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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 31, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the final us evacuation flight leaves kabul airport a minute before midnight — as it formally ends its military involvement in the country — after nearly two decades. this has been a massive military, diplomatic and humanitarian undertaking. one of the most difficult nomination�*s history —— in our nation's history and an extraordinary feat of logistics and coordination under some of the most challenging circumstances imaginable. the taliban have taken control of the airport — the militant group says the withdrawal is a "lesson for
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the world" and future generations. the uk says the immediate priority is getting out those who want to leave. continuing safe passage for those, the minority, the small minority but none the less significant number who haven't yet been able to get out and then dealing with all the other building blocks to make sure afghanistan can be more stable moving forward. let me know today how you think the uk and us handled the exit from afghanistan. message me on inst or twitter or email victoria@bbc.oc.uk hurricane ida: thousands of soldiers and emergency workers are deployed in the us state of louisiana to help with the rescue operation — officials say it could take weeks to restore electricity. a new study suggests playing just one season of professional rugby is enough to start having adverse effects on the brain. in her eighth paralympics, sarah storey wins a record—equalling 16th gold medal in tokyo — a feat hailed by the chair of uk sport. she still has the amazing physical ability to set new standards and push the barriers every single time the games come around, but importantly she still has the same passion and drive. she wants to break her own records.
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hello and welcome if you re watching in the uk or around the world. almost two decades after american troops invaded afghanistan, the united states has formally announced an end to its military involvement in the country. the conflict was the longest in american history — and ends as it began — with the taliban in power. in line with the agreement signed with the taliban, the final us evacuation flight left kabul airport a minute before midnight, localtime, last night. since then, the taliban have taken it over along with the rest of the country, declaring "congratulations to afghanistan, this victory belongs to us all". in all, around 130,000 people have been evacuated in the last few weeks.
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speaking this morning, the foreign secretary dominic raab said the number of uk nationals still in afghanistan was in the �*low hundreds�* and the government were doing all they could to help. the number of afghans trying to leave the country via pakistan and iran is said to have quadrupled in recent weeks. in the last 20 years, almost 2,500 service personnel have been killed and many hundreds of thousands of afghan civilians. for the first time in two decades, there are no foreign troops in afghanistan. 0ur north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the last american soldier to leave afghanistan — major general chris donoghue boarding a cargo plane, the final flight out of kabul. a hugely symbolic moment bringing to an end the us mission that started shortly after the september
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11th attacks in 2001. as the c—17 disappeared into the night sky, on the ground the taliban celebrated with gun fire and fireworks. a victory for them, following two decades of international engagement in the country and recent weeks marked by violence, bloodshed and chaotic scenes in kabul. the us withdrawal follows frantic efforts over the past 18 days to fly 123,000 people out of afghanistan, including 6,000 us citizens. and chaotic scenes in kabul. the us withdrawal follows frantic efforts over the past 18 days to fly 123,000 people out of afghanistan, including 6,000 us citizens. this has been a massive military, diplomatic and humanitarian undertaking, one of the most difficult in our nation's history and an extraordinary feat of logistics and co—ordination under some of the most challenging circumstances imaginable. during the evacuations, 13 us service members were killed in an attack on kabul airport by is—k — a local branch of islamic state. the us now faces questions over a drone attack on suspected militants, which also claimed the lives of ten afghan civilians, including children. up to 200 americans are believed
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still to be in the country. look, there's a lot of heartbreak associated with this departure. we did not get everybody out that we wanted to get out, but i think if we'd stayed another ten days we wouldn't have gotten everybody out that we wanted to get out and would still be people who would be disappointed with that. it's a tough situation. the us and its allies are now facing up to the taliban being in charge of afghanistan and the prospect of building a difficult diplomatic relationship — one that the americans say will not be based on trust. within minutes of that final us flight out of kabul, the taliban were in control of the airport, apparently in a reassuring mood. translation: my message to the public and to the mujahideen is they must not go for gunfire, they must celebrate this happiness by worshipping the god. in the meantime the taliban's also taken control of abandoned us military hardware,
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including armoured vehicles and aircraft left behind during the withdrawal. the americans say the equipment�*s been decommissioned or rendered useless. but for the taliban, this is another strong symbol of their new—found power. as the final us flight departed at midnight, taliban supporters took to the streets to celebrate. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet witnessed the historic moment. well listen, i mean, listen... gun fire. there is tracer fire in the air, the guns are going off, you can see the tracer fire going up in the night sky. all day we we had heard the american war planes circling the city, flying low, as we thought the last
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american flights were taking off. but it is now the 31st august, in afghanistan, the day that presidentjoe biden said the american military mission, the 20—year engagement by us—led nato forces would formally end and this what is you're hearing now, the eruption of gun fire by taliban supporters in the city of kabul. our correspondent in kabul secunder kermani has the latest now on the first full day of taliban rule now that the us has left. the heavy celebratory gunfire we heard from the taliban last night, that continued into the early hours of the morning. many people of course... the taliban declaring this as a great victory. talking to the media from the airport runway where just a few hours earlier planes had been taking off. for many afghans, they will not see it necessarily as a victory, but as a time of deep uncertainty.
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a lot of people i have been talking to here over the past week or so have said that the taliban's attitude and tone in public at least has been far more conciliatory than they had anticipated, but they are worried about how long that will last. whether the taliban might for example introduce more repressive restrictions on women's rights. the taliban say that women will be allowed to be educated, will be able to go to work. but sometimes they have been rather vague in their assurances. and so a lot of attention is going to be paid to what happens in the coming days, particularly what form of political system is announced by the taliban. they have been holding discussions with other senior political figures including the former president hamid karzai. but there is also a lot of discussion within taliban ranks about whether or not they will declare an islamic emirate. that is the name of the regime they had in the 1990s when they were in power.
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and for my sources, it seems a distinct possibility that it will be the name of the new government. but we will have to wait and see. right, i appreciate you are in the capital, but what do you know about people who are still trying to get out of the country by land now? well, in fact i was just at the bus stand in kabul just yesterday evening. and employees there were telling me that the number of people travelling to the borders particularly iran and pakistan, had doubled if not quadrupled in recent weeks. most of those people without visas, without the chance of legally getting into these neighbouring countries, but using people smugglers to do so. then hoping to get on towards turkey, perhaps europe if possible. many of these people citing economic concerns and the uncertainty that has accompanied the taliban's arrival here. saying that theyjust don't know what the future of the country will be. also many of them criticising the previous government as well for its lack of support for ordinary people. this uncertainty that has
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accompanied the taliban's arrival that has been the final push for them to start, or attempt to start this new life. morning that his department had handled the evacuation extremely well. 0ur political correspondent adam fleming was listening to the interview. he says no government department has done a betterjob of handling the crisis in afghanistan than the foreign and commonwealth development office, which i think might raise some eyebrows amongst his colleagues who have been criticising him anonymously in the papers. the big thing that the foreign office in the last few hours is to get this resolution through the un security council in new york. russia and china abstained, which isn't as good as voting for it, but it isn't as bad as vetoing it, stopping it from happening.
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the big priority in that resolution amongst the international community is this idea of safe passage, that is people who are entitled to leave afghanistan actually being allowed by the taliban to leave by some route, whether it is to the airport, but we aren't sure if that is functioning at the moment or not, or whether it is through land borders with afghanistan's neighbours. then you have the issue of how many people are actually eligible to make thatjourney and it is very difficult to work out because you've got different categories of people. you have got british nationals or people who are dual nationals and maybe have an afghan and british passport, who would be entitled to come to the uk. then you have got people who are afghan nationals who provided assistance to the uk and other countries while they were occupying afghanistan and then you've got people who are vulnerable and who might be eligible to be resettled in the uk and elsewhere as refugees. and that is why the foreign secretary this morning couldn't really put an exact number of how many people are still left in afghanistan. i think right now, for me, as a foreign secretary, i'm focused on the immediate priorities — continuing safe passage for those,
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the minority, a small minority, but nonetheless a significant number, who haven't yet been able to get out. we are working with the third countries in the region. we have held the taliban through this un security council resolution to their undertaking to allow safe passage and then dealing with all of the other building blocks to make sure afghanistan can be more stable moving forward. and those building blocks in the un resolution alongside safe passage for people leaving include not allowing afghanistan to be re—established as a safe haven for terrorists as it was in the 1990s and the build—up to the 9/11 attacks on the united states. also another building block is getting a sort of firm foundation for charities and aid organisations and the united nations still provide humanitarian relief. and the resolution also talks about safeguarding the progress made in the last 20 years. that is about protecting the human rights of women and girls and minorities in afghanistan. there is another story circulating
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today, which suggest that there might have been some behind—the—scenes tensions between the uk and the us in the last few days around the airport in kabul. the website politico is reporting that some people in the us administration, particularly wanted to shut one of the gates around the airport, but the final decision was to keep it open because the uk needed that gate to be open to help with its evacuation effort. gate to be open to help dominic raab was asked about that this morning too. look, i've got an excellent working relationship with tony blinken, the secretary of state, in the immediate hours after the attack and again yesterday. look, just as a point of fact, we did everything we could once we were alerted to the threat, but before the explosion took place, to mitigate the risk. that included warning people not to come to the airport, warning people who were in the crowd to leave to the extent that we could. we also shifted the civilian team
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that we had in the barons hotel to the airport because clearly it's a stone's throw away from where the terrorist attack took place. it clearly wasn't safe, but none of that would have required or necessitated the gate at abbey gate to be left open. so there are a huge number of threads to this overall story, but i think there are three things to look out for over the next few days. that issue of safe passage. we will be able to see with our own eyes and whatsapp messages from former translators and assistants and things like that whether people are being able to get out of afghanistan either by air or by land. then there is the issue of recognising the new afghan government because the taliban is on the verge of forming a new government. how does the international community react to that, either as a whole or individually? and thirdly the big event at westminster tomorrow at two o'clock.
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the foreign affairs select committee of mps is going to be questioning dominic raab, the foreign secretary, themselves and that committee is chaired by tom tugendhat, the conservative mp who once served in afghanistan and made that very searing speech when parliament was recalled to discuss the crisis a few days ago. joining me now is sir nicholas kay, britain's ambassador to afghanistan what is your view about how he has handled it? ithink what is your view about how he has handled it? i think we exercise quite bit of humidity and willingness to examine exactly what has happened and weather it has been done best possible way or not. that doesn'tjustify done best possible way or not. that doesn't justify the done best possible way or not. that doesn'tjustify the past done best possible way or not. that doesn't justify the past few weeks and months and it behoves us to look over the past 20 years ago and do some soul—searching. when i look back a look back with pride at what the uk is done and we so again during the evacuation men and women on the ground and brilliant tasks
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and pride in that and great admiration for the people there and resilience and determination and the youth and the things you've created for the country but there is a lot of shame as well. shame that we have not delivered what we said we would do and we have not kept our commitment as we said we would keep our commitment not to abandon the afghan people and to defend human rights and freedoms that they had gained. in rights and freedoms that they had aained. . , ., , rights and freedoms that they had aained. . , .,, , ., gained. in the war ends as it began with the taliban _ gained. in the war ends as it began with the taliban in _ gained. in the war ends as it began with the taliban in power. - gained. in the war ends as it began with the taliban in power. how- gained. in the war ends as it began with the taliban in power. how do | with the taliban in power. how do you feel about that?— with the taliban in power. how do you feel about that? yes, as i say, i do feel shame _ you feel about that? yes, as i say, i do feel shame that _ you feel about that? yes, as i say, i do feel shame that we _ you feel about that? yes, as i say, i do feel shame that we as - you feel about that? yes, as i say, i do feel shame that we as the - you feel about that? yes, as i say, i do feel shame that we as the uk | i do feel shame that we as the uk and nato and the us altogether have not been able to deliver on our commitments and it behoves us i think to be humble and to recognise that tub thumping and chest beating no isn't right so the need to be a
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really good long hard look at how we lost our strategic patience to do what was necessary which was i was going to take far longer than 20 years to help afghans build a nation that was sustainable and at peace with itself. i think we can look back and it is becoming time and urgent that we do that but the work also needs to continue and there are some very tricky questions going forward and huge priorities in terms of helping those afghans were still in afghanistan.— in afghanistan. what you think will ha en in afghanistan. what you think will happen next _ in afghanistan. what you think will happen next with _ in afghanistan. what you think will happen next with the _ in afghanistan. what you think will happen next with the country - in afghanistan. what you think will| happen next with the country under taliban rule? the immediate thing on a mac that is going to happen is hardship for the afghan people. they are facing already a financial crisis and the banks are close and
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there is very little availability and food and clothes are scarce with winter just around the and food and clothes are scarce with winterjust around the corner. although the us has left overnight and there are no more nato forces there on the ground the united nations hasn't left. the united nations hasn't left. the united nations will stay and deliver and i think we now need to work extremely closely with the un to make sure that as an absently massive humanitarian assistance programme in place. that is very different and we shouldn't confuse the two. fix, shouldn't confuse the two. humanitarian system to keep people alive should not be politicised. it should be through agencies and non—commissioned officers. should be through agencies and non-commissioned officers. thank you ve much non-commissioned officers. thank you very much for— non-commissioned officers. thank you very much for talking _ non-commissioned officers. thank you very much for talking to _ non-commissioned officers. thank you very much for talking to us. _ non-commissioned officers. thank you very much for talking to us. thank - very much for talking to us. thank you for your time. adam weinstine is a former us marine who served in afghanistan. he is now a research fellow at the quincy institute in new york city.
