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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  August 25, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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britain says it will use "every hour that's left" to get people out of afghanistan, after the us refuses to extend its airlift deadline beyond next tuesday. huge crowds persist outside kabul airport — day and night, people wade through human sewage to try to get airside to flee. is it betterjust staying here in afghanistan for the moment? translation: there's no way we can stay here. - the americans should shoot us or let us through. with just six days left until the americans leave, we'll be asking, how imminent is the uk withdrawal? also this evening: the mother of claudia lawrence, who went missing 12 years ago, says she's in utter shock over a new police search for her daughter. i've prayed daily for answers,
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even if they're bad. i've prayed daily for something. researchers say booster shots of the covid vaccine may be needed, after a study suggests waning protection we have a special report from the seaside town of rhyl, where poverty levels are among the worst in wales. and dame sarah storey wins the first british gold at the paralympics in tokyo, the 15th gold of her career. and coming up in sportsday later in the hour on the bbc news channel, it's been a brilliant day for england's cricketers, bowling india out forjust 78 runs in the third test at headingley.
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good evening. the government has promised to use every hour left to help as many people as possible escape from afghanistan before american troops withdraw at the end of the month, with nearly 90,000 people now having left the country in total. latest figures released by the ministry of defence show that more than 10,000 people have been airlifted out of kabul by uk forces since august the 13th. of that number, more than 6,300 are afghans and their families. a further 2,000 afghans who are eligible to come to the uk remain in the country. from kabul, our afghanistan correspondent secunder kermani sent this report. shame on them! they've been through so much already. now wading through sewage in the hope of somehow being able to leave this country. huge crowds are still flocking to kabul airport,
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under the watch of american and british soldiers. despite the dirt, the dust, the gunshots and the chaos, people are still coming here. and they're coming here in their thousands. here, a makeshift camp has sprung up. most of the people gathered don't have permission to board an evacuation flight. the few that do are struggling to make their way inside. translation: we've been waiting here for six days and six nights. but we can't get past all these crazy people. is it worth it? is it betterjust staying here in afghanistan for the moment? there's no way we can stay here. the americans should shoot us or let us through. yesterday the taliban said they're not in favour of afghans leaving.
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we saw no sign of them preventing people where we were, but they're clearly frustrated with the scenes unfolding. with time running out, there's a sense of panic amongst those trying to escape. many worry they'll be left behind, like this former british army interpreter who's yet to receive a response to his application. it's very dangerous for us, because from the day the taliban entered kabul, i've changed my home three times, so we are just two days, two nights we are living in one place. he's only got one document from the british army, and it doesn't even say who signed it. but we managed to find his former boss — now a retired soldier in the north of england. i absolutely remember him as one of about_ i absolutely remember him as one of about eight— i absolutely remember him as one of about eight interpreters i worked with out — about eight interpreters i worked with out in afghanistan on my tour, and like _ with out in afghanistan on my tour, and like all— with out in afghanistan on my tour, and like all of the others that i
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worked — and like all of the others that i worked with, he was a brave, bright, intelligent— worked with, he was a brave, bright, intelligent lad who actually genuinely wanted to do better for his country. the british government says no—one's life should be put at risk because of their support for the uk's efforts in afghanistan and that it's working around the clock to relocate as many eligible afghans as possible. so are other countries. but these are the last days of the effort, and many who want to leave are set to left behind. secunder kermani, bbc news, kabul. well, after the us rejected pleas from european leaders to extend a presence in afghanistan beyond august 31st, time is fast running out for the uk airlift at kabul airport, as british troops are likely to leave ahead of us forces. the foreign secretary, dominic raab, wouldn't spell out an exact timetable for the british operation, but there are suggestions it may have to end as soon as friday. 0ur defence correspondent jonathan beale has more. already exhausted,
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but these british troops know that time is running out, still trying to help as many as possible. but the window is fast closing. and soon they'll have to think of their own departure. the americans have got to be given time to get out after we have pulled out. it's about 48 hours which they've got left to actually extract people before they have to start focusing on their own extraction. western forces are still trying to have to worry about their own security to complete that extraction. aircraft have been firing flares as a precaution to avoid the potential danger of surface—to—air missiles. but securing the perimeter of the airfield as forces draw down will be a battle in itself. the longer we stay, starting with the acute and growing risk of an attack by a terrorist group known as isis—k, an isis affiliate in afghanistan, which is a sworn enemy of the taliban as well.
