be the same without her. that�*s all the sport for now. i�*ll have more for you in the next hour. absolutely not! thank you very much. britain and france say they are on course to complete the evacuation of their nationals, and most afghan partners, by the end of the month. the comments come after president biden refused to extend the deadline for us troops to quit kabul airport. let�*s get the latest on the evacuation figures. according to the white house, since the taliban took over on august the 14th, approximately 82,300 people in total have been evacuated from kabul. and as the deadline approaches, they�*re ramping up. within just 12 hours on tuesday, approximately 12,000 people were evacuated by foreign troops. the united states says at least 30,000 afghans may be resettled
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in the united states in the coming weeks. 200 are heading to austin in texas and laura is there. welcome, where there is already a thriving afghan american community made up of people who were interpreters for the us army in afghanistan. they are thrilled that afghanistan. they are thrilled that afghan refugees are coming here, but those who worked as interpreters are desperate to get their families out of afghanistan. but they are not eligible for the evacuation because they do not have these special immigrant visas that say that they actually work for the us military. here in austin last night there was a protest by those former translators for the us army. now american citizens who are desperate to get theirfamilies american citizens who are desperate to get their families out. i went along. haroun abassy leads a protest in austin, texas,
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by afghan—americans who work for the us military and are calling for their families to be evacuated from afghanistan. peoplejust want to bring theirfamily here because they are in danger, so that is why we�*re here. i work, and because of my work, my family is going to be butchered or killed. haroun was an interpreter for the us army and settled here seven years ago. now he is desperately worried about his parents in kabul. they left our house, they locked the door, the only thing they took with them was some food items and one pair and one pair of clothes, so they locked the door and they are sleeping outside the airport. they are afraid if they go back, of course, the taliban have already found out that their son was a translator, so they cannot go back. for the afghans who are being evacuated and are about to arrive here in texas, volunteers are unpacking the donations which have been pouring in. despite the polarised politics of immigration in the us, staff believe that afghans will be welcome here. the people who helped us overseas,
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there is a special category that really does speak across political boundaries and rural, urban, and people understand that these are people who we really need to help. andy hogue of the local republican party agrees, but he says the biden administration has bungled the withdrawal so far and things may get even worse. i hope they make a decision that does not result in a tectonic shift of afghanis coming to the united states. i�*m hoping it will result in those who need to be here for safety reasons to be here and those that need to stay and fight for afghanistan are staying put. the last thing we want is a brain drain in afghanistan where the best and brightest are either being silenced by terroristic activities or are being flighted to america. amid this debate over who gets to come here from afghanistan, tim kennedy is deploying from texas to the middle east to support the evacuation of the afghans who work for the us military. he is a us army sniper and veteran of the war.
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what is it that you hope you will achieve on this mission to afghanistan? that is hard. it is a hard question. i hope that i can preserve and protect human life. as many people that want to live and not to have to live under the tyranny of the taliban, that want to be contributors to a free world and free society, then i will fight for that. i will die for that. that is the america that these former translators believe in, but theirfaith in us might has been tested. now they can only wait and pray theirfamilies make it out of afghanistan alive. laura trevelyan, bbc news, texas. there is so much anxiety here in austin amongst the afghan american community about the fate of their
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relatives, as you can see all they can do is wait desperately for news, checking their phones every second. the other big story here in texas is the surging covid cases. texas is averaging over 16,000 cases a day, almost as many as at the previous peak injanuary, so for more on this we arejoined by peak injanuary, so for more on this we are joined by a paediatric nurse. thank you so much forjoining us on the bbc news channel. thank you so much for “oining us on the bbc news channel._ thank you so much for “oining us on i the bbc news channel.i you the bbc news channel. thank you. you are a paediatric — the bbc news channel. thank you. you are a paediatric nurse _ the bbc news channel. thank you. you are a paediatric nurse him _ the bbc news channel. thank you. you are a paediatric nurse him in _ are a paediatric nurse him in austin, are you seeing more children hospitalised?— hospitalised? yes, we are seeing an increase in covid _ hospitalised? yes, we are seeing an increase in covid infections - hospitalised? yes, we are seeing an increase in covid infections and i increase in covid infections and children— increase in covid infections and children requiring hospitalisation. are their— children requiring hospitalisation. are their parents vaccinated, by and large? are their parents vaccinated, by and lane? a , are their parents vaccinated, by and lane? ~ ., , ., are their parents vaccinated, by and lane? , ., ., . are their parents vaccinated, by and lane? , ., ., ~ , large? many are not. whether they are spreading _ large? many are not. whether they are spreading it _ large? many are not. whether they are spreading it or _ large? many are not. whether they are spreading it or family _ large? many are not. whether they are spreading it or family members are spreading it or family members are spreading it to their children, it is difficult to tell, but we are assuming _ it is difficult to tell, but we are assuming it is because parents are not vaccinated.— not vaccinated. when you talk to arents not vaccinated. when you talk to parents whose — not vaccinated. when you talk to parents whose children - not vaccinated. when you talk to parents whose children have i not vaccinated. when you talk to i parents whose children have coded 19, do they express regret about not being vaccinated?—
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19, do they express regret about not being vaccinated? many have told me the do not being vaccinated? many have told me they do not realise _ being vaccinated? many have told me they do not realise that _ being vaccinated? many have told me they do not realise that children i they do not realise that children could _ they do not realise that children could get— they do not realise that children could get this, having then they would _ could get this, having then they would have chosen it to get vaccinated.— would have chosen it to get vaccinated. . , , ,., vaccinated. texas is something white wor in vaccinated. texas is something white worrying mask _ vaccinated. texas is something white worrying mask is _ vaccinated. texas is something white worrying mask is controversial i vaccinated. texas is something white worrying mask is controversial and i worrying mask is controversial and vaccination rates are lower than for example new york. —— texas is that somewhere where wearing a mask is controversial. the somewhere where wearing a mask is controversial-— controversial. the covid hospitalisation - controversial. the covid hospitalisation rate i controversial. the covid hospitalisation rate is i controversial. the covid i hospitalisation rate is only controversial. the covid - hospitalisation rate is only about 3% rise — hospitalisation rate is only about 3% rise in — hospitalisation rate is only about 3% rise in beaumont the vaccination rate is— 3% rise in beaumont the vaccination rate is 30 _ 3% rise in beaumont the vaccination rate is 30 to — 3% rise in beaumont the vaccination rate is 30 to 40% and the hospitalisation rate for covid is to 20%. _ hospitalisation rate for covid is to 20%, so— hospitalisation rate for covid is to 20%, so that is a 17% difference which _ 20%, so that is a 17% difference which makes a huge impact on the health_ which makes a huge impact on the health care — which makes a huge impact on the health care workers in those communities. 3515 health care workers in those communities.— health care workers in those communities. ~ , . , (w ., , communities. as a nurse 18 months into this pandemic, _ communities. as a nurse 18 months into this pandemic, is _ communities. as a nurse 18 months into this pandemic, is it _ into this pandemic, is it frustrating for you? absolutely, this is something _ frustrating for you? absolutely, this is something that _ frustrating for you? absolutely,
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this is something that is - this is something that is preventable and we are overwhelmed. as health _ preventable and we are overwhelmed. as health care workers, we have our own personal lives and are stressed, 'ust own personal lives and are stressed, just as _ own personal lives and are stressed, just as everyone else's, and having to come _ just as everyone else's, and having to come to — just as everyone else's, and having to come to work, working in conditions _ to come to work, working in conditions where we do not have enough — conditions where we do not have enough staff or patients are really sick and _ enough staff or patients are really sick and sometimes dying, it is very difficult _ sick and sometimes dying, it is very difficult. �* ~' ., sick and sometimes dying, it is very difficult. �* ~ ., ., difficult. and i know that in some - laces difficult. and i know that in some laces in difficult. and i know that in some places in the _ difficult. and i know that in some places in the states, _ difficult. and i know that in some places in the states, doctors i difficult. and i know that in some places in the states, doctors and | places in the states, doctors and nurses are talking about refusing to treat in vaccinated patients, is that happening anywhere that you work? j that happening anywhere that you work? ~' ., that happening anywhere that you work? ~ ., .,, work? i think for the most part, the ma'ori work? i think for the most part, the majority of — work? i think for the most part, the majority of the _ work? i think for the most part, the majority of the medical— work? i think for the most part, the majority of the medical community | majority of the medical community is still very— majority of the medical community is still very committed to serving patients— still very committed to serving patients regardless of their personal choices, but it can be difficult — personal choices, but it can be difficult and disheartening to continue coming to work and seeing patients— continue coming to work and seeing patients as — continue coming to work and seeing patients as because they aren't knowing — patients as because they aren't knowing that they have not chosen to be vaccinated. you knowing that they have not chosen to be vaccinated.— be vaccinated. you are a mother of four. the other _ be vaccinated. you are a mother of four. the other thing _ be vaccinated. you are a mother of four. the other thing that - be vaccinated. you are a mother of four. the other thing that is i be vaccinated. you are a mother of four. the other thing that is very i four. the other thing that is very controversial is the wearing of masks he up. the governor signed an executive order banning the mandate of masks in schools. what are your
