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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 25, 2021 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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the us secretary of state, antony blinken, says the taliban have made a commitment to allow american citizens and at—risk afghans to leave the country after the end of month evacuation deadline. but, there's been continuing chaos and confusion at kabul airport, with a massive crush of people thronging the entry points as the deadline approaches. us vice president kamala harris is on a visit to vietnam as part of an effort to increase us engagement in the region. she said america would find new ways to raise pressure on beijing over concerns about disputed asian waters. the latest us intelligence report into the origins of the coronavirus pandemic is inconclusive, according to us media reports. it looked at whether the virus could have been the result of a lab—leak, or passed from an animal to a human.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are natalie fahy, editor of the nottingham post, and john stevens, the daily mail's deputy political editor. tomorrow's front pages, starting with... �*the sea was closed', the metro quotes foreign secretary dominic raab�*s defence at being on holiday as afghanistan fell to the taliban, saying in hindsight he should have come home earlier. the times also leads on afghanistan, quoting uk defence secretary ben wallace as saying "not everyone is going to get out" �*nobody�*s coming', the guardian front page features testimonies from britons trapped in kabul awaiting evacuation. the telegraph focuses on the nhs, saying the nhs has drawn up plans to vaccinate 12 year olds from the first weeks
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schools go back. covid vaccines feature on the daily mirror front page as well, saying medics have demanded urgent boosterjabs among fears immunity among the elderly could plunge by half. and harry and meghan are on the daily mail's front page which claims the duke and duchess of sussex considered naming the royal they alleged made a racist remark about their son archie. so, let's begin. right. afghanistan on the front page of almost all the papers. we will start with the times and really striking picture which ijust wanted to briefly mention first before we talk about it. the tank underneath the picture is the taliban have
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released pictures of people at a training camp in afghanistan were desperate to become members of the groups of meat forces —— elite forces. it is a powerful propaganda image. and the headline directly underneath that image. everyone, not everyone is going to get out. wallace admits. the defence secretary once thousands of afghans who help the uk, they should head for the border. what is this all about? , ., ., , about? time is running out really cuickl . about? time is running out really quickly- and _ about? time is running out really quickly. and the _ about? time is running out really quickly. and the 31st _ about? time is running out really quickly. and the 31st of _ about? time is running out really quickly. and the 31st of august, i about? time is running out really i quickly. and the 31st of august, joe quickly. and the 31st of august, joe biden said he wants all american troops out of afghanistan. at the moment, the american government has control of the air tower in the airport. they have loads of troops on the ground and it will take
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several days for them to withdraw their troops, withdrawal of the equipment and before that starts to happen, the civilian flights which bring in thousands of people out of afghanistan are going to have to stop and that means at some point, this going to be a lot of people in afghanistan were going to be left behind. look, these people worked as interpreters, the british army during the last 20 years when we have been in afghanistan. some did other roles such as drivers. the fearfor other roles such as drivers. the fear for them other roles such as drivers. the fearfor them is because they fear for them is because they worked with western forces, they are going to become a possible target for the taliban and there are fears that there could be reprisals, they could be harmed, some of them could be killed. and a lot of them are very desperate to get out of afghanistan as quickly as they can and there's much time now for them to do that.