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every day we're on ground is another day we know that isis—k is seeking to target the airport and attack both the us and allied forces and innocent civilians. they're no longer being called the enemy, but the taliban are waiting at the gate and still controlling access. some may look more professional, but there are reports of people being beaten on their way to the airport. the big question now forforeign governments is what kind of country will the taliban control. the taliban has professed a whole range and made a whole range of undertakings. i think the reality for us is to be able to engage, not recognise, not confer legitimacy, but engage and test whether they are serious about wanting to live up to those assurances, and be very clear about what the international community will do if they are, and what they will not do if we see the barbaric practices of the past. it is not like any other withdrawal. when british troops and us marines
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left helmand in 2014, they had months to carefully prepare, and they were handing over to friendly afghan forces. in contrast, this has been described as the most complex evacuation in recent times. and as one military officer put it bluntly, "it'll soon be time to get the hell out of dodge." jonathan beale, bbc news. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet is in kabul. we heard from the us today that nearly 90,000 people have been evacuated. but what hope for the people who are still there? what a staggering number that is, and it doesn't include the afghans who were taken out by the british that you mentioned, the germans, the
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french, the private charters, the huge effort worldwide. it is so astonishing how people have opened up astonishing how people have opened up their hearts, raised huge amounts of money to get people out, and today we are seeing on social media photographs of these huge transport planes, paid for by well—meaning people around the world, and they are half empty, sometimes with just are half empty, sometimes with just a few people on the plane, because as the window closes fast, it gets ever harder even to get to the airport. we spoke to a taliban spokesperson this morning who was unsympathetic and unequivocal that afghans should not be leaving the country and there was only one route out, and that was through the americans. and we are hearing that in these last days the americans are privatising american passport holders, green card holders, and are sending away those who have these special visas which were established for vulnerable afghans, like those who had worked for the american military. but i think we have to
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remember that once the us, the uk evacuation stops, once the last aircraft leaves, afghanistan does not pack up and go. the neighbours and near neighbours will have an interest in helping the country's buses to run again, aircraft to fly, and the roads to be open. for afghanistan to start getting back on its feet. , , . ., its feet. lyse doucet reporting from kabul the mother of claudia lawrence has said she is in total shock after it emerged that police have a begun a new search for her daughter at a popular fishing spot near york. claudia, who worked as a chef at york university, disappeared 12 years ago. danny savage has this report. what happened to claudia lawrence? a search of these former gravel pits now used as fishing lakes near york may finally answer that question. for 12 and a half years, claudia's family has been living with the torment of her disappearance. police believe she was murdered. today, her mother spoke about the latest search.
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i think there might be a light at the end of the tunnel there. i hope so. butjust as her mum, it'sjust... it's the thought that somebody might have done something to her, and the fact that it's taken 12 years. claudia lawrence was last seen alive walking down this road on the way home from work. she lived in this terraced house here, just a few doors down from the nags head inn, where she would often meet friends for drinks. the last known conversations she had, though, were on the night before she died, and they were chats on the telephone with her mum and dad. i'm in another world. i'm in total shock. i wish i'd been prepared a bit more for it, other than on the day, because i'm certain this didn't just happen on the day. it must have been known about. claudia's father, peter lawrence, died earlier this year,
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not knowing what had happened to his daughter. joan lawrence says herfaith has helped her. i mean, i've prayed daily for answers, even if they're bad. i've prayed daily for something. and i know they will come. something has changed in this investigation to lead to this new search. the police won't elaborate on where any new information has come from. for claudia's family, this is another agonising twist in this 12—year mystery. danny savage, bbc news, york. the latest government coronavirus figures show there were 35,8117 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means on average there were 33,828 new cases per day in the last week. the most recent figures show there were more than 6,500 people in hospital with the virus yesterday.