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children doing? fine of masks in schools. what are your children doing?— children doing? one is going to school and _ children doing? one is going to school and will _ children doing? one is going to school and will absolutely i children doing? one is going to school and will absolutely be i school and will absolutely be wearing _ school and will absolutely be wearing a mask to protect himself and his— wearing a mask to protect himself and his siblings and i would hope other— and his siblings and i would hope other parents would mask their children— other parents would mask their children too, so we can keep schools open _ children too, so we can keep schools open and _ children too, so we can keep schools open and keep teachers and pupils save _ open and keep teachers and pupils save. ~ ., , open and keep teachers and pupils save. . . , ., ., ., save. what is the one thing at a ublic save. what is the one thing at a public health — save. what is the one thing at a public health professional i save. what is the one thing at a public health professional that i save. what is the one thing at a i public health professional that you would like to say to people in texas and across the pond in britain? what have you learned from this experience of being a nurse during pandemic? experience of being a nurse during andemic? ~ ~ ., , pandemic? well, i think it really takes an entire _ pandemic? well, i think it really takes an entire community i pandemic? well, i think it really takes an entire community to i pandemic? well, i think it really. takes an entire community to effect a positive _ takes an entire community to effect a positive change in at something like this, — a positive change in at something like this, a — a positive change in at something like this, a virus was not a takes everyone — like this, a virus was not a takes everyone working together and doing their part _ everyone working together and doing their part and for right now, wearing _ their part and for right now, wearing a _ their part and for right now, wearing a mask in public and getting vaccinated _ wearing a mask in public and getting vaccinated are probably the two most important _ vaccinated are probably the two most important things you can do to help with that _ important things you can do to help with that. ., ~ important things you can do to help with that. ., ,, , ., ,., important things you can do to help with that. ., ,, , ., . important things you can do to help with that. ., ,, i. . ., with that. thank you so much for 'oinin with that. thank you so much for
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joining us- _ with that. thank you so much for joining us. thank _ with that. thank you so much for joining us. thank you _ with that. thank you so much for joining us. thank you for - with that. thank you so much for joining us. thank you for having l with that. thank you so much for i joining us. thank you for having me. as ou joining us. thank you for having me. as you can — joining us. thank you for having me. as you can see. _ joining us. thank you for having me. as you can see. a — joining us. thank you for having me. as you can see, a big _ joining us. thank you for having me. as you can see, a big issue - joining us. thank you for having me. as you can see, a big issue here i joining us. thank you for having me. as you can see, a big issue here in l as you can see, a big issue here in texas. spiking covid rates and for the health care professionals that are at the sharp end of this, really upsetting to see children in hospital. upsetting to see children in hosital. ., ~ upsetting to see children in hosital. . ~ , ., upsetting to see children in hosital. ., ~' ., ., hospital. thank you, laura, in austin, texas. _ a report into the use of tasers by police in england and wales says the use of them risks �*losing legitimacy�* in the eyes of the public. the report by the independent office for police conduct was commissioned after a series of taser—related incidents involving black men and people with mental health concerns. a little earlier our home affairs correspondent sean dilley explained the issues laid out in the report. the concerns firstly, they are quite concerning. the independent office for police conduct, we should point out, investigate malfeasance, wrongdoing, in the most serious cases or most controversial cases and their concerns in this case are they found examples from remember the complaints that
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have gone to them about police and found examples where tasers have been used for noncompliance and not just a physical threat. they found that there is a disproportionate use of taser against people who are black, but in particular we should say a use of taser does not necessarily mean discharge. you�*re actually more likely to have one discharged against you if you�*re white, but to be on the wrong end of one, the unfortunate business end of one if you like, if you are black and they have said half of cases involve people with mental health concerns. those are the findings. what are the responses that are coming out to this? the most significant one comes from the national police chiefs council and they look after chief officers across england and wales and they have said they are disappointed, they said the report is vague, it lacks detail. they point out it accounts for a fraction, it�*s 0.01%, they say, of taser uses in the five year period that the iopc has looked at from 2015 to 2020. just to give you an idea of context here. in 2019/20, there were 32,000
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roughly uses of taser. the figures that were being looked at by the iopc are the most serious or controversial cases they have looked at and the national police chiefs council have been very critical because they say the iopc did not attend taser courses and they say there was not sufficient engagement with policing stakeholders. we will talk a little bit more as we have been all afternoon about the situation in afghanistan. we mentioned that the pentagon has been holding another news briefing and we believe that afghanistan is one of many topics that will be discussed. let�*s just and hear some of what has been said that in the us in the last little while is of course evacuation is from kabul. let�*s hear some of today�*s pentagon briefing. is from kabul. let's hear some of today's pentagon briefing. pentagon briefini. us today's pentagon briefing. pentagon briefing. us and _ today's pentagon briefing. pentagon
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briefing. us and coalition _ today's pentagon briefing. pentagon briefing. us and coalition troops i briefing. us and coalition troops maintain a security at the kabul airport. this security continues to allow for the evacuation operations in allowing us to remain to process people in to become a ready to fly. our focus is continuing to get as many people out as efficiently and safely as possible. in the past 24 hours, we exceeded the previous 24—hour flight departures and evacuated a number of passengers nearing the previous day�*s record. yesterday, 42 us military aircraft, of which were 37 c seventeens and five c one 30s deposit with the proximally 11,200 five c one 30s deposit with the proximally11,200 personnel. combined with our 48 coalition and allied partners that come up with thoseit allied partners that come up with
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those it departures an additional 7800 personnel left kabul. that is at 90 flights a total yesterday that left the kabul airport. that is accounted for 19,000 evacuees now safely out of afghanistan within a 24—hour period. since the us and coalition forces began the evacuation today, approximately 88,000 have safely departed from afghanistan. every 39 minutes yesterday, a plain departed kabul airport. these numbers are a testament to the hard—working and brave servicemembers carrying out this mission. in cooperation with the state department, i can also tell you that there are more than 10,000 people currently at this time at the airport awaiting departure. this is a snapshot in time and as we said yesterday, will continue to
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change as more people are able to come onto the airfield and as a flights depart. as i said yesterday, in order that this throughput to remain steady, we depend on the capacity and efficiency of our intermediate staging bases and safe havens. we are appreciative of the support and rely on our allies and partners in this global endeavour. six flights will transport about 1800 vulnerable afghans from germany to the united states today. in addition, approximately 2000 more will arrive, addition, approximately 2000 more willarrive, in addition, approximately 2000 more will arrive, in this case an air base in germany will receive a proximally 13 flights. since august the 20th, yukon has assisted a proximally10,000 vulnerable afghans and evacuees for onward locations. you will likely hear more details
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today and plan from general walters at later today put up several thousand evacuees have arrived from the united states so far and will continue to do so. in the past 24 hours, five flights landed at dulles international airport with approximately 1200 passengers. —— dulles airport. as part of this process, these individuals completed checks according with the fbi and customs border control standards or directed by the department of homeland security. we are working around the clock to provide a safe, sanitary and appropriate receptions at processing at all of our locations around the world. we know you have questions about our current timeline and intent for departure. our mission remains unchanged. for
