Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 29, 2021 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

10:00 pm
10:01 pm
the final british flights from afghanistan touch down in the uk, bringing a 20—year military campaign to a close. planes bringing troops involved in the evacuation operation landed at brize norton in oxfordshire. more arrivals are expected in the coming hours. us military officials say a drone strike in kabul has eliminated another deadly suicide attack as time runs out for those trying to leave the country. the flights are almost over. what are you going to do now? so, what about us? we are work with them, we support them. president biden pays his respects as 13 us troops among those killed in thursday's bombing are brought home. also in the programme tonight...
10:02 pm
the us state of louisiana hunkers down as hurricane ida makes landfall, threatening a catastrophic storm surge. seven more gold medals for great britain at the tokyo paralymics, including the third successive win for hannah cockroft. good evening. the last planes carrying uk troops home from afghanistan have been arriving at raf brize norton in oxfordshire today. more than 15,000 people, including over 2,000 children, have been evacuated by the uk over the past two weeks. britain says the taliban has promised to allow foreign nationals and afghan citizens to leave, if they have the authority to travel. 0urfirst report tonight is from our political correspondent iain watson.
10:03 pm
one of the last british flights from kabul, landing in the uk this morning. the prime minister said we would not have wished to leave in this way. 20 years of military involvement in afghanistan, concluded with a frantic evacuation. but in a government—issued video, he also pledged not to abandon those left behind. if the new regime in kabul wants diplomatic recognition or to unlock the billions that are currently frozen, they will have to ensure safe passage for those who wish to leave the country, to respect the rights of women and girls, to prevent afghanistan from again becoming an incubator for global terror. in a literally heroic effort, 15,000 people, the majority of them afghan citizens, have been airlifted from kabul. while these people got out, hundreds more who are eligible for relocation to the uk are still in the country. this former british army officer
10:04 pm
told me that refugee camps and processing centres need to be set up urgently. i'm not aware of any of these camps, of any of these processes, of any of the grander strategy that is actually required. and again, it goes back to the bigger decision to withdraw when all of these things were not thought through. it's been catastrophic, what's happened in afghanistan, all the more reason why the united nations need to lean into this, and i really do seek britain, as a permanent member of the un security council, to lead forward and to lean into this with some sense of urgency. labour say the process of evacuation should have started sooner and co—operation now from neighbouring countries isn't guaranteed. there are many, many people that i've been in contact with only over the last few days who are currently in hiding, who have no safe route out of afghanistan, as well as hundreds of people who've been trying to make their way to the border and get across, particularly the border with pakistan. when i spoke to officials from the pakistani government
10:05 pm
in the last couple of days, there was an element of pessimism about how much pakistan is going to be able to do. the british ambassador to afghanistan is stepping down from kabul but operations will continue from qatar. while british troops and diplomats have now arrived home safely, many of those who helped uk forces are still in harm's way. is more military aircraft arrive backin is more military aircraft arrive back in the uk tonight, i have been asking the british government very specific questions about those left behind. i have to say, i haven't had very many specific answers. but there is a glimmer of hope tonight because the uk government and some other countries including the us say they have received assurances from they have received assurances from the taliban that their nationals, plus afghan citizens with proper documentation, will be allowed out of the country. and the uk say it is
10:06 pm
also going to raise this issue of safe passage at the united nations. but even if the taliban are true to their word, but even if the taliban are true to theirword, once but even if the taliban are true to their word, once people cross the borders, it looks as though new processing centres still have not been set up, so it also looks as though political and practical problems are going to be persisting long after the last british troops have come home. iain watson, thank you very much. meanwhile, us military officials say one of their drone strikes today in the afghan capital kabul prevented another deadly suicide attack at the airport. thursday's bomb killed at least 170 people, including 13 us troops. the us will continue evacuation operations until tuesday. from kabul, our chief international correspondent lyse doucet reports. a house on fire in a fast burning crisis, said to be a rocket attack streets away from kabul airport. it may have been the target. the us says it unleashed a drone strike, too, hitting a vehicle of suicide bombers heading to the airport. gunfire.
