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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 28, 2021 10:30pm-11:01pm BST

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hello. this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. we'll be taking a look at the papers in a moment after the headlines. downing street says the uk's 20—year military operation in afghanistan has ended tonight. these were some of the last british troops to leave kabul. the evening presidentjoe biden says another attack in afghanistan is imminient. he expects it within the next 36 hours. it comes after the us military says a strike by one of its drones has resulted in the deaths of �*two high—profile�* targets following thursday's attack at kabul airport, which killed as many as 170 people. tens of thousands flee for safety in the us as hurricane ida intensifies as it approaches louisiana. concerns over rising covid infection rates as large crowds
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concerns over rising covid infection rates as large crowds are expected to flock to beaches and festivals over the uk bank holiday weekend. two world records for the british cycling couple, husband and wife lora and neil fachie, who are amongst seven gb paralympians to win gold today. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are rob merrick, deputy political editor of the independent and faiza shaheen, political commentator and former labour parliamentary candidate and non—resident fellow at new york university. well, let's start with a look at those front pages. britain out of afghanistan. the telegraph leads on the exit of uk military personnel from afghanistan after 20 years.
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it writes that the pm promises to honour the sacrifices of those who fell. a look at those left behind — the sunday times focuses on the eruption of a "blame game" in whitehall over the thousands now trapped in afghanistan following the end of the evacuation mission. the final stages of evacuations from afghanistan also lead on the front of tomorrow's observer. it reports on claims that "thousands" of emails from charities and mps detailing afghan�*s efforts to escape that were sent to the foreign office were read and ignored. words of gratitude — "we'll forever be grateful". the express quotes the prime minister speaking about the military�*s evacuation of 15,000 people from afghanistan. �*0ur blood on your hands, boris�* — the words from an afghan translator in hiding lead on the front page of the mirror.
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so, let's begin. rob and faiza, a warm welcome to you this evening. we're going to begin with the sunday telegraph, a dramatic picture of our troopers on one of the last military planes to leave kabul under the headline "britain out of afghanistan." rob, what do you make of this take? i afghanistan.�* rob, what do you make of this take?— of this take? i picture -- a picture tells a thousand _ of this take? i picture -- a picture tells a thousand words. _ of this take? i picture -- a picture tells a thousand words. the - tells a thousand words. the telegraph has the picture that really sums up what happened tonight. these apparently are hundreds of paratroopers who are leaving kabul airport, and i'm not surprised they're probably delighted to get out. we owe them all a huge debt of thanks. it's been an extraordinary effort by these people to evacuate over 15,000 people. so,
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we owe them our thanks, but that's not the whole story. as we know, there are at least 1000 left behind. may be many more, which i think we'll discuss a bit later. that's put some politicians and the firing line. figs put some politicians and the firing line. �* , ., ., ~ put some politicians and the firing line. �* , ., , ., , line. as we look at these images, faiza, line. as we look at these images, faiza. some _ line. as we look at these images, faiza, some of _ line. as we look at these images, faiza, some of the _ line. as we look at these images, faiza, some of the paratroopers l line. as we look at these images, l faiza, some of the paratroopers are smiling, some of them clearly deep in thought. you're wondering what they've experienced, and that headline, as rob was saying, lots of people eligible to come to britain are still there. thejob is not done? are still there. the “ob is not done? w are still there. the “ob is not done? . , are still there. the “ob is not done? ., , ., ., done? no. it is a road flexion across the — done? no. it is a road flexion across the papers _ done? no. it is a road flexion across the papers about - done? no. it is a road flexion across the papers about this. done? no. it is a road flexion l across the papers about this 20 done? no. it is a road flexion - across the papers about this 20 year mark _ across the papers about this 20 year mark -- _ across the papers about this 20 year mark. —— reflection. seeing the work these _ mark. —— reflection. seeing the work these soldiers have done, they must also have _ these soldiers have done, they must also have questions to the politicians over the past 20 years. why isn't —
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politicians over the past 20 years. why isn't the taliban able to come back so quickly? in this article, there _ back so quickly? in this article, there are — back so quickly? in this article, there are quotes from borisjohnson. to be _ there are quotes from borisjohnson. to be honest, they are quite jarring, _ to be honest, they are quite jarring, and seems to really outthink_ jarring, and seems to really outthink with reality. talking about reflecting, but not reflecting —— out of— reflecting, but not reflecting —— out of sync— reflecting, but not reflecting —— out of sync with reality. the responsibility that other countries in the _ responsibility that other countries in the west told this isn't britain out of afghanistan and this isn't the end of our— afghanistan and this isn't the end of our problems. i heard some of my act to— of our problems. i heard some of my act to afghan colleagues talk about the humanitarian crisis, so it's not 'ust the humanitarian crisis, so it's not just about — the humanitarian crisis, so it's not just about the rest it's about the destabilisation in the country which will have _ destabilisation in the country which will have repercussions going forward _ let's talk about those in the sunday