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each day of this operation, we have carried out the direction of the president and secretary of defence. until that mission changes, we will continue to put forward our maximum effort to safely evacuate as many people as possible and we will keep you updated. lastly i want to give you updated. lastly i want to give you a short update on haiti. the department of defence and us southern command are continuing... we will pull away from that news briefing now they have pulled the net moved on to the subject of haiti. afghanistan is the subject we wanted to focus on, i know that briefing is going on for some time. there are 10,000 people still at the airport waiting to get out. an awful lot of facts and figures there about the number of people that they are getting out, but also giving a nod to the logistics of the situation really and talking about the partners and safe hubs they need to get people to before they can now get people to before they can now get them on to third countries and
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all of that of course giving all the figures there at the pentagon because we are building up to that deadline. of course, that is the essence of today because i can the us president will not move beyond that august through 31st deadline. —— because of that news. it�*s only next week, but the numbers, the scale, you can get that sense of that from the pentagon briefing, it reminds you how many people are still at kabul airport trying desperately to get out and those are just the ones who have been able to get the airport. we�*ll note the desperate stories of people who are unable to even get that far. more about afghanistan coming up after the top of the hour and that pentagon briefing is continuing so there may well be more to come out of that as well. now we will turn tech story back here. the media regulator ofcom has told
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the bbc it has left an equality scheme run by the charity stonewall, which works for lgbtq+ rights. the diversity champions scheme has come under repeated scrutiny, following allegations that stonewall has been misrepresenting the law around equality for transgender people — something the organisation denies. joining me now is our correspondentjohn mcmanus. what is off, itself saying? ofcom of course is the organisation which looks after tele— communications, and broadcasters and it is that particular responsibility which seems to have kicked this off because in december, ofcom�*s head went before a parliamentary select committee and was asked by member of the snp whether the bbc should be talking to a particular charity which emerged of a something as a rival to stonewall. was accused of being transphobe at buy credits, something it denies. melanie gave an
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answer that the bbc should not, and ofcom issued a statement which was that was not what melanie meant at all, she was just talking about having balance within debates. there was some anger within ofcom about how melanie�*s comments had been construed for stock today ofcom says it is leaving stonewall�*s equality scheme to transport organisations which pay subscriptions in return to being told how to make their workplaces inclusive and ofcom it says it is leaving because it needs to avoid any perception it is not impartial of a political and social issues such as those of transgender rights. off, leaving the scheme itself has been controversial. report into the incident which occurred at the university of essex were two macro female speakers had their invitations to events
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withdrawn because they were seen to be critical of transgender, ofcom is not the only organisation to leave recently. the equality and human rights commissions also left last year it said on cost grounds that when they had said women should not be abused for talking about clash between trans— killie transgender and women�*s rights. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with tomasz. hello. forecasters are going to be probably running out of things to say over the next few days. there is going to be so little change in the weather brought by this high pressure which has
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anchored itself across the uk. it is really established now and it is here to stay for the next few days but notice there is a cold front here just across the north sea and if you look at the motion of the cloud, it is coming out of the north, dropping from the north, moving southwards and that will introduce slightly fresher air come tomorrow. but today, the best of the weather so far has been across the north—west of the uk. in fact, you are a winner here, it has been so fine for the last couple of days. look at all of that cloud across from east anglia, the midlands, into wales. this cloud will be breaking during the day and giving way to some sunshine, but really the warmest, the sunniest weather will be in the south—west and west of scotland, up to 26 degrees today in glasgow. mid—20s possible for northern ireland too. here�*s that cool front moving across the uk during the course of the night. that will introduce fresher conditions to the north sea coast initially and then the cloud and fresher conditions will spread a little bit further inland as we go through the course of the day on thursday. here it is, not much rain on this weatherfront. it is mostly cloud from say the north—east of england
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through yorkshire, intojust about the midlands and the south—east. the best of the weather i think on thursday again will be across western areas. 23 degrees could well be the warm spots in wales, in cardiff. friday, the cool front is out of the way, back in high pressure here. the high pressure is essentially still here and it is not really moving an awful lot, it is just changing shape a little bit and that also changes the wind direction across the uk, so the areas of cloud we have got right now will basicallyjust move to different parts of the country over the coming days and that is actually a really difficult thing to forecast, cloud amount. the different layers through the atmosphere overlapping, somewhere bright weather, in other areas giving sunnier conditions where it clears, for example on saturday actually lots of sunshine across western parts of the uk, perhaps a bit of cloud there a little bit further east. that was saturday, sunday will be no different and we will stick our neck out into bank holiday monday and probably beyond as well. that high pressure is certainly here to stay for now. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... britain promises to use "every hour that�*s left" to evacuate as many people as it can from afghanistan, as america refuses to extend its airlift deadline beyond next tuesday. the troops will be withdrawn by the end of the month and what we will do is use every remaining hour and day to get our national such as we can, the afghans who work for us, out. so far the raf has brought out more than 10,000 people, including over 6,000 afghans — but many remain. we�*ll report on the afghan families here in britain — desperately worried about loved
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ones who are stranded. inside, ifeel like i�*m broken into many pieces and my body is here. my soul is in afghanistan. as police search for the missing chef claudia lawrence — 12 years after she disappeared — her mother says she�*ll never give up the fight to find out what happened to her daughter. i prayed daily for answers, even if they are bad, i prayed daily for something. researchers say protection against covid from two doses of the vaccine starts to wane within six months. the number of confirmed daily cases of coronavirus in scotland hits another record high — with 5021 cases today.
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the government says it will use every hour that�*s left to evacauate as many people as it can from afghanistan. in the past few minutes the united states has said that 19,000 people were evacuated in the past 24 hours and a further 10,000 people are currently at kabul airport waiting to leave. let�*s get the latest from lyse doucet in kabul. it's it�*s a race against the clock here in afghanistan, a race fraught with risk and fear. there are reassurances that all of the foreign nationals who want to leave, you have to leave, and the afghans, too, who have all the right passports and permissions, will be on a flight out of afghanistan but looking at the crowd, the crush of people, the rising panic, and roof simply realise there is not enough hours left taliban are making it clear they are not letting people through
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from the centre of the city to the water unless they have all the documents to leave. —— make to the airport unless. there are political risks will see the latest development. with this from our diplomatic correspondent. time is runnin i diplomatic correspondent. time is running out- _ diplomatic correspondent. time is running out. they _ diplomatic correspondent. time is running out. they know— diplomatic correspondent. time is running out. they know it. - time is running out and they know it. outside the airport, no letup in the crash people desperate to leave, too afraid to stay, prepared to put up with heat and filth just for a chance. inside, the operation chance on around—the—clock. planes leaving every 45 minutes. if the government says it is using every available to get people out. the danger is rising, says the man ultimately in charge. starting with the growing risk
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of attack from isis k, a swarm enemy of the taliban as well. everyday we are on the ground is another day we know isis k is to target the apple an attack us and allied —— is seeking to target the airport and attack us and allied civilians and forces. the taliban continue to project images of control. the taliban continue to project images of control. elements of a special commando unit visible at key areas around the city as the country�*s new willis stamped their authority, western government of figuring out how and when to deal with the taliban. the reality for us is to be able to engagement not recognised, not confer legitimacy back to engage and test whether they are serious about wanting to live up to those assurances and being very clear about what the international community will do if they are and what they will not do if we see the barbaric practices of the past. one major concern in europe and beyond, just how many more
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refugees will flee this latest phase of afghanistan�*s long agony. in eastern turkey, some have already arrived, leaving the dreams behind. i was deciding to have mining bitcoin. i was planning a big business fair in kabul. the situation suddenly got changed and i decided to leave afghanistan. muhammad was a product of the new afghanistan, a youtuber and web designer, now part of the latest brain drain, on the run, trying to avoid the authorities at the mercy of people smugglers. for those who cannot and will not leave afghanistan, a myriad of desperate challenges, instability, drought and now rising food prices. the currency hitting a new low. aid agencies appealing for help to avoid disaster. paul adams, bbc news.
