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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 29, 2021 11:00am-11:31am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. 20 years after being sent in the last british troops have left have left afg ha nista n. the evacuation in the wake of the taliban taking charge is over. fee effort has been truly humbling to see the hours worked. the exhaustion painted on people's faces. �* , ., exhaustion painted on people's faces. �* ~ ., , faces. but hundreds of afghans eliaible faces. but hundreds of afghans eligible for _ faces. but hundreds of afghans eligible for relocation _ faces. but hundreds of afghans eligible for relocation and - faces. but hundreds of afghans eligible for relocation and uk . eligible for relocation and uk nationals have been left behind and the government has been criticised for not having done more sooner. president biden warns another attack on kabul airport is "highly likely" within the next 2a hours as us forces prepare to leave. forecasters warn a storm approaching louisiana could be more powerful than hurricane katrina, which devastated new orleans 16 years ago.
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dilemma for doctors a severe shortage of test tubes in the uk means patients needing urgent blood tests could face delays. at the paralympics great britain's hannah cockroft wins her third successive 100m gold. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the uk prime minister, borisjohnson, has paid tribute to the military and other personnel involved in the evacuation operation in afghanistan. mrjohnson described their efforts as "heroic" and said the uk departure from afghanistan was "the culmination of a mission unlike anything we've seen in our lifetimes". an raf plane carrying the final contingent of british troops
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and diplomats left kabul airport last night bringing to an end the uk's 20 year military presence in the country. more than 15,000 people have been airlifted out of afghanistan by the uk in the past fornight. but hundreds of afghans eligible for relocation and uk nationals have been left behind. us presidentjoe biden has warned that another attack at kabul airport could come in the next 36 hours. the first of our reports comes from jon donnison. packing up and heading out. the last british soldiers and diplomats have now left afghanistan, bringing an end to a military operation that lasted just shy of two decades. in recent days, more than 15,000 people have been evacuated by the raf. british nationals and afghans who had worked with the uk, along with their families. but hundreds who wanted to get out have been left behind. i don't think there's
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a certain person in kabul or from her majesty's government who could have given more the last two or two and half weeks. the effort has been truly humbling. to see the exhaustion on peoples faces we have tried our best. we have absolutely tried our best. sadly, it has not closed the gap that should not take away from the pride in what we've achieved. it was 2001 in the aftermath of 9/11 that the first british troops arrived in afghanistan, part of a us—led mission. one of the first objectives, to oust the taliban from power. 20 years on, it's the islamist group who are still calling the shots. but in an open letter to troops this weekend, the prime minister said the uk's involvement in afghanistan had kept al-qaeda from our doorfor two decades.
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"we are all safer as a result," he said. "you should feel immense pride." heavy gunfire. but as we leave, the shadow of terror still looms. tension remains high at kabul airport, where thursday's bomb attack by a local branch of the so—called islamic state group killed at least 170 people, and america is warning of a high chance of another attack within the next 2a hours, despite a us drone strike in the east of the country, which the pentagon said targeted is militants. but as the last british troops left, the government here says that focus is on supporting around 1,000 afghans it failed to get out on time. without boots on the ground, what format support will take is not clear. as we've been hearing, the last uk flights out of kabul have been arriving back this morning.