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149 deaths were recorded in the past 2a hours, with an average of 106 deaths a day in the past week. 0n vaccinations, 87.9% of adults in the uk have now had their firstjab, and 77.4% have had two. protection against coronavirus starts to reduce within six months of people being fully vaccinated with the pfizer or astrazeneca vaccines. new research by experts working on the zoe covid study suggests that booster vaccines will be needed. 0ur health correspondent sophie hutchinson has this report. more than three quarters of adults in the uk have now had two doses of a covid vaccine, but how long that protection lasts is a crucial question. sarah, a head teacher, received her second toes in april,
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but injune, after a family all caught the virus, she became infected too.— caught the virus, she became infected too. , ., , , �* , infected too. obviously, i'd been shieldin: infected too. obviously, i'd been shielding at _ infected too. obviously, i'd been shielding at home, _ infected too. obviously, i'd been shielding at home, i'd _ infected too. obviously, i'd been shielding at home, i'd been - infected too. obviously, i'd been i shielding at home, i'd been staying in different rooms, keeping doors and windows open, wearing masks in communal areas of the home, so i'd hope not to get it with my double vaccine, but i knew there was always a possibility of getting it. it was obviously very disappointing to get it in the end, and my symptoms were just like that of a heavy head cold. i didn't have to stop working, i was working from home throughout that period, ifelt like it was working from home throughout that period, i felt like it was a working from home throughout that period, ifelt like it was a much lighter version than the year before. .. . , lighter version than the year before. ., , ., ., ., lighter version than the year before. ., ., ., ., before. sarah is one of a growing number of _ before. sarah is one of a growing number of people _ before. sarah is one of a growing number of people who _ before. sarah is one of a growing number of people who have - before. sarah is one of a growingj number of people who have been infected despite being double jabbed. today's study by the zoe covid team adds to the evidence that vaccines lose effectiveness over time. it found protection from infection with both the fires and astrazeneca vaccines reduced slightly within six months of the
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second dose. but for most, the vaccines still seem to protect severe disease.— vaccines still seem to protect severe disease. what this study tells us is _ severe disease. what this study tells us is that _ severe disease. what this study tells us is that we _ severe disease. what this study tells us is that we have - severe disease. what this study tells us is that we have to - severe disease. what this study tells us is that we have to keep| severe disease. what this study i tells us is that we have to keep an eye on the level of immunity and track it as time goes on so we can make a prediction, one month, three months, six months into the future, or when a booster might be required. and infections have been rising sharply in some parts of the uk. scotland, where schools have gone back, hit another record high today, well over 5000 new cases, with more than a third among teenagers and children. experts are warning the new term is likely to be difficult. i think we do need to be braced for a challenging period. exactly how hi-h a challenging period. exactly how high the — a challenging period. exactly how high the numbers will be is very challenging to predict that. where i think we _ challenging to predict that. where i think we can be more confident is
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that levels— think we can be more confident is that levels of mortality are going to remain — that levels of mortality are going to remain low because we have study after study _ to remain low because we have study after study that still shows the vaccines — after study that still shows the vaccines are working. cornwall's rocketin: vaccines are working. cornwall's rocketing rates _ vaccines are working. cornwall's rocketing rates of _ vaccines are working. cornwall's rocketing rates of infection - vaccines are working. cornwall's rocketing rates of infection have been blamed in large part on a music and surfing festival. preparations are well under way for this weekend's reading festival, where thousands will gather, and where there are crowds, that is likely to be covid. sophie hutchinson, bbc news. our top story this evening... britain says it will use every hour that led to get people out of afghanistan after the us refuses to extend its deadline beyond next tuesday. and it's a sensational start for england in the third test against india at headingley. coming up in sportsday in the next 15 minutes on the bbc news channel... the harry kane transfer saga is over for now. he's says he's not going to leave spurs this summer and is 100% focused on helping the team. the cyclist dame sarah storey moved a step closer today to becoming
