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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 30, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. rockets have been fired towards kabul airport where the us evacuation operation is drawing to a close — they were intercepted by an american anti—missile system. the uk government seeks international support to ensure the taliban allow people to leave afghanistan — as british troops from kabul arrive back on uk soil. president biden declares a major disaster in louisiana as powerful hurricane ida makes landfall — wiping out all power in new orleans. the danger is not weakening at all. we are hearing reports of that water is rising in many communities. there that are bringing down power lines. roofs collapsing.
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the un says north korea appears to have restarted a reactor capable of producing plutonium for nuclear weapons. hospitals are at capacity in tokyo — we follow a team of doctors that goes door—to—door — working to keep covid patients alive. and coming up this hour: we look at the future of staycations after a bumper yearfor uk holidays, as many have opted to stay near home due to the uncertainty around covid travel restrictions. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. rockets have been fired towards kabul international airport, where the us evacuation operation is drawing to a close. about five rockets flew over the afghan capital, before a us anti—missile system stopped them. it isn't known who fired them. it comes as british ministers
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prepare to take part in international meetings aimed at defining a joint approach to the taliban in afghanistan. jon donnison has the details. back in britain. some of the final raf planes from kabul arriving at brize norton airbase in oxfordshire last night, carrying uk troops and officials. earlierflights had brought more afghan refugees, and the man who led the effort to bring them home, ambassador laurie bristow. one plane even landed with an extra passenger on board. baby girl havva was born during the flight. a new life heading for a new land. the evacuation marks the end of the uk's 20—year military involvement in afghanistan. in recent weeks, the raf scrambled to airlift 15,000 people,
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most of them afghan refugees, before the taliban deadline for foreign troops to withdraw by the end of august. but hundreds more remain stranded, both uk citizens and eligible refugees. the taliban has said they will be allowed to leave. but with fear and tensions increasing, it remains to be seen if the islamist group will honour that pledge. and potential danger is not limited to the taliban. a local branch of the so—called islamic state group killed more than 170 people in thursday's bomb attack, including mohammad niazi, a taxi driverfrom hampshire who travelled to kabul to bring his family back. his wife, samina, and their baby daughter also died. mohammad was one of the best men we have in the community, working hard to give the best life for his kids. yesterday the us launched a drone strike against a car which it said was carrying more is suicide bombers. and this morning, five
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rockets were fired towards kabul international airport. it's not known by whom, but they were reported to have been intercepted by a us anti—missile system. and with a humanitarian crisis looming, the uk is promising it will continue to support those left behind. today, ministers will reach out to other nations, including turkey and qatar, who they hope may have more influence over the taliban, afghanistan's new rulers. jon donnison, bbc news. rajini vaidyanathan is covering events from delhi. this is covering events from delhi. morning images stai circulate this morning images started to circulate on social media which showed huge plumes of smoke in the vicinity of carpal airport and eyewitnesses say that they sell rockets being fired in the direction of the airport and the eyewitnesses say they were launched from a vehicle. now, we have had this now confirmed by the white house and
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they say that president biden has been updated on the situation. some us media is reporting at the moment that one, at least one of those rockets was intercepted by a missile defence system although that has not been directly confirmed to us by the white house. in this white house statement it said that us evacuation operations and of course the us is also packing up everything else ahead of the deadline tomorrow on tuesday, august 31. those operations will continue despite this heightened security threat. just a few days ago presidentjoe biden said it was highly likely that there would be another terror attack in the next 36 hours, so in this timeframe after thursday's devastating suicide attack at the airport which claimed more than 170 lives. more than 170 lives. 0ur political correspondent nick eardley explained what the uk government is doing to get remaining evacuees out of kabul.
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the government this morning, when asked, would not put a number on how many people who were eligible to come to the uk had been left in afghanistan, who had not managed to get out as part of that air left. last week ministers were talking about it being up to 1000. labour think it is far more. the question, as you say, is what happens now? we had the taliban say to various foreign governments yesterday, around 90 of them releasing a letter, saying they had been given assurances by the taliban that safe passage for either foreign nationals are people with the right documentation from afghanistan would be allowed safe passage out of the country. the question is how the international community can enforce that? at what leverage the uk and its allies have to make sure that that promises caps and we heard from the uk government minister this morning that he was sceptical that
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the promise would be met. have a listen. it the promise would be met. have a listen. , ., , , the promise would be met. have a listen. , ., , ., listen. it is not possible for anybody — listen. it is not possible for anybody to _ listen. it is not possible for anybody to give _ listen. it is not possible for anybody to give absolute . listen. it is not possible for - anybody to give absolute assurances. as i say, _ anybody to give absolute assurances. as i say, we — anybody to give absolute assurances. as i say, we are working with international partners to try to facilitate — international partners to try to facilitate that repatriation and evacuation. of course, we have also received _ evacuation. of course, we have also received commitments from the taliban — received commitments from the taliban. obviously, we're quite sceptical— taliban. obviously, we're quite sceptical about that but, as the prime _ sceptical about that but, as the prime minister has said, we will judge _ prime minister has said, we will judge them on their conduct rather than their— judge them on their conduct rather than their words. they have said that they— than their words. they have said that they want to be treated like a legitimate government and there is a lon- legitimate government and there is a long way— legitimate government and there is a long way to _ legitimate government and there is a long way to go before we might consider— long way to go before we might consider that but nevertheless we are willing to engage with them based _ are willing to engage with them based on — are willing to engage with them based on what they do and if they start acting like a government, if they start — start acting like a government, if they start facilitating both internal travel and exiting from afghanistan then we will engage with them on _ afghanistan then we will engage with them on that basis but what we are not able _ them on that basis but what we are not able to— them on that basis but what we are not able to do, what no country is
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able _ not able to do, what no country is able to— not able to do, what no country is able to do— not able to do, what no country is able to do is— not able to do, what no country is able to do is give a cast—iron guarantee. able to do is give a cast-iron guarantee-— able to do is give a cast-iron auarantee. ., , �* , ., ~ guarantee. that is the uk's take this morning- — guarantee. that is the uk's take this morning. i've _ guarantee. that is the uk's take this morning. i've got _ guarantee. that is the uk's take this morning. i've got to - guarantee. that is the uk's take this morning. i've got to say - guarantee. that is the uk's take this morning. i've got to say for| this morning. i've got to say for all the talk of keeping the scheme open there is not much detail at the moment about how that might operate. what should people do if they did not manage to get to the airport but had documentation to get to the uk what their immediate action should be and we know from having spoken to a lot of them across the bbc that many of them are still deeply worried about how they were treated by the taliban. no detail about hubs in the region, about where people should go in neighbouring countries if they want to claim asylum or refuge in the uk. the labour party has been calling for more detail about what will happen and also suggesting that the number of eligible people who did not make it onto flights in the last couple of weeks is far higher than the government is saying. they have accused ministers of spain, saying
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it could be as many as 5000. have a listen to the shadow minister this morning. listen to the shadow minister this morninu. :: :: :: listen to the shadow minister this mornin. :: :: :: .,, listen to the shadow minister this morninu. :: :: :: .,, , listen to the shadow minister this mornin. :: i: i: , ., ., morning. 5000 as the number alone that labour mps _ morning. 5000 as the number alone that labour mps are _ morning. 5000 as the number alone that labour mps are dealing - morning. 5000 as the number alone that labour mps are dealing with. i that labour mps are dealing with. presumably— that labour mps are dealing with. presumably conservative - that labour mps are dealing with. presumably conservative mps - that labour mps are dealing with. i presumably conservative mps have many _ presumably conservative mps have many thousands— presumably conservative mps have many thousands of _ presumably conservative mps have many thousands of cases _ presumably conservative mps have many thousands of cases as - presumably conservative mps have many thousands of cases as well. presumably conservative mps have i many thousands of cases as well and of course, _ many thousands of cases as well and of course, there _ many thousands of cases as well and of course, there are _ many thousands of cases as well and of course, there are ngos _ many thousands of cases as well and of course, there are ngos and - many thousands of cases as well and of course, there are ngos and other| of course, there are ngos and other people _ of course, there are ngos and other beanie dealing — of course, there are ngos and other people dealing with _ of course, there are ngos and other people dealing with these _ of course, there are ngos and other people dealing with these cases - of course, there are ngos and other people dealing with these cases so ij people dealing with these cases sol think that _ people dealing with these cases sol think that the — people dealing with these cases sol think that the government - people dealing with these cases sol think that the government is - people dealing with these cases sol think that the government is clearly| think that the government is clearly trying _ think that the government is clearly trying to— think that the government is clearly trying to put— think that the government is clearly trying to put some _ think that the government is clearly trying to put some kind _ think that the government is clearly trying to put some kind of— think that the government is clearly trying to put some kind of spin- think that the government is clearly trying to put some kind of spin on. trying to put some kind of spin on these _ trying to put some kind of spin on these numbers— trying to put some kind of spin on these numbers but— trying to put some kind of spin on these numbers but the _ trying to put some kind of spin on these numbers but the numbers i trying to put some kind of spin on. these numbers but the numbers are much _ these numbers but the numbers are much higher~ — these numbers but the numbers are much higher~ our_ these numbers but the numbers are much higher. our armed _ these numbers but the numbers are much higher. our armed forces - these numbers but the numbers arej much higher. our armed forces and diplomats— much higher. our armed forces and diplomats and — much higher. our armed forces and diplomats and officials _ much higher. our armed forces and diplomats and officials out - much higher. our armed forces and diplomats and officials out in - diplomats and officials out in afghanistan _ diplomats and officials out in afghanistan have _ diplomats and officials out in afghanistan have done - diplomats and officials out in afghanistan have done an i diplomats and officials out in - afghanistan have done an incredible 'ob afghanistan have done an incredible job and _ afghanistan have done an incredible job and we — afghanistan have done an incredible job and we should _ afghanistan have done an incredible job and we should be _ afghanistan have done an incredible job and we should be so _ afghanistan have done an incredible job and we should be so proud - afghanistan have done an incredible job and we should be so proud of. job and we should be so proud of what _ job and we should be so proud of what they— job and we should be so proud of what they have _ job and we should be so proud of what they have done _ job and we should be so proud of what they have done but - job and we should be so proud of what they have done but they. job and we should be so proud of. what they have done but they have been _ what they have done but they have been badly— what they have done but they have been badly iet _ what they have done but they have been badly let down _ what they have done but they have been badly let down by— what they have done but they have been badly let down by their- been badly let down by their political— been badly let down by their political masters— been badly let down by their political masters who - been badly let down by their political masters who have l been badly let down by their. political masters who have had been badly let down by their- political masters who have had 18 months _ political masters who have had 18 months to — political masters who have had 18 months to pian— political masters who have had 18 months to plan for— political masters who have had 18 months to plan for this _ political masters who have had 18 months to plan for this and - political masters who have had 18 months to plan for this and havel months to plan for this and have compieteiy— months to plan for this and have completely failed _ months to plan for this and have completely failed to _ months to plan for this and have completely failed to plan - months to plan for this and have . completely failed to plan properly. the french— completely failed to plan properly. the french people _ completely failed to plan properly. the french people do _ completely failed to plan properly. the french people do expect- the french people do expect government— the french people do expect government started - the french people do expect. government started evacuating the french people do expect- government started evacuating back in may _ government started evacuating back in may so _ government started evacuating back in may so the — government started evacuating back in may so the government _ government started evacuating back in may so the government has - government started evacuating back in may so the government has been| in may so the government has been asleep _ in may so the government has been asleep on _ in may so the government has been asleep on the — in may so the government has been asleep on the wheel _ in may so the government has been asleep on the wheel at _ in may so the government has been asleep on the wheel at this. - in may so the government has been asleep on the wheel at this. their. asleep on the wheel at this. their massively— asleep on the wheel at this. their massively underestimated - asleep on the wheel at this. their massively underestimated the - asleep on the wheel at this. their- massively underestimated the numbers of people _ massively underestimated the numbers of people who _ massively underestimated the numbers of people who have _ massively underestimated the numbers of people who have been _ massively underestimated the numbers of people who have been left _ massively underestimated the numbers of people who have been left behind. . of people who have been left behind. they should — of people who have been left behind. they should level— of people who have been left behind. they should level with _ of people who have been left behind. they should level with the _ of people who have been left behind. they should level with the british - they should level with the british people _ they should level with the british people and — they should level with the british people and tell _
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they should level with the british people and tell us _ they should level with the british people and tell us what - they should level with the british people and tell us what is - they should level with the britishl people and tell us what is actually going _ people and tell us what is actually going on— people and tell us what is actually going on on— people and tell us what is actually going on on the _ people and tell us what is actually going on on the ground _ people and tell us what is actually going on on the ground and - people and tell us what is actually l going on on the ground and perhaps we could _ going on on the ground and perhaps we could start — going on on the ground and perhaps we could start to _ going on on the ground and perhaps we could start to see _ going on on the ground and perhaps we could start to see a _ going on on the ground and perhaps we could start to see a government| we could start to see a government that is— we could start to see a government that is going — we could start to see a government that is going to— we could start to see a government that is going to get— we could start to see a government that is going to get on— we could start to see a government that is going to get on top- we could start to see a government that is going to get on top of- we could start to see a government that is going to get on top of this i that is going to get on top of this issue _ that is going to get on top of this issue and — that is going to get on top of this issue and help _ that is going to get on top of this issue and help people _ that is going to get on top of this issue and help people who - that is going to get on top of this issue and help people who are i that is going to get on top of this l issue and help people who are now really _ issue and help people who are now really at _ issue and help people who are now really at the — issue and help people who are now really at the mercy _ issue and help people who are now really at the mercy of _ issue and help people who are now really at the mercy of the - issue and help people who are now really at the mercy of the taliban. i really at the mercy of the taliban. the focus — really at the mercy of the taliban. the focus is — really at the mercy of the taliban. the focus is going _ really at the mercy of the taliban. the focus is going to _ really at the mercy of the taliban. the focus is going to be _ really at the mercy of the taliban. the focus is going to be a - the focus is going to be a diplomatic pressure so you have the foreign— diplomatic pressure so you have the foreign secretary holding talks with nato and _ foreign secretary holding talks with nato and g7 allies. also qatar and turkey— nato and g7 allies. also qatar and turkey hoping they can exert some influence _ turkey hoping they can exert some influence in— turkey hoping they can exert some influence in the region. there is a meeting _ influence in the region. there is a meeting of— influence in the region. there is a meeting of the permanent five of the un security council later that could be really _ un security council later that could be really important because it brings— be really important because it brings in— be really important because it brings in china and russia who are major— brings in china and russia who are major players in the region as well and will— major players in the region as well and will be — major players in the region as well and will be important to making sure that the _ and will be important to making sure that the taliban can be kept to any promises _ that the taliban can be kept to any promises that it makes. but after the military operation. after the talent _ the military operation. after the talent of— the military operation. after the talent of the last couple of weeks, the next _ talent of the last couple of weeks, the next few weeks and months are going _ the next few weeks and months are going to _ the next few weeks and months are going to be — the next few weeks and months are going to be really tricky. the next few weeks and months are going to be really tricky. let's cross to our news correspondent zoe conway who is at the afghanistan and central asian association in feltham, west london.