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times, and the afghan blame game. it referred to over thousands left in kabul and soldiers flying home at the end of 20 year mission. take us through what the times is saying. well, one of the things it says is we now expect the other people eligible to come to the uk to somehow find a way to other countries, which will be a long and extraordinarily dangerous journey across afghanistan. perhaps into pakistan or iran, and somehow, they're going to come to the uk. the sunday times says dominic raab has not made proper preparations. he may well have been able to host some refugees before they came to the uk, so that's one criticisms being made. i thought the referring to the
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holiday when the crisis was at his height, something which he seems to regret. viewers may have seen last night on newsnight where boris johnson and dominic raab... dominic raabjust appeared to johnson and dominic raab... dominic raab just appeared to be blindsided or ignorant by what was going on. i caught him asking the woman in charge of the centre what the situation was at the airport, and i thought, mate, you're the foreign secretary. the whole thing epitomise how for all the influence boris johnson and dominic raab have had, they might as well have stayed on holiday. they might as well have stayed on holida . �* , ., ., , holiday. there's a really vivid sto at holiday. there's a really vivid story at the _ holiday. there's a really vivid story at the bottom - holiday. there's a really vivid story at the bottom of - holiday. there's a really vivid story at the bottom of the i holiday. there's a really vivid i story at the bottom of the front page of the sunday times. british troops help last evacuate to climb the fence. it gives you a very strong sense of the absolutely
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desperate situation that people have found themselves in as they have scrambled to try to make it on board a flight. for everyone who's got on, you think about people who are left behind. �* ., ,., ., , behind. and there are so many stories, images _ behind. and there are so many stories, images of— behind. and there are so many stories, images of babies - behind. and there are so many| stories, images of babies being handed — stories, images of babies being handed over barbed wire fences to us soldiers _ handed over barbed wire fences to us soldiers. these are absolutely horrific— soldiers. these are absolutely horrific stories. these are just people — horrific stories. these are just people with families that a few weeks — people with families that a few weeks ago, i couldn't imagine this was the _ weeks ago, i couldn't imagine this was the case. we're told a completely different story by their government and by the west as to what would happen to troops and withdrawing them. they find themselves in this horrific situation, and on the british side, ithink— situation, and on the british side, i think this — situation, and on the british side, i think this article sums up the symbolic— i think this article sums up the symbolic nature that's and several of the _ symbolic nature that's and several of the papers today. unfortunately, there's _ of the papers today. unfortunately, there's been a theme of the way in which _ there's been a theme of the way in which it's— there's been a theme of the way in which it's been handled, whether
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it's dominic raab on holiday, whether— it's dominic raab on holiday, whether it's this horrible stories of refugees already here and hearing about _ of refugees already here and hearing about thousands that have been deported in the last ten years. hearing — deported in the last ten years. hearing about a small child falling from a _ hearing about a small child falling from a window from a block of flax that people were telling authorities this is— that people were telling authorities this is not— that people were telling authorities this is not safe —— block of flats. you've _ this is not safe —— block of flats. you've got — this is not safe —— block of flats. you've got to ask the question about how serious— you've got to ask the question about how serious we are in taking responsibility. there's a line from boris _ responsibility. there's a line from borisjohnson saying he responsibility. there's a line from boris johnson saying he wants to welcome — boris johnson saying he wants to welcome it refugees with open arms, but there _ welcome it refugees with open arms, but there is— welcome it refugees with open arms, but there is a real app from the action— but there is a real app from the action and _ but there is a real app from the action and how prepared we are to fulfil our— action and how prepared we are to fulfil our responsibility and take on afghan refugees. they admitted a very small— on afghan refugees. they admitted a very small number compared to other country~ _ very small number compared to other country~ we _ very small number compared to other country. we talk about the uk and 5000. _ country. we talk about the uk and 5000, but— country. we talk about the uk and 5000, but canada has taken 20,000 initially, _ 5000, but canada has taken 20,000 initially, and pakistan, not a rich
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country~ — initially, and pakistan, not a rich country~ it's_ initially, and pakistan, not a rich country. it's expecting to have 700,000 _ country. it's expecting to have 700,000 refugees come, so this is a crisis _ 700,000 refugees come, so this is a crisis. , , . , ., crisis. just a little bit of the detail from the _ crisis. just a little bit of the detail from the story. - crisis. just a little bit of the l detail from the story. british troops help last evacuee. the report says was injured while working with uk forces in 2011. they spent more than 100 hours trying to find a way to the airport. he was there with his wife, three—month—old baby and three—year—old son. they had almost given up hope of given on board. but in this last —— attempt was held by british troop to climb the fence.