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how do you feel about the war ending as it began with the taliban in power? i as it began with the taliban in ower? ~ , power? i think we will see if the war has actually _ power? i think we will see if the war has actually ended. - power? i think we will see if the war has actually ended. what i power? i think we will see if the | war has actually ended. what we power? i think we will see if the - war has actually ended. what we know is that us troops and nato troops of the part of the country but of course the walk and continued internally in afghanistan and also continue through drone strikes and we saw one the other day which killed an afghan family. i think it was the right decision to leave afghanistan. if we look at the last week in afghanistan it is a microcosm of what the war was. we see us troops placed in an impossible situation which led to casualties. we see a terrorist attack that targeted civilians and we also see a us drone strike that ultimately killed civilians so this is what the legacy of the last 20 years has been and the only alternative i have so offered was to continue that status: definitely.
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could the departure have been handled better?— handled better? certainly the de arture handled better? certainly the departure could _ handled better? certainly the departure could have - handled better? certainly the departure could have been i handled better? certainly the - departure could have been handled better, the entire war could have been handled better but what we see time and time again is that the us and nato for that matter have been incapable of handling things better. so the vast evacuation we saw in my view was simply an extension of the fop lit might dysfunction we saw in the last 20 years.— the last 20 years. what was the dysfunction _ the last 20 years. what was the dysfunction of _ the last 20 years. what was the dysfunction of the _ the last 20 years. what was the dysfunction of the last - the last 20 years. what was the dysfunction of the last 20 - the last 20 years. what was the l dysfunction of the last 20 years? the dysfunction of the last 20 years is there are so many variables on the ground nato troops were incapable of handling. too many variables, we were unable to fix conditions on the ground. a perfect example of this last week. we saw all the good troops were doing and getting fork out also had the
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side—effect of attracting is—kp terrorists who were capable of inflicting harm on civilians and what was the us response? a readiness to engage in a drone strike based on faulty intelligence that ultimately killed a civilian afghan family and their children. this is what we have been seeing over the last 20 years and to continue military intervention with no end in sight. it continue military intervention with no end in sight.— no end in sight. it protects the uk from any terrorism _ no end in sight. it protects the uk from any terrorism emanating - no end in sight. it protects the uk. from any terrorism emanating from afghanistan which was one of the aims? mike i'm not sure that's true. the united states department of homeland security and defences inside the united states and our ability to intercept terrorist threats abroad have become more sophisticated in the same is true
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for the uk. does having boots on the ground and the ability to collect human intelligence in afghanistan help? sure. was it worth the gust of remaining in afghanistan militarily and in a definite manner? no. the job of the us president and ultimately us and europe as well as to be able to prioritise risks. it to be able to prioritise risks. if you look at the risk emanating from afghanistan it simply does not justify open—ended military occupation in perpetuity. justify open-ended military occupation in perpetuity. thank you ve much occupation in perpetuity. thank you very much for— occupation in perpetuity. thank you very much for your _ occupation in perpetuity. thank you very much for your time _ occupation in perpetuity. thank you very much for your time to - occupation in perpetuity. thank you very much for your time to do. - occupation in perpetuity. thank you very much for your time to do. we l very much for your time to do. we appreciate it. this morning, a taliban spokesman has been speaking, let's hear what he had to say. translation: during the last 20 years - and with our dedication and efforts and help from allah, we managed today to regain our independence
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and make us forces leave. this is big lesson for other invaders and for our future generation""|t is also a lesson for the world,""we we want to have good relations with the us and the world. we welcome good diplomatic relations with them all. congratulations to afghanistan... this victory belongs to us all >bbc news chief picture producers —— this victory belongs to us all. a huge rescue operation is taking place in the us state of louisiana, which was struck by hurricane ida on sunday. rescue workers and volunteers are using boats and aircraft to find people trapped by floods along the mississippi river.
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our correspondent nada tawfik has the latest from new orleans. ida has transformed streets into waterways, trapping some residents in the worst affected parts of louisiana. volunteer search teams known as the cajun navy have been out trying to reach the most desperate. even on dry land, many were overwhelmed by the damage residents in the worst affected parts of louisiana. volunteer search teams known as the cajun navy have been out trying to reach the most desperate. even on dry land, many were overwhelmed by the damage to their homes, to their lives. right now, i've got nothing. all i got here, i got a backpack with a few clothes in, in case i had to run out. but i didn't know where... i didn't know where... i would end up in. it's the worrying. it's the worrying it's the worrying. it's the worrying i don't _ it's the worrying. it's the worrying i don't like — it's the worrying. it's the worrying i don't like. i'm just glad that i'm here _ i don't like. i'm just glad that i'm here and — i don't like. i'm just glad that i'm here and can start again. more resources are beginning to pour into the region. 5,000 national guard members have been deployed to help local authorities. the storm has left behind a massive mess. nearly one more mcmillian residents in louisiana are without power.
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it's well over1 million people. on monday, crews from the energy company began repairs where it was safe. still it could take weeks before things are up and running again. ida was one of the most powerful storms to hit the united states. it is certainly one residents here will not soon forget. nada tawfik, bbc news, new orleans. joining me now is cbs correspondent michael george. he's in bridge city, louisania where recovery efforts are under way. these power failures are massive. that's right, we're talking about a million people still without power two days after the hurricane hit. this is a three—storey transmission tower down by ida and that official saying it will take weeks not days to fully restore the system. it is very hot and humid during the daytime here in louisiana so people are suffering through without any power and without any air conditioning. it's a very difficult situation for people already dealing with flood conditions. in situation for people already dealing with flood conditions.— with flood conditions. in terms of the recovery _ with flood conditions. in terms of the recovery and _ with flood conditions. in terms of the recovery and rescue - with flood conditions. in terms of. the recovery and rescue operation, how's that going? the recovery and rescue operation, hovfs that going?— the recovery and rescue operation, how's that going? tragically we know that two people _ how's that going? tragically we know that two people have _ how's that going? tragically we know that two people have lost _ how's that going? tragically we know that two people have lost their - that two people have lost their lives and we do expect that tall to
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increase right now. there are rescue operation under way throughout the state. there are search helicopters going through different areas. unfortunately it doesn't appear that we have the —— fortunately it's a pierce we don't have the enormous loss of life we saw through katrina because the flood walls and levies built after that held so we haven't seen the damage we saw during hurricane katrina 16 years ago. —— fortunately it appears. police in brazil are searching for about 20 heavily— armed men who raided banks in the southern city of aras—a—tuba. they took passers by as human shields and as these grainy images show strapped hostages to the top of their getaway vehicles after the raid. they also shot at police. at least three people were killed, among them one suspect. officials said more than 20 people took part in the heist, blocking off roads with burning
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vehicles and placing explosive devices right across the city. it's the seventh day of the paralympic games in tokyo and cyclist dame sarah storey has won her 16th gold in the women's c5 time trial. she's equalled britain's most decorated paralympian, swimmer mike kenny's record. earlier i spoke rachael latham who's there in tokyo for us — she told me more about the reaction. she actually went faster than she expected to go this morning. after her race, she said she felt smooth, she enjoyed it, and it was actually an exciting ride. she even showed a little bit of emotion on the podium which is unusual for storey, she's been a medal winning machine since 1992 and often, she is fierce and on form, but today, she kind of let her guard down when that medal
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was put round her neck. she has still got one more race to come on thursday were she hopes to pick up another gold medal and that gold will make her the most decorated of all time in a paralympic gb, more gold medals than any paralympic athlete has one more gold medals. but from one dame to another, here's dame katherine grainger, giving more of an insight into sarah storey. 0h, she is, she is generally one—of—a—kind. this is her eat paralympic games, she is talking about paris which will be her ninth, she still has the amazing physical ability to set new standards and push the barriers every single time the games come around, but importantly, she still got the same passion, the same drive, she likes to break her own records, and she is loving it, so it is really lovely to see... i don't know when she will ever stop! maybe she won't! she has one more day back on the road and we never want to put
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too much pressure on anyone, she's got a really good great chance there obviously, with the two events so far, itjust shows how good performers, so one more, plenty could happen, but we have got all great hopes, and then she could become the most decorated of all time, which isjust... a title fully deserving, if and when she gets that one. that was dame katherine grainger, chair of uk sport, talking there about cyclist dame sarah storey has won her 16th gold in the women's c5 time trial at the paralympics. the lockdown—inspired surge in takeaway food in the uk has continued as restrictions have eased. nearly a quarter of people are spending more on takeaways and food deliveries now than before the pandemic, according to market research group mintel. while the growth in home deliveries is an opportunity for some, many restaurants are also wary of it. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith has more. three burgers, smoking joe, lots of milk... - grub's up at frank's burgers. sizzling, sliced, and stacked — it's ready in minutes. but like so much restaurant food, this order won't be eaten here. a mile or so down the road... ..sarah and her family are waiting
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for lunch to arrive. we usually get one once a week, don't we, sophie? it's like a fun night. i don't know whether they prefer a takeaway to mummy�*s cooking — i wouldn't like to say that's what it is, but... itjust feels as if you're doing something kind of fancy, you know? even if you are not. and you think you're eating a little bit more takeaway then you had been pre—pandemic? i don't want to put it on camera that i'm eating more takeaways than i normally would. i've even managed to rope my mum and dad into getting takeaways, and they've never been big fans. definitely in this area, we are quite rural, so it's not quite as easy to get things delivered — but i think it's ramped up a lot. takeaways boomed during lockdown as one of the few remaining treats. but 18 months on, habits have stuck — the average spend on takeaways has gone up by more than 40% over the last couple of years. in 2019, it was £452 per person each year. in 2021, that's jumped to £641 per person. i've got a burger and some fries.
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but for some people, it's a lot more than that. still stuck working from home in a shared house, harshad spends about £700 a month on takeaways. is it lunch and dinner every day? it depends. sometimes i have dinner as well. i started it during the lockdown, but now i'm just kind of used to it, just saving time and effort. i think it's worth it. we contacted the biggest fast food chains in the uk, including mcdonald's, burger king, and pizza hut, and they've all told us that delivery and take out is a really important part of their business — but crucially, they're gearing up for it to become even more significant. even small players are having to keep up with the changes. a third of the orders at this pan—asian chain are now for delivery, and they'rejuggling diners and riders coming down the same stairs. there's operational challenges. on a sunday night, you're getting a few orders, you would avoid setting people close
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to the entrance. so we will always prioritise dine—in customers. are you worried that delivery could grow too big it, and almost take over the business here? yes. there's definitely an erosion of dine in, so people can get restaurant quality food at home. quite a large percent of it what we are generating are going to the delivery platform. but that's the challenge restaurants will have to face... i think we've just got into a bit of a habit when we couldn't go out, i guess, so it's kind of stuck since then, really. ithink, you know, friday nights, it was like, "what can we do? let's get a takeaway." ..as the trend for takeaways continues to take off. coletta smith, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... the final us evacuation flight leaves kabul airport a minute before midnight — as it formally ends its military involvement in the country — after nearly two decades. the taliban have taken control of the airport — the militant group says
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the withdrawal is a "lesson for the world" and future generations. in the wake of hurricane ida — thousands of soldiers and emergency workers are deployed in the us state of louisiana to help with the rescue operation — officials say it could take weeks to restore electricity. a new study suggests playing just one season of professional rugby is enough to start having adverse effects on the brain. in her eighth paralympics, sarah storey wins a record—equalling 16th gold medal in tokyo. and coming up — environmental campaigner, greta thunberg tells us she'll only attend the un climate change conference in glasgow later this year, if the event is covid safe and democratic. a new study, seen exclusively by the bbc, reports that afterjust one season of rugby, professional players saw a decline in both blood flow to the brain and cognitive function. the university of south wales' research followed a team — testing players preseason, mid—season and post season. the sport's governing body,
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world rugby, has welcomed the findings and has doubled its investment into concussion research. earlier i spoke to the author of the study, and asked him how rugby�*s bodies should react after the findings . hopefully people are going to take stock of some of the findings and i suppose the important findings are that we provide some insight into the mechanisms that queued over the life span explain some of the impairments.— life span explain some of the imairments. ., , ., ,, ., ., impairments. could professional ru . b impairments. could professional ru:b as a impairments. could professional rugby as a result _ impairments. could professional rugby as a result of _ impairments. could professional rugby as a result of your- impairments. could professional| rugby as a result of your research introduce more mitigating factors when playing the game? joe might be sufficient evidence and this is one study, there are many others now, they will suggest that contact, not necessarily concussion but contact
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will mean less of a big bang for the brain and that is potentially damaging, and shane mentioned there, the substitution is one intervention, we can also limit contact incurred during contact where they were sparring, training, so intervention is now i think need to be considered part more widely. he was more at risk, amateur players are professionals? the he was more at risk, amateur players are professionals?— are professionals? the evidence is divided. there _ are professionals? the evidence is divided. there are _ are professionals? the evidence is divided. there are much _ are professionals? the evidence is divided. there are much bigger- are professionals? the evidence is divided. there are much bigger for divided. there are much biggerfor six, greaterforces, the g divided. there are much biggerfor six, greater forces, the g forces that the brain is subject to our extraordinary, incredible, similar to car crashes, but they've got great techniques and this is something amateur players do not have, they don't have the technique. for contact tackle perhaps in the
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professional game and the crowd gasped but we see this an awful lot in the amateur game, the evidence is divided but there is an argument for both camps if you like. cristiano ronaldo has offically returned to manchester united — after the club completed a deal to re—sign portuguese superstar. he's agreed a two year dealfrom from italian club juventus. the 36—year—old says manchester united has a special place in his heart as he signs 12 years after leaving the club. as football's transfer deadline day takes place — the sport's world governing body says clubs spent nearly fifty billion dollars on buying players over the past decade. fifa has carried out research into transfers between 2011 and 2020. manchester city top the list of big spenders, followed by chelsea and the spanish giants, barcelona. fifa's study found that more money has been spent on brazilian players than footballers from any other country. there's also been a big rise in the amount paid to agents; they were given a total of $3.5 billion.