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the association here is just two miles away from heathrow where more than 1000 afghan refugees are quarantining in hotels. and what the association has been doing is collecting donations for those refugees. let mejust collecting donations for those refugees. let me just have a look and show you what has been coming in. just piles of clothes, nappies, toys, buggies, carseats. it has been the most incredible show of generosity. and this isjust a been the most incredible show of generosity. and this is just a fad of what they have received in the last three days. so incredible generosity coming from this community. in west london there are around 100,000 british afghans living here and this association was set up 22 years ago by someone who arrived from afghanistan. he fled the taliban in 1999. what do you
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make of the donations that you have seen coming in?— seen coming in? festival, thank you ve much seen coming in? festival, thank you very much to _ seen coming in? festival, thank you very much to the — seen coming in? festival, thank you very much to the british _ seen coming in? festival, thank you very much to the british people - seen coming in? festival, thank you very much to the british people for. very much to the british people for their generosity helping the new arrived _ their generosity helping the new arrived people through making donations. at the moment we are very busy with— donations. at the moment we are very busy with sorting out the donations. with the _ busy with sorting out the donations. with the support of volunteers and also, _ with the support of volunteers and also, distributing these donations to those _ also, distributing these donations to those people who have arrived into the _ to those people who have arrived into the united kingdom so the donation — into the united kingdom so the donation includes clothes, food, toiietries. — donation includes clothes, food, toiletries, stationery, tories. , toys _ toiletries, stationery, tories. , toys this— toiletries, stationery, tories. , toys. this is— toiletries, stationery, tories. , toys. this is important for us as a british— toys. this is important for us as a british citizen to show that we can care that — british citizen to show that we can care that we are who are in need of our support — care that we are who are in need of our support. from now we can think about— our support. from now we can think about how— our support. from now we can think about how we can start working on
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offering _ about how we can start working on offering new services to those people — offering new services to those people because they need to integrate into society. they need to improve _ integrate into society. they need to improve their understanding about the british culture, about the british— the british culture, about the british system. and we are here as an organisation to do everything as possible _ an organisation to do everything as possible to — an organisation to do everything as possible to help those people most in need _ possible to help those people most in need. ., ., ., ., in need. you are one of the volunteers _ in need. you are one of the volunteers and _ in need. you are one of the volunteers and you - in need. you are one of the volunteers and you have i in need. you are one of the. volunteers and you have just in need. you are one of the - volunteers and you have just started volunteering here in the last few days. why did you decide to help out? , , , ., days. why did you decide to help out? , , ., ., ., out? just seem to have a thick videos and _ out? just seem to have a thick videos and images _ out? just seem to have a thick videos and images on - out? just seem to have a thick videos and images on social. out? just seem to have a thick- videos and images on social media and on _ videos and images on social media and on the — videos and images on social media and on the news _ videos and images on social media and on the news. it— videos and images on social media and on the news. it was _ videos and images on social media and on the news. it was the - videos and images on social media and on the news. it was the lease i and on the news. it was the lease that i_ and on the news. it was the lease that i could — and on the news. it was the lease that i could offer. _ and on the news. it was the lease that i could offer. as— and on the news. it was the lease that i could offer. as i— and on the news. it was the leasel that i could offer. as i mentioned, i that i could offer. as i mentioned, i am _ that i could offer. as i mentioned, iam pregnant— that i could offer. as i mentioned, iam pregnant and— that i could offer. as i mentioned, i am pregnant and i— that i could offer. as i mentioned, i am pregnant and i have - that i could offer. as i mentioned, i am pregnant and i have a - i am pregnant and i have a nine—month—old _ i am pregnant and i have a nine—month—old baby- i am pregnant and i have a nine—month—old baby butl i am pregnant and i have ai nine—month—old baby but it i am pregnant and i have a i nine—month—old baby but it is i am pregnant and i have a - nine—month—old baby but it is the least _ nine—month—old baby but it is the least we — nine—month—old baby but it is the least we can— nine—month—old baby but it is the least we can do _ nine—month—old baby but it is the least we can do for— nine—month—old baby but it is the least we can do for the _ nine—month—old baby but it is the l least we can do for the newcomers. they are _ least we can do for the newcomers. they are in — least we can do for the newcomers. they are in desperate _
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least we can do for the newcomers. they are in desperate need - least we can do for the newcomers. they are in desperate need and i least we can do for the newcomers. i they are in desperate need and being offered _ they are in desperate need and being offered the _ they are in desperate need and being offered the services _ they are in desperate need and being offered the services that _ they are in desperate need and being offered the services that we - they are in desperate need and being offered the services that we can i offered the services that we can provide — offered the services that we can rovide. ., ., ., ., , provide. you have got family in cabo? l've _ provide. you have got family in cabo? we got _ provide. you have got family in cabo? i've got my _ provide. you have got family in cabo? i've got my uncles i provide. you have got family in cabo? i've got my uncles than | provide. you have got family in i cabo? i've got my uncles than their families and _ cabo? i've got my uncles than their families and children _ cabo? i've got my uncles than their families and children in _ cabo? i've got my uncles than their families and children in desperate i families and children in desperate need _ families and children in desperate need all— families and children in desperate need all the _ families and children in desperate need. all the afghans _ families and children in desperate need. all the afghans currently i families and children in desperate i need. all the afghans currently are asking _ need. all the afghans currently are asking for— need. all the afghans currently are asking for help. _ need. all the afghans currently are asking for help, asking _ need. all the afghans currently are asking for help, asking to - need. all the afghans currently are asking for help, asking to get i need. all the afghans currently are asking for help, asking to get out i asking for help, asking to get out of the _ asking for help, asking to get out of the country _ asking for help, asking to get out of the country. you _ asking for help, asking to get out of the country-— asking for help, asking to get out of the count . ., ., , ., of the country. you have been to the hotels every — of the country. you have been to the hotels every day- — of the country. you have been to the hotels every day. tell _ of the country. you have been to the hotels every day. tell me, _ of the country. you have been to the hotels every day. tell me, how i of the country. you have been to the| hotels every day. tell me, how other families that are doing? what are their worries?— families that are doing? what are their worries? they are believed to have left the _ their worries? they are believed to have left the country _ their worries? they are believed to have left the country in _ their worries? they are believed to have left the country in some i their worries? they are believed to have left the country in some kind| have left the country in some kind of safety — have left the country in some kind of safety now _ have left the country in some kind of safety now and _ have left the country in some kind of safety now and are _ have left the country in some kind of safety now and are being - have left the country in some kind of safety now and are being basicl of safety now and are being basic than needs— of safety now and are being basic than needs they _ of safety now and are being basic than needs they require - of safety now and are being basic than needs they require however| of safety now and are being basic i than needs they require however they are lost— than needs they require however they are lost knowing — than needs they require however they are lost knowing what _ than needs they require however they are lost knowing what is _ than needs they require however they are lost knowing what is going - than needs they require however they are lost knowing what is going to i are lost knowing what is going to happen— are lost knowing what is going to happen after— are lost knowing what is going to happen after the _ are lost knowing what is going to happen after the quarantine i are lost knowing what is going to i happen after the quarantine period. where _ happen after the quarantine period. where are _ happen after the quarantine period. where are they _ happen after the quarantine period. where are they going _ happen after the quarantine period. where are they going to _ happen after the quarantine period. where are they going to go, - happen after the quarantine period. where are they going to go, what . happen after the quarantine period. i where are they going to go, what are they going _ where are they going to go, what are they going to — where are they going to go, what are they going to be _ where are they going to go, what are they going to be given, _ where are they going to go, what are they going to be given, where - where are they going to go, what are they going to be given, where are i they going to be given, where are they going to be given, where are they going — they going to be given, where are they going to _ they going to be given, where are they going to be _ they going to be given, where are they going to be located, - they going to be given, where are they going to be located, they. they going to be given, where arei they going to be located, theyjust need some — they going to be located, theyjust need some answers. _ they going to be located, they 'ust need some answers.i they going to be located, they 'ust need some answers. you're planning on volunteering _ need some answers. you're planning on volunteering here _ need some answers. you're planning on volunteering here for _ need some answers. you're planning on volunteering here for a _ need some answers. you're planning on volunteering here for a few- need some answers. you're planning on volunteering here for a few more | on volunteering here for a few more months yet? i on volunteering here for a few more months yet?— months yet? i whatever i can give and provide _ months yet? i whatever i can give and provide am — months yet? i whatever i can give and provide am happy _ months yet? i whatever i can give and provide am happy to - months yet? i whatever i can give and provide am happy to offer. i
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months yet? i whatever i can give i and provide am happy to offer. they know this is — and provide am happy to offer. they know this is just _ and provide am happy to offer. know this is just the and provide am happy to offer. tip;- know this is just the beginning and provide am happy to offer. know this isjust the beginning in terms of supporting these families and in terms of donations that is the easy bit. the next bit is helping to integrate these refugees, helping to integrate these refugees, helping them to learn english and helping them to learn english and helping them to learn english and helping them really to feel at home. thank you very much, zoe, and your guests. the headlines on bbc news: rockets have been fired towards kabul airport where the us evacuation operation is drawing to a close — they were intercepted by an american anti—missile system. the uk government seeks international support to ensure the taliban allow people to leave afghanistan — as british troops from kabul land back on uk soil. president biden declares a major disaster in louisiana as powerful hurricane ida makes landfall — wiping out all power in new orleans. hurricane ida is battering the us state of louisiana,
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leaving more than a million people without power, including the whole of new orleans. having hit the gulf of mexico last week, the slow moving storm has brought what forecasters called catastrophic storm surge conditions and extreme winds to coastal areas of louisiana. nada tawfik sent this report from new orleans. this is the destructive power of ida. oh, my gosh! easily lifting the roof clear of this hospital in cut—off louisiana. these coastal areas have been the hardest hit so far. besides ferocious winds, there have been tidal surges as high as 16 feet and flash flooding. this fire station in delacroix, louisiana, posted footage before and after the storm as water rushed in. officials warn some of the most affected parts may be uninhabitable for weeks. in comparison, much of new orleans is protected by the levees and flood walls of a newly built hurricane defence system. that is being put to the test now. in the iconic french quarter,
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debris such as this roof and fallen tree branches litter the streets. and at nightfall, power went out across the entire city. in washington, president biden received a briefing on ida at the federal emergency management agency, or fema. he made an appeal to people in the region. i want to emphasise again, this is going to be a devastating, devastating hurricane. a life—threatening storm. so please, all you folks in mississippi and louisiana, mississippi and god knows, maybe even further east, take precautions. listen, take it seriously, really, very seriously. fema is sending 2,000 emergency
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workers to assist local authorities. for now, though, residents are on their own for the duration of the storm. nada tawfik, bbc news, new orleans. a little earlier, cbs correspondent michael george was in new orleans and he gave us this update. here nur learns people have had a very brutal day yesterday and is a very brutal day yesterday and is a very brutal day yesterday and is a very brutal morning. while it has weakened, the danger is still very real. people are dealing with a citywide power outage. the entire citywide power outage. the entire city is without power and no timeline as to when it will be restored. they are advising floodwaters and we have had reports that simply by trapped in their homes, even in the attics has waters continue to rise. at the same time emergency responders can reach many of those people in need of a rescue. in fact, some people who have called for emergency help have been getting a message saying there is technical difficulties on the line so it is a very dangerous situation. even though the rain and the winner have
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eased up a bit, that they concern right now is reaching those people who are trapped by the flood waters and hoping that the flood waters and the levees continue to hold. those levies have — the levees continue to hold. those levies have been _ the levees continue to hold. those levies have been strengthened i the levees continue to hold. those levies have been strengthened since hurricane katrina 16 was devastating. there had been fears that this would be more powerful. does it look like they are holding? so far they are. there were billions of dollars spent over the last 16 years strengthening and reinforcing those levies and it was found after katrina that the failure of those levies are what led to such a tragic and enormous loss of life during that time so the governor said prior to the storm that he was confident that despite the fact that it was even stronger than katrina he was confident the levees and the walls would hold. of course the storm is far from over would hold. of course the storm is farfrom over and would hold. of course the storm is far from over and the true test will be over the next couple of hours. how long a period, it is obvious the
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hours but then even once it is past it is going to be a while, isn't it? but the danger still remains. absolutely. but the storm like there is the impact can take a great and of course an issue right now is we don't know this extent of the damage so a lot of people right now are not able to communicate. power is out throughout the city and emergency lines are shut down and so we are trying to assess exactly how bad the damage is. how many people are in danger. as our emergency managers. thank you forjoining us. i spoke to you previously. you had chosen not to leave. does that still feel like the right choice for you. well, the
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levels fluctuate depending on the time of the day but i don't think that leaving is an option. and we're just hoping that things get together and can function and i hope that the security issue that has arisen in the past few days can be addressed because it is use of the security vacuum. it is making use of this absence of administration from the taliban side and we really hope that they have their game and form their government and fill these administrative roles as soon as possible. what is it like living in kabul right now for you?- possible. what is it like living in kabul right now for you? kabul is, riaht kabul right now for you? kabul is, right now. — kabul right now for you? kabul is, right now, made _ kabul right now for you? kabul is, right now, made of _ kabul right now for you? kabul is, right now, made of two _ kabul right now for you? kabul is, right now, made of two different i right now, made of two different universities that exist parallel to each other. one is the normal city that you go out into if you are flying under the radar. if your ordinary. nobody really says
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anything to you. yesterday, there was an incident at the city centre where they shot a young man because they had asked him to stop and i think either he had not heard but they shot him in the middle of the city. there are fighters to take matters into their own hands when something brushes than the wrong way. on the other end of the situation at the airport which has de—escalated and change because right now they have formalised the whole process. you end up taking buses from a specific area and then there are buffers and the witch after getting multiple checkpoints before you get get into the airport so it is not as haphazard or anarchic as it was at the gate that we saw the incident we saw happening a few days ago. there is a lot of apprehension and anxiety and people are holding their breath waiting to see what the taliban will do and we're slowly seeing policies come from the and they are appointing specific ministers with regards to education as well so we're really
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seeing how much they would be willing to negotiate on those factors. in willing to negotiate on those factors. , ., ., ., factors. in terms of the normal stuff of life. _ factors. in terms of the normal stuff of life, getting _ factors. in terms of the normal stuff of life, getting money i factors. in terms of the normal. stuff of life, getting money from the bank was an issue, is that still a problem? and getting food, all the normal stuff and people doing jobs, what is the picture like on that? well, let's break it down. with regard to the economy and banking, the banks are still shattered. there are a few atms that are functional and huge lines outside those atms. the taliban had informed the central bank that they wanted banks to start operating. there is a limit of $200 every week which should be allowed but we have not seen that in action yet. on the health sector, the normal food sector or local businesses, they are functional. and the other is the educational sector
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and that is still waiting on the start of semesters. the higher education ministry announced yesterday that they want segregated classes and they want female faculty teaching female students. that in itself is extremely impractical in afghanistan because i don't think that, in my department, we even have a single female faculty member so i don't think how we would move ahead with that and i am hoping that the universities are having these conversations with the taliban. there are ways around it. physically, the presence of a male teacher is a problem, we could do online sessions and there could be other ways, alternatives to addressing the final goal that they want. but we need to make sure that more than half of the population of afghanistan does not get locked out. neither to a ban or through policies
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that make it impractical for them to study. that make it impractical for them to stud . ., ., , ., ., study. how does that get done, because if _ study. how does that get done, because if that _ study. how does that get done, because if that is _ study. how does that get done, because if that is what - study. how does that get done, because if that is what they i study. how does that get done, | because if that is what they want study. how does that get done, i because if that is what they want to do, will people resist? the capitalistic _ do, will people resist? the capitalistic overlord - do, will people resist? lie: capitalistic overlord or do, will people resist? tie: capitalistic overlord or the do, will people resist? ti9 capitalistic overlord or the hand of god, as mentioned by adam smith, that normally has its own weight in the short term and in the long term. so with regards to private industries and private institutes which represent a very large chunk of the educational sector, it would be really up to them to raise their voice. we had a conversation with the higher education commission announced they had to segregated classes and when they protested these policies citing the impracticality and the lack of female faculty they said they were fine with letting old pious men teach female students as well. and then they asked for a policy
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recommendation in return so that they could it. so there is room for a conversation to be had so we will hope that the private sector of education, they can raise their voice. that this voice can be supported by any civil society that can do so and that the international community puts its pressure is about to make sure that, because these are the initial days. this is where we are negotiating spaces for each other�*s existence and we might accept a smaller space but it has to be a workable space. and that happens and we ensure it with the tying of the aid and low average that the united states and its allies have two what we expect out of this work so it is important and this is where the support really mean something. lincoln said he would not compromise on the right of afghans and this is the time to put their money where their mouth is and support afghans to the and how they
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set up their society. this support afghans to the and how they set up their society.— set up their society. as you said, it of, the future _ set up their society. as you said, it of, the future is _ set up their society. as you said, it of, the future is being - set up their society. as you said, | it of, the future is being revealed slowly as decision take and are rolled out. you were talking about the segregation of students. what about female lecturers. but they still going to be allowed? you mentioned male lecturers being able to teach females. is it clear what will happen with girls in school at this point? will happen with girls in school at this oint? , , :, this point? girls have, upon their announcement, _ this point? girls have, upon their announcement, they _ this point? girls have, upon their announcement, they have - this point? girls have, upon their announcement, they have said i this point? girls have, upon their l announcement, they have said that they want girls and women to be educated. girls schools are functional. again, this is actually a term break, in a way. they are encouraging female faculty. they want only female faculty to teach female students. the problem is afghanistan does not have enough female faculty with the credentials that normally female faculty do. so the universities are really
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scrambling to try and find a way around it but the only opening that the taliban gave us in the situation with is no female faculty they can let old pious men teach in their stead. so, again, we really have to see exactly where we push and pull and where we settle eventually with regards to these policies. it is really interesting _ regards to these policies. it is really interesting to _ regards to these policies. it is really interesting to talk to you and we will talk to no doubt. thank you very much. thank you very much. a un watchdog says north korea appears to have re—started a nuclear reactor after a gap of almost three years. the assessment is based on satellite images because inspectors haven't been allowed into the country since 2009. the facility involved is widely believed to produce weapons—grade plutonium. our correspondent in seoul, laura bicker has more. this is a significant development spotted by the un watchdog. these experts are not able to get into north korea and were expelled by the
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capital back in 2009 so they rely on satellite images and what they have seen is activity at the nuclear reactor. that would suggest that material is being made that could be used in nuclear weapons. now, that site has been inactive since december 2018 and for those paying attention you might have noticed thatis attention you might have noticed that is just a few months after the north korean leader met with the us president, donald trump. and it has remained inactive until experts believe around july this year. in january this year he promised that he would update its nuclear arsenal, make more tactical weapons, miniaturised warheads and even make a super large hydrogen bomb but there has been no activity to suggest that he was on his way to achieving this aim. however, now, that activity has started. so something has changed. i think it is worth noting that within the last
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few months north korea has been extremely quiet, focusing on domestic issues. internally they are dealing with a deepening economic crisis and widespread food shortages which the regime openly admits. the site was on the table when it came to negotiations between kimjong—un and donald trump. they said they it in return for sanctions released but since the new president, since president biden has taken office, he has said he is willing to willing to talk to north korea but north korea has not exactly been a policy priority. this action here that we are seeing might be away that pyongyang is signalling it might want to move the top of washington's to do list. the headlines on bbc news: rockets have been fired towards kabul airport — where the us evacuation operation is drawing to a close. they were intercepted by an american anti—missile system. the uk government seeks international support to ensure the taliban allow people to leave afghanistan — as british troops
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from kabul arrive back on uk soil. president biden declares a major disaster in louisiana as powerful hurricane ida makes landfall — wiping out all power in new orleans. the danger is not weakening at all. we're hearing reports of flood waters rising in many communities. trees coming down, bringing down power lines. roofs collapsing. the un says north korea appears to have restarted a reactor capable of producing plutonium for nuclear weapons. hospitals are at capacity in tokyo. we follow a team of doctors that goes door—to—door — working to keep covid patients alive. and coming up this hour: we look at the future of staycations after a bumper yearfor uk holidays — as many have opted to holiday at home due to the uncertainty around covid travel restrictions. more now on afghanistan, where rockets
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were intercepted as they were fired towards kabul international airport, as the us evacuation operation is drawing to a close. it comes as british ministers prepare to take part in international meetings aimed at defining a joint approach to the taliban in afghanistan. the foreign secretary, dominic raab, will hold talks with his counterparts from the g7 — as well as nato and qatar. mikey kay, a former raf helicopter pilot officer who worked in national security and aviation for 20 years and undertook two tours of afghanistan, explained what the security impact of the western withdrawal might be over the next few months. i think the big question and the travesty of all of this is the way that the afghan national army, which the us and uk have mentored for over two decades, the billions spent on that,
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we know about the equipment which has been seized by the taliban but that entity, the afghan national army, could have been utilised to ameliorate that now and that could have been done if talks between the taliban and the government of afghanistan had been pushed through by the biden administration which was a prerequisite of the agreement which was adopted by the trump administration so what you are starting to see are the negative consequences of, at the political level, of pushing these agreements through and the lack of embracing the government of afghanistan and the military entity that has been trained over the last 20 years. those over the horizon attacks being carried out by the us against is targets and, in the latest one, a vehicle carrying multiple suicide bombers, it has been described as, heading for an attack at the airport, was hit. what are these indicating about the intelligence the taliban have welcomed this latest air strike. this process, that you are seeing, is called the kill chain. and it is a process that
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has evolved over many, many years of uk and us intelligence agencies coordinating, sometimes not coordinating with the pentagon, sometimes doing it internally through the cia and other times it is the pentagon who conduct these air strikes and there is a whole system that goes on when you are targeting someone or something, someone driving a big bomb, which is a car. what are the intelligence channels the us are using? we are in uncharted waters.
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in terms of the way that these air strikes are being done and so long as the us has air superiority over afghanistan they will need to be coordinating in some way with them on these air strikes. the key bit here is, how long do the us have air superiority over afghanistan? that is the key question i keep asking. the air superiority is the only light rage right now and eternally the us have over the taliban and how long can they keep that is the they question?
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scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, is self—isolating after being identified as a close contact of someone with covid—19. she said she would remain in isolation pending the outcome of a pcr test. scotland has seen a record 7—thousand new coronavirus cases in the latest 2a hour period. the scottish government reported more than seven—thousand new cases on sunday, but this includes some tests submitted more than 48 hours earlier. there are currently 507 people in hospital with covid across the country, including 52 in intensive care. daily cases in scotland fell to around 1,000 in early august, but have risen again in recent weeks. the surge in infections came after schools returned from the summer holidays — deputy first ministerjohn swinney said there was no doubt the return of pupils and staff contributed to the unprecedented levels. professorjason leitch, the national clinical director for scotland, said his health worker colleagues are already feeling the pressure of delivering covid and non—covid nhs services. adding a new infectious disease on top of what we already manage,
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diabetes and stroke and so on, of course that is stretched. it is stretched in paris and london and here but the problem is the only tap you can kind of turn—off is press boarding surgery, spawning what we call non—emergency care, but it is pretty emergency if you are waiting for your wisdom teeth or whatever, so we were just managing that backlog and now one of the things we are having to do in some hospitals in the country is turn that tap off again and postpone people's care which the health care system hits doing but you cannot magic up doctors, nurses and beds. it is all very well building a bid, you have to stuff the bid with the right people and moving people around is one of the ways we have to resolve some of that i am afraid. new zealand has reported its first recorded death linked to pfizer's covid—19 vaccine.
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the health ministry said a woman suffered a rare side effect leading to inflammation of her heart muscle. pfizer said such side effects were extremely rare. the news of the death comes as the country battles an outbreak of the delta variant after nearly six months of being virus free. a lockdown in auckland has been extended by two weeks. the azores, switzerland, and canada are among seven destinations on the uk government's green travel list today. denmark, finland, liechtenstein and lithuania also move to the list, which means travellers arriving in the uk won't have to quarantine. but thailand and montenegro are being added to the red travel list, meaning arrivals must enter a quarantine hotel. as week two of the paralympics gets underway in tokyo, more than 10,000 people with covid—19 are waiting for treatment in the city. hospitals say they can't deal with the current numbers — let alone if there were an outbreak in the paralympic village. our tokyo correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes reports. in the back of the car, dr kazuma tashiro is trying to find a hospital bed for one of his covid patients.