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really dramatic read there. we're seeing very different takes on the front pages from some of the papers. the mirror goes with "our blood on your hands, boris." this was a translator who didn't make it onto the light and is in hiding from the taliban. faiza, i'll get you to start on this one. i guess for all those people who were supposed to get out and haven't, there will be a huge focus now on the detail of what the government is doing to try to actually help them. but it's very difficult with no goods on the ground. difficult with no goods on the round. . ~ difficult with no goods on the round. . ,, , , difficult with no goods on the round. . ~ , , ., ground. yeah, i think the speed at which this is _ ground. yeah, i think the speed at which this is all— ground. yeah, i think the speed at which this is all unfolding - ground. yeah, i think the speed at which this is all unfolding has - ground. yeah, i think the speed at| which this is all unfolding has made it difficult _ which this is all unfolding has made it difficult to evacuate people. but ithink— it difficult to evacuate people. but i think for— it difficult to evacuate people. but i think for the majority of the public, — i think for the majority of the public, at _ i think for the majority of the public, at least the translators,
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the people manning the embassy, the people _ the people manning the embassy, the people that helped british troops, there _ people that helped british troops, there is— people that helped british troops, there is a — people that helped british troops, there is a very clear sense of responsibility. to read this in the mirror, _ responsibility. to read this in the mirror, to — responsibility. to read this in the mirror, to hear that translator is hiding _ mirror, to hear that translator is hiding from the taliban in fear of their— hiding from the taliban in fear of their lives— hiding from the taliban in fear of their lives because the taliban will know— their lives because the taliban will know that — their lives because the taliban will know that they have been helping the british, _ know that they have been helping the british, this really is not a good look— british, this really is not a good look for— british, this really is not a good look for britain. i think this is one _ look for britain. i think this is one story— look for britain. i think this is one story we've heard emerged over the next _ one story we've heard emerged over the next few weeks, and it comes back— the next few weeks, and it comes back to _ the next few weeks, and it comes back to how these people are meant to leave _ back to how these people are meant to leave now. there's apparently "00 _ to leave now. there's apparently "00 the — to leave now. there's apparently 1100 the defence secretary has said are behind. we heard a little bit about— are behind. we heard a little bit about may be pakistan, but it's very unclear~ _ about may be pakistan, but it's very unclear. what is the message we're sending _ unclear. what is the message we're sending to — unclear. what is the message we're sending to people that helped the
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british? _ sending to people that helped the british? now they are being left to the wolves. ., , british? now they are being left to the wolves-— british? now they are being left to the wolves. ., , ,, , , , the wolves. rob, the sunday express toes the wolves. rob, the sunday express aoes with the wolves. rob, the sunday express goes with the — the wolves. rob, the sunday express goes with the prime _ the wolves. rob, the sunday express goes with the prime minister- the wolves. rob, the sunday express goes with the prime minister will- the wolves. rob, the sunday express goes with the prime minister will be l goes with the prime minister will be forever grateful. it focuses on his praise for the british military and their efforts. that's part of the story, as we said at the top. borisjohnson is saying he hopes their efforts will not be in vain. we heard from many veterans, some of them horrifically injured, that they do feel their efforts were in vain. they believe they were going to afghanistan to help create a better society, to ensure the rights of women, to prevent the taliban executing minorities. 0f prevent the taliban executing minorities. of course, if you've given your legs perhaps to that
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cause, you're bound to feel it was in vain if you see all that progress rolled back. it's notjust saying we're grateful, because there is a much deeper story. you would hope that perhaps any newspaper would try to reflect the wider access of the story on the front page, but you won't get this from the sunday express. it won't get this from the sunday ex - ress. , , ., express. it will be interesting to see how the _ express. it will be interesting to see how the various _ express. it will be interesting to see how the various angles - express. it will be interesting to see how the various angles are l see how the various angles are framed. moving on to the observer. ministry ignored frantic pleas to help afghans. as of thousands of e—mails to the foreign office detailing urgent cages of afghans escaping have not been read, including cases flagged by government ministers. the observer has been told. it paints a 0bserver has been told. it paints a picture of the department being overwhelmed, doesn't it? yes. picture of the department being
