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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 28, 2021 11:00am-11:31am BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the us hits back against islamic state in afghanistan with a drone strike — following thursday's deadly attack at kabul airport. meanwhile, the uk's evacuation in afghanistan reaches its final stages — the head of britain's armed forces says it's been a success. we've done an extraordinaryjob to evacuate as many as we have, but i'm afraid it's absolutely heartbreaking that we can't bring everybody out. a recipe for covid chaos — government plans for schools are criticised by education unions who fear a rise in coronavirus infections. hurricane ida is approaching louisiana — forcing the evacuation of high—risk areas. and british husband and wife lora and neil fachie not only win gold but break the world record
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in their respective cycling events. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the us military says it's carried out a drone strike in western afghanistan, targeting what it said was a planner for the islamic state group known as isis—k. the group is thought to have carried out the attack on thursday at kabul airport, in which 170 people were killed, inluding 13 american service personnel. in a statement, us central command said that...
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meanwhile, the last british flights carrying civilian refugees out of afghanistan are leaving kabul today. this report from graham satchell. the final flights leaving kabul airport. the british effort here is all but done. it has been a mammoth logistical operation. injust two weeks, more than 14,000 people airlifted by the raf to safety in the uk. but the ministry of defence ackknowledges as many as 1,000 former interpreters and other staff will left behind. we are so worried about our future. i think it's not fair. it's like a betrayal of their own heroes. the horrifying aftermath of the terror attack at the airport. president biden promised to hunt down is—k, the group responsible. and, overnight, us forces have carried out a drone strike in eastern afghanistan, killing a so—called terrorist planner. among those killed in the suicide bombing, london taxi driver mohammad niazi who travelled to kabul to help his family escape. his eldest daughter is missing, his wife also killed. kabul�*s main hospital
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is full of the injured, like two—year—old mohammed reza, fighting for his life. what chance now that these people, many of whom worked for western forces, will be able to get to safety? they will, sadly, be people who haven't got through, people who might qualify, and what i would say to them is that we will shift heaven and earth to help them get out. we will do whatever we can. immediately outside the airport, the crowds of people have gone, the streets empty. the taliban — in american military vehicles — have set up roadblocks to stop people getting near. some taliban leaders claim to have already taken over parts of the airport, a claim denied by the mod and the pentagon. they're not in charge of any of the gates. of any of the airport operations.
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that is still under us military control. the global effort to get people to safety is now ending. these german troops have already returned home. spanish troops are back in madrid. british and american forces will be the last to go. the 20—year western mission in afghanistan ends in a chaotic, bloody withdrawl with the taliban ready to take charge. graham satchell, bbc news. the chief of the british armed forces, general sir nick carter confirmed that after today, flights out of kabul would only be used to bring troops home. we've done an extraoridnaryjob to evacuate as many as we have, but i'm afraid it's absolutely heartbreaking that we can't bring everybody out, and i think that point�*s been made very strongly, certainly by the defence secretary and others in the last ten days or so.
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personally, i've probably had over 100 messages from different afghans who i know in my long association with the country, and many of those friends of mine won't make it out. and, for me, not a day passes without me having a bit of a tear in my eye about all of that. i mean, you know, he uk will continue to welcome those sorts of people — we should be pretty clear of that, and i think our government has made that very clear. if they are able to get out post this evacuation, if you like, the, sort of, second phase of it, they will always be welcome if they need to come. and i'm afraid it is an awfulfact of life that difficult decisions have had to be made. some people have not been able to make it across town, across kabul to be able to get to the evacuation. others have kept their head down, for obvious reasons. but the plain fact is that we're there for them into the future if they need us.