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so many plans postponed, so many dreams destroyed as afghanistan turns another corner but for now, the focus for many afghans as on what is happening at the air. we have had a statement from the pentagon saying there were 10,000 people still the airport waiting to leave what will they be able to leave what will they be able to leave in safety? let�*s join a security correspondent frank gardner. we�*ve heard president biden talking about notjust the security risk but the risk of attacks by the original group of so—called islamic state. tell us how much of an impact they have on the region.
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the iskp�*s strength is concentrated in the east of the country and they had at one stage about 1000 militants there, no one really has an accurate handle on how money they got. you would think that as violent jihadists, they would be on the same page as al-qaeda and may be sympathetic to the taliban�*s take over but they are not, they are rivals who have carried out a number of attacks on previous years against not only us forces, afghan security forces but even against the taliban when they were both insurgents. so the threat of reporting was picked up the threat of reporting was picked up by us intelligence was that they were planning or considering some kind of attack at the air what. you know because of sealant with your own eyes what an incredibly volatile dynamic, shifting and turn situation it is at the airport so you can imagine what even the rumour of an attack by them would do to that
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situation which is why the us has decided they cannot delay any longer. decided they cannot delay any [on i er. ~ ., decided they cannot delay any lonier_ . ., ., decided they cannot delay any lonier. . ., ., , , longer. what about the relationship between al-qaeda _ longer. what about the relationship between al-qaeda and _ longer. what about the relationship between al-qaeda and taliban i longer. what about the relationship l between al-qaeda and taliban which has now come to power. that was one of the main issues of discussions during negotiations that led to the taliban deal in 2020. this during negotiations that led to the taliban deal in 2020.— during negotiations that led to the taliban deal in 2020. this is a very murky question — taliban deal in 2020. this is a very murky question because _ taliban deal in 2020. this is a very murky question because there i taliban deal in 2020. this is a very murky question because there is i taliban deal in 2020. this is a very| murky question because there is no question about it that in the past they�*ve had a very close relationship, the taliban saying they agreed in those peace talks and they agreed in those peace talks and the deal you mention from february last year that they would disallow any connection with al-qaeda but the report that came out a few months ago said that is not the case and there are very strong ethnic and marital ties between the two groups. the taliban have made it very clear at the press conference last week, that there would be... they would
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not allow the aslan emirate of afghanistan as they are calling to be a base for any group to attack another country. the truth is that evenif another country. the truth is that even if they for both their al-qaeda friends from carrying out any kind of attack on the west either inside afghanistan are outside, they may not necessarily be in control of all that. as you know, afghanistan is a very rugged country with a lot of remote values, and for the last 20 years, the us and its afghan allies have enabled to intercept and interdict any ports that were hatching in those remote values because they have eyes and ears on the ground and then quick reaction as on the dead of night, they don�*t have that facility any more which put them over the horizon with activities like drone strikes that are not as efficient or timely.
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thank you forjoining us with your assessment. this morning, we met with some taliban spokesmen who are urged the foreign media not to focus on the airport, to focus on what else is happening in afghanistan nine days after the taliban to charge and they have a point, tens of millions of afghans will be staying put. they are anxiously waiting to see what kind of state new taliban will establish this time, making it clear they want a strong islamic system. for some insight, we arejoined strong islamic system. for some insight, we are joined from istanbul from the ambassador to pakistan 20 years ago when the taliban were ousted by us led invasion and he has written a book about his life in taliban and played a role in the peace talks. welcome to the bbc. you�*ve always made it clear that you
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think that this time round, the taliban will not repeat their harsh rule of the 1990s, what will be different this time. the education and that the women can go to work. taliban are not revenge for the people and they are instead discussing... forthe for the people and they are instead discussing... for the people to be in the government for afghanistan. i think that we are witnessing the many changes that taliban and afghanistan experience where they have more knowledge and they know about the neighbours and the
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sensitivity of the community. the -ictures sensitivity of the community. the pictures are _ sensitivity of the community. the pictures are not _ sensitivity of the community. the pictures are not as clear as you depict when we are here in afghanistan. for example concerning the rights of women to work. many women have been told including in government offices that they should stay home for now, that the situation is not safe. that is what the women were told in 1996 and they did not go to work for all the years that the caliban were in power —— that the caliban were in power —— that the caliban were in power —— that the taliban were in power. they fear now this is simply an excuse. today i heard that the taliban told a woman that the procedure is not completed for the women and also the... they promise for women to be returning to the war. in the media, the women there are working. the
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promises of the... this comes to the media. it allows them as soon as possible... but the women are allowed to work. we heard today about a targeted killing being reported in these reports have come from many months now and look at how many young educated afghans are leaving. they still fear the taliban. what can be done to reassure educated afghans there is a place for them here. you know better _ there is a place for them here. you know better than _ there is a place for them here. ym. know better than me the afghan
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situation and they are pointing to the airport issue. there are thousands of people coming to the air what. thousands of people coming to the airwhat. —— to thousands of people coming to the air what. —— to the airport. right now, the people of afghanistan are going from other places, they want to go to europe or other countries. that is the risk. right now, the people are thinking this is an opportunity for the people to work. i think this is something which i am looking at as a conspiracy. giving this idea to the people that the
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taliban are against the people are against education but the way i�*m looking and the people in campbell, the people are happy there, there is no problem. —— the people in kabul. there is no revenge there. even the people at the airport. the education is not... what is your problem? what do you mean? let is not. .. what is your problem? what do you mean?— do you mean? let me tell you what they need. — do you mean? let me tell you what they need. they _ do you mean? let me tell you what they need, they need _ do you mean? let me tell you what they need, they need to _ do you mean? let me tell you what they need, they need to feel i do you mean? let me tell you what they need, they need to feel safe. l they need, they need to feel safe. i�*ve spoken to so many young, educated afghans who were working in the government, any private sector and they are terrified they will be killed. many had threatening messages from the taliban. they�*ve seen, i�*ve been here in kabul and seen, i�*ve been here in kabul and seen the targeted assassinations. there was one just today. that does
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not reassure afghans, that frightens them. j not reassure afghans, that frightens them. ~ �* not reassure afghans, that frightens them. ~' �* ., ., them. i think i'm not agreeing with ou about them. i think i'm not agreeing with you about the _ them. i think i'm not agreeing with you about the treatment _ them. i think i'm not agreeing with you about the treatment of - them. i think i'm not agreeing with you about the treatment of the i you about the treatment of the people of afghanistan. the taliban are releasing the number that if something happens, they can call them and they ensure the law to stay in afghanistan. if something is happening for example one happening, this was... it is not possible to be not happening. most people are safer than before. i think this is a big problem with afghanistan, especially to the generation that given this kind of... , the taliban or telling them this is your country, you can stay in afghanistan and participate
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in the next politician... in afghanistan. but how can you the taliban? igrate afghanistan. but how can you the taliban? ~ ., ., ., taliban? we have to leave it there would thank _ taliban? we have to leave it there would thank you _ taliban? we have to leave it there would thank you very _ taliban? we have to leave it there would thank you very much. i taliban? we have to leave it there l would thank you very much. people outside afghanistan will listen very closely to words like this. but even more they are going to watch what is happening on the ground in afghanistan. readers have written that the taliban the first time around did not have the education to make a deal with the world. they say they have changed. have they changed as much as afghanistan has? afghans and others will soon find out. we will continue our special coverage of these extraordinary events in afghanistan but are now back to you in london. for now we will take a