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britain's most decorated paralympian, after she won britain's first gold medal at the paralympics in tokyo. the gold was the 15th of her career and she broke her previous world record in the process. in total, great britain claimed six medals on the first day of the games. 0ur sports correspondent, andy swiss, has been watching the action in tokyo. a golden start from one of britain's most golden athletes. for dame sarah storey, it seems winning is just a way of life. storey arrived here with 1a paralympic titles, and the 15th was never in doubt. in the pursuit, she'd set a world record in qualifying, and her all—british final against crystal lane—wright was more a victory procession as she caught her team—mate with laps to spare. and dame sarah storey! nearly 30 years after her paralympic debut, storeyjust keeps getting better. she needsjust one more gold from her two remaining events here to become britain's most successful paralympian.
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and for her husband, barney, and children charlie and louisa back home, the pride was only too clear. yes, as soon as she came quite close to crystal, i was like, "i know she's going to win." it was totally worth it, and i was screaming my head off. it was absolutely superb. it's... yeah, quite surreal in some ways, being so many thousand miles away and still enjoying that amazing experience of seeing sarah win again. and there was another medal in the velodrome — steve bate, who's visually impaired, and his pilot, adam duggleby, beaten by the netherlands, but silver wasn't a bad consolation. a glittering start for the cyclists, then, especially for dame sarah storey, for whom history now beckons. and there was more british success to come, as across tokyo at the aquatic centre, the medals were soon mounting up. they weren't quite the colour they might have been, though.
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tully kearney says she had to learn to swim again after missing the rio games through injury, but with a huge lead in herfinal, she seemed on course for remarkable triumph. but over the final length, gradually, she was reeled in. if it was 199 metres freestyle, she might have won, but it was the 200 metres, and agonisingly, she didn't. pipped by china's zhang li, still silver for kearney, but oh, so close to gold. it wasn't the only near miss for britain's swimmers. world champion reece dunn was involved in a thrilling finish in the butterfly before being just edged out. but with a silver for him and a bronze for 18—year—old toni shaw, the sight of britain's paralympians on the podium is already becoming familiar. andy swiss, bbc news, tokyo. the use of tasers by police needs to be reviewed to prevent officers from losing the trust of the communities they serve — that's the warning from the police watchdog.
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the review of the devices by the independent 0ffice for police conduct found black people were more likely to face a taser, and that some officers were not considering the risk of injury to vulnerable people. our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds, has more. put it down! these days the police are wearing _ put it down! these days the police are wearing cameras _ put it down! these days the police are wearing cameras which - put it down! these days the police are wearing cameras which show l are wearing cameras which show clearly what they do one under pressure. a taser generates up to 50,000 volts. that can be reasonable force in threatening situations. but the police watchdog wanted to know, is it being used safely and fairly? darren and john sullivan are not armed robbers. but police believe they were. irate armed robbers. but police believe the were. ~ ., ~ armed robbers. but police believe the were. ~ . ,, ., they were. we were talking and we heard a thud- _ they were. we were talking and we heard a thud. the _ they were. we were talking and we heard a thud. the police _ they were. we were talking and we heard a thud. the police went - they were. we were talking and we | heard a thud. the police went round us, guns at the window. we pulled over and they said, out, out! us, guns at the window. we pulled overand they said, out, out! ijust had a knee operation and they dragged me out. i said,