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0ur political correspondent jessica parker is here with me. him making it clear that that was not easy. the americans will be the last to leave so he is speaking to the fact that will be a difficult moment. in terms of civilian flights, as we have been hearing, some civilian flights still to take out but very few left. uk troops will be coming out but some uk troops of any returning that it is a delicate situation. of course, overnight as well we saw by mistake by the americans against the plan for i0s and labour shadow defence secretaryjohn healey was asked for his reaction to that drone strike earlier. the strike overnight was part of the necessary steps that the us has been taking notjust to try and keep the airport safe in the us troops and civilians safe but the bits as well. we have only been able to do this
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evacuation because the us was willing to put in an extra 6,000 troops to secure the airport. so, when we are under attack and our personnel on the ground have been under attack in recent days and it has been dangerous, desperate, desperate mission under the most unimaginable circumstances, where necessary, it was important that they did that strike and i think our thoughts now as those last british military military planes and the last us planes leave, these are prime terrorist targets and we all want to see our british troops, every one of them, back home safely same and the us troops back home safely as well. how is that going to work with my how are people going to be safely got matter—macro and a son who didn't make it to the airport? got matter-macro and a son who didn't make it to the airport?
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0ur correspondent rajni vaidyanathan has been in afghanistan — she's now in delhi and she sent us this update on the security situation at the airport. as things are drawing to a close there is a heightened sense of security around kabul airport. the us embassy issued in boarding earlier saying that any us citizen should avoid going to the airport and the already said that any us citizens are already at the airport should leave immediately. us officials have been saying that this is potentially be the most dangerous part of this ongoing evacuation process and, of course, that's unsurprising given the events on thursday. we've also heard that italy is also winding up its operation evacuation flight ended last night france conducted its last airlift in one of the reasons why they stop yesterday was because of deteriorating security situation at the airport. we have been hearing there are stricter taliban checkpoints around the airport vicinity but, of course, that is the
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main concern now as foreign forces wrap up their operations before that deadline, of course, on the 31st of august. it is also worth mentioning that the taliban have been saying that the taliban have been saying that they already control three main parts of the airport on the military side and yesterday the us said that that wasn't the case and that they were still in control of the gates and operations but we hearing that that transfer to the taliban could happen quite soon so it really is coming into the endgame now. coronavirus plans for schools in england have been described as "a recipe for chaos" by education unions, who say they will not be enough to prevent a rise in infections. the government's scientific advisors have warned it is "extremely likely" cases in schools will be high by late september. the government said it has updated its advice on how to respond
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to an outbreak with minimum disruption to education. paul gosling is the headteacher of exeter road community primary school in exmouth. paul is also the vice president of the national association of head teachers. welcome and thank you very much for joining us. how you feel about the return on the prospect of covid—19 cases? i return on the prospect of covid-19 cases? ., ., ., ., cases? i have got a growing nervousness. _ cases? i have got a growing nervousness, actually. - cases? i have got a growing nervousness, actually. we i cases? i have got a growing - nervousness, actually. we finished in the summer. every one, you know, that i know wanted to have a rest from what was a quite difficult 18 months and then hoping that infection rates would be tailing off during the summer holidays and that we could return to normal in school in september which was something that we all wanted to do but, you know, the news from sage and what has been going on in scotland is raising some concerns now that perhaps the government has not got plans in place to address what needs to happen in the next few weeks. the government says it has updated its advice on how to respond to an outfit with minimum disruption. you claim about the plan and how it will
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work with mac i claim about the plan and how it will work with ma— work with mac i have been reading the lans work with mac i have been reading the plans this _ work with mac i have been reading the plans this morning _ work with mac i have been reading the plans this morning and - work with mac i have been reading i the plans this morning and preparing ready for my school to open and certainly there are some steps in there that if you get an outbreak in there that if you get an outbreak in the school you can take and give school some measures that they can put in place. however, what i'm about is that staff are going to be getting ill and they are going to be off school and hopefully won't be getting seriously ill because they are double vaccinated but that will cause disruption. we won't have stuff in school. teachers may well be absent for a period of time and so the government may well have a plan for reducing infection was of infection gets into the school it will cause disruption through staff and people absence. share will cause disruption through staff and people absence.— and people absence. are all your stuff double _ and people absence. are all your stuff double vaccinated? - and people absence. are all your stuff double vaccinated? yes. . and people absence. are all your| stuff double vaccinated? yes. but ou are stuff double vaccinated? yes. but you are still _ stuff double vaccinated? yes but you are still concerned about stuff double vaccinated? 123 but you are still concerned about the prospect of them getting sick? i am concerned about _ prospect of them getting sick? i —n concerned about them. as you know, if you do test positively for covid—19 you do still have to self—isolate so they will be able to come into work and, as we know, you know, some people might get ill from