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look at much of the day�*s other news. the mother of claudia lawrence, who disappeared more than a decade ago, has said she�*s in shock, after detectives revealed they�*ve begun a new search for her. claudia lawrence, who was a chef, was 35 when she was last seen in york in 2009. our correspondent alison freeman is at the area being searched, sand hutton gravel pits which is about 8 miles from york. it is to be expected that claudia�*s mum would be deeply shocked by this latest turn of events. in the 12 years since a 35—year—old daughter went missing, nine people have been questioned but so far the police have not said what has led them here to carry out the searches but claudia�*s mum has told us that she is upset that she did not receive enough information to for the
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searchers began yesterday. i�*m enough information to for the searchers began yesterday. i'm in total... searchers began yesterday. i'm in total- -- i'm _ searchers began yesterday. i'm in total... i'm in _ searchers began yesterday. i'm in total. .. i'm in another— searchers began yesterday. i'm in total... i'm in another world. i'm| total... i�*m in anotherworld. i�*m in total shock. i wish i�*d been prepared for it other than on the day. because i�*m certain this did notjust happen on the day, it must have been known about. and i had a telephone call saying there was nothing to worry about and ali had the same so she did not bother ringing the police back. claudia's mum sa s ringing the police back. claudia's mum says she — ringing the police back. claudia's mum says she cannot _ ringing the police back. claudia's mum says she cannot think- ringing the police back. claudia's mum says she cannot think of. ringing the police back. claudia's mum says she cannot think of a l ringing the police back. claudia's. mum says she cannot think of a link between claudia and this area but it is so new searches will shed light onto what happened to her. we will keep you up—to—date with that. now we will turn to coronavirus and in the last little while you had the latest figures through and in the last little
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while, uk wide figures to bring you right to date, there are more than 35,800 positive test in the last 24—hour period and as you can see, 149 deaths, that is someone who has died within 28 days of a positive test. a quick update on the vaccine programme as well. very nearly 88% of all adult uk have now had one those of a covid vaccine and more than 77% have had both doses. well, researchers believe protection against covid from having both doses starts to wane within six months. the study looked at data on more than a million people who had been double jabbed with either pfizer or astrazeneca vaccine. the government is expected to offer some people the covid was the next month. this report from a health correspondent.
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how were you after your first vaccination? i was all right. i was just a bit fatigued. just how long vaccines offer protection and whether we need boosters is a crucial question ahead of the winter. today�*s study adds to growing evidence that over time covid vaccines become less effective at stopping infections. it examined 1.2 million positive test results between may and july this year and found that protection from the pfizer vaccine seemed to reduce from 88% to 74% over five to six months and astrazeneca from 77% to 67% over four to five months. importantly, this is about preventing a covid infection. hospital figures suggest that both vaccines have continued to protect against severe illness in many people. all the evidence points to good, sustained protection against hospitalisation at the moment. but obviously, we�*re having to watch that very carefully during the current wave and seeing if there are any signs that people who received the vaccines earliest, that is the elderly, the health care workers, are beginning to lose their protection against serious illness.
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public health england estimates that nearly 85,000 deaths have been prevented as a result of the covid—19 vaccination programme in england so far. however, the study�*s lead investigator said vaccine efficacy could drop to 50% by the winter and boosters would be needed. it is bringing into focus this need for some action. we can�*tjust sit by and see the protectiveness slowly waning while cases are still high and a chance of infection is still high as well. the government has said there will be boosterjabs sometime in september, starting with those most at risk of severe covid—19. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. joining me now is dr simon clarke, associate professor in cellular microbiology at the university of reading.
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good afternoon. good afternoon. the factor is waning _ good afternoon. good afternoon. the factor is waning protection _ good afternoon. good afternoon. the factor is waning protection over i factor is waning protection over time, is that at all surprising? flat time, is that at all surprising? not reall . time, is that at all surprising? not really- when _ time, is that at all surprising? fiat really. when the vaccines first started to show up in the clinic earlier this year, there was the thought may be that immunity would wane at some point but you don�*t know unless you try, really we are seeing now and we�*ve been seeing it in other countries as well. the study that you�*ve just been highlighting, in addition to that, it agrees with what other people are showing so it�*s really not that much of a surprise. showing so it's really not that much of a surprise-— showing so it's really not that much of a surprise. doesn't fundamentally add to the arguments _ of a surprise. doesn't fundamentally add to the arguments are _ of a surprise. doesn't fundamentally add to the arguments are making i of a surprise. doesn't fundamentally | add to the arguments are making that boosterjabs are important and where does it take us on that topic? it does it take us on that topic? ft tells us they will have a place. there is a lot to be discussed about who gets what and when they get it. they get the full dose, have a dose? do we really need to give it to only
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the very elderly? i�*ve seen some suggestion that in israel they might be giving it to people as low as 30 or offering it, buti be giving it to people as low as 30 or offering it, but i have not followed that up was that there is a lot to be discussed around the but i think we�*ll see vaccine booster is in some form in the coming months. does it also tie into the debate, the fact that we are as a society going to have get used to living with coronavirus, with covid—19, as part of life and it is how we manage it and deal with it that has to be discussed? i it and deal with it that has to be discussed?— it and deal with it that has to be discussed? ~ ,., , , ., discussed? i think so. this is one ofthe discussed? i think so. this is one of the ways. _ discussed? i think so. this is one of the ways, boosters, _ discussed? i think so. this is one of the ways, boosters, of- discussed? i think so. this is one of the ways, boosters, of living i of the ways, boosters, of living with the virus, i think that phrase, although it�*s true, we have will have to live with the virus, some people it meant doing nothing and i don�*t think on the cards. the government we said before, they�*ve ordered 35 million doses of the pfizer vaccine for delivery in the second half of next year. the
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obviously still see it as a problem and that a booster might be needed. how does the risk of new variants tie in with that as well! that how does the risk of new variants tie in with that as well!— tie in with that as well! that is alwa s a tie in with that as well! that is always a problem. _ tie in with that as well! that is always a problem. current i tie in with that as well! that is i always a problem. current roosters that will be offered do not take into account any new variants. we may see or we will see new variants next year but if we do not drive down transmission, it�*s fair to say the vaccines are not as good as we hope at stopping transmission but there are still some effect because if you stop people getting the virus, they cannot pass it on so it is that transmission being blocked that will help us keep down or potentially keep down new variants, stop them arising so every time someone get it, it doesn�*t matter where they are on the road or who they are, they will intentionally be a factory for a new variants. does the stars we _ a factory for a new variants. does the stars we have _ a factory for a new variants. does the stars we have to _ a factory for a new variants. does the stars we have to be _ a factory for a new variants. does the stars we have to be strict i a factory for a new variants. does the stars we have to be strict about our own behaviour? should there be a
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narrative that all the phrases we talked about so much at the very beginning of the pandemic, keeping distance, washing hands, all those things, is actually that going to be key particularly in winter months? it may well be, yes. i think i would expect at some point between now and the new year we are in for a new restriction, and i don�*t know what they will be or when they will be put in place, the lockdown or whatever, i hope not they will likely hinge upon that virus, no doubt. staying with covid. .. the number of confirmed daily cases of coronavirus in scotland has hit another record high today with 5021 cases — a big jump from yesterday. our correspondent alexandra mckenzie sent this update. more than 5000 daily cases and that