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overwhelmed, doesn't it? yes, it does, overwhelmed, doesn't it? yes, it does. and _ overwhelmed, doesn't it? yes, it does, and this _ overwhelmed, doesn't it? yes, it does, and this has _ overwhelmed, doesn't it? yes, it does, and this has been - overwhelmed, doesn't it? yes, it does, and this has been one - overwhelmed, doesn't it? yes, it does, and this has been one of l overwhelmed, doesn't it? yes, it i does, and this has been one of the aspects over the last few days. we heard the prime minister claimed the lion's share has made it out of afghanistan. meanwhile, we have many mps saying you simply can't be correct because only a handful of perhaps hundreds of constituents they've raised have actually been successful. they still been desperately trying to secure passage out for their constituents, so here we have evidence perhaps that the second thing i mentioned is true because it appears as if thousands of these e—mails are not even being read, let alone acting upon. some of them appear to be sent by victoria atkins, who had been made the ministerfor afghan atkins, who had been made the minister for afghan settlement. anyone who would have their e—mails read, you would think it would be the minister. but according to the
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observer, it was one of those that 0bserver, it was one of those that played unopened. we've been talking about 5000 e—mails left unopened for many days. that's a figure of about 1100 people will call back and maybe, that's much father. some of the case is — maybe, that's much father. some of the case is being _ maybe, that's much father. some of the case is being put _ maybe, that's much father. some of the case is being put forward, - maybe, that's much father. some of the case is being put forward, would be people who they believe to be eligible. we don't know all of these are people who would've been eligible, but raises concerns about to go back to what i was saying, about the department being overwhelmed by the scale of the events on the ground in afghanistan, the pace of the events on the ground. late afghanistan, the pace of the events on the ground-— afghanistan, the pace of the events onthearound. ~ ., , , on the ground. we don't know because the e-mails — on the ground. we don't know because the e-mails weren't _ on the ground. we don't know because the e-mails weren't open. _ on the ground. we don't know because the e-mails weren't open. it's - on the ground. we don't know because the e-mails weren't open. it'sjust - the e—mails weren't open. it'sjust the e—mails weren't open. it'sjust the basic— the e—mails weren't open. it'sjust the basic thing. to be able to open the basic thing. to be able to open the e-mails — the basic thing. to be able to open the e—mails and see what the problem
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is, it might _ the e—mails and see what the problem is, it might be mps are writing because — is, it might be mps are writing because they have constituents who have family there. we don't know because _ have family there. we don't know because the e—mails weren't opened. let's hope _ because the e—mails weren't opened. let's hope there is transparency and accountability going forward. we find out — accountability going forward. we find out exactly how many people have been— find out exactly how many people have been left behind, how else we can help _ have been left behind, how else we can help them. i think the foreign office _ can help them. i think the foreign office has— can help them. i think the foreign office has been overwhelmed, but 0ffice has been overwhelmed, but actually— office has been overwhelmed, but actually it's not like they didn't know— actually it's not like they didn't know this _ actually it's not like they didn't know this was coming. there were discussions — know this was coming. there were discussions with the us and britain before _ discussions with the us and britain before the — discussions with the us and britain before the summer, and in essence, everyone _ before the summer, and in essence, everyone was on holiday. it's an obscene — everyone was on holiday. it's an obscene level of negligence. to the troops _ obscene level of negligence. to the troops that are there and to the brits— troops that are there and to the brits that — troops that are there and to the brits that are there, but to eskimos —— afghanistan war generally. i think —— afghanistan war generally. think the —— afghanistan war generally. i think the government would —— afghanistan war generally. i think the government would argue it isn't being negligent. clearly, that's a point for discussion. we're going to move away from afghanistan and talk about the only
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other story on the front pages, covid. a pretty worrying stat on the front of the observer, saying cases are 26 times higher than a year ago. the picture is obviously different. many people have been vaccinated. but that's still a very worrying stat, isn't it?— but that's still a very worrying stat, isn't it? yes, it is. i'm sure like many _ stat, isn't it? yes, it is. i'm sure like many peeple. _ stat, isn't it? yes, it is. i'm sure like many people, i've _ stat, isn't it? yes, it is. i'm sure like many people, i've been - stat, isn't it? yes, it is. i'm sure - like many people, i've been enjoying the summer. you go and live life and do the things you use to. sometimes you worry about it and feel a little bit guilty. these figures suggest that we may be all forgotten how serious the covid picture still is. a year ago, before we went into the second wave in the autumn, one in