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this but even being off for ten days, which you need to do if you contract the virus, even if you only guess it mildly, that will disrupt schools. �* . guess it mildly, that will disrupt schools. ., , ~ ., schools. but that sounds like a roblem schools. but that sounds like a problem that _ schools. but that sounds like a problem that is _ schools. but that sounds like a problem that is literally - schools. but that sounds like a problem that is literally neverl problem that is literally never going to go away? because schools have to go back. it is a fact of life, as you say, that people will catch the virus even though they are double vaccinated but hopefully won't be ill enough to go to hospital, so what are you suggesting should be done about that? i hospital, so what are you suggesting should be done about that?- should be done about that? i think that, ou should be done about that? i think that. you know. — should be done about that? i think that, you know, the _ should be done about that? i think that, you know, the isolation - that, you know, the isolation measures that we had before where we could ask people not to comment would stop the virus ripping through schools. i guess what we are worried about is that there will be a huge spike in schools and so september will be disrupted. it was meant not myjob to come up... find will be disrupted. it was meant not my job to come up...— my job to come up... and you 'ust clarify a? — my job to come up... and you 'ust clarify a? an fl my job to come up... and you 'ust clarify a? an income i my job to come up... and you 'ust clarify a? an income the i my job to come up... and you just clarify a? an income the plans - my job to come up... and you just l clarify a? an income the plans going forward and that if there's a positive case others don't have to isolate unless they test positive. it's the daily testing. connect. and
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that applies to kids and teachers. are you saying you are not happy with that? ., , , ., ~ , with that? the daily testing takes lace in with that? the daily testing takes place in secondary _ with that? the daily testing takes place in secondary school - with that? the daily testing takes place in secondary school written | with that? the daily testing takes i place in secondary school written by me so we have relying on lsd testing taken at home by parents which they may or may not do but most of the time hopefully will do among other people live in but it is the contacts, isn't it? when we were controlling the virus before context or isolating the that protection any more. close contacts will still come into school and i suspect that is thatis into school and i suspect that is that is what is happening in scotland at the moment, but that is spreading the virus of the population. spreading the virus of the population-— spreading the virus of the population. spreading the virus of the --oulation. �* ., ,. ., population. and come into school and i sus - ect population. and come into school and i suspect that — population. and come into school and i suspect that is _ population. and come into school and i suspect that is what _ population. and come into school and i suspect that is what is _ population. and come into school and i suspect that is what is happening . i suspect that is what is happening in scotland at the moment, but that is spreading the virus of the population. and, of course, the issue with that to education was enormous with hundreds of thousands of kids missing out on school. so, which is the most pragmatic option? that is a good question, joanna, and i don't know. until we get into it in the next few weeks. but, as they say, i think the disruption is
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inevitable because we will have staff that will have to stay off school because they are ill. what level that reaches and how that mousse of the population i don't know. sage might have a better idea. we might get some clues in scotland. we might get some clues in scotland. we got colleagues, i got a friend in leicester who school has been back for a week already. we might be able to get some information from that about how many people are actually following ill and having to be off work. but i guess what i'm saying is that disruption is going to be inevitable but we want, we don't want to, like, have people seriously ill. there are still people in our communities that are not vaccinated for a number of reasons and we don't want the virus, i would imagine, to rip through the population because those people to become ill or hospitalised. and it's a difficult situation. ijust think hospitalised. and it's a difficult situation. i just think that the government at the moment had plans, certainly a few weeks ago, they may be changing as you go through this weekend but certainly the plan was for business as usual with the hand washing and the ventilation is on
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those things in place but the way things are going in scotland, you know, head teachers and school leaders across the country are just wondering if there's more that can be done to actually stop this virus ripping through schools in the way that it looks like it's doing at the moment. . ~ that it looks like it's doing at the moment. ., ,, , ., ., that it looks like it's doing at the moment. ., ~' , ., ., ., that it looks like it's doing at the moment. ., ,, ., ., , moment. thank you for “oining us. pulled gosling, * moment. thank you for “oining us. pulled gosling, head _ moment. thank you forjoining us. pulled gosling, head teacher- moment. thank you forjoining us. pulled gosling, head teacher of. pulled gosling, head teacher of exeter road primary school in exmouth. let's take a look at what's happening at the paralympics in tokyo. it's day four and 56 medals have been up for grabs, and a british husband and wife have each broken the world record in their respective cycling events. lora fachie secured her gold—winning achievementjust half—an—hour after her spouse, neil, seen here, set a new record in the men's b 1000 metres time trial. china are celebrating after liu cuiqing won the women's 400 metres in the t—eleven category.