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is for the first time since the beginning of the pandemic so this again for the second day a record number of cases and its 700 more than the total number of daily cases from yesterday. quite concerning there. there have also been five deaths in the last 24—hour us and also 391 in hospital. that was an increase of 27 since yesterday so a bit of a rise there but the total number of people in hospital is still far lower than it was at the beginning of the year so the nhs services and staff have been under intense pressure throughout the pandemic with many operations and appointments, they�*ve been delayed and there is now a huge backlog they are so real concern in the nhs and as services begin to get back to
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normal, the health secretary said that unless something is done, the people are waiting treatment, these cues will just grow people are waiting treatment, these cues willjust grow and grow so today he and the first minister nicola sturgeon announced a £1 billion plan over the next five years, a recovery plan for the nhs and that was part of their election pledge. there is money in addition to the already nhs annual budget and they have admitted it will be a big challenge to get the nhs on a road to recovery but they have said that they are confident as they spoke to nicola sturgeon earlier today. the nhs nicola sturgeon earlier today. tue: nhs continues nicola sturgeon earlier today. t'ta: nhs continues to be nicola sturgeon earlier today. tta: nhs continues to be under severe pressure because of covid and that has created a very significant backlog of care and treatment and also backlog of diagnosis, patients
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who have not came forward and been diagnosed. we have to tackle out as quickly as possible but through that put the nhs onto a sustainable path for the future and that is what this plan sets out to do. it�*s a plan for the year and now but one which will be in rented right across the duration of this parliamentary term and they will invest an additional £1 billion into the nhs, targeted investment that will increase the targeting of the nhs. more inpatient and outpatient appointments, day case procedure is getting primary care with gps at the heart of that care with gps at the heart of that car back to much more normal operation but side by side with that is a big focus on innovation, reforming how patients are seen and go through the national health service. that will improve patient outcomes as well.— service. that will improve patient outcomes as well. some of the key
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ioints are outcomes as well. some of the key points are that _ outcomes as well. some of the key points are that patients _ outcomes as well. some of the key points are that patients should i outcomes as well. some of the key points are that patients should see | points are that patients should see their gps face to face and the number of gps is to be increased by 800 across the country and the capacity of the nhs is to be increased to deal with the backlog by 10% and according to the scottish government, there will be additional elective surgeries which will be carried out every year. now, elective surgery has obviously been badly affected by the pandemic and also there will be additional investment in mental health. the recovery plan will also include additional support for staff in the nhs to ensure their recovery and recuperation. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafenaker. another fine day across the uk. skies probably looking something like this and the best of the
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weather, sunniest its guise, actually across the north—west of the uk, northern ireland, western and central scotland with the scent of the high pressure here and this is where the highest temperatures will be this afternoon, peaking at 26 in glasgow. light winds, blue skies. elsewhere a little cooler because we have more cloud. notice a cold front will be just grazing eastern parts of the uk during the course of the night, introducing a somewhat stronger breeze coming off the north sea. temperatures first thing in the morning will be more or less the same everywhere, 14, 13 degrees, but are by day tomorrow will introduce a lot more bad taste in areas which will drift further west too. —— will introduce a lot more cloud. remaining warm in the west. hello, this is bbc news. i�*m jane hill. the headlines:
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britain promises to use "every hour that�*s left" to evacuate as many people as it can from afghanistan, as america refuses to extend its airlift deadline beyond next tuesday. the troops will be withdrawn by the end of the month and what we will do is use every remaining hour and day to get our nationals, such as we can, the afghans who worked for us, out. so far, the raf has brought out more than 10,000 people, including over 6,000 afghans, but many remain. as police search for the missing chief claudia lawrence, 12 years after she disappeared, her mother says she�*ll never give up the fight to find out what happened to her daughter. i have prayed daily for answers, even if they are bad, i have prayed daily for something. researchers say protection against covid from two doses of the vaccine starts to wane within six months.
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the number of confirmed daily cases of coronavirus in scotland hits another record high, with 5021 cases today. more to come on all those stories. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here�*s austin halewood. hi,jane. yes, the paralympics are finally underway in tokyo and the british team are fifth on the medals table after day one with one gold, four silvers and a bronze. the first gold won by who else but dame sarah storey. she smashed her own world record and beat her team—mate crystal lane—wright in the final of the c5 3000 metres individual pursuit. it�*s the 43—year—old�*s 15th paralympic title, as patrick geary reports. the seemingly never—ending story. dame sarah storey won her first
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olympic medal in barcelona in 1992 and yet here she was, breaking the c five pursuit record, her own world record, in qualifying, aged 43. to the final, on the right of your screen, her opponent, crystal lane—wright. a fellow brit from her saddle guaranteed to best seat in the house for another remarkable piece of storey glory. seven laps in, the great dane was approaching fast. dame sarah storey catches crystal lane—wright! her 15th medal won in her eight games across two sports, this time with her family miles away. to see her finish required an early start. as miles away. to see her finish required an early start. as soon as i wake u- required an early start. as soon as i wake up i — required an early start. as soon as i wake up i was — required an early start. as soon as i wake up i was like _ required an early start. as soon as i wake up i was like dad, - required an early start. as soon as i wake up i was like dad, what i required an early start. as soon as i wake up i was like dad, what are| i wake up i was like dad, what are you doing? it was totally worth it. i was screaming my head off! as soon as she came quite close to crystal,
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i knew she was going to win. that faith was well _ i knew she was going to win. that faith was well placed and if sarah storey went out other two events, she will be the greatest. well, after a summer of intense speculation about his future, the england captain harry kane has revealed that he will be staying at tottenham. in a statement on social media, kane says he's 100% focused on helping the team achieve success, and that the messages of support he's had in the last few weeks have been incredible. manchester city had been keen to sign kane, who only referred to staying this summer, but his manager is confident the issue won't come up again injanuary. no, i am not worried at all. it is day by day, he is an option for tomorrow. this is the only thing, it is my only thought, try and make the best decisions to help the team tomorrow and harry is one of the decisions for tomorrow. did he say he was committed for the season?
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i will not say what we spoke about, it is between us. meanwhile, fifa president gianni infantino has asked prime minister borisjohnson for exemptions, so that premier league players will be allowed to travel to red list countries for world cup qualifiers. clubs in england have reluctantly, but unanimously, agreed not to let players travel to matches in countries that require them to quarantine on their return. the rules would apply to nearly 60 players from 19 clubs, including everton�*s richarlison who would miss brazil's world cup qualifier against argentina — he scored their winning goal in the olympic gold medal match a few weeks ago, while liverpool's mo salah would also miss egypt's qualifiers against angola and gabon. and england are in a really strong position on day one of their third test against india at headingley. the visitors chose to bat this morning, but they were bowled out forjust 78 before the tea break.
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jimmy anderson was on fire this morning. he took three early wickets, including the prize scalp of captain virat kholi. and after lunch the other england bowlers did the rest. at one stage they took four wickets for no runs in the space ofjust six balls. england are currently 37—0. you can listen to ball—by—ball commentary right now on slive sports extra. well there's much more on all of those stories, of course, on the bbc sport website. including the news that serena williams has pulled out of next week's us open because she's not recovered fully yet from a torn hamstring. that is all that your sport for now. thank you very much. the taliban's takeover of afghanistan has caused anxiety for afghan families settled in the uk, who are desperate to help their loved ones still in the country. many fear their relatives are now trapped. our correspondent ed thomas has been speaking to people here and in kabul.