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had for the border. uk tells afghans trying to flee. and of course, that is not an easy option in and of itself. ~ . , ,., ., , itself. we have seen so many powerful _ itself. we have seen so many powerful images _ itself. we have seen so many powerful images over - itself. we have seen so many powerful images over the - itself. we have seen so many| powerful images over the past itself. we have seen so many - powerful images over the past few days and _ powerful images over the past few days and small children waiting in that sewage and a lot of people, some _ that sewage and a lot of people, some people trying to climb over the walls and _ some people trying to climb over the walls and try to push back down again— walls and try to push back down again by— walls and try to push back down again by the military and children catching — again by the military and children catching boys. this message will be difficult _ catching boys. this message will be difficult to _ catching boys. this message will be difficult to get through to people and how— difficult to get through to people and how they know not to crowd around — and how they know not to crowd around the _ and how they know not to crowd around the airports and are they going _ around the airports and are they going to — around the airports and are they going to know to head for the board is processing centres that could take them there. will be difficult to get— take them there. will be difficult to get that message through to people — to get that message through to people whojust want to get that message through to people who just want to escape. and you know. _ people who just want to escape. and you know, the deadline is coming quickly— you know, the deadline is coming quickly when troops are going to be withdrawing and apparently tomorrow is the last— withdrawing and apparently tomorrow is the last day when people can get on a plane — is the last day when people can get on a plane. i think we're going to
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see a— on a plane. i think we're going to see a lot — on a plane. i think we're going to see a lot of— on a plane. i think we're going to see a lot of chaotic scenes of the next _ see a lot of chaotic scenes of the next few — see a lot of chaotic scenes of the next few days. see a lot of chaotic scenes of the next few deve— see a lot of chaotic scenes of the next few days. the chaos that we have seen _ next few days. the chaos that we have seen so _ next few days. the chaos that we have seen so far _ next few days. the chaos that we have seen so far may _ next few days. the chaos that we have seen so far may well- next few days. the chaos that we have seen so far may well not. next few days. the chaos that we have seen so far may well not be| have seen so far may well not be much compared to what actually happens and the final few hours and dove has to be a worry down in westminster. taste dove has to be a worry down in westminster.— dove has to be a worry down in westminster. ~ ., westminster. we saw on saturday. several peeple _ westminster. we saw on saturday. several people killed _ westminster. we saw on saturday. several people killed outside - westminster. we saw on saturday. several people killed outside of. westminster. we saw on saturday. | several people killed outside of the processing centre and people think it may be the last chance to go, there are concerns that this going to be panicked at the airport. i think that's partly why you see him getting his message out there. but there are possible alternatives and that they want people to think about, whether possibly going through the land borders rather than the airport. large numbers of people there, but the people absolutely desperate. there are some on the news earlier saying that they should
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either lead us through shooters and that people are absolutely desperate remembers those horrific scenes from last week of those military planes taking off of of people holding onto the wheels and ijust taking off of of people holding onto the wheels and i just think that for people to think that that is their best option, it's a shows the sheer desperation that people want to get out of afghanistan. find desperation that people want to get out of afghanistan.— desperation that people want to get out of afghanistan. and the guardian have some of — out of afghanistan. and the guardian have some of the _ out of afghanistan. and the guardian have some of the numbers _ out of afghanistan. and the guardian have some of the numbers on - out of afghanistan. and the guardian have some of the numbers on all- out of afghanistan. and the guardian have some of the numbers on all of. have some of the numbers on all of this and what you are talking about that we have been covering throughout the day today. more than 80,000 people have been airlifted by western forces that is with the us was saying. planes taking off almost every half an hour from was saying. planes taking off almost every half an hourfrom kabul airport. and lots of people coming out and praising whatever the rights and wrongs of the policy decision, but praising the people on the ground, the boots on the ground actually carrying out this logistical exercise. let us continue the theme of numbers