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in this densely—packed part of southern tokyo, there are now dozens of covid patients who need to be in hospital but can't get a bed. dr tashiro and his team are a literal lifeline. in this block, a 61—year—old man is very sick and on oxygen. so, last night i called him to check if he was alive and he could talk with me at the time, but this morning i couldn't talk with him by phone so i'm very anxious for his health condition. as soon as he enters, it's apparent the man is alive. it turns out he hasn't been able to pay his phone bill, so it's been cut off. he has also removed his oxygen mask, and, as he checks, he finds his blood oxygen level is very low. his saturate is below two, the blood oxygen level is only 92%,
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it is not good value, so i put the oxygen mask to his mouth, and please keep it to protect your life. and what's going to happen now about his bill? ah! this is for telephone bill, he is living alone. so, he couldn't pay his telephone bill because of his very bad condition so i received it and now i'm going to the convenience store to pay it, pay for it. it's the arrival of the delta variant here injapan that has led to this explosion of covid cases. if you look back to mid—july, there were around 1,500 new cases a day. by mid—august, that hadjumped to 6,000. and now we're seeing the same with seriously ill. at the end ofjuly, dr tashiro and his team were treating just one seriously ill person. last week, that had jumped to 50. phone rings. back at base, staff are constantly
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working the phones, trying to find beds. so, what if there's an outbreak at the paralympics? yeah, i think there are no room to treat the paralympic members because manyjapanese people cannot get into the hospitals. it's time to move again. a new address and a new set of ppe. like the first man, this patient has not been vaccinated. this is the pattern now. the man is in bad condition. his lips are turning blue and he's having difficulty breathing. dr tashiro thinks he may have pneumonia. he really needs to be in hospital. it is really difficult for us to make a definite diagnosis. so, he needs to go to hospital now? yes, yes, yes, definitely. and what did they say, is there any beds or you don't know? yes, now, no beds. dr tashiro and his team are keeping
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these people alive but across tokyo there are now more than 10,000 covid patients waiting for a hospital bed. each extra day they are forced to wait, the more likely it is they will die. rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in tokyo. lee "scratch" perry, one of the most influential figures injamaican music, has died at the age of 85. a pioneer of reggae and dub, perry produced artists from the wailers to the beastie boys and released more than 70 albums. the jamaican prime minister was among those to pay tribute. lloyd parks is ajamaican reggae vocalist and bass player who's worked with bunny wailer, bob marley — and lee "scratch" perry. i would remember lee "scratch" perry as one of the most significant and one of the best reggae producers in
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jamaica, out ofjamaica. i have worked with lee "scratch" perry and i can tell you when he calls you for a session he gets things out of your you never knew were inside. he is like a medical man. he will be sadly missed for each and every one of us. he is one of the greatest producers, worked with bob marley, myself, and it goes on and on. bob marley had three styles and one of them came from lee "scratch" perry and one comes from bob marley himself and one came from the wailers. the headlines on bbc news: rockets have been fired towards kabul airport where — the us evacuation operation is drawing to a close.
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they were intercepted by an american anti—missile system. the uk government seeks international support to ensure the taliban allow people to leave afghanistan — as british troops from kabul land back on uk soil. president biden declares a major disaster in louisiana as powerful hurricane ida makes landfall — wiping out all power in new orleans. summer 2021 has been a bumper yearfor uk holidays, with many of us opting not to go abroad because of the uncertainty around covid travel restrictions. some councils have reported record breaking numbers of visitors and resorts like bournemouth say hotel occupancy has been at almost 100% this summer. geeta pendse is on north shore beach in llandudno for us this morning. this summer has been particularly busy as we have heard because of the boom on people staying in the uk for their holidays this year. the hospitality sector has really
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welcomed the influx of visitors but with that has also come concerns around ensuring they are covid—safe. in a moment i will be speaking to one business about how they are striking that balance but first my colleague has been taking a look at our love of the uk getaway. from brighton to bournemouth, the south coast is just one area that has seen record numbers of tourists this summer. it has been so busy, even hotel managers like olivia o'sullivan have had to help clean rooms. been full pretty much since we started, probably about 96% occupancy. is it sustainable? i don't know. once everything else opens up, i don't know if people will come back to the uk. but it's notjust beach resorts. here at salisbury cathedral, city—break seekers have also been flocking in. has staycation saved the day for the cathedral? it has certainly made a huge difference.
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we are seeing people coming to salisbury and salisbury cathedral from right across the country, so we are feeling very positive about the future, but knowing that we still have quite a long way to go. but the issue now is what happens next. as the summer tapers away, they've got the autumn to think of, but, crucially, they are already looking ahead to the summer of 2022. a summer they hope will see more of us holiday at home. duncan kennedy, bbc news. one of the great attractions is this magnificent limestone headline behind me and for the more adventurous it is not just about looking at it but about climbing it and someone who knows all about that is my guest mattjones. you run a rock climbing business and i know like many in the hospitality sector your business has really genuinely been booming.
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what has it been like? this year and particularly last year as soon as we came out of lockdown business just hit the roof. it has been fantastic, good for the town, good to see it so busy. are there particular types of people coming in, families? mostly families i deal with. but there have been groups when it has been allowed of course. normally they would go abroad this time of year and it is their first time in north wales and it is good for them to see what we have on offer here which has been amazing. it is quite early in the day but at peak time it can get very busy here and there are concerns about covid. is that something you have been worried about? because the infection rate is increasing in wales. yes, it has been a bit
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of a concern here. we had the town to ourselves during lockdown when the travel was restricted and when that eased it became crazily busy here and of course we were all a bit "oh," it took us by surprise and it definitely was a concern. it still is but i think outdoors because we have so much outdoors here for people to do it is perhaps less of a concern. we have the beach, there is a lot of outdoor attractions. you live on the other side of the shore. i cannot imagine what it is like to wake up every day to this view. what has it been like for you personally to live here and see people coming back? brilliant. and i hope we can sustain it because most of my clients it is their first time in north wales and they have seen what we have got to offer here and hopefully that will keep going year after year. you do not have to go abroad
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to have a good time. thank you so much. it is quite a moody start to the day but i am told the sun will come out, but, regardless of whether it will, you can see why so many people come to this beauty spot and anyone coming out here should have an ice cream, which is what i plan to do later. an increasing number of graduates arejoining the prison service. new figures show applications forjobs have doubled over the past three years, with 2a applications for every available spot on one programme. luxmy gopal has been finding out why. i'm not making special amendments for anyone else. i'm not asking you to bring stuff in. come on. you know my boundaries. practising for situations they could be facing in earnest in just a few weeks. you did that really clearly, "i'm not going to do this now, "you know the rules, this is where we are going." these young graduates are training to be prison officers, not the most traditional career path for students leaving university. what do your family make of your
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decision to go into this role? obviously everyone was shocked, and, i've got to be honest, their first reaction was they were a bit worried, but, at the end of the day, they were simply proud. the charity unlocked recruits graduates for its intense prison officer programme, with lectures, practical assessments and scenario training. after six short weeks, frankie and her fellow trainees will start theirjobs in prisons across the country. unlocked haven't sugar coated it whatsoever, i know there are going to be some really hard days, but what i want to do is go in there and make people's lives better. i know that they are going to be having a way worse day than me, even when i'm having a bad day, and so i know that anything i can do to help them support and go through probably the toughest moment of their lives, i'm up for that. the recent drama series time, while gritty, also offers a more
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nuanced portrayal of prison officers than many of the graduates grew up seeing in film and tv. and i think the prison officer role for a long time has been like a big burly man, quite aggressive, but you also see empathy and compassion from a prison officer as well, which you don't see very often. i've been into the prison, and it's also incredibly human as well when you go into a prison, you've got people laughing and chatting and being extremely friendly with each other as well. i can make it worth your while. jack, i don't like the way you have just spoken to me there. - serving prison officers mentor the graduates, preparing them for a workplace environment where the number of assaults on staff have nearly tripled in the past decade. nobody is hiding the fact that prisons are exceptionally challenging places to work in. what i would say is that, actually, there's an awful lot of good work that goes on in prisons, and some fantastic people who work in prisons. you can deal with everything
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from somebody who is struggling with self—harm, you can deal with violence and aggression, you can deal with people who have got substance misuse issues, and you have to fill the needs of those people and try to make a difference their lives. a record number of graduates, nearly 3,000, have applied to the programme this year. previous cohorts have gone on to make a difference. one participant, for example, when prisoners came in, they often did not have reading glasses. she managed to fund 1,000 pairs of reading glasses, so when prisoners come into that prison now, they have glasses, so they can access education, they can fill in forms for work, for housing. it's a transformative thing. actually, it's not a kind of huge piece of work, but, for that prison, it has made a real difference. i am hoping to one day have an honest conversation with a prisoner, and hopefully make his life better as a consequence. that's all i'm hoping for, just small changes in someone else's life. for these soon to be prison
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officers, it is more thanjust a job, it is a mission to help with rehabilitation, to break the cycle of reoffending, and to reform the criminaljustice system from within. luxmy gopal, bbc news. the critically—claimed play east is east returns to the birmingham rep — 25 years after it first opened there. the comedy drama, which was adapted into an award—winning film, centres around a mixed ethnic household living in salford in the seventies. butjust how relevant is the autobographical play in today's world? the bbc asian network's shabnam mahmood has been to rehearsals. 25 years after it first opened on stage in birmingham, the comedy drama east is east returns to the theatre. there is a new cast, new director, but the story, which explores the lives of a pakistani father, his english wife and their children, remains the same. we have been married — children, remains the same. we have been married 25 _ children, remains the same. we have been married 25 years. _ children, remains the same. we have been married 25 years. yes, - children, remains the same. we have been married 25 years. yes, the i
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been married 25 years. yes, the famil . been married 25 years. yes, the family- and _ been married 25 years. yes, the family- and it — been married 25 years. yes, the family. and it is _ been married 25 years. yes, the family. and it is the _ been married 25 years. yes, the family. and it is the struggles i family. and it is the struggles between _ family. and it is the struggles between an older generation and the younger— between an older generation and the younger generation. struggles between people who have been raised in other— between people who have been raised in other places and they have raised their kids _ in other places and they have raised their kids in — in other places and they have raised their kids in a totally different place — their kids in a totally different place with totally different rules and they grew up with different rules — and they grew up with different rules. and it is about their partnership and struggle to maintain that partnership within a changing world _ that partnership within a changing world and — that partnership within a changing world and growing children. although it is set in the — world and growing children. although it is set in the 70s, _ world and growing children. although it is set in the 70s, the _ world and growing children. although it is set in the 70s, the themes i it is set in the 70s, the themes covered in the play, like racism, domestic violence and arranged marriages, are still relevant to any audience. :,, marriages, are still relevant to any audience. :, , marriages, are still relevant to any audience. :, audience. those conversations have never been — audience. those conversations have never been more — audience. those conversations have never been more widespread i audience. those conversations have never been more widespread than l audience. those conversations have i never been more widespread than they are now than they are happening in the mainstream. so i think this play feels like it speaks even more powerfully to the modern time than 25 years ago. powerfully to the modern time than 25 years ago-— powerfully to the modern time than 25 years ago. since premiering here in 1996 east — 25 years ago. since premiering here in 1996 east is _ 25 years ago. since premiering here in 1996 east is east _ 25 years ago. since premiering here
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in 1996 east is east went _ 25 years ago. since premiering here in 1996 east is east went on - 25 years ago. since premiering here in 1996 east is east went on to i 25 years ago. since premiering here in 1996 east is east went on to be . in 1996 east is east went on to be made into a bafta award—winning movie of the same name. some of the film's actors became household names. it film's actors became household names. , :, :, :, :, , , film's actors became household names. :, :, :, , , :, names. it is an honour to step into those shoes- _ names. it is an honour to step into those shoes. you _ names. it is an honour to step into those shoes. you can _ names. it is an honour to step into those shoes. you can say - names. it is an honour to step into those shoes. you can say to i names. it is an honour to step into| those shoes. you can say to people at my age who are not born when it first came out, everyone kind of knows this. because it is such a classic it is an honour to be trusted with this part. b5 classic it is an honour to be trusted with this part. as soon as i watched the _ trusted with this part. as soon as i watched the film _ trusted with this part. as soon as i watched the film it _ trusted with this part. as soon as i watched the film it is _ trusted with this part. as soon as i watched the film it is a _ trusted with this part. as soon as i watched the film it is a beautiful. watched the film it is a beautiful creation, — watched the film it is a beautiful creation, a — watched the film it is a beautiful creation, a revolution for its time and even — creation, a revolution for its time and even though i was not born i can appreciate _ and even though i was not born i can appreciate it — and even though i was not born i can appreciate it. the and even though i was not born i can appreciate it— appreciate it. the 25th anniversary -roduction appreciate it. the 25th anniversary production of— appreciate it. the 25th anniversary production of east _ appreciate it. the 25th anniversary production of east is _ appreciate it. the 25th anniversary production of east is east - appreciate it. the 25th anniversary production of east is east will- appreciate it. the 25th anniversary production of east is east will also| production of east is east will also be shown at the national theatre in london later this year. shabnam mahmood, bbc news. the american actor ed asner has died at the age of 91. he was best known for playing the fictionaljournalist lou grant — and voicing the lead character
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in the pixarfilm up. asner won seven emmy awards, the most for a male performer. his family said he passed away peacefully yesterday morning. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with carole. if you are looking for rain in the forecast this week there's nothing significant coming our way. there will be a lot of cloud in the next few days. some of that will produce light patchy rain or drizzle but for most it will remain dry and temperatures round about average. high pressure still firmly in charge of the weather keeping things settle down and you can see the breeze coming around from the just accentuating a chilly feel at times. especially along the rocky coastline. quite a bit of cloud around, some good breaks across parts of scotland this afternoon. one or two on the site. northern ireland seeing some sunny breaks.
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west wales and around the midlands and east anglia will also see some breaks but the message as there is a lot of cloud and across parts of the east and north—east it will be thick enough to patchy light rain and drizzle. along the north sea coastline temperatures 1a to 18 and inland around 20. this evening and overnight we return to that scenario of a lot of cloud. the breeze coming down the north sea and across the english channel. temperature is very similar to the nightjust gone, falling away between ten and 1a or 15. tomorrow once again we start with a lot of cloud. high pressure still towards the north—west. this breeze coming in from the north sea moving across the english channel. still a lot of cloud around. parts of western scotland and parts of northern ireland, northern england and into the south—east the favoured places for sunshine. along the north
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sea coastline temperatures will be cooler. as we head into wednesday still very much high pressure with us and still the wind rotating around it from an author north—easterly direction. accentuating the cool feel along the north sea coastline. the brightest breaks across scotland and northern ireland but we will see a few along north—west wales as well. temperatures in the sunshine 20 degrees and with lighter blazes across parts of western scotland it will feel quite nice. this latest status quo prevails and next week we could see some rain.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11: rockets have been fired towards kabul airport where the us evacuation operation is drawing to a close — they were intercepted by an american anti—missile system. the uk government seeks international support to ensure the taliban allow people to leave afghanistan — as british troops from kabul arrive back on uk soil. hurricane ida has now weakened to a tropical storm — after president biden declared a major disaster in louisiana as powerful winds and rain wiped out all power in new orleans. the danger is not weakening at all. we are hearing reports of floodwaters rising in many communities, there are downed trees that are bringing down power lines, roofs collapsing.
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people travelling to the uk from canada, denmark and 5 other new �*green list�* countries will not need to isolate as the uk's latest covid travel rules come into force. a new law is being introduced to make school uniforms cheaper in england and wales this autumn — but won't be in place in time for the new school year. american actor ed asner — best known for playing fictional tv newsman lou grant and voicing the lead of the animated film up — has died aged 91. and coming up, more success for team gb in the paralympics in tokyo, as andrew small takes gold in the men's t33 and phoebe paterson pine takes gold in the archery. rockets have been fired towards kabul international airport,
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where the us evacuation operation is drawing to a close. about five rockets flew over the afghan capital, before a us anti—missile system stopped them. it isn't known who fired them. it comes as british ministers prepare to take part in international meetings aimed at defining a joint approach to the taliban in afghanistan. jon donnison has the details. back in britain. some of the final raf planes from kabul arriving at brize norton airbase in oxfordshire last night, carrying uk troops and officials. earlierflights had brought more afghan refugees, and the man who led the effort to bring them home, ambassador laurie bristow. one plane even landed with an extra passenger on board. baby girl havva was born during the flight. a new life heading for a new land. the evacuation marks the end of the uk's 20—year military involvement in afghanistan.
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in recent weeks, the raf scrambled to airlift 15,000 people, most of them afghan refugees, before the taliban deadline for foreign troops to withdraw by the end of august. but hundreds more remain stranded, both uk citizens and eligible refugees. the taliban has said they will be allowed to leave. but with fear and tensions increasing, it remains to be seen if the islamist group will honour that pledge. and potential danger is not limited to the taliban. a local branch of the so—called islamic state group killed more than 170 people in thursday's bomb attack, including mohammad niazi, a taxi driverfrom hampshire who travelled to kabul to bring his family back. his wife, samina, and their baby daughter also died. mohammad was one of the best men we have in the community, working hard to give the best life for his kids.