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greta thunberg, says she will only attend the un climate change conference in glasgow later this year, if the event is "safe and democratic". for her, that means ensuring participants from poorer countries are fully vaccinated and able to travel to take part. our environment correspondent kevin keane has more. she sailed across the atlantic twice to get to the last un climate conference in 2019, but this time she's not so sure. greta thunberg wants to go to the glasgow talks, but says her participation is conditional. hi, greta. in an interview for bbc scotland, i asked what was stopping herfrom coming. well, of course, i'm not 100% sure yet. but if it's considered safe and democratic, then i will of course there. —— then i will of course go there. then i will of course go there. i take it you mean by that that it's accessible
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to the world's poorer nations. how important and why is that to you? because that's the essence of this meeting. it should be all about climate justice and of course we can't achieve climate justice if everyone is not contributing on the same terms. it won't be the first time greta has visited the uk. she addressed a large crowd in bristol last year before the pandemic, but it will be her first time in scotland. she famously clashed online with donald trump and doesn't seem too impressed with his successor. the biden administration doesn't seem to take the climate crisis the least bit serious, since they are actually expanding fossil fuel infrastructure, so it shows that they are not ready to take action. and she says the same applies to the uk government, which is considering whether to approve a new oil field off shetland. i think that maybe summarises the whole situation that we are in. the fact that these kinds of countries who are actually hosting the cop is actually planning to expand fossil fuel infrastructure, to open up new oil fields and so on.
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what do we want? climate justice... with such a large following, greta's absence from cop26 will be felt. but she says if all participants are vaccinated and allowed to travel, so will she. kevin keane, bbc news. environmental groups have welcomed the announcement that leaded petrol is no longer used anywhere in the world. the united nations described the fuel�*s eradication, in the last country where it was used, algeria, as a huge milestone for global health and the environment. the un estimates that its abolition will prevent more than a million premature deaths each year. energy companies can apply for a £450m fund to explore greener ways to power british homes.the energy regulator ofgem said businesses should develop big, bold and ambitious ideas. the government is committed to reaching net zero carbon emissions by 2050. thousands of people
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in california have been fleeing the popular tourist spot of lake tahoe as a huge wildfire rages. the caldorfire is heading towards the main resort town, in an area which straddles the border between california and nevada. more than three thousand firefighters are working to contain the blaze. a huge public science project called the kindness test is hoping to explore people's attitude to kindness. it's been devised by psychologists at the university of sussex. claudia hammond is presenter of bbc radio 4's all in the mind and visiting professor at sussex who's leading the project. she's doing it along with professor robin banerjee, the university's head of the school of psychology. sometimes people think it's something really soft and easy but it can be more complex than that, it's a really important skill. you want to know what people think it
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is, where kindness takes place, what are the kind that they have done themselves recently or what is being done to them and to look at things like their well—being and the personality to try to understand much more about where kindness comes from and what enables people to be kind but what makes it hard to be kind but what makes it hard to be kind because even though we all know it's a good thing, really. professor, are you thinking potentially that somebody�*s background, health or something else might be impactful on their ability to be kind? that is right, that's really what we want to find out from this questionnaire and getting a large group of people to share the thoughts and experiences we will learn if there are differences between groups of people in different parts of the uk, parts of the world and there is evidence already to suggest that kindness is associated with our mental health and well—being, there is a link
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there but the research done thus far is on quite a small scale so this is a game changer and an opportunity to get a really large group of people together from all over the place to share their experiences and we will learn so much from it. i wonder, is this partly prompted by the fact we have alljust come through a pandemic and seen incredible acts of kindness through that time? you are right, kindness does have something of a moment now and the pandemic has made all of us reassess what really matters to us and to think about how we interact with other people and what is really important to us, so i think on the one hand, it has come up a lot because of the pandemic, seeing great acts of kindness people have done, lots of people in groups in their street, whatsapp groups where they all cooperate together with people they did not know before but it's also having a moment within psychology
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and research and there is now what and lots of research and neuroscience, psychology on the topic of kindness where there didn't used to be with 10—15 years ago there being very little and now recently there's lots more of it and lots of that is done in small excellent studies in the lab and what we want to do is get a lot more people to see what many thousands of people think. professor, is it good for an individual�*s mental health if they are kind to someone? that's a great question and actually there is a lot of evidence accumulating which does suggest that indeed kindness has benefits notjust for the recipient, the person receiving the act of kindness, but for the giver as well, the person performing the act of kindness and that is a really interesting question raised from the role of kindness in our lives and it being important as an ingredient for mental health and well—being but getting to the nuances of that
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is what we want to do through this questionnaire so we want as many people as possible to go to the questionnaire site which is thekindnesstest.org and share their experiences. we are looking forward to sharing the findings later in the year. —— early in the new year. the headlines on bbc news... the final us evacuation flight leaves kabul airport a minute before midnight — as it formally ends its military involvement in the country — after nearly two decades. the taliban have taken control of the airport — the militant group says the withdrawal is a "lesson for the world" and future generations. in the wake of hurricane ida — thousands of soldiers and emergency workers are deployed in the us state of louisiana to help with the rescue operation — officials say it could take weeks to restore electricity. staff at nike's corporate headquarters in oregon have been given a week off to support their mental health. from today until friday, the us firm will "power down"
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to give employees a rest after a tough year. it follows similar moves from dating app bumble and linkedin, as a growing number of employees have reported feeling burnt out due to the pandemic. the european union is recommending that its member countries re—introduce travel restrictions on unvaccinated travelers coming from the united states. that would mean quarantines or testing for those who have not received the jab. however, these are recommendations, and they are not mandatory. each eu member state imposes its own covid guidelines and restrictions. the south korean prime minister has said he supports calls for the head of samsung to return to managing the global tech firm, weeks after being released from prison. the prime minister told the financial times that it was not appropriate to curtail lee jae—yong's activities when he had already been freed from prison. the samsung heir was released on parole earlier this month, having served just over
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half his sentence. regulators in china have imposed restrictions on online video gaming — stopping anyone under 18 from playing more than three hours a week. they've been told they'll only be allowed to access the games between eight and nine in the evening on fridays, saturdays and sundays — as well as on public holidays. beijing says it wants to protects the physical and mental health of young people. andrew kinch, founder of gameaware — an organisaion that helps manage and prevent gaming disorders through education and gaming strategies has been talking to breakfast about the issue. it does seem very extreme to me and it seems like it comes from a fundamental misunderstanding about the culture and psychology behind video games. for example, we know there are benefits to buying and benefits that actually boost well—being, you could say but we also know that over playing video
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games can do the opposite for us so it indicates that there is a sweet spot and i guess the trick is finding that sweet spot. it’s spot and i guess the trick is finding that sweet spot. it's a very difficult thing. _ finding that sweet spot. it's a very difficult thing. you're _ finding that sweet spot. it's a very difficult thing. you're a _ finding that sweet spot. it's a very difficult thing. you're a parent, i finding that sweet spot. it's a very difficult thing. you're a parent, soj difficult thing. you're a parent, so am i, you have young boys and so do i who are into gaming and it's how to manage. if i could say to my boys, sorry, you are not allowed according to the government, you get three hours a week, that would save me a lot of hassle potentially. you can imagine _ me a lot of hassle potentially. you can imagine that _ me a lot of hassle potentially. you can imagine that it _ me a lot of hassle potentially. wm. can imagine that it will blow you pretty tricky thing for them to deal with, if you know what i mean. there will be a few impacts, i think, in the situation. some stuff on the surface for example, just off the top of my head, server congestion, everyone trying to log on at the exact same time might cause some issues, you sports is an enormous industry especially in china and they need to train to be able to compete and outside of those hours, i don't know what will happen, it
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will be a wait and see i guess what is the right — will be a wait and see i guess what is the right balance? _ will be a wait and see i guess what is the right balance? that's something you try and teach, isn't it? you are a parent of two and an avid gamer. it? you are a parent of two and an avid gamer-— avid gamer. the trick is understanding - avid gamer. the trick is understanding why. i avid gamer. the trick is| understanding why. you avid gamer. the trick is i understanding why. you need avid gamer. the trick is - understanding why. you need to understanding why. you need to understand the motivation of why they played, some people are playing to cope because life is really tough and there is stress, mental health staff, anxiety, simply to be creative and some to connect with their friends, creative and some to connect with theirfriends, some creative and some to connect with their friends, some for competition. it is all about that sort of answer because we know people are not fulfilling these kinds of needs in real life, they will turn to the gaming world orjust the online world to try and do that, so that is sort of where it comes down to schools i think. schools and parents and communities in general because if we do not have parents, schools, gamers and collisions on the same page, speaking the same language and seeing it from a gamer perspective, you will not get past the first
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obstacle which is the resistance, you need to be able to convince them of anything so starting in school as the place to be. let's take you to the homeland of taekwondo — south korea — along with two of the country's finest para athletes. however, despite taekwondo being south korea s national sport, disabled competitors receive barely any support from their nation. in the year that taekwondo makes its paralympic debut, will the country finally be won over by its disabled champions. this is known as the sacred land of tae kwon do, south korea, the country where this powerful sport was born. tae kwon do is making its paralympic debut in tokyo
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but despite the sport's long history in south korea, only one athlete from the country has qualified for the games. translation: when i was two years old, there was a cutting _ machine, when i stepped out to see my neighbour, i put my hand into the machine and that's how i got injured. in paralympic mattress, the points are given for valid kicks to the trunk. the more complex the move, the points are given. when a kick is delivered to the protector on the trunk, the score goes up automatically. at the end, whoever gets the highest score wins the game. but for an athlete without arms, this makes
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it harder to qualify. in tae kwon do, i can only kick starting that make —— standing on one foot, if your upper body loses control, your lower body would collapse. that's why i often roll over and fall down. this year, this person is korea's only hope in the middle for the sport but the country is expecting more people to qualify after these paralympic games. translation: in this paralympics, tae kwon do is mainly for the less severely disabled athletes so i will train much harder this time and devote myself to exercise. whether you have arms or not, sports have no limits as long as you have the courage to want more and challenge yourself, the sport accepts anyone in so just try it and you will achieve your dreams and build courage. farmers are struggling to get
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the workers they need to bring in the harvest — that's according to the national farmers union. it's calling on the government to expand the scheme that allows eu citizens to work for up to 6 months on uk farms. the rules on working in the uk for eu citizens changed when we left the european union. our correspondent nina warhurst is on a hop farm in worcestershire for us. hello from the worcestershire herefordshire border. i am in amongst the hop plants which grow on vines and just look from above, 100 acres there are here of them and just look at this close—up. this is the golding flower and would give your beer a bitter, citrusy, honey flavour. every year in the uk, it's estimated we need around 70,000 seasonal workers come and pick crops, the number has reduced significantly because of brexit.