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and go to the independent. the photo, i should and go to the independent. the photo, ishould mention and go to the independent. the photo, i should mention first of all because it's the first thing you see. that is the wonderful sarah storey celebrating. we will come to that a little later on. we'll focus on afghanistan. that is the main story on the independent and the headline there. uk races to rescue 2000 and final hours of air left. that is focusing on the 2000 people on the uk perspective. it that is focusing on the 2000 people on the uk perspective.— on the uk perspective. it was 2000 --eole in on the uk perspective. it was 2000 peeple in this _ on the uk perspective. it was 2000 people in this race _ on the uk perspective. it was 2000 people in this race against - on the uk perspective. it was 2000 people in this race against time - on the uk perspective. it was 2000j people in this race against time and they managed to get them out, afghan interpreters and those work with the uk and _ interpreters and those work with the uk and military forces. while there they will— uk and military forces. while there they will build to get them out or not to— they will build to get them out or not to be — they will build to get them out or not to be able to identify them and what seems like a chaos of the airport. — what seems like a chaos of the airport. it _ what seems like a chaos of the airport, it seems like another question— airport, it seems like another question of course. it remains to be seen, _ question of course. it remains to be seen. its— question of course. it remains to be seen. it'sjust— question of course. it remains to be seen, it'sjust massive race against time _ seen, it'sjust massive race against time and _ seen, it'sjust massive race against time and that 2000 people there hopefully will be able to get them
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out. hopefully they'll be able to -et out. hopefully they'll be able to get out — out. hopefully they'll be able to get out even more. but 10,000 people in the _ get out even more. but 10,000 people in the airport. it has to be some logistical— in the airport. it has to be some logistical task to identify the people — logistical task to identify the people who are the most priority are those _ people who are the most priority are those who _ people who are the most priority are those who have uk citizenship or work— those who have uk citizenship or work with— those who have uk citizenship or work with uk forces who are those people _ work with uk forces who are those eo - le. . . ., work with uk forces who are those --eole. ., , people. the fact that there focusing on the taliban, _ people. the fact that there focusing on the taliban, the _ people. the fact that there focusing on the taliban, the first _ on the taliban, the first things they did successfully before they even entered kabul and secure the ski rights and trading posts as a think it is not an easy option but realistic how things are. it will continue to dominate over the next few days of these crucial hours i will focus on the nhs and covid—i9. in the nhs draws sub plans
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to vaccinate. covid-19. in the nhs draws sub plans to vaccinate-— to vaccinate. these are children between the — to vaccinate. these are children between the ages _ to vaccinate. these are children between the ages of— to vaccinate. these are children between the ages of 12 - to vaccinate. these are children between the ages of 12 and - to vaccinate. these are children between the ages of 12 and 15 i to vaccinate. these are children l between the ages of 12 and 15 and to vaccinate. these are children - between the ages of 12 and 15 and we are not sure if they will be given the coronavirus jab or not but so far it's only been children with underlying health conditions have been offered the vaccine. increasingly looking like they are going to be offered the jab because they have the nhs is speaking to the local trust across the country saying that they need to urgently draw up plans for how they would deliver the vaccine to 12 to 15—year—olds. and they have not been given much time. they have to give planned quickly for a possible vaccine tried starting in the next fortnight but one of the concerning things will be for a lot of parents to have the issue of consent here. it means plans talking about the possibility that parents want to get to say whether their children get thejob or not. a to say whether their children get the job or not. a lot of parents will be up for having there's
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children get the jab but whether children get the jab but whether children should be going to schools having the jabs and only finding out afterwards. ~ ., ., , ., having the jabs and only finding out afterwards. ~ ., ., , , afterwards. what do you pick up in the sto ? afterwards. what do you pick up in the story? as _ afterwards. what do you pick up in the story? as a — afterwards. what do you pick up in the story? as a parent _ afterwards. what do you pick up in the story? as a parent myself, - afterwards. what do you pick up in the story? as a parent myself, i i the story? as a parent myself, i think the test _ the story? as a parent myself, i think the test that _ the story? as a parent myself, i think the test that they're - the story? as a parent myself, i | think the test that they're using, previously— think the test that they're using, previously been used for things like this. previously been used for things like this with— previously been used for things like this. with the girls at that age can take contraception at that age of the parental consent and that also applies— the parental consent and that also applies to — the parental consent and that also applies to the covid—19 vaccine as welt _ applies to the covid—19 vaccine as welt it's— applies to the covid—19 vaccine as well. it's concerning that, i think that a _ well. it's concerning that, i think that a 12—year—old can make that kind of— that a 12—year—old can make that kind of choice because it is a choice — kind of choice because it is a choice that they have to make and there's— choice that they have to make and there's a _ choice that they have to make and there's a lot of evidence that needs to come _ there's a lot of evidence that needs to come out— there's a lot of evidence that needs to come out whether the benefit of having _ to come out whether the benefit of having the — to come out whether the benefit of having the vaccine for this age group — having the vaccine for this age group is — having the vaccine for this age group is beneficial for them as a lot of— group is beneficial for them as a lot of studies that need to be done.