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yesterday the us launched a drone strike against a car which it said was carrying more is suicide bombers. and this morning, five rockets were fired towards kabul international airport. it's not known by whom, but they were reported to have been intercepted by a us anti—missile system. and with a humanitarian crisis looming, the uk is promising it will continue to support those left behind. today, ministers will reach out to other nations, including turkey and qatar, who they hope may have more influence over the taliban, afghanistan's new rulers. jon donnison, bbc news. rajini vaidyanathan is covering events from delhi. this morning, images started to circulate on social media which showed huge plumes of smoke in the vicinity of kabul airport and eyewitnesses say that they saw rockets being fired in the direction of the airport, and the eyewitnesses say they were launched from a vehicle. now, we have had this now
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confirmed by the white house. they say president biden has been updated on the situation. some us media and the reuters news agency is reporting at the moment that at least one of those rockets was intercepted by a missile defence system, although that has not been directly confirmed to us by the white house. in this white house statement it said that us evacuation operations, and of course the us is also packing up everything else ahead of the deadline tomorrow on tuesday, august 31, well, those operations will continue despite this heightened security threat. only a few days ago, presidentjoe biden saying it it was highly likely that there would be another terror attack in the next 24—36 hours, so in this kind of timeframe, after of course thursday's devastating suicide attack at the airport, which claimed more than 170 lives. our political correspondent nick eardley explained what the uk
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government is doing to get remaining evacuees out of kabul. the government this morning when asked wouldn't put a number on how many people who are eligible to come to the uk had been left in afghanistan, who hadn't managed to get out of the airlift. the last week ministers were talking about it being up to around 1000. labor think it is more. the question is what happens now? we heard the taliban say to various foreign governments yesterday around 90 of them releasing a letter saying they have been given assurances by the taliban that safe passage for either foreign nationals or people with the right documentation from afghanistan would be allowed a safe passage out of the country. the question is how the international community can enforce that, what leveraged the uk and its
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allies have to make sure that that promise is kept to? we heard from the uk government ministerjames cleverly this morning that he was sceptical that that promise would be met. :, :, , , :, met. have a listen. it is not possible — met. have a listen. it is not possible for _ met. have a listen. it is not possible for anybody - met. have a listen. it is not possible for anybody to i met. have a listen. it is not| possible for anybody to give absolute assurances. we are working with international partners to try and facilitate that repatriation and evacuation. of course we have also received _ evacuation. of course we have also received commitments from the taliban, — received commitments from the taliban, obviously we are sceptical about— taliban, obviously we are sceptical about that — taliban, obviously we are sceptical about that but as the prime minister has said. _ about that but as the prime minister has said, we willjudge them on their— has said, we willjudge them on their conduct rather than their words — their conduct rather than their words. they have said they want to be treated — words. they have said they want to be treated like a legitimate government and there is a long way to go— government and there is a long way to go before we might consider that, but we _ to go before we might consider that, but we are _ to go before we might consider that, but we are willing to engage with them _ but we are willing to engage with them based on what they do. if they start acting — them based on what they do. if they start acting like a government, stop facilitating _ start acting like a government, stop facilitating both internal travel and external travel from
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afghanistan, then we will engage with them on that basis but what we are not— with them on that basis but what we are notable — with them on that basis but what we are not able to do is give them absolute — are not able to do is give them absolute guarantees. that are not able to do is give them absolute guarantees.— are not able to do is give them absolute guarantees. that is the uk government's _ absolute guarantees. that is the uk government's take _ absolute guarantees. that is the uk government's take this _ absolute guarantees. that is the uk government's take this morning. i l government's take this morning. i have too safe for all the talk of keeping this schemes open, there isn't much detail at the moment about how that might operate, what should people do if they didn't manage to get to kabul airport but have documentation to get to the uk, what their immediate action should be. we know from having spoken to a lot of them that many are still deeply worried about how they will be treated by the taliban stop no detail yet for example about hubs in the region, about where people should go in neighbouring countries, if they want to claim asylum or refugee in the uk. the labour party has been calling for more detail about what will happen and also suggesting that the number of eligible people who didn't make it
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onto flights in the last couple of weeks is far higher than the government is saying. they have accused ministers of smyrna, saying it could be as many as 5000. have a listen to the shadow minister at this morning. listen to the shadow minister at this morning-— listen to the shadow minister at this morninu. :: :: :: , , this morning. 5000 is the number alone labor— this morning. 5000 is the number alone labor mps _ this morning. 5000 is the number alone labor mps are _ this morning. 5000 is the number alone labor mps are dealing i this morning. 5000 is the number alone labor mps are dealing with. j alone labor mps are dealing with. presumably there are other people dealing _ presumably there are other people dealing with these cases so the government is trying to put some kind of— government is trying to put some kind of spin on these numbers, but the numbers are much higher. our armed _ the numbers are much higher. our armed forces and diplomats and officials — armed forces and diplomats and officials out in afghanistan have done _ officials out in afghanistan have done an— officials out in afghanistan have done an incredible job, we should be so proud _ done an incredible job, we should be so proud of— done an incredible job, we should be so proud of what they have done but they have _ so proud of what they have done but they have been badly let down by their political masters who have had 18 months— their political masters who have had 18 months to plan for this, have completely failed to plan wobbly. let's not — completely failed to plan wobbly. let's not forget the french government started evacuating people back in— government started evacuating people back in may so that the government
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has been _ back in may so that the government has been asleep at the wheel on this _ has been asleep at the wheel on this they— has been asleep at the wheel on this. they underestimated the number of people _ this. they underestimated the number of people left behind, they should be level— of people left behind, they should be level with the british people and tell us— be level with the british people and tell us what is going on on the ground — tell us what is going on on the ground and then we can perhaps start to see _ ground and then we can perhaps start to see a _ ground and then we can perhaps start to see a government that is going to -et to see a government that is going to get on _ to see a government that is going to get on top _ to see a government that is going to get on top of this issue and start to help _ get on top of this issue and start to help those people who are now really _ to help those people who are now really at _ to help those people who are now really at the mercy of the taliban. the focus — really at the mercy of the taliban. the focus today is going to be on diplomatic pressure. you have the foreign secretary dominic raab holding talks with nato and g7 allies, also qatar and turkey in the hope they can exert some influence in the region. there is a meeting of the permanent five of the un security council later, that could be important because it brings in china and russia to are major players in the region and will be important to making sure the taliban can be kept to any promises that it makes. but after the military operation, after that airlift of the last couple of weeks, the next few weeks and months will be really
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tricky. hurricane ida is battering the us state of louisiana, leaving more than a million people without power, including the whole of new orleans. it's since been downgraded to a tropical storm. having hit the gulf of mexico last week, the slow moving storm has brought what forecasters called catastrophic storm surge conditions and extreme winds to coastal areas of louisiana. nada tawfik sent this report from new orleans. this is these destructive power of hurricane ida. easily lifting the roof clear of this hospital in louisiana. these coastal areas have been the hardest hit so far besides ferocious winds there have been tidal surges as high as 16 feet and flash flooding. this fire station posted footage before and after the storm as water rushed in. officials want some of the most effective parts may be uninhabitable for
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weeks. much of new orleans is protected by a newly built hurricane defence system. that is being put to the test now. in the iconic french quarter debris such as this roof and fallen tree branches littered the streets. at night for power went out across the entire city. in washington, president biden received a briefing. he made an appeal to people in the region. i a briefing. he made an appealto people in the region.— people in the region. i want to emphasise _ people in the region. i want to emphasise again _ people in the region. i want to emphasise again this - people in the region. i want to emphasise again this is - people in the region. i want to emphasise again this is going | people in the region. i want to i emphasise again this is going to be a devastating, devastating hurricane. a life—threatening storm. so please, all you folks in mississippi and louisiana and god knows maybe even further east, take cautions. take it seriously. really very seriously. cautions. take it seriously. really very seriously-— very seriously. they are sending 2000 emergency _ very seriously. they are sending 2000 emergency workers i
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very seriously. they are sending 2000 emergency workers to i very seriously. they are sending i 2000 emergency workers to assist. for now though, residents are on their own facing the storm. a little earlier, cbs correspondent michael george was in new orleans and he gave us this update. here in new orleans, people have had a very brutal day yesterday and it's a very brutal morning. while hurricane ida has weakened, the danger is certainly very real. people dealing with a citywide power outage, the entire city is without power with no timeline as to when it will be restored. there is also rising flood waters. we've even heard reports that some people are trapped in their homes, even in their attics, as the waters continue to rise. at the same time, emergency responders can't reach many of those people who are in need of a rescue. in fact, some people who have called for emergency help have been getting a message saying there are technical difficulties on the line, so right now it's a very dangerous situation. even though the rain and wind have eased up a bit, the big concern right now is reaching those people who are trapped by the floodwaters, hoping the flood walls and the levees continue to hold.
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and those levies have been strengthened since hurricane katrina 16 years ago, which was devastating. there have been fears hurricane ida would be more powerful. does it look like they are holding? so far they are. there was billions of dollars spent over the last 16 years strengthening, reinforcing those levies. it was found after katrina that the failure of those levies are what led to such a tragic and enormous loss of life during that storm, so the governor said prior to the storm that he was confident despite the fact ida was even stronger than katrina, he was confidence the levies and the flood walls would hold. so far that has been the case but of course the storm is really far from over. the true test will be the next several hours. how long a period, it is obviously hours but then even though once it has passed, it's going to be a while when the danger still remains. absolutely.
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with a storm like this the impact can take a great deal of time and of course an issue right now is we don't know the extent of the damage. a lot of people right now aren't able to communicate, power is out throughout the city, emergency lines are shut down and so we are still trying to assess exactly how bad the damage is, how many people are in danger, as are emergency managers. the headlines on bbc news: american anti—missile systems have intercepted rockets fired towards kabul airport — where the us evacuation operation is drawing to a close. the uk government seeks international support to ensure the taliban allow people to leave afghanistan — as british troops from kabul arrive back on uk soil. hurricane ida has now weakened to a tropical storm — after president biden declared a major disaster in louisiana as powerful winds and rain wiped out
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all power in new orleans. the who has said the increase in covid transmission rates across europe is "deeply worrying". in a press conference, the regional director hans kluge said a number of countries were experiencing low vaccination take—up in priority populations. several countries are starting to observe an increased burden on hospitals and more deaths. last week, there was an 11% increase in the number of deaths in the region. with the one reliable projection expecting 236,000 deaths in europe by december one. three factors account for this increase. the first is the more transmissible delta variant, now reported in 50 countries in the region. the second factor is the easing of public
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health measures and the third is the seasonal surge in trouble. driving a significant growth in case numbers in most countries. we are seeing a particularly steep increase in cases in the balkans, the caucasus and the central asian republics. we must be fast in maintaining protection of including vaccination and masks. vaccines are the path towards reopening societies and stabilising economies. despite this we remain challenged by insufficient production, insufficient access and insufficient vaccine acceptance. the azores, switzerland, and canada are among seven destinations on the government's green travel list today. denmark, finland, liechtenstein and lithuania also move to the list which means travellers arriving in the uk won't have to quarantine. but thailand and montenegro are being added to the red travel list, meaning arrivals must enter
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a quarantine hotel. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, is self—isolating after being identified as a close contact of someone with covid—19. she said she would remain in isolation pending the outcome of a pcr test. scotland has seen a record 7,000 new coronavirus cases in the latest 2a hour period. schools and colleges in wales will be given new ozone disinfectant machines. more than 1,800 devices will be bought by the welsh government at a cost of £3.3 million. the aim is to reduce the time and expense of cleaning classrooms and lecture theatres after positive cases of coronavirus. 35 weeks pregnant and hospitalised with covid—19, 28—year—old hajrah aslam had to be placed into an induced coma earlier this year. she was struggling to breath and her oxygen levels
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were dangerously low. this was hours after doctors delivered her first child through a c—section. her family were warned several times, she may not make it. it would be six weeks before hajrah woke and a further two before she could finally meet her baby, huzayfah. hajrah was sent to rehab to relearn how to look after herself and build enough strength to feed her son. i'm pleased to say hajrah aslam is back at home in peterborough and joins me now. welcome. thank you very much for joining us. you have been through a tough ordeal. how are you and your son now? i tough ordeal. how are you and your son now? :, ,:, tough ordeal. how are you and your son now? :, :, :, :, son now? i am so glad i am home. it's like son now? i am so glad i am home. it's like a — son now? i am so glad i am home. it's like a dream _ son now? i am so glad i am home. it's like a dream come _ son now? i am so glad i am home. it's like a dream come true. i son now? i am so glad i am home. it's like a dream come true. we i son now? i am so glad i am home. | it's like a dream come true. we are both doing well. flan it's like a dream come true. we are both doing well.— both doing well. can you take us back to that _ both doing well. can you take us back to that moment _ both doing well. can you take us back to that moment in - both doing well. can you take us back to that moment in january i both doing well. can you take us i back to that moment in january when back to that moment injanuary when you were heavily pregnant and also ill with covid? how are you that time? i ill with covid? how are you that time? a a, a, a ill with covid? how are you that time? _, a, " a,
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time? i contracted covid-19 on the 15th of january _ time? i contracted covid-19 on the 15th of january but _ time? i contracted covid-19 on the 15th ofjanuary but i _ time? i contracted covid-19 on the 15th of january but i got _ time? i contracted covid-19 on the 15th of january but i got worse - time? i contracted covid-19 on the 15th ofjanuary but i got worse on i 15th of january but i got worse on the 18th. that is when i was hospitalised. i was struggling to breathe, struggling to do daily activities so i had to go in. my son was pushing against my lungs and they made the decision he has to come out which was on the 20th of january. i had my cesarean on the 20th of january and on that same night my oxygen levels dropped to 5% which they said they had to go into a coma to be intimated. must have been so frightening. _ a coma to be intimated. must have been so frightening. how - a coma to be intimated. must have been so frightening. how much - a coma to be intimated. must have i been so frightening. how much were you a rare of all that time? i can remember _ you a rare of all that time? i can remember giving _ you a rare of all that time? i can remember giving birth _ you a rare of all that time? i can remember giving birth to - you a rare of all that time? i can remember giving birth to my - you a rare of all that time? ica�*u remember giving birth to my son and i was aware of everything at that time but i was really, really scared because i havejust given birth to my son and he is in the intensive care unit and i am going into
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intensive care. giving birth alone is a scary experience and i was really frightened. ifound my is a scary experience and i was really frightened. i found my family members to say goodbye because i thought i wasn't going to wake up. so you went into a coma then at that point forcing sweets. what was it like when you woke up you realised it was march? did you remember you had a son? w' , it was march? did you remember you hadason? , , had a son? luckily i remember giving birth to him — had a son? luckily i remember giving birth to him but — had a son? luckily i remember giving birth to him but after _ had a son? luckily i remember giving birth to him but after that _ had a son? luckily i remember giving birth to him but after that i _ had a son? luckily i remember giving birth to him but after that i don't - birth to him but after that i don't remember. i woke up and the date was right in front of me on a white board. it said much. istarted crying. the nurse told me i have been through a lot, been really poorly. do you remember your son? been through a lot, been really poorly. do you rememberyourson? i couldn't because i had a tracheostomy so i couldn't speak so all i did was cry. it was... frightening. it all i did was cry. it was... frightening.— all i did was cry. it was... frightening. all i did was cry. it was... frirahtenin. ., , ., ., .,
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frightening. it was another two weeks before _ frightening. it was another two weeks before you _ frightening. it was another two weeks before you could - frightening. it was another two weeks before you could see - frightening. it was another two l weeks before you could see your frightening. it was another two - weeks before you could see your son. what was the moment like when you are finally reunited? i what was the moment like when you are finally reunited?— are finally reunited? i can't describe — are finally reunited? i can't describe it. _ are finally reunited? i can't describe it. when - are finally reunited? i can't describe it. when i - are finally reunited? i can't describe it. when i first - are finally reunited? i can'tl describe it. when i first saw are finally reunited? i can't - describe it. when i first saw him, i saw him when he was a little baby for a couple of seconds when he was born and then all of a sudden he is two months old, a little chump! it was the best. two months old, a little chump! it was the best-— two months old, a little chump! it was the best. ., ., , ., ., ., ., was the best. how do you manage to name him before _ was the best. how do you manage to name him before you _ was the best. how do you manage to name him before you went _ was the best. how do you manage to name him before you went into - was the best. how do you manage to name him before you went into the l name him before you went into the coma? , ., , . ., , ., coma? yes. i got his clothes, i got his prime. — coma? yes. i got his clothes, i got his prime, everything. _ coma? yes. i got his clothes, i got his prime, everything. as - coma? yes. i got his clothes, i got his prime, everything. as a - coma? yes. i got his clothes, i got his prime, everything. as a new i his prime, everything. as a new month i planned everything so i named him. month i planned everything so i rramed him-— month i planned everything so i named him. , ., named him. the point then when you are reunited — named him. the point then when you are reunited and _ named him. the point then when you are reunited and obviously _ named him. the point then when you are reunited and obviously you - named him. the point then when you are reunited and obviously you are i are reunited and obviously you are out of the coma and on the mend, there was still a long way to go before you got back to full health. tell us about that process. iwhen before you got back to full health. tell us about that process.- tell us about that process. when i woke u- i tell us about that process. when i woke up i couldn't _ tell us about that process. when i woke up i couldn't do _ tell us about that process. when i
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woke up i couldn't do anything. i. woke up i couldn't do anything. i couldn't move. i couldn't even use my fingers. i couldn't do anything, i was literally bedbound. so i stayed in hospital until april, then i had to go to rehab. they were amazing, so i literally learnt to walk and do everything, just like a newborn baby again. it is walk and do everything, 'ust like a newborn baby again. it is absolutely incredible to — newborn baby again. it is absolutely incredible to see _ newborn baby again. it is absolutely incredible to see you _ newborn baby again. it is absolutely incredible to see you and _ newborn baby again. it is absolutely incredible to see you and talk i newborn baby again. it is absolutely incredible to see you and talk to i incredible to see you and talk to you today looking fully well. is there any legacy from this for you? oh, god. youjust don't there any legacy from this for you? oh, god. you just don't know what is coming round the corner. every single minute, like now, i take nothing for granted. nothing at all. i live my life to the fullest, even though i am still struggling. with my breathlessness and i have nerve damage now from being in a coma, so i struggle to walk and go up the stairs, but i am taking nothing for
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granted. considering from where i was too now, just live life to the fullest. was too now, 'ust live life to the fullest. ., ., , ., ., fullest. you thought you would die and our fullest. you thought you would die and your family — fullest. you thought you would die and your family were _ fullest. you thought you would die and your family were not - fullest. you thought you would die and your family were not able i fullest. you thought you would die and your family were not able to i fullest. you thought you would die | and your family were not able to be with you and they must have been so frightened as well. it with you and they must have been so frightened as well.— frightened as well. it was a terrible time _ frightened as well. it was a terrible time for _ frightened as well. it was a terrible time for them. i frightened as well. it was a terrible time for them. my| frightened as well. it was a i terrible time for them. my mum, frightened as well. it was a - terrible time for them. my mum, my dad, my mum had to be hospitalised a couple of times as well. my dad lost so much wait. my brother didn't go to work for two months, it was just a stressful time for them. someone to say your daughter is not going to make it, it wasjust to say your daughter is not going to make it, it was just a to say your daughter is not going to make it, it wasjust a horrible time. make it, it was 'ust a horrible time. ., _, ., make it, it was 'ust a horrible time. ., ., . ., time. having come that close to fearina time. having come that close to fearing he _ time. having come that close to fearing he would _ time. having come that close to fearing he would not _ time. having come that close to fearing he would not survive, i time. having come that close to l fearing he would not survive, you are now not taking any time for granted. do you have any specific plans? you have your hands full with a baby but has it shifted your outlook in a more sort of practically profound way in terms of wanting to change anything? yes.
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before i contracted _ wanting to change anything? i'ezs before i contracted covid, wanting to change anything? iezs before i contracted covid, i wanting to change anything? iez3 before i contracted covid, i used to plan everything so i planned i will give birth this way, but you know what? i'm not going to plan any more. i don't plan. i live each day as it is, just one day at a time now because you don't know what is around the corner. that because you don't know what is around the corner.— around the corner. that is very true. around the corner. that is very true- it's _ around the corner. that is very true. it's great _ around the corner. that is very true. it's great to _ around the corner. that is very true. it's great to see - around the corner. that is very true. it's great to see you i around the corner. that is very i true. it's great to see you looking well. congratulations again on the birth of your son. thank you so much forjoining us. some breaking news about nicola sturgeon. we were telling you she was self isolating after coming into contact with somewhere positive for covid—i9. she was isolating before the results of a pcr test and we are hearing that thatis a pcr test and we are hearing that that is now negative. there is her tweet.