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those with settled or pre—settled status can fill those roles. and there are 30,000 seasonal permits from across the globe but is 30,000 enough? it's up to businesses like this, the government says, to look at labour market in the uk with unemployment at 4.7%, so why is there not enough people to pick these crops? let's talk to alison. first and foremost, how far off are you from finding out whether or not some of your harvest will simply be wasted? well, we started the hops yesterday and our apples start at the weekend and it's only when the labour doesn't turn up we know we have a problem. everybody turned up yesterday but we need 13 people to harvest the hops. we are all taking a deep breath and hoping that everyone turns up for the apple harvest. you do not know day to day
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whether your product will go to waste ? at the moment, i'm being told everyone is coming but it's only people don't show up you know you have a problem and if they do not show up on picking to a tight window, that's when you cannot get your crop in. when you hear your business secretary saying to recruit locally or recruit in the uk, what is going on? the unemployment levels have not reached what the government is forecasting. last year, there was talk about the end of furlough, unemployment reaching ten or 12%, you need to recruit locally and unfortunately unemployment nationally is at 4.7% locally and just over 3%. what about having to fill those roles? the government could say it's up to you to pay these workers more to improve the living conditions on the farm and you will get the workers. we have great living conditions here and the rates of a very good. the average rate of in
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the industry is £12— 15 an hour and this is not cheap work. but it is outside, it is hard work and that is in all weathers which does not appeal to many people. for decades, we have brought workers from all of the world to pick our fruit and veg as do all first world economies, notjust the uk, it is global. it's a win—win because the workers who come in afternoon 5—10 times what they would at home, come for a short period and go home, finish their education, build a house, educate their children and want do we get in return? our society gets our fruit and veg for in peak when it's right. —— in peak when it's ripe. the national farmers' union says now what they needed emergency measures because they are at crisis point and they say for the next year, the recovery plan, why not expand? if these hops are not picked
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on time, if you think across the country where this is happening, you will see a reduction in the variety of flavours available and ultimately an increase possibly in the price of your pint at the pub. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol. hello again, high pressure remains with us for the next couple of days, meaning a lot of us will have a lot of clout, thinking for some cheap, light rain and drizzle but some sunshine around, very similar to today's forecast actually. here is the high pressure, breeze coming in from the north sea, cooler along the coastline but also fairly breezy through the english channel today. there are still some murkiness around, dampness in the air, the best chance you have of seeing some brighter breaks across parts of central and western scotland, northern ireland and at times parts of northern england. to the south—east, we could see some sunshine at times but generally
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speaking for most, it is going to be very cloudy and don't forget that patchy light rain or drizzle especially but not exclusively in the east. temperatures down the north sea coastline of around 17 celsius but feeling chillier if you are exposed to the breeze, 20 in the sunshine. heading on through the course of the evening and overnight, start of cloud around with some breaks through the central parts of scotland winning your temperatures could fall two or three celsius are a bit chilly but towns and cities will hang on to temperatures either in the high single figures although double figures. temperatures very much with us tomorrow with a reason from the north sea, breezy through the english channel to the coast of devon and cornwall and the clouds still thick enough for some patchy, light rain or drizzle especially in the eastern parts of the south—east tomorrow as well, so some sunshine across parts of scotland, northern ireland and into cumbria with temperatures up to 21 celsius which
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will feel pleasant in the sunshine. the high pressure is still with us but starting to drift further eastwards during the course of thursday with the wind indicating it will be quite easy and still fairly cloudy as well, with the cloud still thick enough for some patchy, light rain and drizzle. perhaps more overseeing some bright or sunny skies particularly the further west you are with highs ranging between 14-20 c you are with highs ranging between 14—20 c and as we head on into friday, more of the same with saturday catching the odd shower but low pressure coming our way on sunday which will bring in some rain for some.
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this is bbc news, i'm rebecca jones. the headlines at 11. taliban fighters have declared victory at kabul airport after the final withdrawal of us troops saying their takeover is a "lesson for the world". translation: during the last 20 l years and with dedication and effort and help from allah, we managed today to regain our independence and make us forces leave. the final us evacuation flight left kabul airport a minute before midnight — as it formally ends its military involvement in the country — after nearly two decades. the uk says the immediate priority is getting out those who want to leave. continuing safe passage for those, the minority, the small minority, but nonetheless a significant
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number, who haven't yet been able to get out. and ending with all of the other building blocks to make sure afghanistan can be more stable moving forward. our other main news this morning, hurricane ida — thousands of soldiers and emergency workers are deployed in the us state of louisiana to help with the rescue operation — officials say it could take weeks to restore electricity. a new study suggests playing just one season of professional rugby is enough to start having adverse effects on the brain. in her eighth paralympics, sarah storey wins a record—equalling 16th gold medal in tokyo — a feat hailed by the chair of uk sport. she still has the amazing sort of physical ability to set new standards and push the barriers every single time the games come around. but importantly she has still got the same passion and the same drive, she still wants to sort of break her our own records.
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hello and welcome to bbc news. almost two decades after american troops invaded afghanistan, the united states has formally announced an end to its military involvement in the country. the conflict was the longest in american history — and ends as it began — with the taliban in power. in line with the agreement signed with the taliban, the final us evacuation flight left kabul airport a minute before midnight, localtime, last night. since then, the taliban have taken it over along with the rest of the country, declaring "congratulations to afghanistan, this victory belongs to us all". in all, around 130,000 people have been evacuated in the last few weeks. speaking this morning,
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the foreign secretary dominic raab said the number of uk nationals still in afghanistan was in the �*low hundreds' and the government were doing all they could to help. the number of afghans trying to leave the country via pakistan and iran is said to have quadrupled in recent weeks. in the last 20 years, almost 2,500 service personnel have been killed. for the first time in two decades there are no foreign troops in afghanistan. this morning, a taliban spokesman has been speaking, let's listen to that now. translation dedication and effort, this is... this is our lesson for ourfuture. we want this is... this is our lesson for our future. we want to have good
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relations with the us and the world. we welcome good diplomatic relations with the mall. congratulations to afghanistan, this victory belongs to us all. with all the latest on the us withdrawal, here's our north america correspondent peter bowes. the last american soldier to leave afghanistan — major general chris donoghue boarding a cargo plane, the final flight out of kabul. a hugely symbolic moment bringing to an end the us mission that started shortly after the september 11th attacks in 2001. as the c—17 disappeared into the night sky, on the ground the taliban celebrated with gun fire and fireworks. a victory for them, following two decades of international engagement in the country and recent weeks marked by violence, bloodshed and chaotic scenes in kabul. the us withdrawal follows frantic efforts over the past 18 days to fly
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123,000 people out of afghanistan, including 6,000 us citizens. this has been a massive military, diplomatic and humanitarian. undertaking, one of the most difficult in our nation's history and an extraordinary feat of logistics and co—ordination under some of the most challenging circumstances imaginable. during the evacuations, 13 us service members were killed in an attack on kabul airport by isk — a local branch of islamic state. the us now faces questions over a drone attack on suspected militants, which also claimed the lives of 10 afghan civilians, including children. up to 200 americans are believed still to be in the country. look, there's a lot of heartbreak associated with this departure. we did not get everybody out that we wanted to get out, but i think if we stayed another 10 days we wouldn't have gotten everybody out that we wanted to get out and would still be people
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who would be disappointed with that. it's a tough situation. the us and its allies are now facing up to the taliban being in charge of afghanistan and the prospect of building a difficult diplomatic relationship — one that the americans say will not be based on trust. within minutes of that final us flight out of kabul, the taliban were in control of the airport, apparently in a reassuring mood. translation: my message - to the public and to the mujahideen is that they must not go for gunfire, they must celebrate this happiness by worshipping the god. in the meantime, the taliban's also taken control of abandoned us military hardware, including armoured vehicles and aircraft left behind during the withdrawal. the americans say the equipment�*s been decommissioned or rendered useless. but for the taliban, this is another strong symbol of their new—found power.
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as the final us flight departed at midnight, taliban supporters took to the streets to celebrate. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet witnessed the historic moment. listen. look at the tracer fire in the air. the guns are going off. you can see behind the tracer fire going off on the night sky. all day we had heard the american airplanes fly low. it is the day that president biden said the american mission would formally end and this is what you
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are hearing no. the eruption of celebrity gunfire by taliban supporters in the city of campbell. —— can build. our correspondent in kabul secunder kermani has the latest now on the first full day of taliban rule now that the us has left. the heavy celebratory gunfire that we heard from the taliban last night, that continued into the early hours of the morning. many people, of course... the taliban declaring this as a great victory, talking to the media from the airport runway where just a few hours earlier planes had been taking off. for many afghans, they won't see it necessarily as a victory but as a time of deep uncertainty. the people i have been talking to here over the past week or so have said that the taliban's attitude and tone in public, at least, has an far more conciliatory than they had anticipated being, but they are worried about how long that will last, whether the taliban might,
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for example introduce more repressive restrictions on women's rights. the taliban say that women will be allowed to be educated, will be able to go to work. but sometimes they have been rather vague in their assurances. and so a lot of attention is going to be paid to what comes and happens in the coming days, particularly what form of political system is announced by the taliban. they have been holding discussions with other senior political figures, including the former president hamid karzai, for example. but there is also a lot of discussion within taliban ranks about whether or not they will declare an islamic emirate — that's the name of the regime they had in the 1990s when they were in power. and from my sources it seems a distinct possibility that it will be the name of the new government. but we will have to wait and see. the british foreign secretary dominic raab was adamant this morning that his department had handled the evacuation extremely well. our political correspondent adam fleming was listening to the interview.
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he says no government department has done a betterjob of handling the crisis in afghanistan than the foreign and commonwealth development office, which i think might raise some eyebrows amongst his colleagues who have been criticising him anonymously in the papers. the big thing that the foreign office has done in the last few hours is to get this resolution through the un security council in new york. russia and china abstained, which isn't as good as voting for it, but it isn't as bad as vetoing it and stopping it from happening. the big priority in that resolution amongst the international community is this idea of safe passage, that is people who are entitled to leave afghanistan actually being allowed by the taliban to leave by some route, whether it is through the airport, but we aren't sure if that is functioning at the moment or not, or whether it is through land borders with afghanistan's neighbours. then you have the issue of how many people are actually eligible to make thatjourney and it is very
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difficult to work out because you've got different categories of people. you have got british nationals or people who are dual nationals and maybe have an afghan and british passport, who would be entitled to come to the uk. then you have got people who are afghan nationals who provided assistance to the uk and other countries while they were occupying afghanistan and then you've got people who are vulnerable and who might be eligible to be resettled in the uk and elsewhere as refugees. and that is why the foreign secretary this morning couldn't really put an exact number of how many people are still left in afghanistan. i think right now, for me, as a foreign secretary, i'm focused on the immediate priorities — continuing safe passage for those, the minority, the small minority, but nonetheless a significant number, who haven't yet been able to get out. we are working with the third countries in the region. we have held the taliban through this un security council resolution to their undertaking to allow safe passage and then dealing with all of the other building blocks to make sure afghanistan can be more stable moving forward.
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and those building blocks in the un resolution alongside safe passage for people leaving include not allowing afghanistan to be re—established as a safe haven for terrorists as it was in the 1990s and the build—up to the 9/11 attacks on the united states. also another building block is giving a sort of firm foundation for charities and aid organisations and the united nations still provide humanitarian relief. and the resolution also talks about safeguarding the progress made in the last 20 years. that is about protecting the human rights of women and girls and minorities in afghanistan. there is another story circulating today, which suggest that there might have been some behind—the—scenes tensions between the uk and the us in the last few days around the airport in kabul. the website politico is reporting that some people in the us administration, particularly wanted to shut one of the gates around the airport, but the final decision was to keep it open because the uk needed that
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gate to be open to help with its evacuation effort. dominic raab was asked about that this morning too. look, i've got an excellent working relationship with tony blinken, the secretary of state, i spoke to him in the immediate hours after the attack and again yesterday. look, just as a point of fact, we did everything we could once we were alerted to the threat, but before the explosion took place, to mitigate the risk. that included warning people not to come to the airport, warning people who were in the crowd to leave to the extent that we could. we also shifted the civilian team that we had in the barons hotel to the airport because clearly it's a stone's throw away from where the terrorist attack took place. it clearly wasn't safe, but none of that would have required or necessitated the gate at abbey gate to be left open. so there are a huge number of threads to this overall story, but i think there are three things to look out for over the next few days. that issue of safe passage. we will be able to see
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with our own eyes and whatsapp messages from former translators and assistants and things like that whether people are being able to get out of afghanistan either by air or by land. then there is the issue of recognising the new afghan government because the taliban is on the verge of forming a new government. how does the international community react to that, either as a whole or individually? and thirdly the big event at westminster is tomorrow at two o'clock. the foreign affairs select committee of mps is going to be questioning dominic raab, the foreign secretary, themselves and that committee is chaired by tom tugendhat, the conservative mp who once served in afghanistan and made that very searing speech when parliament was recalled to discuss the crisis a few days ago. sir nicholas kay, britain's ambassador to afghanistan between 2017 and 2018 said he had a lot of pride in what britain had achieved in the last 20 years but he also said he felt that the uk
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had abandoned the afghan people. ido i do feel shame that we as the uk and nato and the us altogether have not been able to deliver on our commitments. and you know it behoves us you know to be humble and to recognise that something and chest beating now is not right. so there needs to be a good long hard look as to what was necessary which was going to take all this far, far longer than 20 years to help afghans build a nation that was sustainable and at peace with itself. so, yeah, we can look back and i think it is now becoming tame and urgent that we do do that. but of course the work also needs to continue, there are some tricky questions going forward and huge priorities in terms of helping those afghans who are still in afghanistan.