10:07 pm
and next to the airfield, gunfire. this, a likely salvo from taliban guards struggling to control the crowds. machine gun fires. today, military flights are still taking off, but britain's airlift has ended. not long now before america packs up, too. in a fleeting twilight, afghans hold fast to documents, to hope. my life is in danger injalalabad. but the flights are almost over. what are you going to do now? so, what about us? we are work with them. we support them. i'm cia agent. you? i have documents. this man tells us he worked for us intelligence. some people, like this man, received an e—mail saying, "going to the gate." other people say they don't
10:08 pm
have access to e—mails. they hear the news that the military flights are all but over. but even in these last few hours, they still keep trying on the basis of what they've heard. the new face of security in this city. many taliban fighters wearing the same uniforms and driving the same vehicles as the afghan government forces they ousted. a new order takes shape. and on a plane out, a new life starts. this 26—year—old gave birth to a girl as she flew to britain. a baby named hava, or eve, who may now have a better future. lyse doucet, bbc news, kabul. this afternoon the bodies of the 13 us service members who were among those killed in thursday's blast in kabul were returned to the united states. the withdrawal from afghanistan marks the end of 20 years of foreign troops in the country.
10:09 pm
a57 uk military personnel died during the campaign, while tens of thousands of afghan civilians lost their lives. our world affairs correspondent caroline hawley looks back at the conflict, and considers what may lie ahead. it was in the wake of the al-qaeda attacks on new york in 2001 that the then president george bush declared a war on terror.— a war on terror. america has no truer friend _ a war on terror. america has no truer friend than _ a war on terror. america has no truer friend than great - a war on terror. america has no truer friend than great britain. | truer friend than great britain. britainjoined the fight truer friend than great britain. britain joined the fight to topple the taliban, invading afghanistan, where the militants had training camps. where the militants had training cams. ~ . , ., where the militants had training cams. ~ ., ., ., , camps. military action against taruets camps. military action against targets inside _ camps. military action against targets inside afghanistan - camps. military action againstj targets inside afghanistan has begun — targets inside afghanistan has be . un. targets inside afghanistan has beuun. , , ~ targets inside afghanistan has beuun. , , . ., ., ., ., begun. the presence of international troo -s begun. the presence of international traces enabled _ begun. the presence of international troops enabled girls _ begun. the presence of international troops enabled girls to _ begun. the presence of international troops enabled girls to go _ begun. the presence of international troops enabled girls to go to - troops enabled girls to go to school. but there was blood, sweat, dirt and danger. the war cost trillions and took an enormous toll. the wiltshire town of royal wootton bassett paid britain's respects so
10:10 pm
many times. john white lost three limbs in afghanistan, one of hundreds of soldiers who came back with life—changing injuries. i hundreds of soldiers who came back with life-changing injuries.— with life-changing in'uries. i don't feel like it was _ with life-changing in'uries. i don't feel like it was a _ with life-changing injuries. i don't feel like it was a waste _ with life-changing injuries. i don't feel like it was a waste of - with life-changing injuries. i don't feel like it was a waste of my - with life-changing injuries. i don't. feel like it was a waste of my time, i don't have any resentment towards it or anything like that. we saw stuff out there which quite frankly disgusted, sickening, at times, that's what we were hoping that we could get rid of. it'sjust incredibly sad knowing that people are going to have to suffer in that way. are going to have to suffer in that wa . ., ., ., way. now, the taliban are in control and the uk — way. now, the taliban are in control and the uk needs _ way. now, the taliban are in control and the uk needs to _ way. now, the taliban are in control and the uk needs to deal _ way. now, the taliban are in control and the uk needs to deal with - way. now, the taliban are in control| and the uk needs to deal with them. it wants their co—operation, not just on safe passage but on preventing afghanistan being used once again as a base for islamist militants that aim to harm the west. but what influence can britain have now that it is gone? we but what influence can britain have now that it is gone?— now that it is gone? we shouldn't kid ourselves _ now that it is gone? we shouldn't kid ourselves that _ now that it is gone? we shouldn't kid ourselves that we've - now that it is gone? we shouldn't kid ourselves that we've got - now that it is gone? we shouldn't kid ourselves that we've got the l kid ourselves that we've got the same levers. we don't, our influence is much diminished. the influence of china has increased, the influence
10:11 pm
of pakistan has increased, the influence of iran has increased, and ours has consequently diminished. the manner of the exit from afghanistan will haunt america and its allies. today, joe biden mourned the 13 soldiers who died in the suicide attack at kabul airport. the latest and america hopes the last casualties of the country's longest war. but the consequences of the west's defeat in afghanistan will continue to reverberate for a long time around the world. caroline hawley, bbc news. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, is self—isolating after being identified as a close contact of someone who has covid—19. she's awaiting the results of a pcr test. it comes as the number of new covid cases reported in scotland has hit another record high of more than 7,000 in the last 2a hours. the scottish health secretary warned that the nhs was facing a perfect storm of pressure. a look now at the latest government data.