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let's return to the situation in afghanistan — the us says its anti—missile system in the afghan capital, kabul, has intercepted up to five rockets, fired towards the airport where its evacuation operation is drawing to a close. i'm joined now by greg mills — the director of the brenthurst foundation — who was a former advisor to the international security assistance force in afghanistan. and has done academic work. thank you forjoining us. where we are now is a very fast moving situation. do you feel it is important to look back and understand how it was that afghanistan fell so quickly to the taliban in order to understand how we move forward? to taliban in order to understand how
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we move forward?— we move forward? to an extent. i think it is important _ we move forward? to an extent. i think it is important to _ we move forward? to an extent. i think it is important to look- think it is important to look backwards because it has a bearing of future oceans. it is human nature we find ourselves in stability operations across the world, indeed there are a number on going not least in africa where i am based. mali, somalia, elsewhere, these are all sites ofjihadist insurgency so it has a bearing both in terms of the enormous boost that they would have received but also has consequences for the government is attending to both negotiate and indeed stop those insurgencies. there is a great deal of relevance in looking back and if you look back you have to say although there is plenty of blame to go around, the biggest blame of all is the failure to contemplate this within an overall political environment. it is the failure of politics. what happens because of the failure of politics and politics is the way in
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which you remedy it and too much emphasis was over or placed on military means and on developmental means to try and stabilise afghanistan. and then much belatedly on political negotiations which the us handled frankly in an appalling manner. it made peace with its enemy without including its ally, akin to czechoslovakia and south vietnam and thatis czechoslovakia and south vietnam and that is what you get what you get today. iii that is what you get what you get toda . . that is what you get what you get toda . , ., ., ., ., , today. in terms of going forward, is there any first _ today. in terms of going forward, is there any first concrete _ today. in terms of going forward, is there any first concrete signs i there any first concrete signs potentially of how things might work in terms of that shared common interest? that us air strike against the car that had isis insurgents inside, ready to go to the airport with suicide bombs. the taliban has welcomed that american operation. what does that say to you? mar; welcomed that american operation. what does that say to you?- what does that say to you? may be that there are _
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what does that say to you? may be that there are a _ what does that say to you? may be that there are a few _ what does that say to you? may be that there are a few pinpricks i what does that say to you? may be that there are a few pinpricks of i that there are a few pinpricks of light there in terms of functional cooperation. there is a common enemy in isis. but it remains to be seen really to what extent that cooperation will take other forms and long—term forms. the immediate question is will the us and other western governments recognise the taliban government? what will be the relationship between the west and pakistan as the principal supporter? indeed midwife to the taliban. both historically and recently. and how will we endeavour to go about engaging with the taliban in terms of humanitarian assistance? will it be dependent on refugee floods? what will be the relationship between investment flows because obviously you don't want a failed state within afghanistan any more than you have it already. legitimacy, the nature
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of the taliban regime, the tolerance exhibited by the taliban on critical indicators like women's rights, freedom of the media and so on, these are going to determine legitimacy but there isn't i think a danger that it soon becomes yesterday's news and the world moves on and afghanistan is left to its own fate. i think that is why there has been such a huge effort made in getting people out of afghanistan over the last ten days. to getting people out of afghanistan over the last ten days.— getting people out of afghanistan over the last ten days. to an extent do western — over the last ten days. to an extent do western countries _ over the last ten days. to an extent do western countries had _ over the last ten days. to an extent do western countries had to - over the last ten days. to an extent do western countries had to take i over the last ten days. to an extent do western countries had to take a| do western countries had to take a back seat and at the regional countries around and china and russia actually be more active in shaping the future there? that is a great question. one of the big takeaway is from the 20 years, other than the failure of politics, has been the geography trumps
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goodwill. pakistan has a set of interest, china, iran, the west's relationship with iran has not helped. all of these matters have to be taken on board in order to see afghanistan stabilise and even, perhaps, even develop in years to come. in places like africa, at least my own country south africa, teachers that to make peace, the international bodies, pushing in the same direction. you also need the internal parties to realise there is more to be gained by ending fighting than continuing with it. you also need leadership, timing and method. in afghanistan plasma case, one of the great feelings was that he did not have alignment. there is opportunity to. the ties with
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pakistan and the existential pakistani crisis with india, that is ongoing, suggest it is not going to be solved that easily. then you have russia and chinese interest. and the iranian interest with the west, which complicates matters. it is not easy to start this and not easy to get everybody pushing in the same direction. they will presumably see that a stable afghanistan is, to a greater extent, in those interests. thank you. greater extent, in those interests. thank yon-— now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. there is no significant rain in the forecast this week. at times, light and patchy rain or drizzle coming out from the thick cloud. cloud around today. easy on the north sea coastline. chilly are here. best of the breaks in scotland, northern
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ireland, west wales and also parts of south—west england. top temperature up to 19 or 20 celsius. tonight, more cloud develops over much of the uk, where we have not had it during the day. still breezy down the coastline and also the english channel. some cloud breaks. temperature similar to last night. following a way to between ten and 14 or 15 celsius. tomorrow, spot the difference. a lot of cloud around. breezy along the english channel and north—east coastline. some breaks in northern ireland and parts of northern england and scotland tomorrow. highs of 19 celsius. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... american anti—missile systems have intercepted rockets fired towards kabul airport, where the us evacuation operation is drawing to a close the uk government seeks international support to ensure the taliban allow people to leave
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afghanistan — as british troops from kabul arrive back on uk soil. hurricane ida has now weakened to a tropical storm — after president biden declared a major disaster in louisiana as powerful winds and rain wiped out all power in new orleans. people travelling to the uk from canada, denmark and five other new 'green list�* countries will not need to isolate as the uk's latest covid travel rules come into force. sport and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre. one of the women's individual archery compound final. unable to defend the women as sex butterfly title. she finished fifth. rachel is
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in tokyo. the weather has been doing all sorts of things behind you. two goals for paralympics gb today. the first of the golds was won by andrew. held on for that win. a great victory for him. he picked up a gold medal in rio dejaneiro. today in tokyo it was a gold medal. he watched in london 2012 and decided i want to become a paralympic athlete. iie decided i want to become a paralympic athlete.- decided i want to become a paral mic athlete. ., , , , paralympic athlete. he was inspired to net into paralympic athlete. he was inspired to get into the _ paralympic athlete. he was inspired to get into the sport _ paralympic athlete. he was inspired to get into the sport and _ paralympic athlete. he was inspired to get into the sport and he - paralympic athlete. he was inspired to get into the sport and he showedj to get into the sport and he showed today— to get into the sport and he showed today that _ to get into the sport and he showed today that if you get involved, you can make — today that if you get involved, you can make it — today that if you get involved, you can make it and be on top of the podium — can make it and be on top of the podium and hopefully inspire others. he also— podium and hopefully inspire others. he also inspired harryjenkins, who is making a debut in the same race. he got a bronze medal. and phoebe got the gold in the archery. she won
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by one single point. in the powerlifting, there was a bronze. and ellie robinson got a fifth in the 50 metre butterfly. it was a gold medalfor ellie the 50 metre butterfly. it was a gold medal for ellie today. many may say settled for a fifth but she said it was a triumph, not defeat. she talked about an injury, or a condition, to do with her hip that has been causing her so much pain that she has not been able to train properly. she alluded to that that condition may mean she will have to retire. herwords condition may mean she will have to retire. her words where this is the end of a chapterfor her. that retire. her words where this is the end of a chapter for her. that could be the end of the paralympic cycle by the end of her paralympic career. we will have to wait and see. just a we will have to wait and see. just a ruarter of we will have to wait and see. just a quarter of a — we will have to wait and see. just a quarter of a second _ we will have to wait and see. just a quarter of a second outside - we will have to wait and see. just a quarter of a second outside the i quarter of a second outside the meadow places today. we believe that they are. in tokyo, thank you. lewis hamilton has cold the belgium grand prix a farce and heavy rain delayed
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the race for more than three hours before two laps away completed. half points were awarded to the top ten drivers. lewis hamilton third. thea;t drivers. lewis hamilton third. they knew when — drivers. lewis hamilton third. they knew when they — drivers. lewis hamilton third. they knew when they sent _ drivers. lewis hamilton third. iie: knew when they sent us drivers. lewis hamilton third. tie: knew when they sent us out drivers. lewis hamilton third. tierg knew when they sent us out at drivers. lewis hamilton third. tieg knew when they sent us out at the end they are that the track was any better. they did it so we could start two laps behind the safety car, the minimum requirement for a race. i really hope the fans get their money back today. {line race. i really hope the fans get their money back today. one of the most anticipated _ their money back today. one of the most anticipated debuts _ their money back today. one of the most anticipated debuts in - their money back today. one of the most anticipated debuts in football| most anticipated debuts in football took place. it came on as a substitute in the second half. he came on with his good friend. a nice hug there. there were glimpses of his quality. his first game for a side other than barcelona. he won 45 trophies with the spanish club but
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signed a two—year contract with the paris club worth £25 million. and finally, the us open gets under way in new york this evening. former champion andy murray faces a tough test in his first round match. he has been drawn against the third seed. murray won the title in 2012. he is unseeded at the tournament, after overcoming injury niggles to be there and hoping for a good tournament. it be there and hoping for a good tournament.— be there and hoping for a good tournament. . ., ., ., ., ., tournament. it will be a good, good test for me — tournament. it will be a good, good test for me to _ tournament. it will be a good, good test for me to see _ tournament. it will be a good, good test for me to see where _ tournament. it will be a good, good test for me to see where my - tournament. it will be a good, good test for me to see where my game | tournament. it will be a good, good l test for me to see where my game is at and where it has progressed to from when i arrived in the states, really. i have been practising hard. i have got some matches in. yes, we will see where my game is at. taste will see where my game is at. we certainly will. that is all your support for an hour. back to you, joanna. thank you. let's stay with that success into tokyo.
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phoebe paterson pine has won archery gold with a 134 to 133 victory against her chiliean opponent. en route to the final, paterson pine beat the defending champion — and fellow team gb archerjess stretton. earlier i spoke to phoebe paterson pine's mum alison, who told me how happy she was about the victory incredibly proud. very, very proud. she has worked so hard to get to this point and she deserved it, she really does. it was unfortunate she was up againstjess. they are really good friends, the it meets, they train together. but phoebe held her nerve. we are all very tired here but it has been an amazing morning, night. but it has been an amazing morning, nirht. �* . but it has been an amazing morning, nirht. �* , , ., but it has been an amazing morning, nirht.�* �*, night. and it is your husband's birthda . night. and it is your husband's birthday- an — night. and it is your husband's birthday. an extra _ night. and it is your husband's birthday. an extra special- night. and it is your husband's i birthday. an extra special birthday present for him. it is his birthday today. i present for him. it is his birthday toda . .. present for him. it is his birthday toda . ~' ., today. i think the pair of wellington _ today. i think the pair of wellington boots - today. i think the pair of wellington boots i i today. i think the pair of i wellington boots i bought today. i think the pair of- wellington boots i bought him today. i think the pair of - wellington boots i bought him a today. i think the pair of— wellington boots i bought him a may appeal against the medal. wellington
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boots, an interesting _ appeal against the medal. wellington boots, an interesting choice. - appeal against the medal. wellington boots, an interesting choice. we i boots, an interesting choice. we want to talk about that. let's talk about phoebe. tell us about how hard phoebe has worked. yes. about phoebe. tell us about how hard phoebe has worked.— phoebe has worked. yes, she works incredibly hard. _ phoebe has worked. yes, she works incredibly hard. she _ phoebe has worked. yes, she works incredibly hard. she trains _ phoebe has worked. yes, she works incredibly hard. she trains four- phoebe has worked. yes, she works incredibly hard. she trains four or i incredibly hard. she trains four or five days per week. she is competing most weekends. she is partway through a degree at university. she has had various health problems over the years, particularly in 2018. she had major surgery on herfit. it took quite a while for her to recoverfrom took quite a while for her to recover from that. just the past two or three years she has been on quite a journey. she isjust incredibly resilient. she really is. she bounces back from all of these things. last night's results show that. �* ., , ., that. and how did she get into archery specifically? _ that. and how did she get into archery specifically? so, i that. and how did she get into archery specifically? so, like i that. and how did she get intoj archery specifically? so, like a that. and how did she get into i archery specifically? so, like a lot of peeple. — archery specifically? so, like a lot of peeple. we _ archery specifically? so, like a lot of people, we went _ archery specifically? so, like a lot of people, we went on _ archery specifically? so, like a lot of people, we went on holiday i archery specifically? so, like a lot of people, we went on holiday to | archery specifically? so, like a lot| of people, we went on holiday to a well known woodland to holiday park
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and we tried an awful lot of things. one of the things she tried was archery and loved it. so when we came home i contacted our local club and arranged for summer sessions with one of their coaches, dan gill, and it went from there, really. we bought her a second hand ball and she started competing. then a couple of years she was indoor and outdoor champion. the amazing thing about archery is people can compete regardless of whether they are able bodied or have disability. it is a very level playing field. stand bodied or have disability. it is a very level playing field. and what did that bring _ very level playing field. and what did that bring to _ very level playing field. and what did that bring to her, _ very level playing field. and what did that bring to her, then, i very level playing field. and what did that bring to her, then, when j did that bring to her, then, when she realised she could excel at this? , she realised she could excel at this? . ., she realised she could excel at this? . .. ., ,, she realised she could excel at this? . .. . this? just a massive confidence boost when _ this? just a massive confidence boost when you _ this? just a massive confidence boost when you have _ this? just a massive confidence boost when you have a - this? just a massive confidence | boost when you have a disability this? just a massive confidence i boost when you have a disability it is very difficult to find a sport that you can compete in on a level with able—bodied people. itjust gave her tremendous confidence based and that confidence has grown over
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the years. it and that confidence has grown over the ears. . .. , ., ., and that confidence has grown over the ears. , ., ., the years. it is a testament to your famil , the years. it is a testament to your family, obviously, _ the years. it is a testament to your family, obviously, that _ the years. it is a testament to your family, obviously, that she - the years. it is a testament to your family, obviously, that she has i the years. it is a testament to your family, obviously, that she has thej family, obviously, that she has the resilience that she has got. what was your approach to hurt spina bifida from the site? == was your approach to hurt spina bifida from the site?— was your approach to hurt spina bifida from the site? -- from the start? my — bifida from the site? -- from the start? my message _ bifida from the site? -- from the start? my message was - bifida from the site? -- from the start? my message was you i bifida from the site? -- from the start? my message was you can i bifida from the site? -- from the i start? my message was you can always do what you want to do. it was difficult in those first few years. lots and lots of physio, lots of hospital appointments. we were always determined that she would live as full a life as she possibly could and we always encouraged her to carry on with whatever she wanted to carry on with whatever she wanted to do. she has found her thing. she has found the thing that she thoroughly enjoys and she can do. have you spoken to her? ida. have you spoken to her? no, unfortunately _ have you spoken to her? no, unfortunately not. _ have you spoken to her? no, unfortunately not. i- have you spoken to her? no, unfortunately not. i have i have you spoken to her? iifr, unfortunately not. i have swapped several messages with her boyfriend and with other family members but the time being we have not heard from her. she will have to go through a process of press interviews and anti—doping tests,
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and that sort of thing. we expect to hear from and that sort of thing. we expect to hearfrom her later. stand and that sort of thing. we expect to hear from her later.— hear from her later. and what next for her? she _ hear from her later. and what next for her? she should _ hear from her later. and what next for her? she should be _ hear from her later. and what next for her? she should be home i hear from her later. and what next for her? she should be home on i for her? she should be home on thursday- _ for her? she should be home on thursday- and — for her? she should be home on thursday. and then _ for her? she should be home on thursday. and then she - for her? she should be home on thursday. and then she is i for her? she should be home on thursday. and then she is going j for her? she should be home on i thursday. and then she is going to have a few days here just to get over the jet lag and recover, have a few days here just to get over thejet lag and recover, and then she is supposed to be having a few weeks. it is national disability championships in two weeks' time. she may compete at that, or she may be encouraged to have a longer break. ., , ., be encouraged to have a longer break. ., . , ., . break. how will you celebrate? well ou break. how will you celebrate? well you husband — break. how will you celebrate? well you husband get _ break. how will you celebrate? well you husband get his _ break. how will you celebrate? well you husband get his wellington i break. how will you celebrate? well. you husband get his wellington boots on and go for a nice walk? mr; on and go for a nice walk? my husband on and go for a nice walk? ij�*ig husband will get on and go for a nice walk? mg husband will get to open his presents later and we will raise some glasses to team gb. we will all be celebrating by having a nap later. new research from the george institute for global health in sydney suggests thousands of strokes and heart attacks could be prevented if people reduced salt in their diet. a study of 20,995 people in rural china who had a history of stroke, or were over 60 and had high blood
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pressure, showed fewer stroke events in those taking a mixture of 75% salt and 25% potassium chloride, compared to those who consumed regular salt. with me to discuss this is our news correspondent simon dedman. really interesting research. tell us more about it. it is really interesting research. tell us more about it.— more about it. it is a study that has taken _ more about it. it is a study that has taken place _ more about it. it is a study that has taken place over _ more about it. it is a study that has taken place over five i more about it. it is a study thatj has taken place over five years. 21,000 people in china have taken part. we have all had experience of stroke or a history of high blood pressure. half were given regular salt and the other half were given a substitute of salt, which also contained potassium. what it found over the five years is that there were 3000 people who suffered from stroke. those who had the salt substitute had a better outcome. there were 14% lower risk of stroke
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for those that had this substitute, 12% fewer premature deaths and 13% major cardiovascular events and no adverse effects from higher potassium, is what the study found. i was about to ask you that, whether there was any issue around the substitute?— there was any issue around the substitute? ., , . ., substitute? not in this particular stud , substitute? not in this particular study. no- _ substitute? not in this particular study. no- the — substitute? not in this particular study, no. the british _ substitute? not in this particular study, no. the british heart- study, no. the british heart foundation does say that ideally people should be having less salt, that would be the best thing to do. there are some conditions for some diseases, too much potassium can knock be a good thing. so you should check with your doctor first. on the whole, potassium is a good minimal and good for hearts and seen as being better than sodium chloride. what impact make the study have then, any practical sense? here in then, any practical sense? here in the uk, then, any practical sense? here in the uk. they _ then, any practical sense? here in the uk, they have _ then, any practical sense? here in the uk, they have been _ then, any practical sense? here in the uk, they have been 34,000 . then, any practical sense? here in i the uk, they have been 34,000 deaths the uk, they have been 3a,000 deaths linked to stroke. and also we have had around 100,000 hospital
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admissions every year due to heart attacks, according to the british heart foundation. professor graham macgregor, a professor of cardiovascular medicine at the london school of medicine, says that the study clearly shows the uk consumers it is much better to reduce your salt intake. if you cannot do that, moving to a salt substitute is going to be better for your health. taste substitute is going to be better for your health-— substitute is going to be better for our health. ~ ., ., ., ., your health. we are not we are meant to cut down — your health. we are not we are meant to cut down on _ your health. we are not we are meant to cut down on salt _ your health. we are not we are meant to cut down on salt but _ your health. we are not we are meant to cut down on salt but it _ your health. we are not we are meant to cut down on salt but it is _ to cut down on salt but it is difficult to know sometimes how much salt you are consuming. it difficult to know sometimes how much salt you are consuming.— salt you are consuming. it can be, eseciall salt you are consuming. it can be, especially here — salt you are consuming. it can be, especially here in _ salt you are consuming. it can be, especially here in the _ salt you are consuming. it can be, especially here in the uk. - salt you are consuming. it can be, especially here in the uk. in i salt you are consuming. it can be, | especially here in the uk. in china, the study talks about how people are preparing their own food with salt. here, the nhs estimates that around 75% of our salt intake comes from processed foods. our diets are different, but our salt intake is high. fora regularadult, we are recommended to have a six grams of salt per day. recommended to have a six grams of salt per day-— salt per day. thank you very much, simon. the headlines on bbc news...
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american anti—missile systems have intercepted rockets fired towards kabul airport — where the us evacuation operation is drawing to a close. the uk government seeks international support to ensure the taliban allow people to leave afghanistan — as british troops from kabul arrive back on uk soil. hurricane ida has now weakened to a tropical storm — after president biden declared a major disaster in louisiana as powerful winds and rain wiped out all power in new orleans. a new law is being introduced to make school uniforms cheaper in england and wales this autumn. but many parents are concerned it won't be out in place in time for the start of the school year. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith reports from a uniform swap shop. do you want to try this on? dressing the kids for school doesn't come cheap. with four children, the cost of uniform is extortionate. anything that can help me out, something i don't have to spend out
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on, isjust incredible. swap shops have become a lifeline to millions of parents. i've spent way over £400 on uniform, and that won't be the last time during the year that i'll have to buy again, whether it's school shoes orjumpers that need replacing. when you look around and see how much there actually is that can be put to good use rather than going to landfill, it makes sense to reuse. according to the latest survey from the children's society, a full uniform costs an average of £315 per primary pupil, and for secondary school it's even more, £337 per pupilfor parents to fork out. you can spend that money on taking them on holiday, so, yeah. we were saying we'd much rather spend that money making memories than just a school uniform. yeah! especially after being locked up for so long, it's
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nice to get out there. that's a small. that looks too small for you. emma's decided enough is enough. she started this swap shop and has helped more than 400 families over the last few months. do you want to try it on? if they're not wearing the right i blazer or they've got a wrong pe kit or they're not wearing the right tie, then they can be _ given detention, they can be put in isolation, - they can be sent home. and it shouldn't be that, _ children shouldn't ever be punished for not having a school uniform. but a new law is on the way which will force schools in england and wales to have affordability at the centre of the uniform policy. it's expected that the law will limit the number of logos on every uniform, to make sure there's more than one supplier for every school, and to make it easier for parents to complain if it's still too expensive to buy the uniform. but the law isn't in place yet, and so another expensive school year is kicking off. actually, i've met with them...
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the mp who led the campaign for the new law says schools need to be made to change. so, there has been statutory guidance around since 2013, but guidance is guidance, and far too many schools, whether that's principals and head teachers and governors, have ignored that. how confident are you that these new rules will kick in in time for the next academic year? it must be in place next year. i'd be incredibly disappointed to say the least. very importantly so would hundreds of thousands of children, parents, families and campaigners. it must happen. but until then, parents up and down the country are trying to help each other to save money. colletta smith, bbc news, in winsford. summer 2021 has been a bumper yearfor uk holidays, with many of us opting not to go abroad because of the uncertainty around covid travel restrictions. some councils have reported record breaking numbers of visitors and resorts like bournemouth say
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hotel occupancy has been at almost 100% this summer. geeta pendse is on north shore beach in llandudno for us this morning. this summer has been particularly busy as we have heard because of the burden on people staying in the uk for their holidays this year. ——boom. the hospitality sector has really welcomed the influx of visitors but with that has also come concerns around ensuring they are covid—safe. in a moment i will be speaking to one business about how they are striking that balance but first my colleague has been taking a look at our love for the uk getaway. from brighton to bournemouth, the south coast is just one area that has seen record numbers of tourists this summer. it has been so busy, even hotel managers like olivia o'sullivan have had to help clean rooms. been full pretty much since we started, probably about 96% occupancy.
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is it sustainable? i don't know. once anything else opens up, i don't know if people will come back to the uk. but it's notjust beach resorts. here at salisbury cathedral, city—break seekers have also been flocking in. has staycation saved the day for the cathedral? it has certainly made a huge difference. we are seeing people coming to salisbury and salisbury cathedral from right across the country, so we are feeling very positive about the future, but knowing that we still have quite a long way to go. but the issue now is what happens next. as the summer tapers away, they've got the autumn to think of, but, crucially, they are already looking ahead to the summer of 2022. a summer they hope will see more of us holiday at home. duncan kennedy, bbc news.