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what we over here? —— what should we do? the phone calls to kabul. the anguish, uncertainty of what comes next. inside, ifeel like i am broken into many pieces. my body is here, my soul is in afghanistan. and so is the rest of her family — uncles, aunties, in—laws. most of them work for the afghan government or western forces. this is the picture of the taliban they have taken secretly, my brother—in—law. we blurred these images not to reveal the family home. so this is them in the house. this is the taliban. they want a female member of ourfamily. they want to know where they are. they were just sitting there. is that a rifle? she says all the women in the family have been moved to a safe house. this is the problem they have,
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because they are in hidden places. we have to ring so many times. she is not feeling well, she cannot go to the doctor. she is saying she is really ill and she cannot go to the doctor or anything. they are eligible under the resettlement scheme, but we have heard nothing. what do you think will happen to yourfamily? they will get killed, they will get killed. 100% they will get killed. if i leave them and something happens to them, i will never be able to forgive myself. from manchester to kabul. it's extremely difficult, if not impossible. is that gunfire behind you? that's right. it's not so bad now, actually. at night, it was really bad. this is sher shah, a british citizen hiding in kabul with young children and elderly parents. my father is in his 80s, my mother is elderly and ill and frail. i can send you pictures. they cannot survive without me. a family isolated,
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with decisions to make. going to the airport with young children is extremely difficult, if not impossible. the four gates to kabul airport are mobbed by thousands of people. i really wonder how many of them are genuine and how many are opportunists. documents are being faked all over the place. at the cost of a few pounds. i wouldn't be surprised if some people managed to get onto flights to the uk with fake documents. but there are lucky ones. officially flown out of kabul, now in quarantine. the kids are sleeping in another room. this is amazing. khasrow is thankful, safe and alive with his family. kabul has collapsed. in the hands of the taliban. it was shocking for us. what have you left behind? my home, my friends. my ambitions, my future, my country. everything.
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we worked for nothing, i think. our correspondent ed thomas there speaking to people here and in kabul. the media regulator ofcom has told the bbc it has left an equality scheme run by the charity stonewall, which works for lgbtq+ rights. the diversity champions scheme has come under repeated scrutiny, following allegations that stonewall has been misrepresenting the law around equality for transgender people — something the organisation denies. ofcom of course is the organisation which looks after tele— communications, postal services and broadcasters and it is that particular responsibility which seems to have kicked this off because in december, ofcom's head, melanie, went before a select committee and was asked whether the
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bbc should be talking to a particular charity, the lgbt particular charity, the lg bt alliance, particular charity, the lgbt alliance, which was a rival to stonewall. they had been accused of being transphobe it by the critics, something it denies. melanie gave an answer in which she appeared to suggest that the bbc should not talk to them and those comments were widely reported for stock afterwards, ofcom issued a statement saying actually that is not what melanie meant at all, she was just talking about having balance. there was some anger within ofcom about how melanie�*s comments had been construed. today, ofcom says it is leaving stonewall�*s equality scheme which it runs for organisations which it runs for organisations which pays subscriptions in return for being told how to make their workplaces for less lgbt. ofcom
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leaving is controversial. a report led into an incident said stonewall may have misinterpreted and potentially given legal advice, something stonewall strongly denies and ofcom are not the only organisation to leave recently was not the equality and human rights commission also left last year, it said on cost grounds, but when its head gave a statement saying women should not be abused for talking about a perceived clash between transgender and women's rights, stone openly criticised her as well. —— stonewall openly criticised.
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thousands of lives could be harmed if more isn't done to reduce regional inequality in britain, according to a report by the salvation army. the government says it's investing billions in the "levelling up" agenda. our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports from the seaside town of rhyl, which contains the two poorest neighbourhoods in wales. the pandemic has been devastating. in an instant, the tourism stopped, a lot of the caravan parks shut. so those jobs that people rely on were just instantly, in one fell swoop, gone. suzi taylor is on the front line of rhyl�*s covid recovery. so i've brought you in todayjust to sort out how we can help you... she's helping people find work in a town that saw a 50% increase in universal credit claims during the pandemic. things are, at last, getting better. the amount ofjobs are increasing. but, unfortunately, it's all very low—skilled. it's very important, because i can pay my way in life, then. i don't have to scrounge from the government. denverjeff is one of susie's successes —
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thanks to the salvation army's help, he started work on monday in a supermarket. the former labourer had struggled through the pandemic to find work. it's impossible because everything's shut. you've got papers, but there's no jobs in the papers no more, either. they're all on the internet — job search and things like that. and i haven't. .. i did not have a computer. this year's staycation frenzy has created many seasonaljobs here. rhyl hopes its bid for regeneration funding will fuel more sustainable work. tens of millions have already been spent updating its seafront. there is a sense that the town is now at a crossroads — how do you attract new visitors, new money into the area at the same time as making a meaningful difference in the lives of some of the poorest people in the united kingdom? hi, it's natasha calling _ from the good news mission in rhyl. at this charity, they've been inundated with requests for help — both food and furniture
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are in great demand. any new money, they say, should come to their neighbourhood. why in 2021 is somebody deciding to put food on the table _ or electricity in the meter who's got a family? _ it's great to get the tourists in, but what about the people that| actually live here that, - every day, have to choose — electricity, food? yeah, no, i can fully understand that. but we had to start somewhere. so the challenge is to marrying up the level of investments to the benefits of the people in the most deprived areas and what they get out of it — but we've made a start. the uk government says improving living standards is a key focus of its investment in regional towns and cities, who all benefit from new funding. in rhyl, they wait and wonder if the ripples from such schemes will wash beyond the seafront. michael buchanan, bbc news, rhyl. the headlines on bbc news... britain promises to use "every hour that's left" to evacuate as many
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people as it can from afghanistan, as america refuses to extend its airlift deadline beyond next tuesday. so far the raf has brought out more than 10,000 people including over 6,000 afghans, but many still remain. researchers say protection against covid from two doses of the vaccine starts to wane within six months. the mother of claudia lawrence, who disappeared more than a decade ago, has said she's in shock, after detectives revealed they've begun a new search for her. claudia lawrence was 35 when she was last seen in 2009.
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her when she was last seen in 2009. mother spoke to correspondent. her mother spoke to our correspondent.— her mother spoke to our correspondent. her mother spoke to our corresondent. �* ., ., , ~ correspondent. i'm in total shock, i wish i had been _ correspondent. i'm in total shock, i wish i had been more _ correspondent. i'm in total shock, i wish i had been more prepared - correspondent. i'm in total shock, i wish i had been more prepared for| wish i had been more prepared for it, other than on the day, because i am certain this did notjust happen on the day. it must have been known about. ., ., , ., on the day. it must have been known about. ., ., ,, _,, , about. how are you coping, being thrust back _ about. how are you coping, being thrust back into _ about. how are you coping, being thrust back into that _ about. how are you coping, being thrust back into that media - thrust back into that media spotlight again, after their being a lull in that investigation? t do spotlight again, after their being a lull in that investigation?- lull in that investigation? i do not know how i _ lull in that investigation? i do not know how i am _ lull in that investigation? i do not know how i am coping. _ lull in that investigation? i do not know how i am coping. it - lull in that investigation? i do not know how i am coping. it is - lull in that investigation? i do not l know how i am coping. it is nothing like it was at the beginning and i'm on my own now with it. but i have people around me i can trust, which i did not have before. was kept out of it very much before. i was not allowed to have a voice. mit? of it very much before. i was not allowed to have a voice. why was that? you — allowed to have a voice. why was that? you tell— allowed to have a voice. why was that? you tell me. _ allowed to have a voice. why was that? you tell me. what - allowed to have a voice. why was that? you tell me. what do - allowed to have a voice. why was that? you tell me. what do you l allowed to have a voice. why was - that? you tell me. what do you say? peo - le that? you tell me. what do you say? peeple used — that? you tell me. what do you say? peeple used to _ that? you tell me. what do you say? people used to contact _ that? you tell me. what do you say? people used to contact me _ that? you tell me. what do you say? people used to contact me and - that? you tell me. what do you say? people used to contact me and say i that? you tell me. what do you say? people used to contact me and say itj people used to contact me and say it has claudia got a mum? but nobody
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can tell what it is like inside and it is sometimes very difficult to describe what it is like inside. and you are frightened, what you are going to find. you wonder what has led up to it. you wonder if some information has come in. it is a bit up information has come in. it is a bit up in the air, actually. figs information has come in. it is a bit up in the air, actually.— up in the air, actually. as a mum, what is your— up in the air, actually. as a mum, what is your biggest _ up in the air, actually. as a mum, what is your biggest fear - up in the air, actually. as a mum, what is your biggest fear right - up in the air, actually. as a mum, l what is your biggest fear right now? what they might find. because i still have hope. i have always had hope. so what they might find. they are not going to all this trouble and expense for nothing. there must be something, something has triggered it off from somewhere and i have been told it could go on for weeks or a few days. i mean, the
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impact on my life for all of it from day one, it changes your life forever, no matter what happens, it has changed your life. t do forever, no matter what happens, it has changed your life.— has changed your life. i do find it hard going _ has changed your life. i do find it hard going to _ has changed your life. i do find it hard going to claudia's _ has changed your life. i do find it hard going to claudia's house. i i hard going to claudia's house. i think there might be alight hard going to claudia's house. i think there might be a light at the end of the tunnel there, i hope so. just as a mum, it is the thought that somebody might have done something to her and the fact that it has taken 12 years. the mother there of claudia lawrence who disappeared in 2009, a police investigation is continuing that there are about eight miles from york. extinction rebellion protesters have gathered in central london, on the third day of a fortnight of demonstrations around the capital.