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one of the last touched down at raf brize nortonjust under an hour ago. our correspondent, james reynolds, is there. who was on that last flight? there were around 250 passengers on board, many were soldiers who had been working at kabul airport in recent days. the most symbolic passenger of all was britton�*s departing ambassador to afghanistan. he was the first passenger of the plane that we watch land here at 8:30am. he walked down the stairs alone. he was greeted by the permanent under secretary of the foreign office. they shook hands, there were no speeches, no official ceremony. they walked quietly into the terminal building. that stark image was proof that britain's mission in kabul is now over. everybody here knows that the mission is incomplete because a number of local afghan allies, one
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person counted around a thousand, were left behind and they've said that their safety is now in the hands of the taliban.- that their safety is now in the hands of the taliban. we can speak now to rina amiri, senior fellow at the center for international cooperation at new york university and a former special advisor to the us state dept on afghanistan. she has close personal ties with the country, so thank you very much for joining us. what are your thoughts as the evacuation operation draws down? ., ~' ,, as the evacuation operation draws down? ., ~ ,, , . as the evacuation operation draws down? ., ~ , . ., ., down? thank you very much for having me. i have down? thank you very much for having me- i have been _ down? thank you very much for having me. i have been spending _ down? thank you very much for having me. i have been spending the - down? thank you very much for having me. i have been spending the last - me. i have been spending the last several hours just talking to people who are desperately trying to leave and their anxiety and frustration... the ambassador did tweet out
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yesterday that an agreement had been reached with the taliban and that people would still be able to leave. people are texting me and asking me if that's true and my responses i very much hope so. i if that's true and my responses i very much hope so.— if that's true and my responses i very much hope so. i spoke to one erson very much hope so. i spoke to one person earlier _ very much hope so. i spoke to one person earlier who _ very much hope so. i spoke to one person earlier who was _ very much hope so. i spoke to one person earlier who was talking - person earlier who was talking earlier about the trauma of the afghan�*s. he left when he was 15. i know that you were born and left in the 1970s. he was saying that he still bears the scars of it and those left behind, he said he was speaking to his father and his father said that he is just sick of moving around and sick of the uncertainty. it is exhausting. what are your full summer?— are your full summer? yes, i remember — are your full summer? yes, i remember distinctly - are your full summer? yes, i remember distinctly as - are your full summer? yes, i remember distinctly as a - are your full summer? yes, i l remember distinctly as a small child, just the level of fear and uncertainty that my family had and it stays with you. it stayed with us throughout our life and every family member that i know has a story about
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how they were certainly false to flee and for all of us, it is traumatising because we just love we have this hope that in the last 20 years, it was over and now seeing another generation leaving in the same way, people who had had a normal life and had their lives turned upside down over nights, it's hard to watch. d0 turned upside down over nights, it's hard to watch.— turned upside down over nights, it's hard to watch. do you have any hope that the taliban _ hard to watch. do you have any hope that the taliban will _ hard to watch. do you have any hope that the taliban will be _ hard to watch. do you have any hope that the taliban will be different, - that the taliban will be different, but things could be different going forward? i but things could be different going forward? , , ., , .,, but things could be different going forward? ,, ., , .,, , forward? i desperately hope so but there are signs _ forward? i desperately hope so but there are signs that _ forward? i desperately hope so but there are signs that make - forward? i desperately hope so but there are signs that make them - forward? i desperately hope so but i there are signs that make them more hopeful, that they will be better this time, some argue that they are more restrained but then the community of people that i have been in contact with, the human rights organisations, some of the minority groups and women told me things that make me concerned. people coming to
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their houses and interrogating them, ransacking their offices and that makes me really fear that what we haveis makes me really fear that what we have is the taliban of the 1990s. the taliban argues that because it's a situation of instability that things will become much betterfor the population and i wish that they could make that case to the afghan public because right now they are running round terrified, risking their lives. you don't show up at their lives. you don't show up at the airport with your family unless you feel like you have everything to lose, and right now, afghans feel like they have everything to lose. you obviously have the dual aspect on this and also your extensive work as a conflict mediator, what you think is the way for the west to engage in the most pragmatic way with the taliban to try to have the
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best outcome for the afghan people because i mean at the very least there needs to be conversations around aid, and obviously, stability. around aid, and obviously, stability-— stability. absolutely. the international _ stability. absolutely. the international community | stability. absolutely. the i international community has stability. absolutely. the - international community has to engage the taliban and i think it's not simplyjust going it alone. the situation is and dramatically differently now. the west is no longer in a leadership position in afghanistan. it is china, russia, pakistan that have the lethbridge and iran to a lesser extent. —— they have the leveraged. these are the countries that the west need to support and encourage and pull together regionally. and come
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together regionally. and come together as a community of countries and negotiate with the taliban. to ensure that there is stability, which is far from ensure that there is stability, which is farfrom certain. it is a very unstable situation and to address the catastrophic humanitarian situation, which will end up on everyone's doorsteps. it could be a massive refugee situation once again if they don't come quickly together and negotiate with the taliban. they have to negotiate on humanitarian quarters, they have to open up the borders, they have to provide these again so that the population doesn't feel locked in and they have to negotiate with the taliban and hold them accountable, otherwise this situation will not hold. the taliban cannot control the country as it is. already, we are
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seeing that terrorism is very real. it is notjust isis, it is a number of different terrorist organisations in the region from central asia, pakistan and from other parts of the world and that will come together, and if afghanistan falls apart, it will have catastrophic consequences for the region and for the world. certainly, europe is going to face massive refugee issues coming from afghanistan, so i would say that it is in the world's interests. 20 years has been a long time but this should be seen as the beginning of really coming together in a responsible way and addressing the human rights, humanitarian and also the political situation in afghanistan.— the political situation in afghanistan. the political situation in afuhanistan. ., . ., afghanistan. thank you so much for “oininu us.