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and as _ lot of studies that need to be done. and as mentioned in the telegraph as well with— and as mentioned in the telegraph as well with the second dose, you can -et well with the second dose, you can get a _ well with the second dose, you can get a very— well with the second dose, you can get a very rare side effect, inflammation of the heart. very rare, _ inflammation of the heart. very rare. this — inflammation of the heart. very rare, this distress them. but stop and much — rare, this distress them. but stop and much research done into that. in people _ and much research done into that. in people have — and much research done into that. in people have questions about this. the pfizer— people have questions about this. the pfizerjab was approved and further research in this age group is about to be published when that research is published. going back to the times. and on the right—hand side there. europe goes through its hottest year on record and we are used to hearing these stories of record temperatures but this is a very significant one, john. this is a very significant one, john. . . . ., .. this is a very significant one, john. . . . ., ., ., , john. according to the latest fi . ures, john. according to the latest figures. it — john. according to the latest figures, it was _ john. according to the latest figures, it was the _ john. according to the latest figures, it was the hottest i john. according to the latest i figures, it was the hottest year john. according to the latest - figures, it was the hottest year on record in europe and for a lot of
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countries, they broke records and near france, belgium, spain, the netherlands. ukraine, all recorded their hottest years. uk was the third hardest year in 2014 in 2006 were apparently the hotter years. but the problem is it's going to be climate change in the next few months, were going to see boris johnson bring all the world leaders bring people together for the climate change conference and the question is, do they manage to actually start delivering on some of the promises that they've made over the promises that they've made over the last few years is a big developing countries with millions and millions of pounds to help those less well off, make the economy is more green but it's been a problem with them not actually stumping up the cash and when it comes to individual countries, even though a lot of people want to go green we have to make tough decisions about
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getting people to get rid of their gas boilers and keep on spending lots of money, changing their cars and diesel cars and electric cars. these things can be slightly more controversial. i these things can be slightly more controversial.— controversial. i want to go back to the numbers _ controversial. i want to go back to the numbers before _ controversial. i want to go back to the numbers before we _ controversial. i want to go back to the numbers before we go - controversial. i want to go back to the numbers before we go on - controversial. i want to go back to the numbers before we go on to l controversial. i want to go back to - the numbers before we go on to that. the records dating back to 1850, globally last year. it was one of the three warmest years on record. dating back to 1850. those on the it is worrying. from the un it makes very clear— it is worrying. from the un it makes very clear that this is all through the fault — very clear that this is all through the fault of humans. this is not 'ust the fault of humans. this is not just about — the fault of humans. this is not just about using plastic bags and plastic— just about using plastic bags and plastic straws, this is got to be a global— plastic straws, this is got to be a global effort. it's all about
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investing some serious money in this and this— investing some serious money in this and this big _ investing some serious money in this and this big questions that need to be answered. gas boilers, electric cars, _ be answered. gas boilers, electric cars. but— be answered. gas boilers, electric cars, but also, how are we going to make _ cars, but also, how are we going to make the _ cars, but also, how are we going to make the fuel to replace fossil fuels? — make the fuel to replace fossil fuels? are we going to make hydrogen in a green _ fuels? are we going to make hydrogen in a green way that will power peoples — in a green way that will power peoples heating from their homes? is a massive _ peoples heating from their homes? is a massive questions that needs to be answered _ a massive questions that needs to be answered. were actually seeing the tangible _ answered. were actually seeing the tangible effects of climate change there _ tangible effects of climate change there. so, what is going to happen for? will— there. so, what is going to happen for? will wait to see? the there. so, what is going to happen for? will wait to see?— for? will wait to see? the sister -a er. megan and harry back in the news. it was written finding freedom. it was an unauthorised book about how much or how much not harry and nick inc. . saying that they did not have the office at all. back in the news because it's been updated. adding an