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and, dutch athlete fleurjong broke the world record in the long jump t—sixty—four — with a leap of 6.16m. let's go live to tokyo — and speak to the bbc�*s rachael latham. there is a new golden couple in time? ., ., , , , ., .,, time? that absolutely is and it was somethin: time? that absolutely is and it was something that _ time? that absolutely is and it was something that both _ time? that absolutely is and it was something that both of— time? that absolutely is and it was something that both of them - time? that absolutely is and it was | something that both of them feared would never come because both of them have had problems before at paralympic games missing out on gold medals and the thought that might happen again here in tokyo. but it didn't. they performed their absolute best and are bringing home gold medals for great britain and also at the velodrome a world record was set in the team sprint and that was set in the team sprint and that was kid dean cox, jacco van gass and jodie condi. they broke that world record got another medal for great britain. . ~' , ., , record got another medal for great britain. ., ,, i. , .
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—— levee. -- levee. -- x-ray. the headlines on bbc news... the us hits back against islamic state in afghanistan with a drone strike — following thursday's deadly attack at kabul airport. meanwhile, the uk's evacuation in afghanistan reaches its final stages — the head of britain's armed forces says it's been a success: a recipe for covid chaos — government plans for schools are criticised by education unions who fear a rise in coronavirus infections. looking ida has brought heavy wins looking ida has brought heavy wins and vain into cuba as it heads into the gulf of mexico.
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winds at 80 mph and torrential rain, the western coast of cuba the first place hurricane ida makes landfall. flash floods and mudslides also expected injamaica and the cayman islands. but this is not ida at her worst. she's expected to become extremely dangerous when she hits the southern united states this weekend. it's going to travel over some extraordinarily warm water, over an area we call the loop current. it basically is a superhighway of incredibly warm water all the way to the shores of louisiana, and along the way, that's just going to feed energy into the storm and they're expecting rapid intensification of the storm. right now, it has 80 miles per hour. well, they expect it to come onto the shores of louisiana with winds of 140mph, making it a category 4 hurricane. ida will arrive 16 years to the day since hurricane katrina hit, when 80% of new orleans was flooded and almost 2,000 people lost their lives. hurricane ida is not expected to cause such devastation. though the winds will be stronger, the wall of water is not expected to be as high as that that
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submerged the city in 2005. but the authorities in new orleans are not taking any chances. at this time, i will be — and i am — calling for mandatory evacuation of all areas outside of our levee protection system. all areas outside of our levee protection system, definitely mandatory evacuation. some in areas protected by levees are staying put. but in the path of the storm, they're preparing for the worst. gail maclellan, bbc news. a parole board in california has recommended that the man who assassinated robert f kennedy, the brother of presidentjohn f kennedy, should be released from prison.
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sirhan sirhan has served more than 50 years injail for the killing in 1968. the recommendation does not mean sirhan will be freed automatically — it would have to be approved by the governor of california. a shortage of lorry drivers has led to fast food chains like mcdonald's, kfc and nandos running out of popular products but the business secretary has rejected calls for immigration rules to be temporarily loosened to ease the problem. instead kwasi kwarteng wants employers to use incentives like new training schemes and higher salaries to attract uk—based workers. our business correspondent, katy austin reports. single—use plastic cutlery, plates and polystyrene cups could be banned in england, under new plans to tackle pollution. the government will launch a public consultation this autumn, following an eu ban injuly and plans for similar moves in scotland, wales and northern ireland already announced. some campaigners say measures need to go further and faster though. joining me now is michael smith, joint owner and managing director of the venus company, which runs a number of beach cafes in devon and cornwall... thank you forjoining us. what do you think about single use plastic?