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earlier, i spoke to the uk's shadow secretary. she told us that the uk seem to be completely unprepared for the speed of the events in afghanistan but her real concern is for the thousands of people left behind. ., for the thousands of people left behind. . ., , for the thousands of people left behind. ., . , , ., , for the thousands of people left behind. . ., , , ., , ., behind. there are many people that i have been in — behind. there are many people that i have been in contact _ behind. there are many people that i have been in contact with _ behind. there are many people that i have been in contact with over- behind. there are many people that i have been in contact with over the i have been in contact with over the last few_ have been in contact with over the last few days who are currently in hiding. _ last few days who are currently in hiding, who have no safe route out of afghanistan and as well as hundreds of people who have been trying _ hundreds of people who have been trying to— hundreds of people who have been trying to make their way to the border, — trying to make their way to the border, particularly the border with pakistan _ border, particularly the border with pakistan. when i spoke to officials from _ pakistan. when i spoke to officials from the _ pakistan. when i spoke to officials from the pakistani government in the last couple _ from the pakistani government in the last couple of days, there was an element — last couple of days, there was an element of— last couple of days, there was an element of pessimism about how much pakislan— element of pessimism about how much pakistan is_ element of pessimism about how much pakistan is going to be able to do. they— pakistan is going to be able to do. they have — pakistan is going to be able to do. they have got 3 million afghan refugees already in the country and ithink— refugees already in the country and i think many of those regional partners — i think many of those regional partners are looking at the united kingdom — partners are looking at the united kingdom. they are looking at the home _ kingdom. they are looking at the home office, where pretty patel has said that _ home office, where pretty patel has said that we are going to cap the
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number— said that we are going to cap the number of— said that we are going to cap the number of refugees that we are going to accept, _ number of refugees that we are going to accept, 5000 over the next year and they— to accept, 5000 over the next year and they are thinking how on earth can you _ and they are thinking how on earth can you expect us to do more when your commitment is so little. that is why— your commitment is so little. that is why the — your commitment is so little. that is why the prime minister urgently needs— is why the prime minister urgently needs to _ is why the prime minister urgently needs to get a grip on this. he said he would _ needs to get a grip on this. he said he would move heaven and earth to -et he would move heaven and earth to get people — he would move heaven and earth to get people out but yes many of his government departments are taking steps _ government departments are taking steps that— government departments are taking steps that are actively working against — steps that are actively working against those efforts and it is appalling, frankly, that he hasn't -ot appalling, frankly, that he hasn't got more — appalling, frankly, that he hasn't got more of a handle on this given how much— got more of a handle on this given how much those people did for us and if our— how much those people did for us and if our troops _ how much those people did for us and if our troops and our government over— if our troops and our government over the — if our troops and our government over the last 20 years. our political correspondent jessica parker said the government is likely to face pressure on how they plan to get the hundreds of people left behind in afghanistan out. i think one of the key questions that ministers will now be pressed on over the coming days is what relationships have been established, what agreements, if any, have been established with countries bordering afghanistan in order to try and