10:12 pm
and there were 33,196 new infections recorded in the uk in the latest 24—hour period, which means on average there were 34,361 new cases per day in the last week. 61 deaths were recorded in the past 2a hours, with an average of 114 deaths a day in the past week. 0n vaccinations, 88.3% of adults in the uk have now had theirfirst jab and 78.4% have had both doses now. hurricane ida has made landfall in the us state of louisiana, with winds of 150mph. the authorities have warned of catastrophic damage, with forecasts that the storm could be the worst to hit the state for more than 150 years. tens of thousands of people have already left low—lying areas, where there are fears a tidal surge could overwhelm flood defences. 0ur correspondent nada tawfik reports from new orleans.
10:13 pm
dangerous winds, streets all around the city and its famous french quarter sit empty. from this point on, residents are on their own for the duration of the storm. earlier, masses rushed to the airport to evacuate before it shut down. many others took to the road. we evacuate before it shut down. many others took to the road.— evacuate before it shut down. many others took to the road. we have two kids and a car. _ others took to the road. we have two kids and a car, they _ others took to the road. we have two kids and a car, they are _ others took to the road. we have two kids and a car, they are both - kids and a car, they are both 12 months, we really wanted to evacuate for them. �* , ,, months, we really wanted to evacuate forthem.�* , ,. ., ., for them. best case scenario is, like, for them. best case scenario is, like. power _ for them. best case scenario is, like, power outages _ for them. best case scenario is, like, power outages and - for them. best case scenario is, like, power outages and some l for them. best case scenario is, - like, power outages and some minor flooding _ like, power outages and some minor floodinu. ~ ., , , like, power outages and some minor floodinu. ~ ., , ., �* flooding. worse case, i don't even want to think _ flooding. worse case, i don't even want to think about. _ flooding. worse case, i don't even want to think about. 8ft _ flooding. worse case, i don't even want to think about. 8ft of- flooding. worse case, i don't even want to think about. 8ft of water. want to think about. 8ft of water inside. kenneth _ want to think about. 8ft of water inside. kenneth had _ want to think about. 8ft of water inside. kenneth had to _ want to think about. 8ft of water inside. kenneth had to evacuate| inside. kenneth had to evacuate doing _ inside. kenneth had to evacuate doing a — inside. kenneth had to evacuate doing a previous _ inside. kenneth had to evacuate doing a previous harry- inside. kenneth had to evacuate doing a previous harry kane. . inside. kenneth had to evacuate doing a previous harry kane. he inside. kenneth had to evacuate - doing a previous harry kane. he says this time _ doing a previous harry kane. he says this time he — doing a previous harry kane. he says this time he has— doing a previous harry kane. he says this time he has had _ doing a previous harry kane. he says this time he has had no— doing a previous harry kane. he says this time he has had no time - doing a previous harry kane. he says this time he has had no time to - this time he has had no time to leave — this time he has had no time to leave. ., ~' this time he has had no time to leave. ., ~ ., ., ., leave. you think no matter how stron: leave. you think no matter how strong the _ leave. you think no matter how strong the infrastructure - leave. you think no matter how strong the infrastructure is, - leave. you think no matter how. strong the infrastructure is, there still might be that little chance.
10:14 pm
from space, images capture the magnitude of ida, which came ashore with winds of 150mph and is causing a life—threatening storm surge. in washington, president by received a briefing on ida at the federal agency. he said his administration will put the full might of the country behind the recovery. everyone should listen to the instructions from local and state officials, just how dangerous this is. and take it seriously, notjust the coast, notjust new orleans, it is north as well, the rainfall is expected to be exceedingly high. the region's new storm defences, which failed during hurricane katrina in 2005 on this exact date, will be tested like never before. but even with protections in place, ida is expected to have a catastrophic impact.