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had a knee operation and they dragged me out. isaid, i had a knee operation and they dragged me out. i said, i can't lay on my front i've had my knees done. i had an officer on each arm. as i turned round, they tasered me and threw me on the ground. the turned round, they tasered me and threw me on the ground.— turned round, they tasered me and threw me on the ground. the kind of incident which _ threw me on the ground. the kind of incident which resulted _ threw me on the ground. the kind of incident which resulted in _ threw me on the ground. the kind of incident which resulted in this - incident which resulted in this report. in 101 cases resulting in a complaint, 71% involved white suspects and 22% black, disproportionate, according to the report. in 58% of the cases, there were mental health concerns about the suspect. in a quarter, the watchdog found police officers had a case to answer about their conduct. a key concern is the use of tasers not for personal protection, as in this training, but to make suspects comply orjust to make them stop. last year, a police officer chased a suspect onto hammersmith bridge and onto a tow path. he used his taser. the suspect ended up in the river thames and he was tasered another four times. this report says too
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often the police are not considering the safety aspects of using their stun guns. the watchdog wants a rethink in police training, especially when assessing whether a suspect might have hidden vulnerabilities. elected police commissioners agreed. the vulnerabilities. elected police commissioners agreed. the misuse of tasers when — commissioners agreed. the misuse of tasers when somebody _ commissioners agreed. the misuse of tasers when somebody is _ commissioners agreed. the misuse of tasers when somebody is in _ commissioners agreed. the misuse of tasers when somebody is in a - commissioners agreed. the misuse of tasers when somebody is in a mental| tasers when somebody is in a mental health crisis is notjust a tragedy, it's a preventable tragedy, and better training and awareness, better training and awareness, better humanity would prevent that from happening. but better humanity would prevent that from happening-— from happening. but police chiefs have dismissed _ from happening. but police chiefs have dismissed today _ from happening. but police chiefs have dismissed today bostock - from happening. but police chiefs i have dismissed today bostock report as vague, unfair even. they say tasers are used correctly most of the time, they save lives. some chiefs want every officer to carry one. let's take a look at some of today's other news. the england captain, harry kane, has announced he won't be leaving tottenham hotspur during this transfer window. the striker, who's contracted to spurs until 2024, has been the subject of intense transfer speculation all summer. manchester city had previously confirmed
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that they were interested in signing him. the unite union has elected its first female general secretary, sharon graham, who takes over from len mccluskey. unite is the labour party's biggest trade union funder. graham's appointment has been welcomed by labour leader sir keir starmer, who came under criticism from her predecessor. the online food delivery company just eat says it's creating 1,500 new customer service jobs in the north east of england within the next 12 months. the staff will be based at a new office in sunderland, as part of a £100 million investment in the region over the next five years. the government is holding a public consultation on whether beavers should be reintroduced to england's rivers, as has already happened in scotland. the creatures were hunted to extinction in britain 400 years ago. beaver dams create wetland habitats, which act as natural flood barriers, but the national farmers' union warns the animals can damage trees and impede drainage from farmland.