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extra chapter about something being talked about and that will be the big interview they did in march with 0prah big interview they did in march with oprah and what happened behind the scenes. 0bviously, oprah and what happened behind the scenes. obviously, the big row that came out of that was the suggestion from harry and megan that one member of the world member —— royal member said something with claims that harry and megan did think about publicly naming vet royal. but it is obviously explosive.— publicly naming vet royal. but it is obviously explosive. remember at the time the did not _ obviously explosive. remember at the time the did not say _ obviously explosive. remember at the time the did not say who _ obviously explosive. remember at the time the did not say who it _ obviously explosive. remember at the time the did not say who it was - time the did not say who it was but they did say it was not the queen or they did say it was not the queen or the duke of edinburgh. finding out more claims about the relationship between prince harry and the rest of his family. one of the description is that harry and prince charles were on light speaking terms and that prince william was absolutely furious about that interview that they did with 0prah. brute
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furious about that interview that they did with oprah.— furious about that interview that they did with oprah. we will leave that there because _ they did with oprah. we will leave that there because we _ they did with oprah. we will leave that there because we have - they did with oprah. we will leave that there because we have to - they did with oprah. we will leave that there because we have to fit. they did with oprah. we will leave l that there because we have to fit in one last story before we go on the front page with lots of papers. we did see it earlier on. and that is sarah storey, is draped in the british flag winning yet again. she's pretty good at winning, isn't she. . . , . she's pretty good at winning, isn't she. . ., .,, she. fantastic story. not only smashing _ she. fantastic story. not only smashing her _ she. fantastic story. not only smashing her own _ she. fantastic story. not only smashing her own world - she. fantastic story. not only | smashing her own world record she. fantastic story. not only - smashing her own world record but getting _ smashing her own world record but getting another gold medal in getting another gold medal in getting team gb onto a brilliant start— getting team gb onto a brilliant start within tokyo. it's just unbelievable her career. she's got 26 medals, 15 gold medals and she 'ust 26 medals, 15 gold medals and she just keeps— 26 medals, 15 gold medals and she just keeps on winning and smashing the records — just keeps on winning and smashing the records and isjust just keeps on winning and smashing the records and is just fantastic which _ the records and is just fantastic which she — the records and is just fantastic which she has done and what a role model— which she has done and what a role model for— which she has done and what a role model for everyone back here and a great _ model for everyone back here and a great start— model for everyone back here and a great start to the next paralympics and we _ great start to the next paralympics and we will see more of the same thing _ and we will see more of the same thing. fantastic picture as well. she is— thing. fantastic picture as well. she is a — thing. fantastic picture as well. she is a gift to newspaper picture editors, isn't she?—