10:15 pm
that was nada tawfik in new orleans, trying there to tell us what the storm was like. and i think we can tell. a man has been charged in connection with the murders of two people in westminster in central london. clinton ashmore and sharon pickles were fatally stabbed at two different addresses a week and a half ago. lee peacock, who's a9, will appear before westminster magistrates tomorrow. this week, the children's code comes into force across the uk. its purpose is to protect children's online data, and its focus will be on gaming, social media and video streaming. companies, even those whose headquarters are abroad, will be required to adhere to a series of standards, and they'll be sanctioned if they don't. 0ur media editor, amol rajan, reports. hi, guys! hi! today's teenagers have never known the world before the internet. life online has massively expanded. ijust wondered if i could talk to you guys for a little while about whether or not you worry
10:16 pm
about sharing too much personal information online. when it asks for a location, i don't trust it. because it's giving private information away to people. i can see, like, 18 plus adverts which are not exactly appropriate for my age group. well, i see game adverts- about people killing each other which i don't think is appropriate for my age as well. _ it asks to collect my data and i don't know what it's being used for, sometimes that scares me a little bit. from 2nd september, a new children's code will be enforced by the information commissioner's office. there are 15 standards which will govern how children's data is protected online. these include strict rules on data collection and sharing, making high privity settings the default and switching location tracking off by default, too. a key figure behind this new code is the film director and now
10:17 pm
campaigner baroness beeban kidron. personal data is the mechanism by which the companies make money, so it's follow the money. it's designed to grab the data and in doing so, a lot of things, unintended consequences, happen to our children. and by actually saying no, do not take this data, do not take kids' data, take the kids out of the business model, make your profits after you have taken care of young people, we change the system itself. most big technology companies insist children's safety is a priority and say they welcome smarter regulation. but these rules strike at the very foundation of some of their business models and as such are being watched very closely from washington to brussels and canberra. what sort of legal and financial power will you have to sanction those who fall foul of this new children's code? the change we have seen already in large platforms around the world
10:18 pm
is actually because they want to do the right thing, but we do have the power to charge 4% of their global turnover which is a material amount for those who are the most persistent offenders. how do you feel about the fact that your personal information is being used online to make a few people very rich? i feel like they shouldn't do that because they shouldn't make money from other people's personal information. it was my information to start with and even if i did give it to them, the fact that they're making money out of my personal information quite annoys me a lot. guys, you're brilliant. thank you so much for doing this. amol rajan, bbc news. lee scratch perry, one of the most influential figures injamaican music, has died at the age of 85. a pioneer of reggae and dub, perry produced artists from the wailers to the beastie boys and released more than 70 albums. the jamaican prime minister was among those paying tribute today.
10:19 pm
with all the sport now, here's 0lly foster at the bbc sport centre. good evening. it's been another really good day for great britain at the paralympics. seven more golds including a first in wheelchair rugby, but there was a serial winner on the athletics track. from tokyo, here's our sports correspondent andy swiss. it's become one of british sport's most gloriously familiar sights. hannah cockroft has never lost at the paralympics and once again she did what she always does. a new world record! a sixth paralympic title for cockroft, who prepared the heat of tokyo in a plastic greenhouse at her home in cheshire. we got up to 45 degrees one day, our hottest day here has been 44, so it worked pretty well. at times it felt stupid, it felt so silly to be doing it, but here we are and it has worked, so maybe that's the secret! others were on the road to redemption. after a mistake cost her gold in
10:20 pm
rio, lauren steadman nearly retired. she will be glad she didn't. triumph in the triathlon and the biggest smile in tokyo. but there was british delight everywhere. at the rowing lake, lawrence whiteley celebrated his 30th birthday by retaining his double sculls title with lauren rowles, and the mixed coxed four also took gold. in thejudo, world number one chris skelly lived up to his billing as he took gold, as did britain's equestrian team, a title they've won at every games since 1996. but among the glut of golds today, one was particularly special. britain had never won a medal in wheelchair rugby until now. few paralympic sports make quite such an impact. it's been described by one former player as chess with violence, and in the final against usa,
10:21 pm
britain powered their way to victory and history. a golden moment the british parasport on another golden day. andy swiss, bbc news, tokyo. lewis hamilton says he hopes the 75,000 formula 1 fans at spa today get their money back. the belgian grand prix will go down in history as the first f1 race to have no racing. after a three—hour delay because of heavy rain, the drivers managed just two laps behind the safety car before the grand prix was called off. max verstappen was given the win by virtue of qualifying on pole but he still trails hamilton in the standings with the number of points awarded to the drivers today halved. rangers have won the first old firm match of the scottish premiership season. despite being without their manager steven gerrard and a number of players because of a covid outbreak, they beat celtic 1—0 at ibrox to move up to third in the table. swedish defender filip helander scored the second half winner. there were three games in the premier league today, all the goals are coming up on match of day 2 after the news, or i've got the results for you now, if you want them.