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establish some sort of a safe route out of afghanistan for those who still wish and fear for their safety and desperately want to leave. now, what the government has been saying is that it is going to work with international partners that it has levers that it can pull with afghanistan to get them to operate. that might cooperate. we have asked if we can put our own questions with the prime minister but in the statement, borisjohnson talks about the uk government and others will now be engaging with the taliban. not on the basis of what they say but what — not on the basis of what they say but what they do. and if the new regime _ but what they do. and if the new regime in — but what they do. and if the new regime in kabul once diplomatic recognition or to unlock the billions _ recognition or to unlock the billions that are currently frozen, they have — billions that are currently frozen, they have to ensure safe passage for those _ they have to ensure safe passage for those who _ they have to ensure safe passage for those who wish to leave the country, to respect _ those who wish to leave the country, to respect the rights of women and girls. _ to respect the rights of women and girls. to _ to respect the rights of women and girls, to prevent afghanistan from again— girls, to prevent afghanistan from again becoming an incubator for global— again becoming an incubator for global terror because that would be
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disastrous— global terror because that would be disastrous for afghanistan. now, global terror because that would be disastrous for afghanistan.- disastrous for afghanistan. now, it is worth remembering _ disastrous for afghanistan. now, it is worth remembering that - disastrous for afghanistan. now, it is worth remembering that as - disastrous for afghanistan. now, it is worth remembering that as we l disastrous for afghanistan. now, it. is worth remembering that as we have seen this morning, the ambassador in kabul is no longer in kabul. we don't have an embassy any more, they are going to set up in qatar. we don't have a military presence in afghanistan any more, so undoubtedly influences hugely diminished. the government are trying to say that there are things that they can do, but to what extent they can have influence, we will have to see over the coming months. christina lamb is chief foreign correspondent at the sunday times and author of �*farewell kabul�* and has been covering afghanistan for 33 years. thank you so much forjoining us. you have written in the paper this morning about the importance of working with the taliban to stop history from repeating itself and we have obviously been hearing about discussion over who has the power and the leveraged right now, what are your thoughts? i’m and the leveraged right now, what are your thoughts?— and the leveraged right now, what are your thoughts? i'm in pakistan at the moment. _
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are your thoughts? i'm in pakistan at the moment. the _ are your thoughts? i'm in pakistan at the moment. the taliban... - are your thoughts? i'm in pakistan | at the moment. the taliban... they have had relations ever since, so anything in the west now that they want to do, pakistan is going to be crucial. �* ., , ., , ., , ., crucial. but does that history also make pakistan _ crucial. but does that history also make pakistan have _ crucial. but does that history also make pakistan have divided - make pakistan have divided loyalties? some people here feel that the west got what they deserved and that they have been warning the west for years that... so some feel strongly about that... so some feel strongly about that. it's a question now about how
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much... inaudible. christina, i am holding on, hoinu inaudible. christina, i am holding on. heping that _ inaudible. christina, i am holding on, hoping that the _ inaudible. christina, i am holding on, hoping that the line _ inaudible. christina, i am holding on, hoping that the line with - inaudible. christina, i am holding on, hoping that the line with get i on, hoping that the line with get clearer because it's great to talk to you but unfortunately it is not a good line and we are struggling to hear you. good line and we are struggling to hearyou. i good line and we are struggling to hear you. i willjust try one last question before we will have to call time on it. in terms of other countries in the region, who could come together on this, and obviously russia and china are having a big influence, what are the prospects of these countries coming together with
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these countries coming together with the support of western countries? well, the taliban obviously more than anything else needs recognition, so that they can access assistance. afghanistan is incredibly poor and dependent on foreign aid and at the moment that is blocked, so there is a big incentive for them to try and get recognition. that's probably the only range that the west has on trying to influence them. inaudible. thank you so much for joining us, christina lamb. i hope you could hear most of what christina was saying there.