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she is a gift to newspaper picture editors, isn't she? yes, especially with everything — editors, isn't she? yes, especially with everything going _ editors, isn't she? yes, especially with everything going on. - editors, isn't she? yes, especially with everything going on. we - editors, isn't she? yes, especially| with everything going on. we need the paralympics to lift us up, the olympic games she is getting into the routine of watching it around work. and then it goes away and forget about it and then a couple weeks later, the paralympics come back you think thank goodness we have a bit more of this. with everything going on in afghanistan and everything going on with coronavirus, i think is just brilliant that all of these positive uplifting stories and a lovely thing about not only the olympics and the paralympics that there's always a local angle, there's always a local angle, there's always a local angle, there's always a local athlete doing well. we there's always a local athlete doing well. ~ . ., ., ., there's always a local athlete doing well. . ., ., ., ., well. we have charlotte who has got so many metals _ well. we have charlotte who has got so many metals under _ well. we have charlotte who has got so many metals under her _ well. we have charlotte who has got so many metals under her belt. - well. we have charlotte who has got so many metals under her belt. she | so many metals under her belt. she will hopefully be going back for a if you _ will hopefully be going back for a if you have some great people in the past. _ if you have some great people in the past, richard was a great runner and the paralympics in the years gone by
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and she _ the paralympics in the years gone by and she was often seen pounding the streets _ and she was often seen pounding the streets where she lived in nottinghamshire which is a fantastic site. people loved her and their communities.— site. people loved her and their communities. ~ ., ., . ., communities. wonderful to chat with ou. thank communities. wonderful to chat with you- thank you _ communities. wonderful to chat with you- thank you so — communities. wonderful to chat with you. thank you so much _ communities. wonderful to chat with you. thank you so much for- communities. wonderful to chat with you. thank you so much for guiding i you. thank you so much for guiding us expertly through the front page this evening. thank you very much. that's it for the papers this evening. my thanks again to natalie and john. all the day's sport next. but for now — from me — it's goodbye. good evening. we start with cricket because england are in a commanding position on day one of their third test against india at headingley. the visitors chose to bat — and they've probably regretted that ever since —
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because they were all out forjust 78 before tea. joe wilson was watching. strange things happen at headingley�*s cricket ground, the unexpected, the dramatic. an indian team spilling over with confidence collapsed. james anderson took the first three wickets, including india's captain virat kohli for seven. 0llie robinson dismissed rishabh pant. controlled aggression is the big idea. little more india's captain could do now, except count. is that rohit sharma? could that be 67—6? yeah. and this here withjoe root�*s stretching catch was 78 all out. so, how did that happen? well, england bowled with extreme discipline. why waste time with intimidation when you can be taking wickets? this ground of the extraordinary, where grown men dress as seagulls to pursue a six foot bag of chips, was now the scene of serene english batting. where english fans might have
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waited for something to go wrong, nothing did. runs just kept flowing and india on the first day lost sight of the match. rory burns, and with him haseeb hameed, a new opening partnership, added 120 runs together and they're still going. for england, better things have happened here, but not many. joe wilson, bbc news, headingley. paralympics gb are fifth on the medals table after day one of the games with one gold, four silvers and a bronze. three of those medals were in the pool and three in the velodrome — and it was dame sarah storey who got gb�*s first gold. she beat team—mate crystal lane—wright in the final of the c5 3000 metres, individual pursuit. 0ur paralympics reporter rachel latham looks ahead to day two. looking ahead to tomorrow,
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we will finally see ellie simmons in action. she goes to the 200 metres individual. it's notjust for going for great britain. also grace harvey and macy summers newton macy summers newton will also be going in the 200 metres individual classification. everyone will think that ellie is good for the gold but macy has been chasing ellie's tell for a while now. so we'll have to see who comes out on top moving to the equestrian, sophie wells hoping to continue with her gold medal from rio and pick up another gold medal and will be seeing the reigning champion in the 500 metre time trial. kadeena cox. she will have tough competition from canada. can she pick up another gold medal here in tokyo ? we will have to wait and see. to football — there were just three ties in the league cup second round tonight but there were goals galore. a great response from arsenal after their difficult start to the premier league season.