10:22 pm
tottenham hotspur are top of thetable. are top of the table. son heung—min scored the winner as they beat watford 1—0 at home. spurs are the only side to have a 100% record with three wins out of three. mason greenwood scored the winner for manchester united at wolves. they are now unbeaten away from home in 28 league games, an english record. elsewhere, burnley drew 1—1 with leeds. lionel messi made his debut for paris st germain this evening. the six time world player of the year was let go by barcelona earlier this month after spending his whole career there. he came off the bench for the last 25 minutes of their match away at reims with psg already winng 2—0 to go top of the table. lots more on the bbc sport website, but that's all for now. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are. goodbye.
10:23 pm
10:24 pm
10:25 pm
hello. this is bbc news. a shortage of test tubes means gps are having to make difficult choices about who gets blood tests, the british medical association has warned. the bma said shortages across hospitals and gp surgeries were "severe" and if the nhs did not reduce usage in the coming days — even the most clinically important tests may be at risk. kathryn stanczyszyn reports. more than 12 million blood tests are carried out in england each week but now nhs england has admitted there is a serious shortage of the test tubes used in the process. a shortage that is likely to get worse over the next month. it is down to a major supplier of the vials, becton dickinson, experiencing what it says are serious supply chain issues due to increased demand and transportation
10:26 pm
and border challenges. patients in england and wales have been receiving text messages like this from their gp surgeries, stating that new nhs advice means clinically urgent blood tests will continue but others could be rescheduled. the sort of testing put on hold is likely to be in areas like fertility, allergies and pre—diabetes. but some clinicians say the guidance is vague and it is not always easy to decide what's essential. they're calling for more information from government. there will be some patients who absolutely must have blood tests and i have got to make that decision and choice and seek understanding from patients who perhaps could wait a bit longer. but i'll tell you this much, the lack of clarity in terms of how long this might go on for, what volumes we are dealing with, what small numbers we are dealing with in terms of the tubes available, how quickly we are going to go short — all of that is unknown. the department of health and social care says it is working flat out with their supplier to make
10:27 pm
sure there is minimal impact on patient care. but the nhs has been warned, the issues could continue for a significant period of time. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news. supporters groups say families who lost loved ones at the hillsborough disaster have been involved every step of the way in plans to bring back standing to football stadiums. the bbc�*s learnt today that the government intends to lift the ban on standing in the top two tiers of english football this season. there'll be pilot projects at a handful of grounds, as phil mccann reports. plenty of fans were standing at turf moor this afternoon as burnley met leeds in the premier league, but there were plenty of fan sitting down, too. officially, it is what everyone is supposed to do for most of the match, but that is going to start to change.— of the match, but that is going to start to change. what we want to see is those who — start to change. what we want to see is those who want _ start to change. what we want to see is those who want to _ start to change. what we want to see is those who want to stand _ start to change. what we want to see is those who want to stand having - is those who want to stand having the chance to do so in a safe
10:28 pm
environment, those who want to sit being able to do so without having their review blocked by people who are standing. the their review blocked by people who are standing-— are standing. the government is ex - ected are standing. the government is exoeeted to _ are standing. the government is expected to allow _ are standing. the government is expected to allow safe _ are standing. the government is expected to allow safe standing | are standing. the government is. expected to allow safe standing in designated areas are to how full of grounds before the end of this season. it is not yet clear which stadiums will be chosen. the culture secretary has said it is the sensible thing to do because certain fans are standing anyway. it will! sensible thing to do because certain fans are standing anyway.— fans are standing anyway. it will be better if they _ fans are standing anyway. it will be better if they have _ fans are standing anyway. it will be better if they have a _ fans are standing anyway. it will be better if they have a standing - fans are standing anyway. it will be better if they have a standing areal better if they have a standing area so that _ better if they have a standing area so that those who want to stand up can. so _ so that those who want to stand up can, , ., so that those who want to stand up can, ,., .., so that those who want to stand up can, y., , so that those who want to stand up can-_ yes. - so that those who want to stand up | can-_ yes. and can. so you can sit down? yes, and watch the — can. so you can sit down? yes, and watch the match. _ can. so you can sit down? yes, and watch the match. the _ can. so you can sit down? yes, and watch the