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obviously we were having some technical difficulties. tens of thousands of people are fleeing for safety as a powerful hurricane gets closer. hurricane ida is expected on make landfall this evening with winds expected to top 130 miles per hour. nada tawfiq reports. the storm itself is about 100 miles offshore. we expect it to make landfall sometimes tomorrow afternoon, probably around when pm local time. tomorrow, afternoon, probably around when pm localtime. tomorrow, it afternoon, probably around when pm local time. tomorrow, it is midnight right here right now as we will expect impact here with some heavy rain moving through, the wind picking up and by later tomorrow night, i would anticipate that we could actually see hurricane full swings. we are about 60 miles
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england hull inland —— we are 60 miles in land. it is supposed to come on shore as a category for hurricane with winds of 140 mph. keepin hurricane with winds of 140 mph. keep in mind that we have records back 1851 on hurricane is on this would put it in the top three or four strongest hurricane is that ever hit louisiana. a shortage of blood tubes means gps are having to make difficult choices about who gets blood tests, the british medical association has warned. the bma said shortages across hospitals and gp surgeries were "severe" and if the nhs did not reduce usage in the coming days even the most clinically important blood tests may be at risk. the department of health said it is working to restore normal supply and there continues to be stock in place. with me now is doctor gavin jamie, a gp in swindon. welcome, thanks for joining welcome, thanks forjoining us. what is the situation view? for welcome, thanks for “oining us. what is the situation view?—
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is the situation view? for us, a lot ofthe is the situation view? for us, a lot of the guidelines _ is the situation view? for us, a lot of the guidelines came _ is the situation view? for us, a lot of the guidelines came in - is the situation view? for us, a lot of the guidelines came in at - is the situation view? for us, a lot of the guidelines came in at the i is the situation view? for us, a lot i of the guidelines came in at the end of the guidelines came in at the end of last— of the guidelines came in at the end of last week, just before the bank holiday. _ of last week, just before the bank holiday, and so what we are going to be doing _ holiday, and so what we are going to be doing is— holiday, and so what we are going to be doing is going into next week, having _ be doing is going into next week, having to — be doing is going into next week, having to make decisions about which blood _ having to make decisions about which blood tests _ having to make decisions about which blood tests go ahead and which ones can be _ blood tests go ahead and which ones can be postponed or delayed for a while _ can be postponed or delayed for a while. ~ ., , ., ., ., ., while. what proportion i going to have to postpone _ while. what proportion i going to have to postpone a _ while. what proportion i going to have to postpone a delay? - while. what proportion i going to have to postpone a delay? well, | while. what proportion i going to i have to postpone a delay? well, we have to postpone a delay? well, we have not been _ have to postpone a delay? well, we have not been given _ have to postpone a delay? well, we have not been given an _ have to postpone a delay? well, we have not been given an exact - have to postpone a delay? well, we | have not been given an exact figure. we know— have not been given an exact figure. we know that hospitals have been given _ we know that hospitals have been given a _ we know that hospitals have been given a target of 25% and hospitals are going _ given a target of 25% and hospitals are going to tend to have been more acutely— are going to tend to have been more acutely ill— are going to tend to have been more acutely ill patients, patients on drips, — acutely ill patients, patients on drips, in — acutely ill patients, patients on drips, in itu, so i suspect that numbers— drips, in itu, so i suspect that numbers are going to be rather higher— numbers are going to be rather higher in— numbers are going to be rather higher in general practice and were looking _ higher in general practice and were looking at— higher in general practice and were looking at a lot of the test that we do for— looking at a lot of the test that we do for diabetes or monitoring long—term conditions may well be delayed _ long—term conditions may well be delayed and postponed and we are already— delayed and postponed and we are already in— delayed and postponed and we are already in a catch up after a difficult _ already in a catch up after a difficult year.— already in a catch up after a difficult year. already in a catch up after a difficult ear. �* ., ., difficult year. and also what impact could not have _ difficult year. and also what impact could not have on _ difficult year. and also what impact could not have on the _ difficult year. and also what impact could not have on the patient's? i could not have on the patient's? these are going to be the lower risk