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the campaign group wants the government to stop all new investments in fossil fuels — it's calling this two—week long protest across central london the "impossible rebellion". our chief environment correspondentjustin rowlatt has been at oxford circus. it's right in the middle of oxford circus. it started at about two o'clock, a group of 140—50 women ran into the centre of the road junction here. a van pulled up and they dismantled the various components they used to build that structure you can see behind us. the idea was it was going to be a giant table. the message, they say, is come to the table. everyone should come to the table to discuss the climate emergency as they describe it, so... it's quite a complicated obstruction they've created. as well as the main structure, you can see there there is a ring of women you might be able to make out who have glued themselves together and also glued their feet to the floor and then various
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structures, you can see one there, of people who have chained themselves with steel in the centre of steel tubes, so all designed to make it as difficult as possible for the police to move them. it was very dramatic, minutes after they began to erect their structure, a large number of police, probably about the same number, 50—60 police, came in from oxford street and tried to encircle the protest which they did successfully but... and they've been here ever since, so we are essentially in a kind of stand—off now with a larger group of protestors outside the ring of police you can see behind me and all the various streets of london, iconic streets, regent street and oxford street, blocked by police officers to stop more protesters coming here. i wonder whether you are able to get out of there at all to find out what people who are out and about trying to shop, what people think of it, whether they think right is on their side. i think as always with these extinction rebellion protests, there will be irritation at the disruption caused.
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although this is a majorjunction, it is not the busiest road in london so it's quite carefully calibrated. they are shutting down junctions that are not key to traffic in london so they are trying to create an irritation but not perhaps a major disruption and as you walk around the outside of the protest, you do hear people complaining and saying what are you doing this for? why are you disrupting our lives? what gives you the right to do this? these sorts of complaints are very common around extinction rebellion operations and the response you hear from the protestors here is this is notjust a national but global emergency, we have to draw attention to the climate crisis, they say, we need to get people to engage and particularly remember, because we have this major landmark climate conference happening in glasgow in november where the nations of the world will come together in an attempt to raise ambition on cutting carbon emissions and they say it is crucial that we all engage with this issue and create momentum for our politicians to make bold decisions.
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so that is the argument the protesters make and of course, inevitably, there are people who are just irritated and want to get home from work and say why on earth are you blocking the street? the government is proposing to reintroduce beavers into the wild in england. the plans would also give beavers legal protection, making it an offence to deliberately capture, kill or injure them. many experts say beavers would help restore natural habitats. sarah ransome is in ladock in cornwall. a spot of breakfast after dam building the night before. since these beavers arrived on the farm, they've helped regulate water flow and reduce flooding locally. this is their lodge, which they built for themselves, and they will be inside there now, getting ready to sleep or even sleeping. hunted almost to extinction, they are making a comeback. they are often described as eco—engineers, offering a natural solution to some
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of nature's problems. there is no doubt with climate change, we are getting more intensive rain and more flooding incidents, so holding water in our headwaters is going to be really, really important going forward. we can do it ourselves, but beavers do it much cheaper and much better, so we ought to be enlisting them as a primary ally in climate change. the beavers here have been making themselves at home for years. they've been cutting down trees and making new water courses. but however cute these creatures might be, their presence in the countryside is still controversial. the national farmers' union says it will work with the government, but is urging caution, warning of potential damage to trees and drainage fields from these mammals that know no borders. we need to make sure that it's properly funded and that where damage does occur, that there is going to be adequate compensation as well.
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so, the issue is mainly around coming to this with a balanced, open mind, that it is not necessarily all going to be a bed of roses. this project here in cornwall and others in england have already been looking at the impact on the environment. this new consultation will help to decide if, when and where the wider release of beavers should go ahead. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz. hello. forecasters are going to be probably running out of things to say over the next few days. there is going to be so little change in the weather brought by this high pressure which has anchored itself across the uk. it is really established now and it is here to stay for the next few days but notice there is a cold front here just across the north sea
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and if you look at the motion of the cloud, it is coming out of the north, dropping from the north, moving southwards and that will introduce slightly fresher air come tomorrow. but today, the best of the weather so far has been across the north—west of the uk. in fact, you are a winner here, it has been so fine for the last couple of days. look at all of that cloud across from east anglia, the midlands, into wales. this cloud will be breaking during the day and giving way to some sunshine, but really the warmest, the sunniest weather will be in the south—west and west of scotland, up to 26 degrees today in glasgow. mid—20s possible for northern ireland too. here's that cool front moving across the uk during the course of the night. that will introduce fresher conditions to the north sea coast initially and then the cloud and fresher conditions will spread a little bit further inland as we go through the course of the day on thursday. here it is, not much rain on this weatherfront. it is mostly cloud from say the north—east of england through yorkshire, intojust about the midlands and the south—east. the best of the weather i think
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on thursday again will be across western areas. 23 degrees could well be the warm spots in wales, in cardiff. friday, the cool front is out of the way, back in high pressure here. the high pressure is essentially still here and it is not really moving an awful lot, it is just changing shape a little bit and that also changes the wind direction across the uk, so the areas of cloud we have got right now will basicallyjust move to different parts of the country over the coming days and that is actually a really difficult thing to forecast, cloud amount. the different layers through the atmosphere overlapping, somewhere bright weather, in other areas giving sunnier conditions where it clears, for example on saturday actually lots of sunshine across western parts of the uk, perhaps a bit of cloud there a little bit further east. that was saturday, sunday will be no different and we will stick our neck out into bank holiday monday and probably beyond as well. that high pressure is certainly here to stay for now. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines: the british government promises to use "every hour that's left" to evacuate as many people as it can from afghanistan, as president biden refuses to extend the american—led airlift beyond next tuesday. the troops will be withdrawn by the end of the month, and what we'll do is use every remaining hour and day to get our nationals such as we can, the afghans who worked for us, out. we'll report on the afghan families here in britain, desperately worried about loved ones who are stranded. inside, ifeel like i'm broken into many, many pieces. my body is here, my soul is in afghanistan. so far, the raf has brought out more than 10,000 people, including over 6,000 afghans, but many remain.

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