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thousands of lives could be harmed if more isn't done to reduce regional inequality in britain, according to a report by the salvation army. the government says it's investing billions in what it calls its "levelling up" agenda. 0ur social affairs correspondent, michael buchanan, reports from the seaside town of rhyl, which has two of the poorest neighbourhoods in wales. we want rhyl to be associated with quality in the future. we are committed to making sure we've got high—quality attractions. it's great to get the tourists in, but what about the people that actually live here? people need to come three or four streets back and see where the poverty is. this water park is the epitome of rhyl�*s regeneration, a £70 million attraction built by the county council. it's constantly busy and defines a new vision for the town as a quality tourist destination. i think you'd be hard pushed to find
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many resorts across the uk that have invested this sum of money into a seaside resort on the back of a recession and nowjust coming out of a global pandemic, so i think things are looking really bright for rhyl. just minutes away, a different pool and a different world. the new water park is too expensive for this family, a common complaint in a town with high levels of deprivation. today's report says towns across britain need to work harder to engage and listen to local communities, to ensure regeneration provides lasting benefits to residents. i would say at least 75 to 100 families a week we help out. this local charity says the pandemic has exacerbated and revealed levels of poverty that aren't being prioritised in discussions about rhyl�*s future. if people actually came that were making these decisions to somewhere like this, in ten minutes we could give them a rundown of what we see daily and perhaps the money wouldn't be
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going to make the front look pretty but actually perhaps put into where it's needed. the pandemic has been devastating. in an instant, the tourism stopped, a lot of the caravan parks shut, so those jobs that people rely on were just instantly in one fell swoop gone. susie taylor works for the salvation army, helping people find work. never call yourselfjust a cleaner. claims for universal credit, already high, rose 50% during the pandemic. any new investment, she said, should focus on creating decentjobs. there's a lot of agencyjobs. theyjust don't give the financial security that people need to be able to move on in their lives and to see that there is more to life than benefits. the uk government says improving living standards is a key focus of its investment in regional towns and cities, who all
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benefit from new funding. in rhyl, they wait and wonder if the ripples from such schemes will wash beyond the seafront. michael buchanan, bbc news, rhyl. england have made a flying start on the first day of the third test against india at headingley. after choosing to bat, india were dismissed forjust 78 runs. a short time ago, england were 110 without loss. 0ur sports correspondent, joe wilson, has been watching. england's players wore their t—shirts with messages of diversity and inclusion at yorkshire county cricket club, where a report into allegations of racism against a former player, azeem rafiq, is yet to be published. it is long—awaited. england's captain, and rafiq's friend, joe root, is adamant the messages mean something, mean everything. applause. and so to the test match.
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and to the procession. indian batsmen came in, edged the ball to the wicketkeeper and left, time and again. when the captain did it, a special celebration. the kind of reaction virat kohli himself employs in happier times. reaction virat kohli himself employs in happiertimes. not reaction virat kohli himself employs in happier times. not an injured bowler who would disagree. 0llie robinson dismissed rishabh pant. little more india �*s captain could do now except count. is that rohit sharma? 67—6. this wasjoe root�*s stretching catch for 78 all out, a job perfectly done but still half done. now england have to bat. haseeb hameed starting the innings. that seemed to be working for the new opening partnership with rory burns will stop want another one? there we go. england were passed 50 without losing a wicket. is it possible a day of test cricket could run quite this smoothly?
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the answer is basically yes. play is coming to a conclusion with england 114 without loss, both opening batsmen passed 50. i am aware this is only day one but, from england's point of view, day one could not have gone any better. thank you, joe wilson. time for a look at the weather with tomasz schafernaker. it was a beautiful day across many parts of the country and in western scotland, intention, the temperature got up to 27 celsius. 28, 26.8, to be exact. you can see on the satellite picture how sunny it was across scotland, northern ireland and many areas, and this high temperature is a result of the light winds and prolonged sunshine. this is what it looks like early in the morning, very little change in the forecast. we will see cloud
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developing through the night and drifting off the north sea, like last night and the night before. there is a cool front over us tomorrow, introducing fresh air from the north, from the north sea, in fact, the norwegian c. you can see that breeze along that coast. in that breeze along that coast. in that —— that will keep things cool and cloudy from eastern scotland along the east coast east anglia, so temperatures could only be 15 or 16 whereas, towards the west, with lighter winds and sunny skies, temperatures into the 20s. 23 could be the warm spot in cardiff. 0n be the warm spot in cardiff. on friday, more of the same step various areas of cloud being pushed by the light breeze in this area of high pressure. temperatures are somewhat lower friday, particularly around western scotland, perhaps 20 or so. we were much that in london and cardiff at a saturday and sunday at a similar put up i'm going to go straight to bank holiday monday. the high pressure is still with us, so there is no change at all in the forecast, and this is what i was
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talking about yesterday.

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