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tests to _ these are going to be the lower risk tests to delay but that doesn't mean no risk _ tests to delay but that doesn't mean no risk we — tests to delay but that doesn't mean no risk. we are certainly going to have _ no risk. we are certainly going to have patience perhaps having delayed monitoring. we will perhaps have less control over things like diabetes and things. certainly where patients— diabetes and things. certainly where patients are acutely ill we will still be — patients are acutely ill we will still be doing these blood tests and where _ still be doing these blood tests and where there is a risk of harm, we will be _ where there is a risk of harm, we will be doing them but it will be delayed — will be doing them but it will be delayed diagnosis and, essentially, we're _ delayed diagnosis and, essentially, we're going to be pushing these into what is _ we're going to be pushing these into what is potentially a busy time of year as— what is potentially a busy time of year as well as we going the winter. this is— year as well as we going the winter. this is going — year as well as we going the winter. this is going to go on until at least — this is going to go on until at least mid _ this is going to go on until at least mid september and that's the time when we will start to think about— time when we will start to think about three flu vaccinations as well, _ about three flu vaccinations as well, so — about three flu vaccinations as well, so it's going to move it into a busier— well, so it's going to move it into a busier time. well, so it's going to move it into a busiertime. run back well, so it's going to move it into a busier time. run back and we're talking _ a busier time. run back and we're talking huge numbers here, aren't we? more— talking huge numbers here, aren't we? more than 12 million blood tests are carried _ we? more than 12 million blood tests are carried out in the uk every week — are carried out in the uk every week. ., ., ., , ., week. you said that the only target is bein: week. you said that the only target is being put — week. you said that the only target is being put out— week. you said that the only target is being put out there _ week. you said that the only target is being put out there is _ week. you said that the only target is being put out there is the - is being put out there is the hospital won with only 25% being cut but that's millions. it is
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hospital won with only 25% being cut but that's millions.— but that's millions. it is an awful lot. we but that's millions. it is an awful lot- we see _ but that's millions. it is an awful lot. we see an _ but that's millions. it is an awful lot. we see an awful— but that's millions. it is an awful lot. we see an awful lot - but that's millions. it is an awful lot. we see an awful lot of i but that's millions. it is an awful. lot. we see an awful lot of people and on _ lot. we see an awful lot of people and on average people are coming into the _ and on average people are coming into the practice three or four times— into the practice three or four times a — into the practice three or four times a year. i mean, obviously, that's— times a year. i mean, obviously, that's an — times a year. i mean, obviously, that's an average and some people are coming — that's an average and some people are coming in a lot more and a lot of these _ are coming in a lot more and a lot of these people are going to be due blood _ of these people are going to be due blood tests. we have wonderful people — blood tests. we have wonderful people doing blood tests in our practice — people doing blood tests in our practice and they are going to be perhapsm — practice and they are going to be perhaps... we are finding other things— perhaps... we are finding other things for— perhaps... we are finding other things for them to do over the next few weeks— things for them to do over the next few weeks but when we are looking at catch up, _ few weeks but when we are looking at catch up. we — few weeks but when we are looking at catch up, we are certainly not going to double _ catch up, we are certainly not going to double our staff at that stage, so the _ to double our staff at that stage, so the cash it will probably be relatively slow through the winter. thank _ relatively slow through the winter. thank you — relatively slow through the winter. thank you very much. the number of coronavirus cases in new zealand continues to rise with more than 500 people now having tested positive in the country's latest outbreak. more than 60% of those who tested positive under 30. new zealand is currently under lockdown to try and stop the spread of the highly contagious delta variant but all district south of the city auckland