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single use plastic is something that should have been banned many, many years ago. there are loads of alternatives and i welcome the proposal, albeit probably ten years too late. ., proposal, albeit probably ten years too late, ., proposal, albeit probably ten years too late. ., i. ., proposal, albeit probably ten years too late. ., ,, ., i. too late. so, what you do in your business? _ too late. so, what you do in your business? welcome _ too late. so, what you do in your business? welcome that - too late. so, what you do in your business? welcome that we - too late. so, what you do in your| business? welcome that we have too late. so, what you do in your - business? welcome that we have never used lastic business? welcome that we have never used plastic cutlery _ business? welcome that we have never used plastic cutlery or _ business? welcome that we have never used plastic cutlery or plastic _ used plastic cutlery or plastic plates. we never used any of the things that were identified in that list of things that are going to be banned because, to be honest, they are things that are fairly obviously no—brainers in terms of the environment so technology has moved on on quite a way and we keep learning about different alternatives. currently, the bigger users and the bigger problems within our world of catering are hot cups, single use hot cups, lids, things
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like straws, which have now been banned, so we have gone, we adopt technology as soon as it becomes available. currently in our hot cups, for example, we use a new product that is fully compatible so we have focused very heavily on home compostable packaging and materials to avoid the possibility as we operate on beaches. with investment in the world the majority of people do not put —— with the best will in the world the majority of people do not always put things in the rubbish bin. 50 not always put things in the rubbish bin, y., ., not always put things in the rubbish bin. ., not always put things in the rubbish bin. so you say that you adopt new technology — bin. so you say that you adopt new technology as _ bin. so you say that you adopt new technology as soon _ bin. so you say that you adopt new technology as soon as _ bin. so you say that you adopt new technology as soon as it _ bin. so you say that you adopt new technology as soon as it becomes. technology as soon as it becomes available but you have never used plastic cutlery plastic plates so they have been alternatives, obviously, for a very long time. how have you done it through the course of the business? it is have you done it through the course of the business?— of the business? it is really having a mindset. — of the business? it is really having a mindset, first _ of the business? it is really having a mindset, first of _ of the business? it is really having a mindset, first of all. _ of the business? it is really having a mindset, first of all. our- of the business? it is really having| a mindset, first of all. our mission is a company is to be the greenest beach cafe and shop operator so that is, sort of, at the heart of what we
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believe in and so immediately you reject something that doesn't mean that criteria, albeit sometimes you have to do because not always it is an alternative. coming back to the hot cups, there is now a new technology to language cup with something called p h a and that is fully compostable and will compost in a home compost heap and if it goes out onto the beach or in the water —— to line the coffee cup. if it goes out onto the beach or in the water it will disappear within about 6-8 water it will disappear within about 6—8 weeks. i5 water it will disappear within about 6—8 weeks. is it water it will disappear within about 6-8 weeks. , ., water it will disappear within about 6-8 weeks-— water it will disappear within about 6-8 weeks. , ., , , 6-8 weeks. is it more expensive? if ou sate 6-8 weeks. is it more expensive? if you sate is — 6-8 weeks. is it more expensive? if you sate is about _ 6-8 weeks. is it more expensive? if you sate is about a _ 6-8 weeks. is it more expensive? if you sate is about a mindset, - 6-8 weeks. is it more expensive? if you sate is about a mindset, why i you sate is about a mindset, why aren't other companies embracing it? it is absolutely a cost factor. the hot cup probably costs 50% more, maybe, then the plastic lined cup. the actual process itself, i think, is about four times more expensive to produce, but that is fairly common in new technologies. the
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early part of the technology is always expensive but, at the end of the day, if you don't believe in something and go down a route where you want to find the right solution and the right solution is no plastic then you need to support the industries that are trying to help us and our environment for the future. . ~ us and our environment for the future. ., ~' , ., , us and our environment for the future. ., ,, i. , . ., future. thank you very much for “oininr future. thank you very much for joining us. _ future. thank you very much for joining us, michael— future. thank you very much for joining us, michael smith - future. thank you very much for joining us, michael smith of- future. thank you very much for joining us, michael smith of the venus company. feeding birds is big business with people spending more than 250 million pounds a year on bird food in the uk. but are we doing more harm than good? new evidence suggests that supplementary feeding could disrupt a delicate ecological balance beyond our windowsills and gardens. it's because it attracts dominant species to compete with lower—ranking birds which we really want to save and encourage. 0ur science correspondent victoria gill reports.