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bradley bowman served more than 15 years on active duty as a us army officer including as a staff officer in afghanistan. he is now senior director of the center on military and political power at the foundation for defense of democracies, where he focuses on us defense strategy and policy. thank you for stop i wonder how you first of all look back as sir nicholas kay was and how you reflect on the last 20 years and whether any of you the us did accomplish its mission in afghanistan?- of you the us did accomplish its mission in afghanistan? thank you for the question _ mission in afghanistan? thank you for the question and _ mission in afghanistan? thank you for the question and thank- mission in afghanistan? thank you for the question and thank you i mission in afghanistan? thank you for the question and thank you for| for the question and thank you for the opportunity tojoin for the question and thank you for the opportunity to join you. i believe and it is widely viewed the united states went afghanistan after 9/11 for two purposes. one, to bring justice to those who might murdered 3000 people in that horrible day and
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to make sure it never happened again. afghanistan was not used again. afghanistan was not used again as a self haven, training ground and launching pad for international terrorism. for 20 years we have accomplish that objective. for 20 years we have prevented that from happening, we gave our country, but the breathing space we needed and we gave afghan women and girls a historic chance to enjoy some of their god—given freedoms. but i agree with the previous speaker that we, i include the united states, but our allies lost our strategic patience and unfortunately our adversaries have not lost theirs and we have seen the result. let’s we have seen the result. let's talk a little bit more _ we have seen the result. let's talk a little bit more about _ we have seen the result. let's talk a little bit more about the - a little bit more about the departure of us troops. could it have been handled better? absolutely. president biden
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implemented a timeline based on a withdrawal. we saw what happened in iraq. president biden was warned by intelligence community and staff and by the secretary of defence if you implement a withdrawal like this, the taliban will take over. a lot of the taliban will take over. a lot of the tension right now is how the withdrawal has been completed. in the end we would have ended up with either the taliban or al-qaeda either the taliban or al-qaeda either way. and we still would have seen... let's scrutinise how the withdrawal went down and try to learn the lessons. the biggest lesson is that those who have been pushing for the endless war narrative in the united states, they got their recommendation, now
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we're... maybe we should make them answer some tough questions and learn some lessons too. we answer some tough questions and learn some lessons too.— answer some tough questions and learn some lessons too. we have seen us soldiers handing _ learn some lessons too. we have seen us soldiers handing over _ learn some lessons too. we have seen us soldiers handing over to _ learn some lessons too. we have seen us soldiers handing over to the - us soldiers handing over to the taliban, we have seen the celebrated gunfire of the taliban. i wonder what goes through your mind when you see the speck was? i am what goes through your mind when you see the speck was?— see the speck was? i am deeply sad. i am sad. see the speck was? i am deeply sad. i am sad- to — see the speck was? i am deeply sad. i am sad. to service _ see the speck was? i am deeply sad. i am sad. to service members i see the speck was? i am deeply sad. i am sad. to service members out i i am sad. to service members out there, almost all of them served far more regularly than i did there. i want to remind them of what i said, this is not a failure of service men. this is a failure of politicians. this is a failure of politicians. this is a failure of politicians pushing talking points in town halls but do not keep our country safe. we have got to watch out, we do not want an al-qaeda flash —— safe haven. we already have that. we need... we have seen the
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former head of bin laden's group responsible for his security. he has returned triumphantly in broad daylight yesterday. so we have now what we have on september 11 2001 and that is a taliban al-qaeda south haven will stop we will see a massive boost in international terror, recruitment. you massive boost in international terror, recruitment.— massive boost in international terror, recruitment. you paint a bleak picture- — terror, recruitment. you paint a bleak picture. we _ terror, recruitment. you paint a bleak picture. we did _ terror, recruitment. you paint a bleak picture. we did see i terror, recruitment. you paint a bleak picture. we did see that l terror, recruitment. you paint a i bleak picture. we did see that drone strike which the us says prevented suicide bombers attacking the airport. could drone strikes for example be a way of making sure terror groups don't thrive in afghanistan in the way that you are describing? afghanistan in the way that you are describin: ? . , ~ afghanistan in the way that you are describin: ? . , . .., describing? certainly. we can conduct drone _ describing? certainly. we can conduct drone strikes. - describing? certainly. we can conduct drone strikes. we i describing? certainly. we can | conduct drone strikes. we saw describing? certainly. we can i conduct drone strikes. we saw the second one against the vehicle that was bearing a lot of explosive but thatis was bearing a lot of explosive but that is really where president biden is hanging his head. we saw that in
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the 1990s. that didn't work so well and we tried over the horizon... we went from there tell van not controlling one province, to them conquering their country and overthrowing the government. anyone who looks at this in detail understands that there is not something red button. our cia director has said we're not to have this pic of what is going to happen on the ground and we are going to be slower and less agile in responding and that is going to make us all sa. there are some us and uk citizens left in afghanistan but more than that there are vulnerable of afghans. i wonder whether america now can be seen as a reliable ally. what do you think? i am a proud american. i think i country has done
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more good than bad in the world. i think we have done great damage to ourselves. russia and china have been going around the world saying that america is unreliable. we gave them a more credible talking point and we will have to spend some overtime trying to convince allies that we are reliable. we are going to be cleaning up this mess, the self and most —— impose mess. it is a serious one. in the end i think three countries will when but we did harm to ourselves. we three countries will when but we did harm to ourselves.— three countries will when but we did harm to ourselves. we must leave it there. harm to ourselves. we must leave it there- thank — harm to ourselves. we must leave it there. thank you _ harm to ourselves. we must leave it there. thank you for _ harm to ourselves. we must leave it there. thank you for your _ harm to ourselves. we must leave it there. thank you for your thoughts l there. thank you for your thoughts and insights. a huge rescue operation is taking place in the us state of louisiana, which was struck by hurricane ida on sunday. rescue workers and volunteers are using boats and aircraft to find people trapped by floods along the mississippi river. our correspondent nada tawfik has
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the latest from new orleans. ida has transformed streets into waterways, trapping some residents in the worst affected parts of louisiana. volunteer search teams known as the cajun navy have been out trying to reach the most desperate. even on dry land, many were overwhelmed by the damage to their homes, to their lives. i've got nothing. all i got here, i got a backpack with a few clothes in, in case i had to run out. but i didn't know where... i didn't know where... i would end up in. so ijust stayed here. more resources are beginning to pour into the region. it's the worrying i don't like full stop— it's the worrying i don't like full stop i_ it's the worrying i don't like full stop i am — it's the worrying i don't like full stop i am doing what i need to do. it's stop i am doing what i need to do. it's a _ stop i am doing what i need to do. it's a lot — more resources are beginning to pour into the region. 5,000 national guard
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members have been deployed to help local authorities. the storm has left behind a massive mess. nearly 1 nearly1 million households are still without power. in one day cruise from the energy company began repairs when it was safe. still it can take weeks before things are up and running again. it was one of the most powerful storms to ever hit the united states. it is certainly one residency you want quickly forget. cbs's correspondent micahel george gave this update from bridge city, louisania where recovery efforts are underway. more than a million people who are still without power two days after the hurricane hit, and the reason why is right behind me. this is a three—storey transmissions tower that was brought down by ida, and there are holes throughout the power grid right now, so officials are saying it will take weeks, not days, to fully restore the system. it's very hot and humid during the daytime here in louisiana, so people suffering
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through without any power or air conditioning, it's a very difficult situation for people who are already dealing with flood conditions. tragically, we know two people have lost their lives and we do expect that toll to increase. right now, there are rescue operations under way throughout the state, there are search helicopters that are going through different areas. fortunately, it doesn't appear we have had the enormous loss of life we had during katrina, and the reason for that is the flood walls and the levees were greatly improved over these past 16 years, they appear to have held, and that may be why we're not seeing the extent of the damage that we saw during hurricane katrina 16 years ago. thousands of people in california have been fleeing the popular tourist spot of lake tahoe as a huge wildfire rages. the fire is heading towards the main resort town, in an area which straddles the border between california and nevada.
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more than 3,000 firefighters are working to contain the blaze. police in brazil are searching for about 20 heavily—armed men who who raided banks in the southern city of arasatuba. they took passers—by as human shields and as these grainy images show strapped hostages to the top of their getaway vehicles after the raid. they also shot at police. at least three people were killed, among them one suspect. officials said more than 20 people took part in the heist, blocking off roads with burning vehicles and placing explosive devices across the city. a new study, seen exclusively by the bbc, reports that after just one season of rugby, professional players saw a decline in both blood flow to the brain and cognitive function. the university of south wales' research followed a team — testing players pre—season, mid—season and post season. the sport's governing body,
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world rugby, has welcomed the findings and has doubled its investment into concussion research. tomos morgan has the story. shane williams. big step of the left. and there is the crunching south african tackle. it was one of the biggest hits i've evertaken, really, ithink. shane williams became wales' top try scorer, a lion and one of the best ever to have played on the wing, but he also took his fair share of big tackles and head impacts, most notably the one sustained against bakkies botha of south africa in 200a. it just totally wiped me out. i knocked the ball on and south africa scored on the other side of the field, apparently. the funny thing was i don't remember that. it probably wasn't until after the game i felt a bit groggy and sick that i realised that something was wrong. a new study, seen exclusively by the bbc, by the university of south wales and published in tomorrow's edition
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of experimental physiology is believed to be one of the first that's followed a professional rugby team that plays in the united rugby championship over the course of one season, testing players in pre—, mid— and post—season. the players recorded just six concussions between them. however, all of them saw a decline in blood flow to the brain and a decline in cognitive function. the evidence is showing - now that there is a cumulative impact on the brain, i so we are moving away from concussion per se - and focusing more on contact. the research team say more evidence on the topic is needed and are in the process of completing further studies comparing past and present players with a control group. some former players like shane believe, as well as educating, limiting substitutions only when players are injured, rather than as fresh legs against tired opponents, could prevent further injuries. however, the game's governing body says research is ongoing, looking into this specific issue. in response to the new study�*s findings, world rugby said
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that they welcome the new research, that they have recently committed to doubling their investment in player welfare and new concussion research and initiatives, and that player welfare is at the heart of everything we say and do as a sport. steyn puts him down. with the introduction of more severe penalties for dangerous tackles, shane believes the game has become safer, but anything that can be added to mitigate the potential risk of head injuries is welcome. people still ask, would you change anything, would you change the way you played, would you have not played? i wouldn't have because i was playing a game that i absolutely loved. tomos morgan, bbc news, south wales. cristiano ronaldo has offically returned to manchester united — after the club completed a deal to re—sign portuguese superstar. he's agreed a two—year deal from from italian club juventus. the 36—year—old says manchester united has a special place in his heart as he signs 12 years after leaving the club. as football's transfer
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deadline day takes place — the sport's world governing body says clubs spent nearly 50 billion dollars on buying players over the past decade. fifa has carried out research into transfers between 2011 and 2020. manchester city top the list of big spenders, followed by chelsea and the spanish giants, barcelona. fifa's study found that more money has been spent on brazilian players than footballers from any other country. there's also been a big rise in the amount paid to agents, they were given a total of three and a half billion dollars. now it's time for a look at the weather with carole. hello again. the weather over the next couple of days is very similar, in that it's going to be fairly cloudy, the cloud thick enough for patchy, light rain and drizzle, especially in the east, and it is the east that has this onshore breeze, so feeling a wee bit on the chilly side. also breezy across the english channel today, some breaks in the southeast and sunshine coming in over northern ireland, western scotland and,
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at times, northwest england. temperatures up to about 20 degrees. overnight tonight, once again, the return of this cloud. some clearer skies like this morning across parts of the central highlands. here, temperatures could fall to three degrees but generally, in towns and cities, staying in double figures. tomorrow once again, we hang onto all this cloud, still patchy, light rain and drizzle coming from it, especially in eastern and southeastern areas. still this chilly breeze too from the north sea. the breeze continuing through the english channel, along the south coast of devon and cornwall, with highs of 19. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines:
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a final us evacuation flight left kabul airport before midnight tonight after it ended its military occupation after nearly two decades. in the wake of hurricane ida, thousands of soldiers and emergency workers are deployed in the us state of louisiana to help with the rescue operation. officials say it could take weeks to restore electricity. a new study suggests playing just one season of professional rugby is enough to start having adverse effects on the brain. in her eighth paralympics, sarah storey wins a record—equalling 16th gold medal in tokyo. and coming up — the environmental campaigner greta thunberg tells us she'll only attend the un climate change conference in glasgow later this year if the event is covid—safe and democratic. sport, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin.
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another great day in tokyo, gavin? dame sarah storey has won her 16th paralympic gold medal, making her britain'sjoint—most— successful paralympian of all time with swimmer mike kenny. she hit the milestone after winning the c5 time trial in tokyo and will have the chance to go one better in the road race. let's go live to the japanese capital now, where our reporter racheal latham is. a really dominant display and history for sarah storey. absolutely. sarah picked up the first gold medal of the day for great britain, and what a race it was. she stormed ahead and she said she went even faster than she expected to go. she said she enjoyed the ride, it felt smooth and she is looking forward to that race again on thursday. she even got a little emotional during the medal ceremony which is unusualfor the emotional during the medal ceremony which is unusual for the athlete who has been winning medals since 1992.