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is due to see restrictions... more than 500 migrants have been rescued from a fishing boat by the italian coastguard. it was believed that they were travelling across the mediterranean from libya. tens of thousands of people have marched in several us cities, demanding the protection of voting rights. the demonstrators are seeking changes to the newly introduced state laws which they say will make it harder for minorities to vote. more than 20,000 people gathered in washington, dc with raleigh is also taking place in phoenix, atlanta, minneapolis and elsewhere. now, how about this for a destination wedding. the bolivian capital client for three days, so that they could tie the knot at the top of the mountain in the andes. they even got their guests to carry their clothes,
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decorations and food to the top of the peak which is more than 6000 metres. congratulations to them. you are watching bbc news. now to the paralympics, it has been a gold for one of britain's top athletes and a heart—warming arrive in tokyo for two afghan athletes. our correspondent in tokyo has the details. , ., ., .,.'., details. yes, hannah cockroft picks off her sixth _ details. yes, hannah cockroft picks off her sixth medal _ details. yes, hannah cockroft picks off her sixth medal in _ details. yes, hannah cockroft picks off her sixth medal in the _ details. yes, hannah cockroft picks off her sixth medal in the 100 i off her sixth medal in the 100 metres and it was a world record as well. most people who are coming here to defend the title might feel slightly nervous but not hannah. she did not feel the pressure, shejust knew what she needed to do and she got a gold medal. she is also going in the 800 metres next week, where she is hoping to defend her title there as well. she picked up three goals in london, two in rio and she has already got one in tokyo and she is hoping to go home with two which
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will make seven paralympics gold medals for hannah cockroft as she competes, completes her mission. china still sits firmly on top of the paralympic table with 88 medals in total — 35 of them are gold. find in total - 35 of them are gold. and what about — in total — 35 of them are gold. and what about those afghan athletes. it must be particularly special for them to have arrived in tokyo? absolutely. we were missing them in the opening ceremony. the afghan flag was actually carried out by volunteers because the athletes were unable to get out of afghanistan. however, they arrived here in tokyo yesterday with the help of human rights for all, the international paralympic community and world tae kwon do. they will both be going in the tae kwon do and the athletics on the tae kwon do and the athletics on the second and 3rd of september. now, afghan team said through the
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paralympic movement we can deliver the positive message that peaceful coexistence is best for humanity, so it's notjust a celebration for today for the paralympics but also for the world. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello everyone, i hope you're doing it will be clad, cloudy for some of us. �* , , , , , , us. but we will see sunny spells devel0ping- _ us. but we will see sunny spells developing. high _ us. but we will see sunny spells developing. high pressure i us. but we will see sunny spells developing. high pressure is. us. but we will see sunny spells developing. high pressure is in| developing. high pressure is in charge today and over the next couple of days. it will turn cloudy across the south—east corner of england. brazier here and the thickest of the cloud, we may get a bit of drizzle and a few showers just wanting to drift into the south—east. top temperatures under the sunny spells will see 22 or 23 celsius but when it's cooler across
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scotland, it will be 15 or 16 degrees. it is a similar stories over the next couple of days with us hanging onto the cloud overnight temperatures down to 13 or 14 celsius. often cloudy over the next few days with some bright and sunny spells. that's the forecast. this is bbc news. the headlines... 20 years after being sent in the last british troops have left afg ha nista n. the evacuation in the wake of the taliban taking charge is over. the effort has been truly humbling to see the hours worked. the exhaustion painted on people's faces. we tried our best. hundreds of afghans eligible for relocation and uk nationals have been left behind and the government has been criticised for not having done more sooner.
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another attack on coble airport is highly likely in the next few hours as us troops prepare to leave. forecasters warn a storm approaching louisiana could be more powerful than hurricane katrina, which devastated new orleans 16 years ago. dilemma for doctors a severe shortage of test tubes in the uk means patients needing urgent blood tests could face delays. at the paralympics great britain's hannah cockroft wins her third successive 100m gold. i will be back with the latest news for you at the top of the hour. but now it's time for dateline london. hello and welcome to dateline london.

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