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every 1900 people in the uk were affected. now it's one and 70. dramatically higher. this figure can only rise when schools and universities go back in september, and chris whitty was warning six or seven weeks ago that restrictions might well have to be reimposed in the autumn. maybe we think it's all over, but it certainly is not. one of the big issues we're going to see is the growing frustration with the vaccination. people who seem very reluctant to go ahead with vaccinating 12—15 —year—olds. i wonder whether we'll seeing the government moving ahead with that vaccination programme in the next few weeks. . . vaccination programme in the next few weeks-— vaccination programme in the next fewweeks. . ., ,. ., few weeks. faiza, some schools have already returned. _ few weeks. faiza, some schools have already returned. about _ few weeks. faiza, some schools have already returned. about to _ few weeks. faiza, some schools have already returned. about to get - few weeks. faiza, some schools have already returned. about to get back. already returned. about to get back to business. ijust wonder, i
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imagine we will talk about this an awful lot, what the mitigations are in place for schools is the vaccination for 12 to 15—year—olds is not approved. it will feed into the discussion of boosterjabs? there are questions about ventilations in school as well. you'll— ventilations in school as well. you'll find _ ventilations in school as well. you'll find stories about schools and saying they're not ready because they have _ and saying they're not ready because they have repairs and need money, they have repairs and need money, they don't— they have repairs and need money, they don't have the right ventilation. we are looking at this in the _ ventilation. we are looking at this in the next — ventilation. we are looking at this in the next few weeks of school is opening _ in the next few weeks of school is opening up, and students go back to university— opening up, and students go back to university as well. there will be a real problem here. on the booster jabs, _ real problem here. on the booster jabs. in— real problem here. on the booster jabs. in rich— real problem here. on the booster jabs, in rich countries, a vast amount— jabs, in rich countries, a vast amount of— jabs, in rich countries, a vast amount of the world doesn't have any vaccines— amount of the world doesn't have any vaccines at— amount of the world doesn't have any vaccines at all. this is a global pandemic _ vaccines at all. this is a global pandemic. the world health organization 's... if you have rich
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countries — organization 's... if you have rich countries with boosterjabs, you will still — countries with boosterjabs, you will still have a situation where you can — will still have a situation where you can get new variants coming up and the _ you can get new variants coming up and the rest — you can get new variants coming up and the rest of the world, but doesn't — and the rest of the world, but doesn't have the vaccine. we have to be careful— doesn't have the vaccine. we have to be careful with overloading vaccines because _ be careful with overloading vaccines because the risk would still be there — because the risk would still be there if— because the risk would still be there if our neighbours and families and other— there if our neighbours and families and other parts of the world are not vaccinated — and other parts of the world are not vaccinated. this is a decision that's— vaccinated. this is a decision that's not— vaccinated. this is a decision that's notjust about vaccinated. this is a decision that's not just about the uk. vaccinated. this is a decision that's notjust about the uk. that's not 'ust about the uk. we're auoin to that's notjust about the uk. we're going to finish _ that's notjust about the uk. we're going to finish with _ that's notjust about the uk. we're going to finish with another- that's notjust about the uk. -- going to finish with another covid related story. the telegraph talks about the chancellor on covid funding demands. it says he's on a collision course with the nhs over its demands for billions of pounds more covid funding. it's not surprising, listening to the doctors, the health bosses talking about how they need more money. they say to cope with the demands of running other services, plus all the catch up from covid as well. in
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running other services, plus all the catch up from covid as well.- catch up from covid as well. in this buduet in catch up from covid as well. in this budget in march, _ catch up from covid as well. in this budget in march, the _ catch up from covid as well. in this budget in march, the chancellor. catch up from covid as well. in this i budget in march, the chancellor gave i think £7 billion more to the nhs, but it was only to last until september because the challenge was so great. it leaves unanswered the question of how much more money will get to the rest of the financial year. i think the health bosses are pushing for a similar amounts. rishi sunak has recently won a high—profile battle to fight overseas aid. he may take £1000 a year away from the forest people through universal credit. i can't see him winning the battle over the nhs. as you say, apart from the fact that covid is not over, this is an enormous backlog of operations. the nhs will definitely need this money. i imagine the chancellor will have to find it. it i imagine the chancellor will have to find it. , , i imagine the chancellor will have to find it. ,, , , ., to find it. it says the trust are worried- _ to find it. it says the trust are worried- if — to find it. it says the trust are worried. if they _ to find it. it says the trust are worried. if they don't - to find it. it says the trust are worried. if they don't get - to find it. it says the trust are worried. if they don't get the | worried. if they don't get the funding, the 13 million waiting list
