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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 28, 2021 7:00pm-7:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the last uk flight to evacuate civilians from afghanistan leaves kabul. the ministry of defence says the final planes to leave will be for diplomatic staff and military personnel. the us military says a strike by one of its drones has resulted in the deaths of �*two high profile�* targets following thursday's attack at kabul airport, which killed as many as 170 people. tens of thousands flee for safety in the us as hurricane ida intensifies as it approaches louisiana. coming as it approaches louisiana. up later in sport, manc
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city coming up later in sport, manchester city get the biggest win over arsenal as the gunners at sink to the bottom of the premier league. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the uk's last evacuation flight purely for civilians has left the afghan capital kabul. the head of the armed forces, general sir nick carter, said it's "heartbreaking" that british troops haven't been able to rescue everybody. he said hundreds of eligible people have been left behind. the american—led airlift of those trying to escape taliban rule is due to end on tuesday. here's our diplomatic correspondent, caroline hawley. the race to finish an unprecedented rescue mission is almost done.
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the pentagon says more than 110,000 people have been airlifted out of the country in the past two weeks by us forces and its allies. among the planes leaving kabul airport today, the last british evacuation flight for civilians. we've done an extraordinaryjob to evacuate as many as we have, but i'm afraid it's absolutely heartbreaking that we can't bring everybody out. and i think that point�*s been made very strongly certainly by the defence secretary and others over the last ten days or so. personally, i've probably had over 100 messages from different afghans who i know in my long association with the country, and many of those friends of mine won't make it out. and for me, not a day passes without me having a bit of a tear in my eye about all of that. day after day, british personnel have been processing afghans desperate to escape. altogether, nearly 15,000 people have been brought out by the raf — british nationals and afghans who'd worked with the uk, along with their families.
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but hundreds have not been able to reach the airport, afghans whose lives are now at grave risk. it's time to close this phase of the operation now, but we haven't forgotten the people who still need to leave. we'll continue to do everything we can to help them. nor have we forgotten the brave, decent people of afghanistan. they deserve to live in peace and security. at raf brize norton this morning, british personnel arriving back on uk soil. we're told the last military flight will have left kabul. the last diplomats will be out. over the past 20 years, more than 100,000 troops served in afghanistan. a56 british lives were lost. the mission began by ousting the taliban from their power, but ends in a rush to get home on a timetable dictated by the militants. caroline hawley, bbc news. well, those who were eligible to leave — but have been left behind —
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must now decide whether to stay in afghanistan and live under taliban rule, or try to find other ways of fleeing the country. 0ur correspondent secunder kermani reports from kabul. 0utside kabul airport, warning shots ring out. 0utside kabul airport, warning shots ring out. since thursday's awful suicide bombing by the local branch of the islamic state group, the crowds here have grown smaller, but some still remain, desperate to get out of the country. tens of thousands have been evacuated. these afghans escorted by the taliban. others, however, are being left behind... ..like this pizza shop ownerfrom essex. he'd travelled to kabul to help try and take his afghan national wife and young children home. i got in yesterday, and they said stay away from the airport and stay in a safe place. and today, i was calling,
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but nobody answered. elsewhere in kabul, the city remains unusually quiet. the is attack has left many fearing they could be further bloodshed. the united states today said it killed two key is operatives in a drone strike in the east of the country. everyday life in kabul is growing increasingly difficult. increasingly difficult, with banks closed for nearly two weeks now. this is one of the handful of cash machines still working. we are not begging the bank staff to give us money. this is our own money to get — but we have family, we have children. if we don't have money, how should i prepare bread for my family? translation: when i see what has become of the country, i feel- it's impossible to live here. everything is becoming more expensive. - i feel like i'm suffocating. the taliban swept into kabul
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unexpectedly easily, but governing this city and the rest of the country is likely to be a far bigger challenge. the group says it will take time for lives to stabilise. one of the few businesses not complaining, this taliban member selling flags. others are still anxiously waiting to see what life under their rule will look like. secunder kermani, bbc news, kabul. this evening, we have received images from the location where it's reported that the drone strike hit. the pictures, taken by an afghan media agency, ariana news afghanistan, show the aftermath of the us airstrike in afghanistan's nangahar province that the us says resulted in the deaths of �*two high—profile' targets. the strike took place following the attack at kabul airport on thursday, which is reported to have