match. the atmosphere l can. so you can sit down? yes, and i watch the match. the atmosphere has easil not watch the match. the atmosphere has easily got on — watch the match. the atmosphere has easily got on bit _ watch the match. the atmosphere has easily got on bit worse, _ watch the match. the atmosphere has easily got on bit worse, so _ watch the match. the atmosphere has easily got on bit worse, so it - watch the match. the atmosphere has easily got on bit worse, so it works . easily got on bit worse, so it works in germany in places like that. i was young once and they always did up was young once and they always did up then— was young once and they always did up then and — was young once and they always did up then and i— was young once and they always did up then and i had _ was young once and they always did up then and i had no— was young once and they always did up then and i had no problem - was young once and they always did up then and i had no problem thenl was young once and they always didj up then and i had no problem then i do nothing — up then and i had no problem then i do nothing they— up then and i had no problem then i do nothing they will— up then and i had no problem then i do nothing they will have _ up then and i had no problem then i do nothing they will have a - up then and i had no problem then i| do nothing they will have a problem. it do nothing they will have a problem. it was _ do nothing they will have a problem. it was the _ do nothing they will have a problem. it was the hillsborough _ do nothing they will have a problem. it was the hillsborough disaster- do nothing they will have a problem. it was the hillsborough disaster in i it was the hillsborough disaster in 1989 that led to the taylor review in 1994 that recommended all stadiums should be all seated in the top two football tiers to prevent a repeat of the crash that led to the deaths of 97 liverpool fans at hillsborough. liverpool's main supporters group says it supports bringing standing back and it has
10:29 pm
talked about it with those who survived and who lost loved ones at hillsborough. i survived and who lost loved ones at hillsborough-— survived and who lost loved ones at hillsborou~h. , ., hillsborough. i remember at the time when we had — hillsborough. i remember at the time when we had those _ hillsborough. i remember at the time when we had those discussions, - hillsborough. i remember at the time when we had those discussions, they| when we had those discussions, they were incredibly emotive and emotional.— were incredibly emotive and emotional. , ., , were incredibly emotive and emotional. ,., , ., emotional. the government is not -lannina emotional. the government is not ”lannin a emotional. the government is not planning a return _ emotional. the government is not planning a return to _ emotional. the government is not planning a return to the _ emotional. the government is not planning a return to the terraces l emotional. the government is not| planning a return to the terraces or pens that were at grounds like hillsborough. this is what so—called safe standing will look like. it has already been installed at anfield, old trafford, the etihad stadium and stamford bridge but it is not officially induce yet.- stamford bridge but it is not officially induce yet. every seat now has a _ officially induce yet. every seat now has a railing _ officially induce yet. every seat now has a railing in _ officially induce yet. every seat now has a railing in front - officially induce yet. every seat now has a railing in front of - officially induce yet. every seat now has a railing in front of it l now has a railing in front of it which means we do not have a knock—on effect so if an individual doesjump out of knock—on effect so if an individual does jump out of their seat, are not immediately knocking the person in front of him because the real will prevent that from happening. pm real will prevent that from happening-— real will prevent that from haueninu. . ., . happening. an official announcement will ha - en happening. an official announcement will happen next _ happening. an official announcement will happen next week. _ and we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers benedict paviot from france 24 and the editor of the birmingham
10:30 pm
sunday was a day of contrast, cool in the cloud, warm in the sunshine and in actualfact, across south—west england, we started bridges into the mid 20s. a beautiful sunday afternoon for many. the next few days look likely to stay quite quiet across the whole of the country. quite a lot of dry weather around as well, but it will be mostly cloudy, and i suspect the temperatures easing awayjust a touch, around average if we're very lucky. high pressure still dominates the story. it's a blocking high that's preventing weather fronts from moving in off the atlantic. but a little bit more of a breeze always down towards the south, and that's going to continue to push this cloud in off the north sea, which could be taken off on monday morning for a spot or two of drizzle. favoured western areas, perhaps as we go through the afternoon, seeing some sunny spells, but i suspect not as much as recent days. so, the temperatures not as high. cool in the cloud and drizzle, 15—17 degrees, maximum values of 21, possibly 22. now, that cloud will continue to push back in off the north sea through the night. that's going to act like a blanket.
10:31 pm
it's not going to be a cold night, with overnight lows perhaps staying into mid—teens for some.

40 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on