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they looked to get their campaign up and running against championship side west brom. with a comfortable 6—nil win. arsenal captain, pierre—emerick aubameyang with a hat—trick on his first start of the season, before goals from nicolas pepe, bukayo saka and alexandre lacazette helped to seal the win away. elsewhere, newcastle lost out to fellow premier league side burnley, it ended 4—3 on penalties at stjames park, with a debut to remember for goalkeeper wayne hennessey. and southampton secured the biggest away win in their history as they beat newport county 8—0. there was two goals from armando bro—ya on his debut and mohamed elyoun—oussi got a hat—trick on his first saints appearance in over two years. and the news that all tottenham fans had been waiting for — harry kane says he'll be staying at the club, despite intense speculation about the england captain's future. in a statement on social media, kane said he's 100% focused
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on helping the team achieve success, and that the messages of support he's had in the last few weeks have been incredible. manchester city had been keen to sign kane, who says that he will be staying this summer. with the international window just around the corner, fifa president gianni infantino has asked the uk government for exemptions so that premier league players can travel to red—list countries for world cup qualifiers. english clubs have reluctantly — but unanimously — agreed not to let players travel to matches in countries that require them to quarantine on their return. the rules would apply to nearly 60 players, including everton's richarlison, who would miss brazil's world cup qualifier against argentina — while liverpool's mohamed salah would also miss egypt's qualifiers against angola and gabon. rangers have travelled to armenia for their second leg tie with alashkert without manager steven gerrard and a number of players because of a covid outbreak in the squad. assistant gary mcallister
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and coach michael beale will lead the team tomorrow, and it is unclear if gerrard or the unspecified players missing will be able to return in time for sunday's match with celtic at ibrox. leeds rhinos moved back into the super league play—off positions with a 14—0 win over wigan warriors tonight. richie myler scored the pick of the tries as the away side become the first team to stop wigan from scoring a single point in a home game in super league history. and the reigning t20 blast champions — the notts 0utlaws — have been beaten by the hampshire hawks in a low—scoring but thrilling quarterfinal. hampshire struggled with the bat and were only able to set a target of 126, with 18—year—old tom prest getting 44, but it proved enough. notts needed just three runs off the last over, but they were bowled out for 123
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as hampshire head to finals day for the first time since 2017. and that's all the sport for now. hello there. we just had the hottest day of the month on wednesday. and it was western scotland the place to be. looks lovely in the sunshine and temperatures reached 27 celsius. now, it won't get as hot as that again through the rest of the month because we've got this weather front moving down toward the southwest of the uk. it's bringing in cloud, one or two spots of rain just for a while, and as that weather front moves through, so we introduce a cooler wind off the north sea. that's blowing in cooler air and this dropping the temperatures as well. we start with some fog, though, quite extensively across northern ireland in the morning. not so much fog in scotland. the fog will lift. the cloud that we start with in wales and the southwest will break up. sunshine for many western areas. but the wind will continue to blow in more cloud to the eastern side of the uk. should get more sunshine, though, for the northern isles, some areas of cloud lingering across some easternmost parts of scotland. much of the country, though, seeing the sunshine and temperatures 23, maybe 24 in the west
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of scotland this time. could make 22 or 23 in fermanagh and tyrone. always warmer for wales, western parts of england. down the eastern side, a lot of cloud, a cooler wind as well. and around the coasts in particular, temperatures could be no better then 16 or 17 degrees. there could be a hint of sunshine now and again, but generally it's going to be pretty cloudy at headingley for day 2 of an exciting test match. not quite so chilly on friday. by this stage, the cloud is pushing more towards wales and western parts of england, and that means we should get a bit more sunshine for the eastern side of england. there will be some areas of cloud for scotland and northern ireland, some spells of sunshine too, and temperatures are back down to around 19 or 20 degrees typically, perhaps a little lower than that in the far north and east of scotland. heading into the weekend, big area of low pressure is bringing lots of showers into central europe. they are not far away from the southeast on saturday, but over the weekend, it's high—pressure that should tend to dominate. always a wind coming in from the north sea, some brisk winds for the southeast of england. should be a fair bit of sunshine,
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though, i think on saturday, some patchy cloud bubbling up here and there. and in the sunshine, again, across western scotland, we could see temperatures up to 22 degrees. second half of the weekend, still dry, high pressure around, bit breezy and cooler around some of those north sea coasts, a bit more cloud perhaps coming into scotland and northern ireland, sunshine for england and wales and temperatures typically 19 or 20 celsius.
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welcome to newsday. reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines: the united states says it will continue to evacuate people from afghanistan, even after the august 31 deadline. there is no deadline on our work to help any remaining american citizens who decide they want to leave to do so, along with the many afghans who have stood by us over these many years and want to leave and have been unable to do so. is it worth it? is it betterjust staying here in afghanistan for the moment? translation: there's | no way we can stay here. the americans should shoot us or let us through. so what awaits the refugees taken to america? we'll have a special report from the state of texas.
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