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several witnesses have been speaking to local media at the scene. translation: it was two o'clock in the morning when we heard the sound and saw the place was on fire. then we saw three people were dead. 0ne place was on fire. then we saw three people were dead. one was a man and one was a woman, one was a child. another woman was in a very bad condition. �* ,, �* condition. translation: these people _ condition. translation: these people were - condition. translation: | these people were among condition. translation: - these people were among our neighbours and lived here for almost three _ neighbours and lived here for almost three months. the incident took place _ three months. the incident took place at — three months. the incident took place at two p:m.. we found out three _ place at two p:m.. we found out three people have been killed. 0ur correspondent nomia iqbal is in washington. nomia, how clear is us intelligence that this drone strike has killed these two high—profile targets you're talking about? these two high-profile targets you're talking about?- these two high-profile targets you're talking about? there was a pentauon you're talking about? there was a pentagon briefing _ you're talking about? there was a pentagon briefing and _ you're talking about? there was a pentagon briefing and there - you're talking about? there was a pentagon briefing and there was l pentagon briefing and there was confidence that they got who they wanted in this strike. it was a singular strike. the name gerhard
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province borders with pakistan and john kirby said although he didn't give him much detail, he called them planners and facilitators —— nangarhar province. i think the assumption is they probably had some sort of connection. also, there aren't any known casualties, but he said that this strike was based on intelligence. they are pretty confident that they got what they wanted, but they haven't ruled out more strikes. fin wanted, but they haven't ruled out more strikes.— wanted, but they haven't ruled out more strikes. on that point, what is their intelligence _ more strikes. on that point, what is their intelligence telling _ more strikes. on that point, what is their intelligence telling them - their intelligence telling them about fears of further attacks? there was an alert issued thus night by the us embassy, telling americans to stay away from the airport. when we got that alert, the day after that awful bombing happened. america
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is really concerned that isis k could strike again. you've got this looming deadline, and it's quite an extraordinary position that president biden has find himself in, because he's saying to america we want out, we want to get out of and afghanistan. we don't want any more military acted —— action. all this in a country that's so unstable, so volatile. we have the taliban breathing down their neck. they have condemned america for this strike because they want to show they're governing the country. they don't want this happening even if isis k is an avowed enemy. so, this is quite an extraordinary position that mr biden is in. the political pressure on him here is the huge. a lot of politicians, particularly the
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republican party, say this entire evacuation mission is a disaster. they were buried in the way america relies on the taliban to get people out. even today, they confirmed and seem pretty palm though my confident they want —— pretty confident they will get everyone out. they want -- pretty confident they will get everyone out.— will get everyone out. thank you very much- _ will get everyone out. thank you very much. we'll— will get everyone out. thank you very much. we'll be _ will get everyone out. thank you very much. we'll be back - will get everyone out. thank you very much. we'll be back with i will get everyone out. thank you | very much. we'll be back with her coverage of afghanistan very weakly. hurricane ida has intensified over the warm waters of the gulf of mexico as it heads for the us coast. tens of thousands of people in louisiana have fled for safety. some roads are at a virtual standstill. the us national hurricane center says ida is likely to be an extremely dangerous major hurricane when it makes landfall in louisiana. we can speak to tim milnar, a veteran extreme weather chaser and director of the cyclone research group, a nonprofit that takes weather data from the worst parts of landfalling hurricanes.
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thank you very much forjoining us on bbc news today. it will not be lost on people that tomorrow is 16 years since hurricane katrina hit new orleans, flooding 80% of the city. and hate 80% of the city more than 1800 people killed. compare this hurricane strength to katrina. i must say i do remember they vividly describe the fact that it was so long ago. new orleans is a city of roughly 300 to 330,000 people. what many haven't heard is katrina was the most successful peace time evacuation in american history, despite the fact there was such a loss of life. new 0rleans's new 0rlea ns's vulnerability lies because...