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one of the big attractions is this magnificent limestone headline behind me and for the more adventurous it is not just about looking at it but about climbing it and someone who knows all about that is my guest mattjones. you run a rock climbing business and i know like many in the hospitality sector your business has really genuinely been booming. what has it been like? it has gone ballistic. as soon as we came out of lockdown business hit the roof. it has been fantastic, good for the town, good to see it so busy. are there particular types of people coming in, families? mostly families i deal with. but there have been groups when it has been allowed of course. normally they would go abroad this time of year and it is their first
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time in north wales and it is good for them to see what we have on offer here which has been amazing. it is very quiet at the moment. it is quite early in the day but at peak time it can get very busy here and there are concerns about covid. is that something you have been worried about? because the infection rate is increasing in wales. yes, it has been a bit of a concern here. we had the town to ourselves during lockdown when the travel was restricted and when that eased it became crazily busy here and of course we were all a bit "oh," it took us by surprise and it definitely was a concern. it still is but i think outdoors because we have so much outdoors here for people to do, it is perhaps less of a concern. we have the beach, there is a lot of outdoor attractions. that is a good thing. you live on the other side of the shore. i cannot imagine what it is like to
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wake up every day to this view. what has it been like for you personally to live here and see people coming back? brilliant. and i hope we can sustain it because most of my clients it is their first time in north wales and they have seen what we have got to offer here and hopefully that will keep going year after year. you do not have to go abroad to have a good time. thank you so much. it is quite a moody start to the day but i am told the sun will come out, but, regardless of whether it will, you can see why so many people come to this beauty spot and anyone coming out here should have an ice cream, which is what i plan to do later. i hope she has had the ice cream by now. the american actor ed asner has died at the age of 91. he was best known for playing the fictionaljournalist lou grant — and voicing the lead character in the pixarfilm, 'up'. asner won seven emmy awards,
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the most for a male performer. his family said he passed away peacefully yesterday morning. lee 'scratch' perry, one of the most influential figures injamaican music, has died at the age of 85. a pioneer of reggae and dub, perry produced many seminaljamaican musicians, including bob marley and the wailers, and released more than 70 albums. the jamaican prime minister was among those to pay tribute. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again. if you are looking for rain in the forecast this week, there is nothing significant coming our way. a lot of cloud in the next few days. some of it will create patchy rain and drizzle. for most, it will remain dry. temperatures are average. high pressure is in charge
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of our weather, keeping things settled. the breeze coming around it. a chilly feel at times. especially along the north sea coastline. quite a bit of cloud around. good breaks through parts of scotland this afternoon. one or two in the south. northern ireland also seeing sunny breaks. parts of wales, around the midlands, east anglia, here and there we will see some breaks. the message is, a lot of cloud. across parts of the east and the northeast, thick enough for patchy rain and drizzle. along the north sea course lane, temperatures 18 celsius. inland, 20 celsius. tonight and overnight, the scenario of lots of cloud. it breeze coming down the north sea and the english channel. temperatures similar to the nature is gone. following a weigh between ten and 15 celsius. tomorrow, high cloud. high pressure
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towards the north—west. this breeze coming in from the north sea moving across the english channel as well. still a lot of cloud around. parts of sunshine, —— parts of scotland, sunshine. across north—east england at times. don't forget across the north—east coastline, temperatures are cooler. 18 celsius. wednesday, high pressure with us. still the wind rotating around it from a north and north—easterly direction. accentuating the cool feel at times. the brightest breaks across scotland and northern ireland. some across north wales as well. top temperatures in the sunshine, 20 celsius. later breezes across parts of scotland, it will feel quite nice. the status quo prevails on thursday into friday. it is the weekend into next week, some rain.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: american anti—missile systems have intercepted rockets fired towards kabul airport — where the us evacuation operation is drawing to a close. the uk government seeks international support to ensure the taliban allow people to leave afghanistan — as british troops from kabul arrive back on uk soil. the us military has said it is investigating after at least nine afghan civilians were reportedly killed in a drone strike which aimed to prevent an attack on kabul airport. hurricane ida has now weakened to a tropical storm — after president biden declared a major disaster in louisiana as powerful winds and rain wiped out all power in new orleans.
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the danger is not weakening at all. we're hearing reports of flood waters rising in many communities. trees coming down, bringing down power lines. roofs collapsing. people travelling to the uk from canada, denmark and five other new 'green list�* countries will not need to isolate as the uk's latest covid travel rules come into force. a new law is being introduced to make school uniforms cheaper in england and wales this autumn — but won't be in place in time for the new school year american actor ed asner — best known for playing fictional tv newsman lou grant and voicing the lead of the animated film up — has died aged 91. and coming up, more success for team gb in the paralympics in tokyo, as andrew small takes gold in the men's t33 and phoebe paterson pine takes gold in the archery.
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rockets have been fired towards kabul international airport, where the us evacuation operation is drawing to a close. about five rockets flew over the afghan capital, before a us anti—missile system stopped them. it isn't known who fired them. it comes as british ministers prepare to take part in international meetings aimed at defining a joint approach to the taliban in afghanistan. jon donnison has the details. back in britain. some of the final raf planes from kabul arriving at brize norton airbase in oxfordshire last night, carrying uk troops and officials. earlierflights had brought more afghan refugees, and the man who led the effort to bring them home, ambassador laurie bristow. one plane even landed with an extra passenger on board.
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baby girl havva was born during the flight. a new life heading for a new land. the evacuation marks the end of the uk's 20—year military involvement in afghanistan. in recent weeks, the raf scrambled to airlift 15,000 people, most of them afghan refugees, before the taliban deadline for foreign troops to withdraw by the end of august. but hundreds more remain stranded, both uk citizens and eligible refugees. the taliban has said they will be allowed to leave. but with fear and tensions increasing, it remains to be seen if the islamist group will honour that pledge. and potential danger is not limited to the taliban. a local branch of the so—called islamic state group killed more than 170 people in thursday's bomb attack, including mohammad niazi, a taxi driverfrom hampshire who travelled to kabul to bring his family back.
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his wife, samina, and their baby daughter also died. mohammad was one of the best men we have in the community, working hard to give the best life for his kids. yesterday the us launched a drone strike against a car which it said was carrying more is suicide bombers. and this morning, five rockets were fired towards kabul international airport. it's not known by whom, but they were reported to have been intercepted by a us anti—missile system. and with a humanitarian crisis looming, the uk is promising it will continue to support those left behind. today, ministers will reach out to other nations, including turkey and qatar, who they hope may have more influence over the taliban, afghanistan's new rulers. jon donnison, bbc news. our political correspondent nick eardley explained what the uk government is doing to get remaining evacuees out of kabul.
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the government this morning when asked wouldn't put a number on how many people who are eligible to come to the uk had been left in afghanistan, who hadn't managed to get out as part of that airlift. though last week ministers were talking about it being up to around 1,000. labour think it is far more. the question is what happens now? we heard the taliban say to various foreign governments yesterday, around 90 of them releasing a letter saying they have been given assurances by the taliban that safe passage for either foreign nationals or people with the right documentation from afghanistan would be allowed safe passage out of the country. the question is how the international community can enforce that, what leverage the uk and its allies have to make sure that that promise is kept to. we heard from the uk government ministerjames cleverly this morning
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that he was sceptical that that promise would be met. have a listen. it is not possible for anybody to give absolute assurances. as i say, we are working with international partners to try and facilitate that repatriation and evacuation. of course we have also received commitments from the taliban, obviously we are quite sceptical about that but as the prime minister has said, we willjudge them on their conduct rather than on their words. they have said they want to be treated like a legitimate government and there is a long way to go before we might consider that, but nevertheless we are willing to engage with them based on what they do. if they start acting like a government, start facilitating both internal travel and external travel from afghanistan, then we will engage with them on that basis but what we are not able to do, what not country is able to do,
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is give them absolute guarantees. that is the uk government's take this morning. i have too say for all the talk of keeping this schemes open, there isn't much detail at the moment about how that might operate, what should people do if they didn't manage to get to kabul airport but have documentation to get to the uk, what their immediate action should be. we know from having spoken to a lot of them that many are still deeply worried about how they will be treated by the taliban. no detail yet, for example, about hubs in the region, about where people should go in neighbouring countries if they want to claim asylum or refugee in the uk. the labour party has been calling for more detail about what will happen and also suggesting that the number of eligible people who didn't make it onto flights in the last couple of weeks is far higher than the government is saying. they have accused ministers of spin,
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saying it could be as many as 5,000. have a listen to the shadow minister stephen kinnock this morning. 5000 is the number alone that labour mps are dealing with. presumably conservative mps have many thousands of cases as well and of course there are ngos, other people dealing with these cases so the government is trying to put some kind of spin on these numbers, but the numbers are much higher. our armed forces and diplomats and officials out in afghanistan have done an incredible job, we should be so proud of what they have done, but they have been badly let down by their political masters who have had 18 months to plan for this, have completely failed to plan properly. let's not forget the french government started evacuating its people back in may, so the government has been asleep at the wheel on this. they have massively underestimated the number of people left behind, they should be level with the british people and tell us
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what is going on on the ground and then we can perhaps start to see a government that is going to get on top of this issue and start to help those people who are now really at the mercy of the taliban. the focus today is going to be on diplomatic pressure. you have the foreign secretary dominic raab holding talks with nato and g7 allies, also qatar and turkey in the hope they can exert some influence in the region. there is a meeting of the permanent five of the un security council later, that could be important because it brings in china and russia who are major players in the region and will be important to making sure the taliban can be kept to any promises that it makes. but after the military operation, after that airlift of the last couple of weeks, the next few weeks and months will be really tricky. let's cross to our news correspondent zoe conway who is at the afghanistan and central asian association in feltham, west london.
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here in feltham which isjust a couple of miles away from heathrow airport, they have been gathering donations to help the more than 1000 afghan refugees who are in quarantine in the hotel is just by heathrow. there has been the most astonishing response. one morning donations have been arriving. this is nothing compared to what they have been receiving over the last three or four days. the generation adjei is quite staggering and they are incredibly grateful for all that has been arriving, clothing, nappies, push chairs. it really is a very moving thing to see. but that is not all the association is doing. they are also helping british afghans are worried about their family members in afghanistan. this is a community in west london of
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some 100,000 british afghans and people are coming here to try and get health, to get advice, what they can do to help family members back in kabul. you have family members in kabul, you are very worried about them but also your family has suffered terrible loss in the last few days. suffered terrible loss in the last few da s. . ., suffered terrible loss in the last few da s. , .. , few days. yes, we had the terrible news of losing _ few days. yes, we had the terrible news of losing my _ few days. yes, we had the terrible news of losing my first _ few days. yes, we had the terrible news of losing my first cousin i few days. yes, we had the terrible news of losing my first cousin in l few days. yes, we had the terrible news of losing my first cousin in a | news of losing my first cousin in a bomb_ news of losing my first cousin in a bomb blast— news of losing my first cousin in a bomb blast which happened near an airport _ bomb blast which happened near an airport it _ bomb blast which happened near an airport. it was really horrendous moment— airport. it was really horrendous moment for everyone in afghanistan and especially for my family, that we lost _ and especially for my family, that we lost him. i am in fear i am losing— we lost him. i am in fear i am losing my— we lost him. i am in fear i am losing my otherfamily we lost him. i am in fear i am losing my other family members back home _ losing my other family members back home and _ losing my other family members back home and i_ losing my other family members back home and i am so worried about them, that they— home and i am so worried about them, that they are _ home and i am so worried about them, that they are in danger at the moment _ that they are in danger at the moment. that they are in danger at the moment-— that they are in danger at the moment. ., ,., , ., , moment. tell me about your first cousin who _ moment. tell me about your first cousin who you — moment. tell me about your first cousin who you lost. _ moment. tell me about your first cousin who you lost. he - moment. tell me about your first cousin who you lost. he was i moment. tell me about your first | cousin who you lost. he was there with his family. —
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cousin who you lost. he was there with his family, helping _ cousin who you lost. he was there with his family, helping his - cousin who you lost. he was there with his family, helping his young| with his family, helping his young -irls with his family, helping his young girls and — with his family, helping his young girls and their ill child to move across— girls and their ill child to move across to — girls and their ill child to move across to safety so they can have, so they _ across to safety so they can have, so they will — across to safety so they can have, so they will be safe. he sacrificed himselt — so they will be safe. he sacrificed himselt at— so they will be safe. he sacrificed himself. at the risk of over 200 afghan— himself. at the risk of over 200 afghan people who have been killed there stop without mercy. it is very devastating for all of us and for myself— devastating for all of us and for myself personally, it has been very, a very— myself personally, it has been very, a very bad _ myself personally, it has been very, a very bad situation. i wasjust talking — a very bad situation. i wasjust talking to _ a very bad situation. i wasjust talking to him one night before and i have _ talking to him one night before and i have his _ talking to him one night before and i have his voice mail in my phone and thinking he is no more. he was a good _ and thinking he is no more. he was a good man. _ and thinking he is no more. he was a good man. a — and thinking he is no more. he was a good man, a doctor, helping everyone. _ good man, a doctor, helping everyone, families and other people in the _ everyone, families and other people in the country. i really don't know how to _ in the country. i really don't know how to help — in the country. i really don't know how to help them and now i am in fear that— how to help them and now i am in fear that the rest of my family who are there. — fear that the rest of my family who are there, what will happen to them?
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what will— are there, what will happen to them? what will be their situation? they are in— what will be their situation? they are in hiding as well and it is too much _ are in hiding as well and it is too much i— are in hiding as well and it is too much icant— are in hiding as well and it is too much. i can't explain how they are fearing _ much. i can't explain how they are fearing and — much. i can't explain how they are fearing and i— much. i can't explain how they are fearing and i am fearing here. when this happens for a few minutes, i was in _ this happens for a few minutes, i was in shock. how can some innocent person— was in shock. how can some innocent person die _ was in shock. how can some innocent person die like that stop he only wanted — person die like that stop he only wanted his family to be safe. i'm sorry _ wanted his family to be safe. i'm sor . .. ~' wanted his family to be safe. i'm sor . ., ~ , ., wanted his family to be safe. i'm sor . ., ~ ., ., ~ ., wanted his family to be safe. i'm sor . ., ., ., ~ ., , sorry. thank you for talking to us. m son, sorry. thank you for talking to us. my son. you _ sorry. thank you for talking to us. my son. you also _ sorry. thank you for talking to us. my son, you also are _ sorry. thank you for talking to us. my son, you also are very - sorry. thank you for talking to us. my son, you also are very worried| my son, you also are very worried about yourfamily, your my son, you also are very worried about your family, your mother, my son, you also are very worried about yourfamily, your mother, your brother, your grandmother. tell me what is happening to them. what are they having to do? mr; what is happening to them. what are they having to do?— what is happening to them. what are they having to do? my mum is a widow and a teacher- — they having to do? my mum is a widow and a teacher. she _ they having to do? my mum is a widow and a teacher. she also _ they having to do? my mum is a widow and a teacher. she also has _ and a teacher. she also has participated _ and a teacher. she also has participated in _ and a teacher. she also has participated in elections i and a teacher. she also has participated in elections forj participated in elections for presidency— participated in elections for
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presidency and _ participated in elections for presidency and she - participated in elections for presidency and she has i participated in elections for. presidency and she has been participated in elections for i presidency and she has been an activist — presidency and she has been an activist who _ presidency and she has been an activist who has _ presidency and she has been an activist who has always - presidency and she has been an activist who has always fought i presidency and she has been an i activist who has always fought for women's — activist who has always fought for women's rights _ activist who has always fought for women's rights because - activist who has always fought for women's rights because she - activist who has always fought for women's rights because she has. activist who has always fought for- women's rights because she has been working _ women's rights because she has been working with — women's rights because she has been working with them. _ women's rights because she has been working with them. my— women's rights because she has been working with them. my brother- women's rights because she has been working with them. my brother is - women's rights because she has been working with them. my brother is a i working with them. my brother is a journalism — working with them. my brother is a journalism student— working with them. my brother is a journalism student and _ working with them. my brother is a journalism student and he - working with them. my brother is a journalism student and he is- working with them. my brother is a i journalism student and he is working as wett _ journalism student and he is working as wett they— journalism student and he is working as wett they are _ journalism student and he is working as well. they are all _ journalism student and he is working as well. they are all terrified - journalism student and he is working as well. they are all terrified at - as well. they are all terrified at the nronrent— as well. they are all terrified at the moment because _ as well. they are all terrified at the moment because my- as well. they are all terrified at the moment because my mum| as well. they are all terrified at. the moment because my mum got threatened — the moment because my mum got threatened from _ the moment because my mum got threatened from the _ the moment because my mum got threatened from the taliban - the moment because my mum got threatened from the taliban and l the moment because my mum got i threatened from the taliban and they are moving _ threatened from the taliban and they are moving from _ threatened from the taliban and they are moving from house _ threatened from the taliban and they are moving from house to _ threatened from the taliban and they are moving from house to house. - threatened from the taliban and theyl are moving from house to house. plus my cousins. _ are moving from house to house. plus my cousins. mv— are moving from house to house. plus my cousins, my cousin _ are moving from house to house. plus my cousins, my cousin is _ are moving from house to house. plus my cousins, my cousin is in _ are moving from house to house. plus my cousins, my cousin is in the - my cousins, my cousin is in the military— my cousins, my cousin is in the military and _ my cousins, my cousin is in the military and he _ my cousins, my cousin is in the military and he is _ my cousins, my cousin is in the military and he is hiding - my cousins, my cousin is in the military and he is hiding as - my cousins, my cousin is in the| military and he is hiding as well my cousins, my cousin is in the i military and he is hiding as well at the moment _ military and he is hiding as well at the moment. the _ military and he is hiding as well at the moment. the other— military and he is hiding as well at the moment. the other cousin, i military and he is hiding as well at| the moment. the other cousin, he military and he is hiding as well at - the moment. the other cousin, he has four young _ the moment. the other cousin, he has four young daughters _ the moment. the other cousin, he has four young daughters who _ the moment. the other cousin, he has four young daughters who are - the moment. the other cousin, he has four young daughters who are law- four young daughters who are law students, — four young daughters who are law students, journalist _ four young daughters who are law students, journalist students - four young daughters who are law students, journalist students and | four young daughters who are law. students, journalist students and a teacher _ students, journalist students and a teacher and — students, journalist students and a teacher. and the _ students, journalist students and a teacher. and the other— students, journalist students and a teacher. and the other one - students, journalist students and a teacher. and the other one is- teacher. and the other one is working — teacher. and the other one is working in— teacher. and the other one is working in a _ teacher. and the other one is working in a hospital. - teacher. and the other one is working in a hospital. they. teacher. and the other one is. working in a hospital. they are teacher. and the other one is- working in a hospital. they are all terrified~ — working in a hospital. they are all terrified. ~ ., working in a hospital. they are all terrified. ~ . ., , ., terrified. what do they say to you when ou terrified. what do they say to you when you speak _ terrified. what do they say to you when you speak to _ terrified. what do they say to you when you speak to them - terrified. what do they say to you when you speak to them on - terrified. what do they say to you when you speak to them on the i terrified. what do they say to you - when you speak to them on the phone? you speak to them often, what do they say about what life is like now? , . . , . ., now? they are literally at home hidinu. now? they are literally at home hiding- they — now? they are literally at home hiding. they cannot _ now? they are literally at home hiding. they cannot go - now? they are literally at home hiding. they cannot go out. - now? they are literally at home hiding. they cannot go out. my| now? they are literally at home - hiding. they cannot go out. my mum especially— hiding. they cannot go out. my mum especiattv can't — hiding. they cannot go out. my mum especiattv can't go _
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hiding. they cannot go out. my mum especially can't go out _ hiding. they cannot go out. my mum especially can't go out and _ hiding. they cannot go out. my mum especially can't go out and work - especially can't go out and work because — especially can't go out and work because she _ especially can't go out and work because she is _ especially can't go out and work because she is the _ especially can't go out and work because she is the only- especially can't go out and work because she is the only source i especially can't go out and worki because she is the only source of income _ because she is the only source of income in — because she is the only source of income in the _ because she is the only source of income in the house, _ because she is the only source of income in the house, she - because she is the only source of| income in the house, she doesn't have _ income in the house, she doesn't have any— income in the house, she doesn't have any support _ income in the house, she doesn't have any support from _ income in the house, she doesn't have any support from anyone. . income in the house, she doesn't i have any support from anyone. even the other— have any support from anyone. even the other families. _ have any support from anyone. even the other families. they— have any support from anyone. even the other families. they are - have any support from anyone. even the other families. they are there. l the other families. they are there. i the other families. they are there. i have _ the other families. they are there. i have lost— the other families. they are there. i have lost my _ the other families. they are there. i have lost my dad _ the other families. they are there. i have lost my dad so _ the other families. they are there. i have lost my dad so i _ the other families. they are there. i have lost my dad so i don't - the other families. they are there. i have lost my dad so i don't wanti i have lost my dad so i don't want to loose _ i have lost my dad so i don't want to loose my— i have lost my dad so i don't want to loose my mum. _ i have lost my dad so i don't want to loose my mum. i— i have lost my dad so i don't want to loose my mum. i don't - i have lost my dad so i don't want to loose my mum. i don't want i i have lost my dad so i don't want to loose my mum. i don't want toj to loose my mum. i don't want to lose _ to loose my mum. i don't want to lose my— to loose my mum. i don't want to lose my brother. _ to loose my mum. i don't want to lose my brother. he _ to loose my mum. i don't want to lose my brother. he is _ to loose my mum. i don't want to lose my brother. he is very- to loose my mum. i don't want toi lose my brother. he is very young. my mum _ lose my brother. he is very young. mv mum is— lose my brother. he is very young. my mum is very— lose my brother. he is very young. my mum is very young _ lose my brother. he is very young. my mum is very young and - lose my brother. he is very young. my mum is very young and i- lose my brother. he is very young. my mum is very young and i don'ti my mum is very young and i don't want _ my mum is very young and i don't want them — my mum is very young and i don't want them to— my mum is very young and i don't want them to suffer _ my mum is very young and i don't want them to suffer any - my mum is very young and i don't want them to suffer any more. i my mum is very young and i don't want them to suffer any more. thank ou. you want them to suffer any more. thank you- you also — want them to suffer any more. thank you. you also have _ want them to suffer any more. thank you. you also have family _ want them to suffer any more. thank you. you also have family members. you. you also have family members you. you also have family members you are worried about. you have been trying to get help, trying to get through to your mp, to the foreign office. tell me what has that been like. are you getting anywhere with all of this? taste like. are you getting anywhere with all of this? ~ . ., all of this? we are not getting anywhere- _ all of this? we are not getting anywhere- we _ all of this? we are not getting anywhere. we have _ all of this? we are not getting anywhere. we have been - all of this? we are not getting| anywhere. we have been ailing all of this? we are not getting - anywhere. we have been ailing mps, e-maiting _ anywhere. we have been ailing mps, e—mailing any contact details we have _ e—mailing any contact details we have treen— e—mailing any contact details we have been getting. there has been a line, have been getting. there has been a tine. i_ have been getting. there has been a tine. i have — have been getting. there has been a line, i have been calling since the 20th— line, i have been calling since the 20th of— line, i have been calling since the 20th of august and we are not getting — 20th of august and we are not getting anywhere. we need help.