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a welcome dose of nature on our doorsteps, window ledges and in our gardens. in the uk we spent more than £250 million every year on food for our feathered friends. but there's a limited number of familiar resident species that eat the thousands of tonnes of peanuts, seeds and suet that we put out for the birds, and scientists now say this constant supply of supplementary food could have boosted the population of those species at the expense of others. an ongoing rise in the population of great tits and blue tits, for example, could be costly for some of the birds that we don't often see in our gardens. i would worry a psychologist is that by providing commerce auto, unlimited feed for species like blue and grey tips we impact on the species that complete with blue and great tips. the two other species of tips. people may not have heard of them. one is called a mashed hit and one is called a willow tip. they are among the fastest declining birds in the uk. blue and grey tips may be called a dominant species where this mask and willow tips are subordinate species so basically in battles for food and west site it is the blue
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and great tips that come out on top. in cities, for example, the lack of other natural foods forces means that species like house sparrows are having to depend on is feeders. but something the scientists they might do more ecological good is if those of us who are lucky enough to have gardens let them grow wild in plant native fruits and berries. facing our own piece of habitat, they say, could provide a haven for many more species than hiding hanging out at a bird feeder. victoria gill, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with 0wain wyn evans hello, hello everyone. i do hope you are doing all right. now, over the next couple of days,
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we arejoined by an area of high pressure, which for most of us, we'll lead to dry, settled conditions. let's have a quick look at the headline — there we go. i think most of us will see both of these things — the dry weather and the sunny spells. it's not a completely clear—cut story, however, and, of course, for many of us, it's a bank holiday weekend. so all eyes on the weather forecast as far as that goes. you can see this gap in the cloud here on the satellite image. that's because of the high pressure. it's keeping these weather fronts away, keeping areas of low pressure at bay and it will continue to do so over the next couple of days. let's have a look at the finer detail, then. breezy across south—eastern parts of england. we may catch the odd shower here as well. dry for most of us. any mist and fog patches will continue to lift and clear through this afternoon. the exception, i think, being across parts of northern ireland, western coastal parts of scotland in particular, some low cloud, mist and fog will linger here. there we go — quick look at the winds there. and, you know, we're in a relatively mild air mass at the moment, so temperatures probably getting to around 20 or 21 celsius at best, cooler where we see that cloud, and, of course, breezier along the
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south—eastern coast in particular. now through this evening we'll see the return of some low cloud, some mist and fog as well, especially across parts of northern ireland, scotland. this will want to, kind of, extend down as well into northern parts of england. not as chilly as last night, however, with our lows tonight 11 or 12 celsius. so let's return to the pressure chart — there's the high, still with us for now and for the next couple of days. it is shifting a little bit further towards the west, however, and that will draw in a bit more of a breeze along those eastern coastal parts. we'll keep you posted. stay safe. see you soon.
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forcing the evacuation of high risk areas? british husband and wife not only win golds but break the world records in their respective cycling events? now on bbc news it's time for dateline london.
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hello and welcome to dateline london. i'm martine croxall. this week, we discuss the unfolding tragedy in afghanistan and we ask do extinction rebellion's two weeks of disruptive demonstrations here in london help or hinder the response to the climate crisis? our guests, the frenchjournalist and commentator mark roche, the north american broadcaster and writerjeffrey kofman and with me in the studio, still suitably distance, is the bbc�*s chief environment correspondentjustin rowlatt. now, justin covered afghanistan for almost four years of course as the bbc�*s south asia correspondent. he was in a mortar attack by the taliban, so he is well placed to talk to us about the events of this week. welcome to all of you. and so let's start with that then, shall we? on thursday, a suicide bomb attack at kabul airport targeted people desperate to flee the country after the taliban takeover.
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90 people were killed, mostly afghan civilians,

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