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new 0rleans's vulnerability lies because... the entire city is rounded by a levee system to withstand a category three hurricane. they would literally fill up hurricane. they would literally fill up like a bathtub, flooding the entire area.— up like a bathtub, flooding the entire area. , ., , , , entire area. obviously, those levees were strengthened _ entire area. obviously, those levees were strengthened after _ entire area. obviously, those levees were strengthened after katrina, - entire area. obviously, those levees| were strengthened after katrina, but what can you tell us out about these areas outside the levee system? unfortunately, a lot of this area is water from the mississippi river. very sloppy marshland. fortunately, that area outside of the new orleans area is sparsely populated, so had to evacuate that area, it's not really a big to do to evacuate the small towns and villages. either
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into new 0rlea ns small towns and villages. either into new orleans or further, small towns and villages. either into new orleans orfurther, where the elevation is a little bit higher. the elevation is a little bit hiaher. . ~ the elevation is a little bit hiaher. ., ~ i. ~ ., higher. tim, thank you. tim milnar from the cyclone _ higher. tim, thank you. tim milnar from the cyclone research - higher. tim, thank you. tim milnar from the cyclone research group. l you're watching bbc news. meanwhile, here in the uk, the latest coronavirus figures from the government show there were 32,406 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means on average, there were 34,226 new cases per day in the last week. 133 deaths were recorded in the past 2a hours, with an average of 112 deaths a day in the past week. 0n vaccinations, 88.2% of adults in the uk have now had their firstjab, and 78.2% have had both doses now.
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with large crowds expected to flock to beaches and festivals over the bank holiday weekend, there are concerns about rising covid infection rates. public health officials in some areas are calling on holidaymakers to take lateral flow tests before travelling. phillip norton reports from scarborough. ice creams and sand castles, with a strong message of hands, face, space, and take a test. the temperature was well into the 20s in scarborough today. the first bank holiday weekend in england since coronavirus restrictions were lifted. i've got one vaccination — you're doubled, aren't you? yeah. we take all the precautions we can. but we know the sun's good for everybody, so it's nice to be out and about. like many areas, north yorkshire council has asked visitors to take a lateral flow test before coming to results. and if they found they were busy, to consider going elsewhere. but in the south—west of england, that message has been taken even further. infection rates in devon
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and cornwall have spiked, and with a number of festivals taking place and a busy holiday season, extra government support and testing is being provided from monday. elsewhere, thousands of music fans are enjoying the reading and leeds festivals, where there is also a chance to grab a jab. we want to take every opportunity to get as many people vaccinated as possible. especially at the moment, we're targeting the younger age group and where better than to come to a place like this, where the majority of the population is under 20, under 30? festival fun and busy beaches. health officials are hoping the stay safe message has been taken on board. phillip norton, bbc news, scarborough. coronavirus plans for schools in england have been described as "a recipe for chaos" by education unions, who say they will not be enough to prevent a rise in infections. the government said it has updated its advice on how to respond
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to an outbreak with minimum disruption to education. members of the scottish greens have backed a deal which will see the partyjoin the scottish government with the snp. patrick harvie and lorna slater, pictured here with first minister nicola sturgeon, said the agreement promoted a �*sustainable scotland that works for everyone'. the co—leaders will both become ministers in the scottish government. it's the first time the greens have entered government in the uk. 0ur scotland correspondent, jamie mcivor, outlines what lead to the formation of the new power sharing agreement and what it means going forward. the snp were just short of a majority at holyrood after may's election, but they have governed successfully as a minority administration twice before. certainly, the two parties seem to believe it was win—win to work much more closely together. in the past, the snp had sometimes relied on support on an issue by issue basis from the scottish greens
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to get various votes through parliament. now, this deal isn't a formal coalition, though it looks a bit like a coalition in some respects. instead, it's being described as a power—sharing partnership. what does it mean? well, the two co—leaders of the party, lorna slater and patrick harvey, will both be offered junior ministerial positions in the scottish government. we will find out what these positions are next week, and the greens will support the snp when it comes to any matter of confidence or on the scottish budget. but at the same time, they won't need to support the snp policy in some areas such as fox hunting and aviation policy. and the greens certainly feel they will be able to see some of their own priorities put into action, notjust on tackling climate change, but also when it comes to rent control and social housing. i think it was that sense that they had the opportunity to put