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people _ getting anywhere. we need help. peopte of— getting anywhere. we need help. people of afghanistan need everyone's help. someone's nationality or passport should not define _ nationality or passport should not define it — nationality or passport should not define if that life matters or not. this has — define if that life matters or not. this has been happening to people for 20 _ this has been happening to people for 20 years, so long. people have lost their— for 20 years, so long. people have lost their lives, kids, everything. my family— lost their lives, kids, everything. my family is in danger at the moment _ my family is in danger at the moment. every day i get a call from them, _ moment. every day i get a call from them, i_ moment. every day i get a call from them, idon't— moment. every day i get a call from them, i don't know what to tell them next _ them, i don't know what to tell them next i_ them, idon't know what to tell them next idon't— them, i don't know what to tell them next. i don't know what the solution is because _ next. i don't know what the solution is because we are not getting any answers — is because we are not getting any answers. our mps need to do more for us, the _ answers. our mps need to do more for us, the government needs to do more for us _ us, the government needs to do more for us they— us, the government needs to do more for us. they shouldn't be left there for us. they shouldn't be left there for the _ for us. they shouldn't be left there for the taliban. there is no government. that is a terrorist organisation. we need to do more for afghans _ organisation. we need to do more for afghans no _ organisation. we need to do more for afghans. no one is saying anything about— afghans. no one is saying anything about them. we are their voice and other— about them. we are their voice and other afghans need to stand up for them _ other afghans need to stand up for them as— other afghans need to stand up for them as well. other afghans need to stand up for them as well-— other afghans need to stand up for them as well. , . , ,., ., them as well. these are 'ust some of them as well. these are 'ust some of the --eole them as well. these are 'ust some of the people coming h them as well. these are 'ust some of the people coming to _ them as well. these are just some of the people coming to this _ them as well. these are just some ofj the people coming to this community group for help. i was told by the
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director of this organisation that there were people here queueing up from five a:m., trying to get help for theirfamily members from five a:m., trying to get help for their family members back from five a:m., trying to get help for theirfamily members back in afghanistan. as i say the donations just keep on coming.— afghanistan. as i say the donations just keep on coming. thank you very much to you — just keep on coming. thank you very much to you and _ just keep on coming. thank you very much to you and to _ just keep on coming. thank you very much to you and to your _ just keep on coming. thank you very much to you and to your guests - much to you and to your guests there. i'm joined now from kabul by our chief international correspondent lyse doucet. we were hearing some tough stories of people here so worried about their loved ones there. we have heard this morning from the un high commissioner saying that, urging countries bordering afghanistan to keep those borders open. talk us what is happening there now in these dying hours of the us evacuation. yes, we could hear last night and still today the rumble of the american military planes, those flights are still taking off but
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fewer than before and fewer people moving than before. we notice the crowds where we are staying, crowds that other collection points are getting smaller and smaller but the desperation and panic is getting larger because afghans are worried that if they don't have the right documents, they will not be able to go to a third country. they are hoping to get a there was one woman he met yesterday and all she had was an expired id card from 2011 when she worked for the americans. i said, did you e—mail the embassy? she said no. she was bewildered. people see this race to the airport and think, this is my one chance, i had better maximise it. but there are those people who had the e—mails, have the support who have been cleared to take a flight up to britain, the united states to some other processing centre and yes, they are hiding at home is an the
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extraordinary thing is they include, you think afghans on a vulnerable list, university students, musicians, female politicians, they are still here and worried that the windows are closing despite taliban promises that everyone with the proper documents will be able to get out. as you mentioned, the neighbours, pakistan has been taking in a lot of afghans and says it will continue to do so, although there is a huge crush at the afghan border. the northern border into central asian states, also crowds at the border with anyone. traditionally afghans do go back and forth across the border and they are doing it now but the question is, they do not just want to cross the borders, they want to move on. that is the big question now and an urgent question. there have been those five rocket attacks aimed at the airport intercepted by anti—missile technology from the americans and
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also that missile strike on the card taking suicide bombers to the airport. underlining the danger right up till the last moment. the dancer right up till the last moment. the danger right _ right up till the last moment. tie: danger right up right up till the last moment. tte: danger right up to the last moment and the reminder if one was needed right up to the last moment of this chapter of the war, that civilians continue to pay a profoundly heavy price. my colleagues this morning went to a house where the family say ten members of theirfamily, including young children, were killed in the us drone strike yesterday. depending on saying they had targeted a vehicle full of multiple suicide bombers. they say were heading in a car packed with explosives to kabul international airport. they say they hit their target, there were secondary explosions but the full story is becoming clear. we don't know who they hit in the car, who the
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synthesise bombers were. we are told they belong to islamic state but we're also seeing the children also died, at least ten civilians died in this air strike died, at least ten civilians died in this airstrike in died, at least ten civilians died in this air strike in these dying hours of the us military mission here in afghanistan. let's catch up with all the support. it's day 6 of the paralympics in toyko. in the last half an hour, natasha baker has won dressage silver. her third medal of these games, and her eighth overall. there's been gold medal success for great britain on the track and in the archery. rachel latham is in tokyo for us. a great morning for andrew small and phoebe paterson pine? yes. andrew small got a gold medal on the track in the 100 metres this morning. back in rio he got the bronze at the war championships in
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2019, but today here in tokyo, he has clenched that gold for paralympics gb and his team—mate harryjenkins got the bronze. we have also seen a bronze medal be picked up at the powerlifting and that was louise sergeant. phoebe paterson pine got a medal in the archery compound. at the simple, ellie robinson went in the 50 metres butterfly. back in rio she won gold, todayit butterfly. back in rio she won gold, today it was fifth place however she said it was a story of triumph not defeat. she has a hip condition causing her so much pain, she has not been able to train properly, so she said she was so proud of her achievements know everything she has been through last year. {line achievements know everything she has been through last year.— been through last year. one of the treat been through last year. one of the great names- _ not long to go untiljonny peacock defends his title in the men's t64100m final?
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yes, it will all be eyes on great britain'sjonnie peacock in the athletics. it is the 100 metres. he got gold in london, gold in rio. he has never lost at a paralympic games before. this morning in the heat he finished third, so it will be a tough ask forjohnny but he performs on the world stage and he will be hoping to get that gold medal again for great britain tonight. irate hoping to get that gold medal again for great britain tonight.— for great britain tonight. we look forward to seeing _ for great britain tonight. we look forward to seeing how _ for great britain tonight. we look forward to seeing how he - for great britain tonight. we look forward to seeing how he gets . for great britain tonight. we look| forward to seeing how he gets on. thank you. lewis hamilton has called the belgian grand as "a farce" and accused formula 1 of cynicism in the way it ran yesterday's race. heavy rain delayed the belgian grand prix for more than three hours before two laps were completed behind the safety car. that was the minimum required to declare red bull's max verstappen the winner and award half points to the top ten drivers. george russell was second for williams with lewis hamilton third. his championship lead is nowjust three points.
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they do when they sent us out at the end that that the track wasn't any better and they did itjust so we can stop two laps behind the safety car which is the minimum requirement. i hope the fans get their money back today. and finally, the us open gets underway in new york this evening and former champion andy murray faces tough test in his first round match. he's been drawn against the third seed stefanos tsitsipas. murray, who won the title in 2012, is unseeded at the tournament and has had to overcome the thigh injury that ruled him out of the olympic games in tokyo. he is hoping to make an impact at flushing meadows. it will be a good test for me to see where my game is out. i have been practising hard, obviously got some matches in and we will see where my game is out.
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that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. china are limiting the amount of time young people can game online a week — tojust three hours. let's speak to our china correspondent stephen mcdonnell in beijing. this sounds extraordinary. what are they doing? t this sounds extraordinary. what are the doinu? ~ ., this sounds extraordinary. what are they doing?— they doing? i know. teenagers will be screaming _ they doing? i know. teenagers will be screaming out _ they doing? i know. teenagers will be screaming out right _ they doing? i know. teenagers will be screaming out right across - they doing? i know. teenagers will| be screaming out right across china and at least some of their parents pretty happy about this announcement. the person concerned wouldn't mind me telling you that at least one parent of a teenager in our office, cheered with joy when this announcement came out today that children and teenagers are to be limited not only to only three hours per week of online gaming but three specific hours. so friday, saturday, sunday night between eight and 9pm is the only time all week
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that anyone under the age of 18 is to be allowed to indulge in online gaming. i can hear people asking how on earth can you please this? in china you can because they can force companies to use real name registration using actual id documents. some companies will also be using facial recognition scanning because they would be worried about getting in trouble with the authorities. what is unclear is whether or not foreign companies might be forced to in some way impose this on their chinese users or even if the chinese authorities will try to make foreign companies do this, but this is a massive announcement. i mean the gaming industry here is huge. you have millions of gamers in china and of course children and teenagers are a big part of that, but what the
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government has decided is that the paint to be implemented on those gaming companies doesn't match the dangers of online gaming addiction and for that reason they have imposed this very draconian set of rules. but i have to say there will be many parents out there who wouldn't have such a problem with it. . , , . ., wouldn't have such a problem with it. has it been a long time coming? has there been _ it. has it been a long time coming? has there been much _ it. has it been a long time coming? has there been much discussion - has there been much discussion around it? if anyone tries to break the rules what with the punishment be? . , ,., , . , , be? absolutely. there has been -- it has been in — be? absolutely. there has been -- it has been in the _ be? absolutely. there has been -- it has been in the wince _ be? absolutely. there has been -- it has been in the wince for _ be? absolutely. there has been -- it has been in the wince for a _ be? absolutely. there has been -- it has been in the wince for a while - has been in the wince for a while because the government is talking about gaming addiction, we have seen boot camps for kids with gaming addiction and there were instructions in place on the amount of time that children can spend online with gaming. but not to this extent, not like only three specific hours every week. on holidays you can have another hour, so for
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example if there were five days of public holidays, kids could get online then. but if you break these rules, i think companies will lose their licence, they won't be able to keep operating. apart from the fact the authorities have said they will be visiting companies to make sure they have this real name registration in place to make sure they are stopping miners from getting online outside those special hours. i think many companies would be very worried they would lose their right to exist if there were breaches of this and they will take it seriously. breaches of this and they will take it seriously-— now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. there is no significant rain in the forecast this week although at times there will be some light and patchy rain and drizzle coming out from the thick cloud. today quite a bit of cloud around. breezy along the north sea coast. best of the breaks in
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scotland, northern ireland, north—west england, west wales and also parts of south—west england where the top temperature is 19 or 20 degrees. tonight we see more cloud develop across much of the uk where we haven't had it during the day. still breezy down the north sea coast and also the english channel. some cloud breaks but temperatures similar to last night, falling away to between ten and 1a or 15 degrees. tomorrow it is spot the difference. once again a lot of cloud around, still breezy along the north sea coast and english channel. some breaks across the south east, northern ireland, parts of northern england and scotland with highs of 19.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines... american anti—missile systems have intercepted rockets fired towards kabul airport — where the us evacuation operation is drawing to a close. the uk government seeks international support to ensure the taliban allow people to leave afghanistan — as british troops from kabul arrive back on uk soil. the us military has said it is investigating after at least nine afghan civilians were reportedly killed in a drone strike which aimed to prevent an attack on kabul airport.
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hurricane ida has now weakened to a tropical storm — after president biden declared a major disaster in louisiana as powerful winds and rain wiped out all power in new orleans. people travelling to the uk from canada, denmark and five other new 'green list�* countries will not need to isolate as the uk's latest covid travel rules come into force. a new law is being introduced to make school uniforms cheaper in england and wales this autumn — but won't be in place in time for the new school year. hurricane ida has battered the us state of louisiana, leaving more than a million people without power, including the whole of new orleans. it's since been downgraded to a tropical storm. having hit the gulf of mexico last week, the slow moving storm has brought what forecasters called catastrophic storm surge conditions and extreme winds to coastal areas of louisiana. nada tawfik sent this report from new orleans. this is the destructive power of
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hurricane ida. easily lifting the roof clear of this hospital. these coastal areas have been the hardest hit so far. besides the ferocious winds, there have been tidal surges as high as 15 feet and flash flooding. this was footage before and after the storm, is what rushed in. officials warn some of the most affected parts may be uninhabitable for weeks. affected parts may be uninhabitable forweeks. in affected parts may be uninhabitable for weeks. in comparison, affected parts may be uninhabitable forweeks. in comparison, much affected parts may be uninhabitable for weeks. in comparison, much of new orleans is protected by the levees and flood walls by a newly built hurricane defence system. that is being put to the test now. the iconic french quarter, fallen tree branches and riffs litter the streets. at nightfall, power went out across the entire city. in washington, president biden received a briefing at the agency. he made an
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appeal to people in the region. t appeal to people in the region. i want to emphasise again, this appeal to people in the region. t want to emphasise again, this is going to be a devastating, devastating hurricane. a life—threatening storm. so please, all you folks in mississippi and louisiana and god knows maybe even further east, take precautions. listen, take it seriously. very, very seriously. listen, take it seriously. very, very seriously-— listen, take it seriously. very, very seriously. fema are sending 2000 emergency _ very seriously. fema are sending 2000 emergency workers - very seriously. fema are sending 2000 emergency workers to - very seriously. fema are sending i 2000 emergency workers to assist very seriously. fema are sending - 2000 emergency workers to assist in new orleans. for now, residents are on their own for the duration of the stone. —— star. as we've been hearing, hurricane ida has been downgraded to a tropical storm. our weather presenter stav daneos has been looking into how it may develop in the coming days. one of the strongest hurricanes ever to make landfall in louisiana, hurricane ida reached a category for
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storm on sunday. bringing storm surge destructive winds, and in 50 mph and also taking out power to over1 million homes. the system is weakening rapidly as it moves inland. it is going to continue to bring heavy rainfall and flash flooding over the next few days. as of monday, as hurricane ida became a tropical depression and slowed down, bringing phenomenal amounts of rainfall, more than half a metre of rainfall, more than half a metre of rain in places, five to 600 millilitres, now the storm will continue to weaken into a depression as it presses north—eastwards and it will bring heavy rain fell into the tennessee area, areas that have already had flooding over one week ago. and then sail across into the mid atlantic and the northeast united states towards the end of the week. in the short term, further thunderstorms that could hamper the clean—up operation. for nashville, very wet on tuesday. that as the
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remnants moved eastwards. through the north—east atlantic state, wet weather will arrive here wednesday into thursday. a new law is being introduced to make school uniforms cheaper in england and wales this autumn. but many parents are concerned it won't be out in place in time for the start of the school year. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith reports from a uniform swap shop. do you want to try this on? dressing the kids for school doesn't come cheap. with four children, the cost of uniform is extortionate. anything that can help me out, something i don't have to spend out on, isjust incredible. swap shops have become a lifeline to millions of parents. i've spent way over £400 on uniform, and that won't be the last time during the year that i'll have to buy again, whether it's school shoes orjumpers that need replacing. when you look around and see how much there actually is that can be put to good use rather than going to landfill,
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it makes sense to reuse. according to the latest survey from the children's society, a full uniform costs an average of £315 per primary pupil, and for secondary school it's even more, £337 per pupilfor parents to fork out. you can spend that money on taking them on holiday, so, yeah. we were saying we'd much rather spend that money making memories than just a school uniform. yeah! especially after being locked up for so long, it's nice to get out there. that's a small. that looks too small for you. emma's decided enough is enough. 34she started this swap shop and has helped more than 400 families over the last few months. do you want to try it on?
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if they're not wearing the right blazer or they've got a wrong pe kit or they're not wearing the right tie, then they can be given detention, they can be put in isolation, they can be sent home. and it shouldn't be that, children shouldn't ever be punished for not having a school uniform. but a new law is on the way which will force schools in england and wales to have affordability at the centre of the uniform policy. it's expected that the law will limit the number of logos on every uniform, to make sure there's more than one supplier for every school, and to make it easier for parents to complain if it's still too expensive to buy the uniform. but the law isn't in place yet, and so another expensive school year is kicking off. actually, i've met with them... the mp who led the campaign for the new law says schools need to be made to change. so, there has been statutory guidance around since 2013, but guidance is guidance, and far too many schools, whether that's principals and head teachers and governors, have ignored that. how confident are you that these new rules will kick in in time for the next academic year? it must be in place next year. i'd be incredibly disappointed
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to say the least. very importantly so would hundreds of thousands of children, parents, families and campaigners. it must happen. but until then, parents up and down the country are trying to help each other to save money. colletta smith, bbc news, in winsford. this week, the children's code comes into force across the uk. its purpose is to protect children's online data. companies, even those with headquarters abroad, will be required to adhere to a series of standards or risk being sanctioned. our media editor amol rajan has been speaking to behind the children's code, baroness beeban kidron. what it does is it transfers responsibility from parents and children for their immediate safety and their immediate safety underside
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and says, come on tech sector, you have got to do better than this. you have to give us a system that is suitable for kids. you were the key figure in getting this to stage it has got to. you have campaigned in the house of lords for a long time. why did this area attracts your attention? the key thing here is that this is a system that is men and women meet. it is made to optimise whatever they wish. it was not considering when the end user is a child. if the end user is a child and they're being inundated by strangers, adults, if the end user is a child and the are being inundated with notifications during the night, if the end—user is a child and they are being exploited
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in different ways, you have to say, design this app system. in what ways is the current system of legislation and law insufficient. why is it not enough? it wasn't designed for the digital age. one thing i would say, there are 15 provisions of the code. i can name a child who has had the problem that inspired it. it is not arbitrary kids, it is not not real life. these are kids who have been groomed, these to make kids who have been distracted, kids who have been distressed and actually kids with names. you know, peter, molly, frankie. these children have come to difficult situations and we don't have any laws. now, this is the beginning and perhaps most thing about this law is this is the beginning of saying, actually, tech can be regulated. we can insist on something better. we do insist on something better and we welcome the changes that are being made in anticipation. this new children's code
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is going to be enforced by the information commissioner office. that is the regulator that works with data. for people who don't spend time thinking about online safety that may be have concerns about their safety other children's safety, why is it that personal data is the mechanism through which to keep children safe online? because personal data is the mechanism by which the companies make money. it is follow the money. it designed to grab the data and in doing so, a lot of things, unintended consequences, happen to our children. yes? and by actually saying, no, don't take kid's data, take the kids out of the business model. make the profits after you have taken care of the young people, change the system itself. and many of the things that are happening, safe search automatically, high privacy by default, not having adults being able to be in the newsfeeds of children, all of these things will kids safer from the get go. they will transform children's experience.