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becomes much more likely. given that we've just been talking about cases being higher, it sounds like there is going to be unavoidable pressure on the chancellor here to find some more money from somewhere. absolutely. we do have the money. we can borrow _ absolutely. we do have the money. we can borrow it _ absolutely. we do have the money. we can borrow it very cheaply. we have millions _ can borrow it very cheaply. we have millions of— can borrow it very cheaply. we have millions of taxpayers that are not as had _ millions of taxpayers that are not as had as — millions of taxpayers that are not as bad as some have predicted. investing — as bad as some have predicted. investing in the nhs at this time, not only— investing in the nhs at this time, not only to — investing in the nhs at this time, not only to avoid these humongous waiting _ not only to avoid these humongous waiting lists, it will be huge with the public— waiting lists, it will be huge with the public as well. politically and economically, it makes sense. even on a normal— economically, it makes sense. even on a normal year, winter can be very difficult _ on a normal year, winter can be very difficult this — on a normal year, winter can be very difficult. this year, we have
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attired _ difficult. this year, we have attired nhs. —— a tired nhs. we should _ attired nhs. —— a tired nhs. we should think beyond six months and remember— should think beyond six months and remember they were underfunded for ten years— remember they were underfunded for ten years going into the pandemic. we need _ ten years going into the pandemic. we need long—term thinking as well. we are out of time this hour, rob and faiza. thank you very much. rob and faiza will be back at half past 11. for another look at the papers. goodbye for now. good evening. things are staying dry and settled for at least the next week or so with a big area of high pressure firmly in charge of our weather. we have got a warm, sunny day for many areas during saturday. this was the picture in leicestershire a bit earlier. we saw temperatures of 2a degrees across central parts of scotland. sunday, a similar day, again, it's going to be dry and there will be spells of sunshine but there will be more cloud drifting around, particularly in the north. we've got an area of high pressure that's sitting out towards the north—west
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with the winds rotating around that. there is a breeze coming in at the moment off the north sea, so that's going to introduce a little bit more cloud across parts of north—east england and eastern scotland. and then through the course of tonight, that cloud works its way south across scotland, northern england and northern ireland. further south across england and wales, clearer skies through the night so temperatures dipping down to perhaps seven or eight degrees in the coolest spots, but staying in double figures under the cloud further north. so this is how we start sunday morning, we have got that cloud in the north. still that breeze coming in from the north sea, particularly brisk for east anglia and the south—east as well. lighter winds further west and plenty of spells of sunshine for many areas, particularly for england and wales. a little bit more cloud for scotland and northern ireland but there will be some breaks in that cloud, especially towards the west during the afternoon. but top temperatures around about 15 in aberdeen to perhaps 20 in glasgow, 21 in cardiff. as we head to sunday into monday, high pressure stays out towards the north—west, those winds coming in from a north or north—easterly direction. so, they will bring more cloud,
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particularly in the east during the day on monday, where it will be a little bit cool where you're exposed to that breeze off the north sea. so, around some of these east coasts, temperatures generally in the mid to high teens. you'll notice things feel cooler with the gusts of wind at around 30 mph for some areas. lighter winds towards the west and it is here that you'll see the best of any sunshine. the temperature is a touch cooler by the time we get to monday, around about 15 to 21 degrees. things not changing in a hurry through the next few days. tuesday, spot the difference — very similar once again, dry across the board. fairly cloudy, particularly towards the east. best of any breaks in that cloud to be found further west on tuesday. things don't really change much for the week ahead. we've got high pressure still sitting out to the north or north—west, so it is looking dry. there will be spells of sunshine, temperatures generally somewhere between about 17 to 21 degrees. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. another deadly attack at kabul airport is "highly likely" in the next 2a to 66 hours, warns america's president. downing street says the uk's evacuation from afghanistan has ended tonight, bringing a close to 20 years of british military operations in the country. tens of thousands flee for safety in the us as hurricane ida intensifies as it approaches louisiana. members of the scottish greens have backed a deal that could see its leaders in government for the first time in britain. and in cape town, from the townships to the tango, how ballroom dancing has captured the imagination of some residents in one of south africa's
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toughest neighborhoods.

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