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also a gold for great britain this morning was ben watson. it was a surprise gold, in his olympic debut, and he said he was lost for words after the race. two medals were picked up in the cycling to add two medals already won at the velodrome last week. and deb rose for george pease were to who picked up a silver last week and the triathlon. and pease were to who picked up a silver last week and the triathlon.- last week and the triathlon. and she also been speaking _ last week and the triathlon. and she also been speaking to _ last week and the triathlon. and she also been speaking to ellie - also been speaking to ellie robinson, who has hinted at her retirement? to robinson, who has hinted at her retirement?— robinson, who has hinted at her retirement? ., , ., .., retirement? to give you some context about ellie, retirement? to give you some context about ellie. she _ retirement? to give you some context about ellie, she went _ retirement? to give you some context about ellie, she went in _ retirement? to give you some context about ellie, she went in the _ retirement? to give you some context about ellie, she went in the 50m i about ellie, she went in the 50m butterfly last night, finishing fifth. however, five years ago in rio, she picked up a gold medal, so there was a lot of expectations on her. but the general rule is, when you come to a paralympic games, there are three sorts of athletes one dash one, qualifying for the
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games is to be on enzo, two, you are hoping for a medal, three, nothing less than gold will do. but robinson said these games were more about her journey and what she learned about sport and i spoke to her about this earlier. lam iamso i am so empowered by the girl i've turned— i am so empowered by the girl i've turned into, — i am so empowered by the girl i've turned into, the transformation is unbelievable. it was my birthday yesterday, my parents got me this little bracelets, and it was really cute, _ little bracelets, and it was really cute, because i swim the 50 butterfly, and my mum said it represents... 0h! it represents the lii'l represents... 0h! it represents the girl i _ represents... 0h! it represents the girl i turned — represents... 0h! it represents the girl i turned into. because they butterfly— girl i turned into. because they butterfly starts off as a caterpillar, and then they blossom into this _ caterpillar, and then they blossom into this beautiful creature. she was saying that i started off as this very— was saying that i started off as this very anxious girl and now i'm so much — this very anxious girl and now i'm so much more and i have turned into that butterfly.
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she also confirms her retirement from paralympic swimming and saying she looked forward to the next chapter of her career and life. lovely to hear from chapter of her career and life. lovely to hearfrom her. thank you, rachel. andy murray wasn't happy with his opponent stefanos tsitisipas as he was knocked out of the first round of the us open last night. it had been a great match, with murray playing some of his best tennis in recent years, moving into a 2—1 lead over the world number three. tsistipas fought back to 2—2 but then disappeared for an eight—minute bathroom break, something murray was not a bit happy about. he eventually returned and went on to win the final set to close out the victory. cristiano ronaldo says it's a dream come true to return to manchester united after 16 years away. the portuguese striker will be heading back to united for a deal worth nearly £13 million, with potential additional payments. he has signed a two—year contract with the option
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to extend for a further year. the transfer window closes tonight with clubs getting their paperwork in order before the 11pm cut—off. you can follow all the comings and goings on the bbc sport website and app. people escaping the crisis in afghanistan are arriving in the uk with virtually nothing. so, what help is available once they reach here? let's talk to enver solomon, ceo of the refugee council. good to have you with us. i want to ask first of all, what happens to refugees when they arrive in the uk, what's the first thing? the refugees when they arrive in the uk, what's the first thing?— what's the first thing? the first thin that what's the first thing? the first thing that happens _ what's the first thing? the first thing that happens to - what's the first thing? the first thing that happens to them i what's the first thing? the first thing that happens to them is i what's the first thing? the first i thing that happens to them is they have to quarantine in a hotel for ten days because of the pandemic. so, they're taken to that hotel and they stay there for ten days. they
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should be getting support in those hotels. after that periods, what should ideally be happening is they are then allocated to councils across the country, and that council has a house for them to go to and agencies like mine, the refugee council, provides all the needs that family has. these families are often right and werejust family has. these families are often right and were just the clothes they have on their backs, so we give them cash, food parcels, toiletries, help them work out where they are, understand where they are, because they're understand where they are, because they�* re often understand where they are, because they're often extremely per welted. but because there is a shortage of housing for these families, because of the problems with housing stock nationally, what's happening is they are not all being given a house, they having to go to another hotel i wait there to be told when it they'll be getting a house. the challenge is getting support to them when they're in that hotel. you aint a when they're in that hotel. you paint a very — when they're in that hotel. you paint a very clear— when they're in that hotel. you paint a very clear picture there,
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and you mention about people arriving with no clothes on their backs. i was reading about people arriving literally not wearing shoes. it seems to me at we're talking about different types of support, we're talking about that immediate support when people first arrive and then a longer term support. talk me through the different kinds of support that is available. , , ,., available. the support, the immediate _ available. the support, the immediate support - available. the support, the immediate support that i available. the support, the i immediate support that families need, because they're often very traumatised, they don't have the basics, so an organisation like mine will make sure they have clothing, toiletries, they've got all the things they need that we take for granted. they won't have money, they might have a phone but they won't know how to get a seven card. all those things. so they can stay in contact with family at home, which are so important for them. then it's about thinking about the children because a lot of these families have
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children, making sure they have toys, things they can do and they get registered at the local school. making sure that family knows how to get help for health problems, because some families will have long—term health needs. all these vital services and vital support, the everyday things that we take for granted, like having money, having food, having a toothbrush, having shoes, clothes to wear, these are the things each family needs, and that's before you start thinking about the longer term and their mental health well—being, flashbacks, stress, trauma that they will have. it often takes time for that to come out. we have experts working with families that have post—traumatic stress disorder and we will find that it really needs a building of relationships with the family to build trust so you can start to provide the help they need
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to. �* start to provide the help they need to. r ., ., ., , start to provide the help they need to. . . ., ., ,., start to provide the help they need to. . ., ., ,., , to. and ahead of us having this conversation, _ to. and ahead of us having this conversation, i— to. and ahead of us having this conversation, i was _ to. and ahead of us having this conversation, i was reading i to. and ahead of us having this i conversation, i was reading about the refugee council of which you're ceo, and i know you support children arriving in the uk alone, and i wanted to ask you, have any children come on their own from afghanistan or is it all with their families? there are some children who have arrived from afghanistan by themselves. it is important to remember that people were fleeing the taliban and making dangerous journeys to get to the uk, to get to safety, before this evacuation began. we have been working with afghan children, teenagers who have come here. it wasjust afghan children, teenagers who have come here. it was just a afghan children, teenagers who have come here. it wasjust a couple of months ago, i met two afghan teenage boys that have come here by themselves to try and reach safety in the uk. they're extremely vulnerable and they need support and they need to be properly looked after, and that's why we work with
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government and local authorities to get them into a foster placement and to give them the support they need to. most of the children that have been evacuated very recently, i understand have been with families. i would be surprised if there were children in that cohort as well. it there may be people listening who think that they would like to help, so what is needed most?- so what is needed most? people should contact _ so what is needed most? people should contact their _ so what is needed most? people should contact their local- should contact their local authority. only a third of councils have stepped up to offer help, we need more councils to do that. we should also contact agencies like mine, we have an emergency appeal out through the refugee council and lots of other charities, and they should try to talk to their local mps, because it is important that local mps and lobby council so they do their bit as well. if every council stepped up, we would be able to ensure that all these afghan families got the housing they need
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to. ~ , . families got the housing they need to. . , ., ., ~' to. we must leave it there, thank ou. the lockdown—inspired surge in takeaway food has continued as restrictions have eased. nearly a quarter of people are spending more on takeaways and food deliveries now than before the pandemic, according to market research group mintel. while the growth in home deliveries is an opportunity for some, many restaurants are also wary of it. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith has more. three burgers, smoking joe, lots of milk... i grub's up at frank's burgers. sizzling, sliced, and stacked — it's ready in minutes. but like so much restaurant food, this order won't be eaten here. a mile or so down the road... ..sarah and her family are waiting for lunch to arrive.
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we usually get one once a week, don't we, sophie? it's like a fun night. i don't know whether they prefer a takeaway to mummy�*s cooking — i wouldn't like to say that's what it is, but... itjust feels as if you're doing something kind of fancy, you know? even if you are not. and you think you're eating a little bit more takeaway then you had been pre—pandemic? i don't want to put it on camera that i'm eating more takeaways than i normally would. i've even managed to rope my mum and dad into getting takeaways, and they've never been big fans. definitely in this area, we are quite rural, so it's not quite as easy to get things delivered — but i think it's ramped up a lot. takeaways boomed during lockdown as one of the few remaining treats. but 18 months on, habits have stuck — the average spend on takeaways has gone up by more than 40% over the last couple of years. in 2019, it was £452 per person each year. in 2021, that's jumped to £641 per person. i've got a burger and some fries. but for some people, it's a lot more than that.
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still stuck working from home in a shared house, harshad spends about £700 a month on takeaways. is it lunch and dinner every day? it depends. sometimes i have dinner as well. i started it during the lockdown, but now i'm just kind of used to it, just saving time and effort. i think it's worth it. we contacted the biggest fast food chains in the uk, including mcdonald's, burger king, and pizza hut, and they've all told us that delivery and take out is a really important part of their business — but crucially, they're gearing up for it to become even more significant. even small players are having to keep up with the changes. a third of the orders at this pan—asian chain are now for delivery, and they'rejuggling diners and riders coming down the same stairs. there's operational challenges. on a sunday night, you're getting a few orders, you would avoid setting people close to the entrance. so we will always prioritise
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dine—in customers. are you worried that delivery could grow too big it, and almost take over the business here? yes. there's definitely an erosion of dine in, so people can get restaurant quality food at home. quite a large percent of it what we are generating are going to the delivery platform. but that's the challenge restaurants will have to face... i think we've just got into a bit of a habit when we couldn't go out, i guess, so it's kind of stuck since then, really. ithink, you know, friday nights, it was like, "what can we do? let's get a takeaway." ..as the trend for takeaways continues to take off. i'm joined now by peter backman, restaurant delivery expert and restaurant consultant. good to have you with us. has the pandemic changed our habits for ever, do you think?— pandemic changed our habits for ever, do you think? yes. we were auoin in ever, do you think? yes. we were going in that _
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ever, do you think? yes. we were going in that direction _ ever, do you think? yes. we were going in that direction anyway, i going in that direction anyway, eating more and more restaurant delivered food, that was happening. but with the pandemic, lockdowns, have just force people into a position where now, for many, it's become a fact of life.— become a fact of life. what do we mean when _ become a fact of life. what do we mean when we — become a fact of life. what do we mean when we say _ become a fact of life. what do we mean when we say take - become a fact of life. what do we mean when we say take a - become a fact of life. what do we mean when we say take a ways? | become a fact of life. what do we | mean when we say take a ways? is become a fact of life. what do we i mean when we say take a ways? is it fast food or restaurants offering diners the opportunity to order the food that they would have hired if they'd gone to the restaurant, but now they can eat it at home? mi they'd gone to the restaurant, but now they can eat it at home? mil oii now they can eat it at home? all of the above- — now they can eat it at home? all of the above. one _ now they can eat it at home? all of the above. one of _ now they can eat it at home? all of the above. one of the _ now they can eat it at home? rii rrf the above. one of the phenomenal things about delivery, and i prefer the term delivery rather than take away in this context, because it's delivered, one of the defining characteristics is the fact that it can be produced in almost any form
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it —— format that is capable of being delivered. so it can be from a cup of coffee to a steak meal delivered to your home for immediate consumption. 50 delivered to your home for immediate consumption-— consumption. so had to restaurants co -e with consumption. so had to restaurants cope with the _ consumption. so had to restaurants cope with the competing _ consumption. so had to restaurants cope with the competing demands? some of them with huge difficulty, the shape of the restaurantjust isn't right to have diners and delivery drivers coming in to pick up delivery drivers coming in to pick up food and so on. they may well not to be ideally set up. other places, it works fine. if you to not got an entrance round the back where the delivery riders can come and not disturb the diners, that works as well. so, configuring the store is a very important consideration and also, the whole cost of doing it is
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an issue for many, many operators. so, how confidence can diners be the food they ordered for delivery is actually made on the premises? i've been reading about these so—called dark kitchens and i wonder how they work? ii dark kitchens and i wonder how they work? , ., . . dark kitchens and i wonder how they work? , ., .. ., dark kitchens and i wonder how they work? , ., . ., ., ., work? if you can imagine a restaurant _ work? if you can imagine a restaurant and _ work? if you can imagine a restaurant and you - work? if you can imagine a restaurant and you just i work? if you can imagine a l restaurant and you just take work? if you can imagine a i restaurant and you just take away the dining area, just have the kitchen and you transport the kitchen and you transport the kitchen to a place where rents are lower, so it may be on a trading park somewhere, or some other place that can be configured for commercial kitchens, and just make the food in one of those places. the orders come in via the app to the kitchen, the food is prepared and handed over to a rider who leaves and delivers your food. handed over to a rider who leaves and delivers yourfood. but handed over to a rider who leaves and delivers your food.— handed over to a rider who leaves and delivers your food. but say that i order and delivers your food. but say that i order from — and delivers your food. but say that i orderfrom a _
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and delivers your food. but say that i order from a restaurant _ and delivers your food. but say that i order from a restaurant called i and delivers your food. but say that i order from a restaurant called the| i order from a restaurant called the red restaurant, and also in this kitchen they have the blue restaurant and green restaurant, i don't know they have individual chefs, there is no differentiation? you don't know, and it might come from the red restaurant, the actual regular restaurant, which is round the corner, where is round the corner, whereas the blue restaurant makes tea in a dark kitchen. so really, you have no idea where the food is prepared. that really, you have no idea where the food is prepared.— food is prepared. that we see the rise of restaurants, _ food is prepared. that we see the rise of restaurants, i _ food is prepared. that we see the rise of restaurants, i suppose, i rise of restaurants, i suppose, leading on from what you just said, they don't physically exist at all and in some ways just exist online? yes. we're seeing a large motor works we call virtual brands. these are brands that exist on the app, you open the app and there is the
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apparent restaurant with its list of food and prices and so on, it doesn't exist, there is no bricks and mortar configuration for that restaurant, it'sjust made in a dark kitchen and delivered to your home in a bag and that is your experience of that restaurant. 1 million miles away from a restaurant where you go in and are ushered to your seats and the waiter takes your order, goes away and makes, or has it made for you. are very different style of operation. you. are very different style of operation-— you. are very different style of operation. good to talk to you, thank vou- _ police officers have arrived at the farm in gloucestershire which is home to geronimo the alpaca, the animal which has been the focus of intense campaigning opposing his destruction following positive tests for bovine tuberculosis. uniformed officers
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could be seen speaking to three people dressed in blue overalls, masks and goggles outside the farm in wickwar, before leading geronimo away. he has now been loaded into a trailer and taken from the farm. avon and somerset police confirmed they were on the farm to support the animal and plant health agency, who are executing a court warrant. it comes just days before the destruction warrant for the alpaca ends on septemberfourth. geronimo has twice tested positive for bovine tuberculosis, which his owner believes are false positives. the environmental campaigner greta thunberg says she will only the headlines, the final us flight leaves kabul airport at midnight tonight, no matter nearly two decades. that is the main headline
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at 11:52am. the environmental campaigner greta thunberg says she will only attend the un climate change conference in glasgow later this year, if the event is safe and democratic. for her, that means ensuring participants from poorer countries are fully vaccinated and able to travel to take part. our environment correspondent kevin keane has more. she sailed across the atlantic twice to get to the last un climate conference in 2019, but this time she's not so sure. greta thunberg wants to go to the glasgow talks, but says her participation is conditional. hi, greta. in an interview for bbc scotland, i asked what was stopping herfrom coming. well, of course, i'm not 100% sure yet. but if it's considered safe and democratic, then i will of course there. i take it you mean by that that it's accessible to the world's poorer nations.