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some of their beliefs and principles into action, which explains why there was an overwhelming vote in support of the move by the green party members in scotland — more than 80% voted in favour. let's return to our top story, the situation in afghanistan. meanwhile, those who are trying to flee to safety in afghanistan face a growing humanitarian crisis, with families at risk of malnutrition, disease and the ongoing threat of covid—19. let's speak to 0rlaith minogue, who's the senior conflict and humanitarian advocacy advisor for save the children. thanks forjoining us on bbc news. i just want to get a picture, or all your staff out of afghanistan, but your staff out of afghanistan, but you have afghan staff still in the country? you have afghan staff still in the count ? , . ., country? yes, so the children have approximately _
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country? yes, so the children have approximately 1800 _ country? yes, so the children have approximately 1800 staff - country? yes, so the children have approximately 1800 staff inside . country? yes, so the children have| approximately 1800 staff inside the country, and there security is our top priority at the moment. find country, and there security is our top priority at the moment. and are these mainly _ top priority at the moment. and are these mainly afghan _ top priority at the moment. and are these mainly afghan staff _ top priority at the moment. and are these mainly afghan staff or - top priority at the moment. and are these mainly afghan staff or do - top priority at the moment. and are these mainly afghan staff or do you | these mainly afghan staff or do you still have some international staff in the country? i’d still have some international staff in the country?— in the country? i'd rather not go into details. _ in the country? i'd rather not go into details, but _ in the country? i'd rather not go into details, but predominantlyl into details, but predominantly afghan staff. we have staff across the country in a number of provinces. we have a very devastated staff inside the country urging to restart services —— very dedicated. we've listed and our viewers are aware of the numerous challenges facing charities working in afghanistan. what have you been able to learn from staff on the ground about the extra pressure that is on them now? it must be incredibly challenging. them now? it must be incredibly challenging-— them now? it must be incredibly challenging. absolutely. no, you mentioned _ challenging. absolutely. no, you mentioned it. _ challenging. absolutely. no, you mentioned it. this _ challenging. absolutely. no, you mentioned it. this is _ challenging. absolutely. no, you mentioned it. this is an - challenging. absolutely. no, you| mentioned it. this is an incredibly complex situation. half of the
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population of afghanistan were in need of humanitarian assistance, including 10 million children. the impact of covid—19, drought since june, as well as decades of conflict combined with this violence means people are facing a desperate situation. more than 5.5 million afghan children are predicted to face levels of hunger in the second half of this year. this is prior to week that weeks —— recent weeks. insecurity and the uncertainty, and humanitarian services are not being delivered on the ground. 0rganisations are unable to deliver in the situation are committed to stay in the liver, but we're accessing the safety to ensure, so that's happening. —— stay in the
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region. that's happening. -- stay in the reuion. ~ �* , that's happening. -- stay in the reaion.~ �* , .,, that's happening. -- stay in the reaion.~ �* , ., , ., ,. , region. we've seen lots of pictures for afghans — region. we've seen lots of pictures for afghans who _ region. we've seen lots of pictures for afghans who have _ region. we've seen lots of pictures for afghans who have been - region. we've seen lots of pictures for afghans who have been on - region. we've seen lots of pictures | for afghans who have been on those evacuation flights arriving in various points of the world, with local people there putting together packages for them. these people have generally left with just a suitcase, the clothes they were wearing, but how difficult will it be to get aid into afghanistan and to what extent do you see charities like save the children having discussions with the taliban to facilitate the work you're doing? it’s taliban to facilitate the work you're doing?— taliban to facilitate the work you're doing? taliban to facilitate the work ou're doinu? m .., . you're doing? it's crucial that you humanitarian _ you're doing? it's crucial that you humanitarian aid _ you're doing? it's crucial that you humanitarian aid can _ you're doing? it's crucial that you humanitarian aid can resume - you're doing? it's crucial that you humanitarian aid can resume in i you're doing? it's crucial that you i humanitarian aid can resume in the country as quickly as possible, and many organisations are absolutely determined to do that. we've been working in the country since 1976, including in promises that are
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traditionally taliban controlled. we have a lot of experience in this context and many other senses of conflict, so we know we have the experience to be able to go out there and reach people. we're determined to do the same in the reeks and years ahead. what needs to happen is the international community needs to work alongside the united nations to make sure we can guarantee that safe unfettered humanitarian access on the ground. also the neighbouring borders need to remain open to make sure people can flee if they wish to do so. to make sure people are able to reach those goods and services that they need. we're particularly concerned about food and nutrition services for children and their families. this is a real crisis. we spoke to i think more than 600 families who are displaced in kabul at the start of