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the court is going to be enforced by the information office. does the ico have the right sanctions in its toolkit? so the sanctions for the code come from gdpr and they are absolutely mammoth fines. we are talking about the richest companies in the world and this could be a price of doing business, they could spend a lot of time in law courts and so on. i would like ultimately like to see direct liability. i've got to say, i am really interested in compliance and not punishment. i think that there is something about public awareness and public taking a stand and saying, this is important to us, that will actually drive this and help the ico make waves. there's been more medal success for paralympicsgb on day six of the tokyo games. powerlifter louise sugden won
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bronze in the women's —86kg division, with a best lift of 131kg. she lifted the same as the fourth—placed egyptian amany ali — but sugden won the bronze medal as she was more than a kilogram lighter than her rival. and i'm delighted to say louise sugdenjoins us now from tokyo. welcome. congratulations. how are ou welcome. congratulations. how are you feeling? — welcome. congratulations. how are you feeling? really _ welcome. congratulations. how are you feeling? really good. _ welcome. congratulations. how are you feeling? really good. still- you feeling? really good. still trying to take it all in. it has been quite a crazy day. tt trying to take it all in. it has been quite a crazy day. it came down to an issue — been quite a crazy day. it came down to an issue around _ been quite a crazy day. it came down to an issue around checking - been quite a crazy day. it came down to an issue around checking the - to an issue around checking the weights of you and the person who did manage to lift a little heavier than you, but because of your body weight being later, you got it. what was it like waiting for the final decision? tt was it like waiting for the final decision? ., . was it like waiting for the final decision? . , ., . ~ decision? it was nerve-racking. it seemed to _ decision? it was nerve-racking. it seemed to take _ decision? it was nerve-racking. it seemed to take forever. - decision? it was nerve-racking. it i seemed to take forever. thankfully, the decision went my way. now, at london 2012, you competed in the
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wheelchair basketball. you only took up wheelchair basketball. you only took up powerlifting in 2017. you have done incredibly well to get a medal at the games just four years later. why did you decide to take up powerlifting?— why did you decide to take up ”owerliftin ? ~ ., powerlifting? when i retired from basketball. _ powerlifting? when i retired from basketball. i _ powerlifting? when i retired from basketball, i felt _ powerlifting? when i retired from basketball, i felt like _ powerlifting? when i retired from basketball, i felt like i _ powerlifting? when i retired from basketball, i felt like i needed . powerlifting? when i retired from basketball, i felt like i needed a i basketball, ifelt like i needed a new challenge i had a little bit of a break and tried a couple of different sports.— a break and tried a couple of different sports. when i played basketball. _ different sports. when i played basketball, i _ different sports. when i played basketball, i was _ different sports. when i played basketball, i was i _ different sports. when i played basketball, i was i was - different sports. when i played basketball, i was i was one - different sports. when i played basketball, i was i was one of. different sports. when i played i basketball, i was i was one of the strongest players. i don't think i die at any point that i wanted to be a detriment i don't think at any point i said i wanted to be a power lifter. i wasjust point i said i wanted to be a power lifter. i was just enjoying the process and the team and here i am. you build it in slow increments but to get to the point of being able to lift 131 kilograms isjust lift 131 kilograms is just unbelievable lift 131 kilograms isjust unbelievable and beyond the comprehension of most of us. did you think when you started you would be lifting that sort of weight? tia.
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think when you started you would be lifting that sort of weight? trio. t lifting that sort of weight? no, i did not imagine _ lifting that sort of weight? no, i did not imagine that. _ lifting that sort of weight? no, i did not imagine that. that - lifting that sort of weight? no, i did not imagine that. that is - lifting that sort of weight? tirr, t did not imagine that. that is what i love about the sport. i am surprising myself constantly. i never thaw i would be as strong as i am now. i work hard and i enjoy what i do and i know that makes things a lot easier. ~ ., ., i do and i know that makes things a lot easier. . . ., , ., , lot easier. what are your goals auoin lot easier. what are your goals going forward _ lot easier. what are your goals going forward from _ lot easier. what are your goals going forward from here? - lot easier. what are your goals going forward from here? do l lot easier. what are your goals i going forward from here? do you think you can keep getting stronger and lifting heavier? tt is think you can keep getting stronger and lifting heavier?— and lifting heavier? it is getting harder to get — and lifting heavier? it is getting harder to get stronger. - and lifting heavier? it is getting harder to get stronger. that - and lifting heavier? it is getting - harder to get stronger. that happens when you have been any strength of support for a little while. i got my sights set on the european record. it is currently 143. i've got a bit of work to do to get to that. i'd like to compete at the commonwealth games next year and hopefully get a medal there again, as i did in 2018. i thinkjust keep getting stronger and paris is definitely not out of the question. and paris is definitely not out of the question-— and paris is definitely not out of the cuestion. ~ . . , , ,, the question. what has it been like bein: the question. what has it been like being there — the question. what has it been like being there in _ the question. what has it been like being there in tokyo? _
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the question. what has it been like being there in tokyo? it _ the question. what has it been like being there in tokyo? it has - the question. what has it been like being there in tokyo? it has been i being there in tokyo? it has been amazing. i was a little bit sceptical originally with all the covered protocols that were in place. i thaw it was going to be very restricted. tt place. i thaw it was going to be very restricted.— place. i thaw it was going to be ve restricted. . , , ., ., very restricted. it has been amazing desite very restricted. it has been amazing des - ite the very restricted. it has been amazing despite the restrictions. _ very restricted. it has been amazing despite the restrictions. and - very restricted. it has been amazing despite the restrictions. and out. very restricted. it has been amazing despite the restrictions. and out of| despite the restrictions. and out of the concerns around covid. triane despite the restrictions. and out of the concerns around covid. none of ou can the concerns around covid. none of you can have _ the concerns around covid. none of you can have your _ the concerns around covid. none of you can have your family _ the concerns around covid. none of you can have your family and - the concerns around covid. none of you can have your family and loved| you can have your family and loved ones there. how has that been and have you managed to speak to them since the bronze medal? yes. have you managed to speak to them since the bronze medal?— have you managed to speak to them since the bronze medal? yes, i did a video call with _ since the bronze medal? yes, i did a video call with them _ since the bronze medal? yes, i did a video call with them after _ since the bronze medal? yes, i did a video call with them after i - since the bronze medal? yes, i did a video call with them after i got - since the bronze medal? yes, i did a video call with them after i got my i video call with them after i got my medal. it is difficult not having them here, my family were planning on coming out but i will be home in a couple of days and we can celebrate then.— a couple of days and we can celebrate then. what will you do when ou celebrate then. what will you do when you come _ celebrate then. what will you do when you come home? - celebrate then. what will you do when you come home? i - celebrate then. what will you do when you come home? i am - celebrate then. what will you do when you come home? i am notj celebrate then. what will you do - when you come home? i am not sure et. i when you come home? i am not sure yet- i think — when you come home? i am not sure yet- i think they _ when you come home? i am not sure yet. i think they will _ when you come home? i am not sure yet. i think they will be _ when you come home? i am not sure yet. i think they will be a _ when you come home? i am not sure yet. i think they will be a family - yet. i think they will be a family celebration and some farm but it has not been decided yet what we are going to be doing. congratulations
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aaain. going to be doing. congratulations again- thank _ going to be doing. congratulations again. thank you _ going to be doing. congratulations again. thank you so _ going to be doing. congratulations again. thank you so much - going to be doing. congratulations again. thank you so much for- going to be doing. congratulations i again. thank you so much forjoining us, louise acton. again. thank you so much for 'oining us, louise acton.* the critically claimed play, east is east, returns to the birmingham rep — 25 years after it first opened there. the comedy drama, which was adapted into an award winning film, centres around a mixed ethnic household living in salford in the seventies. butjust how relevant is the autobographical play — in today's world. the bbc asian network's shabnam mahmood has been to rehearsals. 25 years after it first opened on stage in birmingham, the comedy drama east is east is back in the theatre. it story remains the same. we have been married for 25 years, the khan family. tt is we have been married for 25 years, the khan family.— the khan family. it is the struggles between an — the khan family. it is the struggles between an older _ the khan family. it is the struggles between an older generation - the khan family. it is the struggles between an older generation and l between an older generation and younger— between an older generation and younger generation. the struggles
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between _ younger generation. the struggles between people who have been raised in other— between people who have been raised in other places and then raising kids any— in other places and then raising kids any totally different place with totally different rules. they grew _ with totally different rules. they grew up — with totally different rules. they grew up with the rules. and it is about— grew up with the rules. and it is about our— grew up with the rules. and it is about our partnership and struggle to maintain that partnership. in a changing — to maintain that partnership. in a changing world and growing children. although _ changing world and growing children. although it is set in the 70s, the although it is set in the 705, the themes covered in the plate like racism, domestic violence and arranged marriages are still relevant to any audience. those conversations _ relevant to any audience. those conversations have _ relevant to any audience. those conversations have never - relevant to any audience. those conversations have never been l relevant to any audience. those - conversations have never been more widespread than they are now. so i think this play feels like it speaks even more powerfully to the modern time than it did 25 years ago. since ”remierin time than it did 25 years ago. since premiering here — time than it did 25 years ago. since premiering here in _ time than it did 25 years ago. since premiering here in 1996, _ time than it did 25 years ago. since premiering here in 1996, it - time than it did 25 years ago. since premiering here in 1996, it went on to be made into a bafta award winning movie by the same name. some of the film because my actors became
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household names. tt is of the film because my actors became household names.— household names. it is an honour to ste into household names. it is an honour to step into the — household names. it is an honour to step into the shoes. _ household names. it is an honour to step into the shoes. my _ household names. it is an honour to step into the shoes. my age - household names. it is an honour to step into the shoes. my age group l step into the shoes. my age group weren't even born when it came out. my weren't even born when it came out. my grandparents, my mum, everyone knows it. of course, that was funny. because it is such a classic, it is an honour to be trusted with this part. t an honour to be trusted with this art. an honour to be trusted with this art, ., . an honour to be trusted with this art. . . �* , ., part. i did watch the film. it's a beautiful creation, _ part. i did watch the film. it's a beautiful creation, really - beautiful creation, really revolutionary for its time. i wasn't born— revolutionary for its time. i wasn't born but— revolutionary for its time. i wasn't born but i— revolutionary for its time. i wasn't born but i can still appreciate how amazing _ born but i can still appreciate how amazing it — born but i can still appreciate how amazing it was. the born but i can still appreciate how amazing it was.— born but i can still appreciate how amazing it was. the 25th anniversary roduction amazing it was. the 25th anniversary production of— amazing it was. the 25th anniversary production of east _ amazing it was. the 25th anniversary production of east is _ amazing it was. the 25th anniversary production of east is east _ amazing it was. the 25th anniversary production of east is east will- amazing it was. the 25th anniversary production of east is east will also i production of east is east will also be shown at the national theatre in london later this year. 35 weeks pregnant and hospitalised with covid—19, twenty—eight—year—old hajrah aslam had to be placed into an induced coma earlier this year. she was struggling to breath and her oxygen levels were dangerously low. this was hours after doctors delivered her first child through a c—section.
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her family were warned several times she may not make it. it would be six weeks before hajrah woke and a further two before she could finally meet her baby, huzayfah. hajrah was sent to rehab to relearn how to look after herself and build enough strength to feed her son. i spoke to her earlier and asked her who she was feeling. i am so glad i am home. it is like a dream come true. can you take us back to that awful moment injanuary when you are heavily pregnant and also ill with covid and had to go into hospital. how were you at that time? i contracted covid on the 15th of january. i got worse in the 18th of january. that is when i was hospitalised. i was struggling to breathe. i was struggling to do daily activities. i had to go in. my son was pushing against my lungs. they made the decision that he had to come out,
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which is on the 20th of january. i had my cesarean on the 20th of january. and on that same night, my oxygen levels dropped 2.5%, which they said i had to go into a coma and had to be incubated. it must have been so frightening. how much are you actually aware of at that time? i can remember giving birth to my son and i was aware of everything at that time but i was really, really scared. i had just given birth to my son and he is in the intensive care. giving birth alone is a scary experience. and, you know, iwasjust really, really frightened. i phoned my family members to say goodbye. i thought i wasn't going to wake up. you went into a coma then at that
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point for six weeks. what was it like when you woke up and you realised it was march? did you even remember you had a son? luckily, i remembered giving birth to him. after that, i don't remember. i woke up and the date was right in front of me on a white board. it said in march and i got really confused. i just started crying. the nurse came up to me and said, you have been through a lot. you have been really, really poorly. do you remember your son. i wasn't responding. i couldn't anyway because i had a tracheostomy. i could not speak. all i did was just cry. yes, it was frightening. and it was another two weeks before you could see your son. what was the moment like when you were finally reunited? oh, god, i can't describe it. when i first saw him... i saw him when he was a little baby for a couple of seconds when he was born and then all of a sudden he is two months old. he is a little chunk.
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i was confused. it was so magical. i can't describe it. it was the best. had you managed to name him before you went into the coma? yes, i managed to name him. i got everything. i got his clothes, got his pram, got everything. as a new mum, i planned everything. i named him his first name. at the point then when you are reunited at it was a long time to go before you got back to full health. tell us about the process.- tell us about the process. when i woke u - , tell us about the process. when i woke op. l _ tell us about the process. when i woke up, i could _ tell us about the process. when i woke up, i could not _ tell us about the process. when i woke up, i could not do _ tell us about the process. when i woke up, i could not do anything. tell us about the process. when i - woke up, i could not do anything. my whole body. i could not move my fingers. i was literally bedbound. i stayed in hospital until april and then i had to go to rehab. they were
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amazing. i literally learnt to walk and do everything, just like a newborn baby again. tt is and do everything, just like a newborn baby again. it is absolutely incredible, newborn baby again. it is absolutely incredible. to _ newborn baby again. it is absolutely incredible, to see _ newborn baby again. it is absolutely incredible, to see you _ newborn baby again. it is absolutely incredible, to see you and _ newborn baby again. it is absolutely incredible, to see you and talk - newborn baby again. it is absolutely incredible, to see you and talk to i incredible, to see you and talk to you today looking fully well. is there any legacy from this for you? god, you don't know what is coming round the corner. honest to god. every single minute, i take nothing for granted. nothing at all. i live my life to the full. even though i am still struggling with my breathlessness and i've got nerve damage now from being in a coma and a struggle to walk and go up the stairs but i am taking nothing for granted. considering from where i was to where i am now, that is it. live your life to the fullest. you thou . ht live your life to the fullest. you thought you _ live your life to the fullest. you thought you would _ live your life to the fullest. you thought you would die and your family were not able to be with you and they must have been so frightened as well. tt and they must have been so frightened as well.— frightened as well. it was a terrible time _ frightened as well. it was a terrible time for _ frightened as well. it was a terrible time for them. - frightened as well. it was a terrible time for them. my| frightened as well. it was a - terrible time for them. my whole family, my mum, my dad. my mum had
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to be hospitalised a couple of times as well. my dad lost so much weight. my as well. my dad lost so much weight. my siblings... my brother did not go to work for two months. it was a stressful time for them. for someone to say your daughter is not going to make it, it wasjust to say your daughter is not going to make it, it was just a to say your daughter is not going to make it, it wasjust a horrible time. make it, it was 'ust a horrible time. �* . make it, it was 'ust a horrible time. �* , make it, it was 'ust a horrible time. a make it, it was 'ust a horrible time. as you say, coming back close to fearin: time. as you say, coming back close to fearing he — time. as you say, coming back close to fearing he would _ time. as you say, coming back close to fearing he would not _ time. as you say, coming back close to fearing he would not survive, - time. as you say, coming back close to fearing he would not survive, you| to fearing he would not survive, you when acting any thing for granted. —— you are not taking anything for granted. you have your hands full with a baby but has it shifted you outlook any more practically profound way in terms of wanting to change anything?— profound way in terms of wanting to change anything? before i contracted covid, is to change anything? before i contracted covid. is to plan _ change anything? before i contracted covid, is to plan everything. - change anything? before i contracted covid, is to plan everything. i - covid, is to plan everything. i planned i am going to give birth this way, i am going to do it this way, but i am not going to plan any more. ijust live each day as it is. one day at a time now. you do not
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know what is around the corner. the american actor ed asner has died at the age of 91. he was best known for playing the fictionaljournalist lou grant — and voicing the lead character in the pixarfilm, 'up'. asner won seven emmy awards, the most for a male performer. his family said he passed away peacefully yesterday morning. lee 'scratch' perry, one of the most influential figures injamaican music, has died at the age of 85. a pioneer of reggae and dub, perry produced many seminaljamaican musicians, including bob marley and the wailers, and released more than 70 albums. now it's time for a look at the weather with phil. the meteorologist turned from summer to autumn on the 1st of september
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come what may with the weather. there is no rush for you to change your weather today. there will be some sunshine. a big area of high pressure up towards the north—west of the british isles. and on the onshore breeze, we are still feeding in a lot of cloud, particularly so in a lot of cloud, particularly so in parts of england and wales. sunshine towards the west of scotland, parts of northern ireland. not an awful lot of breeze but if you get the combination of the onshore wind, and a lot of cloud, not going to feel particularly summary on the east coast. 14 celsius or so. summary on the east coast. 14 celsius or 50. maybe 20 celsius out towards the west. overnight, the only change is the cloud will fill in. mist untilfog around. at its thickest, it may produce the odd spot of drizzle. where the cloud parts, you could get down to 809
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celsius. a5 parts, you could get down to 809 celsius. as i was suggesting earlier on, no radical change in the weather. —— eight or nine celsius. the next few days, dry and not warranting a postcode home. perhaps the best of the sunshine on the western side of scotland. northern ireland, may be towards cumbria. at its best, 20 celsius. you get a little bit of sunshine across the western quarter. underneath the cloud, out towards the east, 15 or 16. that high pressure still very much there on wednesday into thursday. subtle changes in the wind direction may favour more sunshine getting into words cumbria and the north—west of england. scotland faring quite nicely, as well as northern ireland. still that same temperature set up. the best of the temperature, 20 celsius. underneath the cloud, 15 or 16. let's cut to
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the cloud, 15 or 16. let's cut to the chase, thursday, friday, not too different. the best of the sunshine out towards the west. the weekend, could be a change. high declines, the first sign of rain, perhaps.
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this is bbc news. the bbc is told ten people from one family including six children were killed in a us drone attack. the us says the target was an islamic state suicide bomber. rockets have been fired towards kabul international airport as the us evacuation draws to a close. t am us evacuation draws to a close. i am in kabul where _ us evacuation draws to a close. i am in kabul where you _ us evacuation draws to a close. i am in kabul where you may _ us evacuation draws to a close. t —n in kabul where you may hear us warplanes are in the sky as the hours are counted before a 20 year us military engagement in afghanistan ends.- us military engagement in afghanistan ends. us military engagement in afuhanistan ends. ~ ., afghanistan ends. also we are live in washington _ afghanistan ends. also we are live in washington to _ afghanistan ends. also we are live in washington to speak _ afghanistan ends. also we are live in washington to speak to - afghanistan ends. also we are live i in washington to speak to pakistan's ambassador to the united states about the situation in the country.
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i about the situation in the country. 1 billion people without

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