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how important and why is that to you? because that's the essence of this meeting. it should be all about climate justice and of course we can't achieve climate justice if everyone is not contributing on the same terms. it won't be the first time greta has visited the uk. she addressed a large crowd in bristol last year before the pandemic, but it will be her first time in scotland. she famously clashed online with donald trump and doesn't seem too impressed with his successor. the biden administration doesn't seem to take the climate crisis the least bit serious, since they are actually expanding fossil fuel infrastructure, so it shows that they are not ready to take action. and she says the same applies to the uk government, which is considering whether to approve a new oil field off shetland. i think that maybe summarises the whole situation that we are in. the fact that these kinds of countries who are actually hosting the cop is actually planning to expand fossil fuel
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infrastructure, to open up new oil fields and so on. what do we want? climate justice... with such a large following, greta's absence from cop26 will be felt. but she says if all participants are vaccinated and allowed to travel, so will she. environmental groups have welcomed the announcement that leaded petrol is no longer used anywhere in the world. the united nations described the fuel�*s eradication in the last country where it was used, algeria, as a huge milestone for global health and the environment. the un estimates that its abolition will prevent more than a million premature deaths each year. energy companies can apply for a £450m fund to explore greener ways to power british homes. the energy regulator ofgem said businesses should develop big, bold and ambitious ideas. the government is committed
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to reaching net—zero carbon emissions by 2050. staff at nike's corporate headquarters in oregon have been given a week off to support their mental health. from today until friday, the us firm will power down to give employees a rest after a tough year. it follows similar moves from dating app bumble and linkedin, as a growing number of employees have reported feeling burnt out due to the pandemic. now it's time for a look at the weather with carole. hello again. high pressure remains with us for the next couple of days, meaning a lot of us will have a lot of cloud thick enough for patchy, light rain and drizzle but there will be some sunshine around, very similar to today's forecast, actually. here's that high pressure, the breeze coming in from the north sea, picking up moisture, feeling cool on the north sea coastline but also fairly breezy through the english channel today. still some murkiness around, some dampness in the air.
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the best chance you have of seeing some brighter breaks are over parts of central and western scotland, northern ireland and at times, parts of northern england. moving to the south east, we could see some sunshine but generally speaking for most, it is going to be fairly cloudy and don't forget, that patchy, light rain and drizzle mainly, but not exclusively, in the east. temperatures down the north sea coastline around 13—17 degrees but feeling chilly in the breeze. up to about 20 in the sunshine. through this evening and overnight, still a lot of cloud around, some breaks across central parts of scotland. here, temperatures could fall to three degrees, so chilly, but generally speaking, in towns and cities, we will hang onto temperatures in the high single figures or double figures. high pressure still with us tomorrow, this breeze coming in from the north sea. breezy too through the english channel and all the way along to the coasts of devon and cornwall and cloud still thick enough for some patchy,
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light rain or drizzle in parts of the east and south east tomorrow as well. sunshine over parts of scotland, northern ireland and into cumbria, with temperatures up to 21 degrees. that too will feel present in the sunshine. high pressure with us but drifting eastwards over thursday. you can see the wind arrows indicating it will still be quite breezy and still fairly cloudy as well. that cloud still thick enough for some patchy, light rain and drizzle. perhaps more of us seeing a bright or sunny skies, particularly the further west that you are, with highs up to 20 degrees. as we head on into friday, a bit more of the same. saturday, we could catch the odd shower but low pressure coming our way on sunday and that will bring some rain for some.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: taliban fighters have declared victory at kabul airport after the final withdrawal of us troops saying their takeover is a "lesson for the world". translation: during the last 20 years and with our - dedication and effort and help from allah, we managed today to regain our independence and make us forces leave. the final us evacuation flight left kabul airport a minute before midnight — as it formally ends its military involvement in the country — after nearly two decades. the uk says the immediate priority is getting out those who want to leave. continuing safe passage for those, the minority, the small minority, but nonetheless a significant number, who haven't yet been able to get out.
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and ending with all of the other building blocks to make sure afghanistan can be more stable moving forward. our other main news this morning, hurricane ida — thousands of soldiers and emergency workers are deployed in the us state of louisiana to help with the rescue operation — officials say it could take weeks to restore electricity. a new study suggests playing just one season of professional rugby is enough to start having adverse effects on the brain. and in her eighth paralympics, sarah storey wins a record—equalling 16th gold medal in tokyo — a feat hailed by the chair of uk sport. she still has the amazing sort of physical ability to set new standards and push the barriers every single time the games come around. but importantly she has still got the same passion and the same drive, she still wants to sort of break her our own records.
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hello and welcome to bbc news. almost two decades after american troops invaded afghanistan, the united states has formally announced an end to its military involvement in the country. the conflict was the longest in american history — and ends as it began — with the taliban in power. in line with the agreement signed with the taliban, the final us evacuation flight left kabul airport a minute before midnight, localtime, last night. since then, the taliban have taken it over along with the rest of the country, declaring "congratulations to afghanistan, this victory belongs to us all". in all, around 130,000 people have been evacuated in the last few weeks.
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speaking this morning, the foreign secretary dominic raab said the number of uk nationals still in afghanistan was in the �*low hundreds' and the government were doing all they could to help. the number of afghans trying to leave the country via pakistan and iran is said to have quadrupled in recent weeks. in the last 20 years, almost 2,500 service personnel have been killed. for the first time in two decades there are no foreign troops in afghanistan. this morning, a taliban spokesman has been speaking, let's listen to that now. translation: during the last 20 years i and with our dedication and efforts and help from allah, we managed today to regain our independence and make us forces leave. this is big lesson for other invaders and for our future generation. it is also a lesson for the world. we want to have good relations
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with the us and the world. we welcome good diplomatic relations with them all. congratulations to afghanistan... this victory belongs to us all. with all the latest on the us withdrawal, here's our north america correspondent peter bowes. the last american soldier to leave afghanistan — major general chris donoghue boarding a cargo plane, the final flight out of kabul. a hugely symbolic moment bringing to an end the us mission that started shortly after the september 11th attacks in 2001. as the c—17 disappeared into the night sky, on the ground the taliban celebrated with gun fire and fireworks. a victory for them, following two decades of international engagement in the country and recent weeks marked by violence, bloodshed and chaotic scenes in kabul. the us withdrawal follows frantic efforts over the past 18 days to fly
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123,000 people out of afghanistan, including 6,000 us citizens. this has been a massive military, diplomatic and humanitarian. undertaking, one of the most difficult in our nation's history and an extraordinary feat of logistics and co—ordination under some of the most challenging circumstances imaginable. during the evacuations, 13 us service members were killed in an attack on kabul airport by isk — a local branch of islamic state. the us now faces questions over a drone attack on suspected militants, which also claimed the lives of 10 afghan civilians, including children. up to 200 americans are believed still to be in the country. look, there's a lot of heartbreak associated with this departure. we did not get everybody out that we wanted to get out, but i think if we stayed another 10 days we wouldn't have gotten everybody out that we wanted to get out and there would still be people
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who would be disappointed with that. it's a tough situation. the us and its allies are now facing up to the taliban being in charge in afghanistan and the prospect of building a difficult diplomatic relationship — one that the americans say will not be based on trust. within minutes of that final us flight out of kabul, the taliban were in control of the airport, apparently in a reassuring mood. translation: my message - to the public and to the mujahideen is that they must not go for gunfire, they must. celebrate this happiness by worshipping the god. in the meantime, the taliban's also taken control of abandoned us military hardware, including armoured vehicles and aircraft left behind during the withdrawal. the americans say the equipment�*s been decommissioned or rendered useless. but for the taliban, this is another strong symbol of their new—found power.
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as the final us flight departed at midnight, taliban supporters took to the streets to celebrate. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet witnessed the historic moment. listen... look at the tracer fire in the air. the guns are going off. you can see the streams of red lights. you can see behind the tracer fire going up in the night sky. all day we heard the american warplanes circling above the city, flying low as we thought the last american flights were taking off, providing extra cover in these last decisive hours. but it's now the 31st of august in afghanistan, the day that presidentjoe biden said the american military mission, the 20—year engagement by us led
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nato forces, would formally end. and this is what you are hearing now, the eruption and this is what you are hearing now, the eruption of celebratory gunfire by taliban supporters in the city of kabul. i'm joined now by an english teacher in kabul. he worked as an interpreter for british and international forces, but has been unable to leave. to protect his identity, we are not naming him or showing his face. he we are very great you are joining as year. i wanted to start by asking if you have a sense of how your life has changed in the last few days? hello to all and to bbc listeners and viewers. as you mentioned, i am one of the english lecturers that helped the international forces while staying in afghanistan. they
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left is in a condition that is the worst. i am 30 years old now, i haven't experienced such a condition and from the beginning days of my life to now. i have not slept in the last 15 days properly. i sleep five or 15 minutes and then i wake back up. i am experiencing a very bad psychological condition. i am feeling tremendous fear in here and the condition is getting worse and worse. especially when i hear, when i watched the tv and i listen to the radio or i watch the social media, i hear that the killed and military personnel or an interpreter or they are killing people. they have announced an amnesty but they are not committed to it. they haven't announced their government yet, but
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when they announced their government, i am sure they are killing us. especially those who were engaged or involved with the international forces, for those that they work in the english language worked with english people, that is the worst thing. that is the worst experience i am having in these days. experience i am having in these da s. . , experience i am having in these da s. ., ., experience i am having in these da 5. ., ., �* experience i am having in these da s. ., ., �* ., ., days. please go on, i didn't mean to interact joe- — days. please go on, i didn't mean to interactjoe- i— days. please go on, i didn't mean to interact joe. i was _ days. please go on, i didn't mean to interact joe. i was only _ days. please go on, i didn't mean to interact joe. i was only going - days. please go on, i didn't mean to interact joe. i was only going to i interactjoe. i was only going to see you talk about your fear so vividly. and i suppose i wondered, do you fear the taliban are looking for you? do you fear the taliban are looking for ou? . �* , do you fear the taliban are looking for ou? . �*, ., , ., for you? that's the worst thing i am experiencing _ for you? that's the worst thing i am experiencing these _ for you? that's the worst thing i am experiencing these days. _ for you? that's the worst thing i am experiencing these days. from i for you? that's the worst thing i am experiencing these days. from the l experiencing these days. from the 14th i tried different ways to flee afghanistan or to flee the conditions. but i went to the airport and there was no chance on their first day and the second day and then i went to the pakistan embassy to get a visa from there.