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this month, and everything will family spoke about going into debt to afford basic food items. some mention selling their possessions. they don't have very much to sell, but they have been trying. 0thers mentioned cutting back on meals. this is a massive concern. a number of provinces have spoken of price hikes on food items such as flour. with banking closures and atms not working, this situations look likely to get worse. that simply can't be allowed to happen. flow of goods and people needs to be a top priority. 0rlaith, thank you very much for your time. the royal college of nursing says its annual congress will be held online—only
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after serious allegations of sexual harassment emerged. it says making its meeting a virtual event is the best way to safeguard its members. simon jones is here. the royal college represents almost half a million nurses, health care workers, nursing students and health are professionals. now, they were due to gather around 200 of them in person for its annual congress in liverpool — a three day event that was due to take place next month. now, they discussed things such as the coronavirus pandemic. they were due to discuss the effect of long covid, the effect it has on health care workers. but we've now been told that event has been cancelled and it will be online only. the reason that has been given are serious allegations of sexual harassment. i spoke to the rcn. they didn't want to give any further details about how widespread these allegations were, who exactly might be involved. but they have told us in a statement they've taken these allegations very seriously, they've reacted promptly,
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as soon as they were made aware of these allegations. they say they needed to do that to protect the delegates who were due to attend the event, and they also say they're going to carry out a widespread review as part of their cultural change. simonjones reporting. food producers are warning that worker shortages caused by a perfect storm of issues including brexit changes and the pandemic could threaten availability at christmas. the government is facing growing calls for a temporary visa scheme to try to fill the gap. our business correspondent, katy austin, reports. preparing these turkeys for christmas involves 100 extra workers who used to come in from eastern europe. because of brexit, we don't have that guaranteed labour that we've had for the past 30 years. the bigger companies that supply all the supermarkets, they had made the decision to cut their production by between 20% and 25%, which is huge. so, there will absolutely be a shortage of quality british turkeys.
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other areas of food production are also having problems. a shortage of meat processors has caused a backlog of pigs on farms. the government is basically saying that furlough is coming to an end at the end of september, so you can have all of those people and that will resolve your issues. now, those people aren't living in areas where the manufacturing plants are, they don't have the right skills, and i suspect a lot of them wouldn't want to go and work in food manufacturing plants. food industry trade bodies warn there's now a chronic labour shortage across the whole supply chain. this business grows, imports and distributes fresh fruit and veg. there's everything here from carrots to pomegranates, and a lot of it ends up in high street restaurants. but here at this distribution centre, they're 20% short of staff. we are definitely going to start seeing more i supermarket shelves empty, restaurant plates empty. - and then, the big concern ongoing
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from that is christmas. _ he supports calls for a temporary visa scheme to bring in food workers and lorry drivers from europe. isn't it more important to build a sustainable workforce from within the uk, and ultimately pay them more? i'm more than happy to do that. but if the era of cheap labour is over, so tool is the era of cheap food. the government says the supply chain is resilient and it wants to see employers invest in the domestic workforce. but some firms are getting increasingly worried about their ability to keep our shelves and plates full. katy austin, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith—lucas. it's been warm in the sunshine today. the dry theme continues for the next week or so, just subtle �*s changes. sunday brings us more of the same.
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but we are seeing is more cloud working in from the north. it's here that temperatures will fall lois first thing. lowest still quite a brisk breeze on the east coast, and for the southeast. temperature is between 15 to 21 in cardiff. no great changes until monday, best of anything to be —— any sunshine to the west.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... the last uk flight
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to evacuate civilians from afghanistan leaves kabul — the ministry of defence says the final planes to leave will be for diplomatic staff and military personnel. the us military says a strike by one of its drones has resulted in the deaths of "two high—profile" targets, following thursday's attack at kabul airport which killed as many as 170 people. tens of thousands of people flee in the us as hurricane ida approaches louisiana. now on bbc news it's time for the film review. hello, and welcome to the film review with me, anna smith. i'm filling in for mark kermode to review this week's releases.

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