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but the borders are blocked and there is no way out and i am just locked inside for the last 15 days. i have not gone outside. i am sleepless and tired. i was working from 5am to five or 7pm. i was working for different positions, previously i was working for the british and also i was a university lecture besides that. i was working as a lecturer in one of the universities and i help one of the... i universities and i help one of the... . ., ., ., ., universities and i help one of the... . ., ., ., the... i am going to iran to you. what you _ the... i am going to iran to you. what you are — the... i am going to iran to you. what you are saying _ the... i am going to iran to you. what you are saying is - the... i am going to iran to you. what you are saying is very i what you are saying is very compelling. —— to interop you. forgive me for interact seeing, it
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is quite clear that you are a very eminent person and i suppose i wanted to ask you more broadly, you clearly qualified for the scheme to be able to help people leave afghanistan. talk is a little bit more about the obstacles that you have faced. i more about the obstacles that you have faced-— have faced. i tried a hundred ways to net out have faced. i tried a hundred ways to get out of— have faced. i tried a hundred ways to get out of here. _ have faced. i tried a hundred ways to get out of here. i _ have faced. i tried a hundred ways to get out of here. i filled - have faced. i tried a hundred ways to get out of here. i filled forms i to get out of here. i filled forms for the mod ministry of defence of the uk and i tried the immigration, but no feedback yet. i fill the form for the canada, ifilled but no feedback yet. i fill the form for the canada, i filled the form for the canada, i filled the form for the canada, i filled the form for the usa... for the canada, i filled the form forthe usa... i for the canada, i filled the form for the usa... i was trying to get out of here. i didn't meet specific entry. but now i am trying to let
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english people and the uk government, especially the prime minister mr borisjohnson to hear myself. i work for the english and i work for english forces, i worked for english language. so they have to take me out of here. i am feeling in a bad condition and they have to take me out of here, i worked for them. i work for their country. that is the worst thing. believe me nowadays, previously i was so happy that people were respecting me, my pictures were on billboards. but now i hear horrible things, i am a well—known face in people can tell me. that is the worst experience i am having nowadays. we me. that is the worst experience i am having nowadays.— am having nowadays. we are very crateful am having nowadays. we are very grateful that _ am having nowadays. we are very grateful that you _ am having nowadays. we are very grateful that you have _ am having nowadays. we are very grateful that you have taken i am having nowadays. we are very grateful that you have taken the l grateful that you have taken the time to talk to us on bbc news. we wish you well and thank you for your time. ., �* . ., .,
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wish you well and thank you for your time. ., �* .., ., , .,, time. you're welcome, no problem. that is an english _ time. you're welcome, no problem. that is an english teacher— time. you're welcome, no problem. that is an english teacher that i that is an english teacher that lives in two. he has been unable to leave. —— kabul. the british foreign secretary dominic raab was adamant this morning that his department had handled the evacuation extremely well. our political correspondent adam fleming was listening to the interview. he says no government department has done a betterjob of handling the crisis in afghanistan than the foreign and commonwealth development office, which i think might raise some eyebrows amongst his colleagues who have been criticising him anonymously in the papers. the big thing that the foreign office has done in the last few hours is to get this resolution through the un security council in new york. russia and china abstained, which isn't as good as voting for it, but it isn't as bad as vetoing it and stopping it from happening. the big priority in that resolution amongst the international community is this idea of safe passage, that is people who are entitled to leave afghanistan actually
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being allowed by the taliban to leave by some route, whether it is through the airport, but we aren't sure if that is functioning at the moment or not, or whether it is through land borders with afghanistan's neighbours. then you have the issue of how many people are actually eligible to make thatjourney and it is very difficult to work out because you've got different categories of people. you have got british nationals or people who are dual nationals and maybe have an afghan and british passport, who would be entitled to come to the uk. then you have got people who are afghan nationals who provided assistance to the uk and other countries while they were occupying afghanistan and then you've got people who are vulnerable and who might be eligible to be resettled in the uk and elsewhere as refugees. and that is why the foreign secretary this morning couldn't really put an exact number of how many people are still left in afghanistan. i think right now, for me, as a foreign secretary, i'm focused on the immediate priorities — continuing safe passage for those, the minority, the small minority, but nonetheless a significant
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number, who haven't yet been able to get out. we are working with the third countries in the region. we have held the taliban through this un security council resolution to their undertaking to allow safe passage and then dealing with all of the other building blocks to make sure afghanistan can be more stable moving forward. and those building blocks in the un resolution alongside safe passage for people leaving include not allowing afghanistan to be re—established as a safe haven for terrorists as it was in the 1990s and the build—up to the 9/11 attacks on the united states. also another building block is giving a sort of firm foundation for charities and aid organisations and the united nations still provide humanitarian relief. and the resolution also talks about safeguarding the progress made in the last 20 years. that is about protecting the human rights of women and girls and minorities in afghanistan. there is another story circulating today, which suggest that there might have been some
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behind—the—scenes tensions between the uk and the us in the last few days around the airport in kabul. the website politico is reporting that some people in the us administration, particularly wanted to shut one of the gates around the airport, but the final decision was to keep it open because the uk needed that gate to be open to help with its evacuation effort. dominic raab was asked about that this morning too. look, i've got an excellent working relationship with tony blinken, the secretary of state, i spoke to him in the immediate hours after the attack and again yesterday. look, just as a point of fact, we did everything we could once we were alerted to the threat, but before the explosion took place, to mitigate the risk. that included warning people not to come to the airport, warning people who were in the crowd to leave to the extent that we could. we also shifted the civilian team that we had in the barons hotel to the airport because clearly it's
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a stone's throw away from where the terrorist attack took place. it clearly wasn't safe, but none of that would have required or necessitated the gate at abbey gate to be left open. so there are a huge number of threads to this overall story, but i think there are three things to look out for over the next few days. that issue of safe passage. we will be able to see with our own eyes and whatsapp messages from former translators and assistants and things like that whether people are being able to get out of afghanistan either by air or by land. then there is the issue of recognising the new afghan government because the taliban is on the verge of forming a new government. how does the international community react to that, either as a whole or individually? and thirdly the big event at westminster is tomorrow at two o'clock. the foreign affairs select committee of mps is going to be questioning dominic raab, the foreign secretary, themselves and that committee is chaired by tom tugendhat, the conservative mp who once served in afghanistan and made that very searing speech when parliament was recalled to discuss
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the crisis a few days ago. let's speak to our correspondent in kabul secunder kermani. over to you. we saw that celebrated aunfire over to you. we saw that celebrated gunfire from — over to you. we saw that celebrated gunfire from the _ over to you. we saw that celebrated gunfire from the taliban _ over to you. we saw that celebrated gunfire from the taliban continuing i gunfire from the taliban continuing late into the night. we saw the taliban taking over the airport today. speaking to reporters from the tarmac where planes just a short while ago has still been taking today because of the departure of the final us soldiers who were stationed here. not everyone in the country necessarily sees it that way. i am joined country necessarily sees it that way. iamjoined by country necessarily sees it that way. i am joined by the former governor of nanga hard province. thank you forjoining us. as someone who was associated and part of the previous government, what are your emotions today?—
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previous government, what are your emotions today? thank you very much. the taliban is — emotions today? thank you very much. the taliban is taking _ emotions today? thank you very much. the taliban is taking over— emotions today? thank you very much. the taliban is taking over the _ emotions today? thank you very much. the taliban is taking over the three i the taliban is taking over the three provinces— the taliban is taking over the three provinces since two weeks. everyone is waiting _ provinces since two weeks. everyone is waiting for them to form the government and everyone is waiting for them _ government and everyone is waiting for them to— government and everyone is waiting for them to see the commitment they have announced and the promises they did with _ have announced and the promises they did with the _ have announced and the promises they did with the afghan people, are they --oin did with the afghan people, are they going to _ did with the afghan people, are they going to make them commitments and promises _ going to make them commitments and promises are not? they going to make them commitments and promises are not?— promises are not? they are going to allow women _ promises are not? they are going to allow women to _ promises are not? they are going to allow women to be _ promises are not? they are going to allow women to be educated, i promises are not? they are going to allow women to be educated, to i promises are not? they are going to allow women to be educated, to go| promises are not? they are going to i allow women to be educated, to go to work. �* allow women to be educated, to go to work. . , ., allow women to be educated, to go to work. . ,., .., . ., ., work. are you convinced from what ou have work. are you convinced from what you have seen? — work. are you convinced from what you have seen? honestly, - work. are you convinced from what you have seen? honestly, we i work. are you convinced from what you have seen? honestly, we are l work. are you convinced from what i you have seen? honestly, we are not really— you have seen? honestly, we are not really sure _ you have seen? honestly, we are not really sure what is going to happen. we are _ really sure what is going to happen. we are waiting for the taliban to form _ we are waiting for the taliban to form the — we are waiting for the taliban to form the government and we will see then _ form the government and we will see then are _ form the government and we will see then. are they really going to respect — then. are they really going to respect what they have promised to the afghan people, especially the human— the afghan people, especially the human rights, women's rights, education _ human rights, women's rights, education rights and as well as the ri-ht education rights and as well as the right for— education rights and as well as the right for women and freedom of speech, — right for women and freedom of speech, these are the things we are really— speech, these are the things we are really looking forward from the taliban — really looking forward from the taliban to respect. secondly is that, _ taliban to respect. secondly is that, this _ taliban to respect. secondly is that, this is a very big opportunity
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for afghans as the us forces departure has completed. the afghan people _ departure has completed. the afghan people need to come together, work together— people need to come together, work together and for unity. and this is the longest war in the world. many aft hans the longest war in the world. many afghans have _ the longest war in the world. many afghans have left. _ the longest war in the world. many afghans have left. within - the longest war in the world. ij�*iag�*iy afghans have left. within them some of the most educated. how much of a challenge will it be for the taliban to convince for those in big cities, more urban, young populations, that theirfuture more urban, young populations, that their future is here? more urban, young populations, that theirfuture is here? this more urban, young populations, that their future is here?— their future is here? this is a very big challenge _ their future is here? this is a very big challenge for _ their future is here? this is a very big challenge for the _ their future is here? this is a very big challenge for the whole i their future is here? this is a very i big challenge for the whole country, not only— big challenge for the whole country, not only for— big challenge for the whole country, not only for the taliban that the well educated people, the experts and professional people, they are leaving _ and professional people, they are leaving the country and must have left the _ leaving the country and must have left the country. i don't the people who are _ left the country. i don't the people who are left. they did not see their future, _ who are left. they did not see their future, very— who are left. they did not see their future, very bright in this country and some — future, very bright in this country and some of them were scared and thought — and some of them were scared and thought... they had their own dreams to be _
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thought... they had their own dreams to be true, _ thought... they had their own dreams to be true, that is why they left the country. the second challenge the country. the second challenge the taliban is going to have an ecorromic— the taliban is going to have an economic crisis in the country because — economic crisis in the country because of businessmen leave, if there _ because of businessmen leave, if there is— because of businessmen leave, if there is no— because of businessmen leave, if there is no opportunity for businessmen as well as those who will invest— businessmen as well as those who will invest in afghanistan, that will invest in afghanistan, that will be — will invest in afghanistan, that will be another big crisis. but i had a — will be another big crisis. but i had a few— will be another big crisis. but i had a few meetings with the taliban recently. _ had a few meetings with the taliban recently, they have promised they will respect and well as fulfil those — will respect and well as fulfil those promises that they recently made _ those promises that they recently made to— those promises that they recently made to the afghan people, as well as women's rights in education rights — as women's rights in education rights the _ as women's rights in education rights. the right for women to work — rights. the right for women to work... . ., . rights. the right for women to work... . .. ., , rights. the right for women to work... . ., work... can i interact, as someone who is a staunch _ work... can i interact, as someone who is a staunch critic— work... can i interact, as someone who is a staunch critic of— work... can i interact, as someone who is a staunch critic of the i who is a staunch critic of the taliban, do you feel safe here? honestly, i decided to stay in this country— honestly, i decided to stay in this country in — honestly, i decided to stay in this country in kabul. i had a few meetings _ country in kabul. i had a few meetings with the leadership of the taliban, _ meetings with the leadership of the taliban, they promised me there would _ taliban, they promised me there would be — taliban, they promised me there would be no issue but i will see what _ would be no issue but i will see what will— would be no issue but i will see what will happen. i am eating young people _ what will happen. i am eating young people and community leaders and
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leaders _ people and community leaders and leaders of— people and community leaders and leaders of the tribes and youths. -- leaders of the tribes and youths. meeting. a leaders of the tribes and youths. » meeting. a lot of people waiting here to see what political system emerges in the coming days. some of my sources saying it is a distinct policy —— might possibility the taliban will re—establish the islamic emirate they had in the 19905 islamic emirate they had in the 1990s but not possibly with the same rules they had back then. all eyes on what the taliban do next. transforming from an insurgent group into a government will be the next challenge. a huge rescue operation is taking place in the us state of louisiana, which was struck by hurricane ida on sunday. rescue workers and volunteers are using boats and aircraft to find people trapped by floods along the mississippi river. our correspondent nada tawfik has the latest from new orleans.
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ida has transformed streets into waterways, trapping some residents in the worst affected parts of louisiana. volunteer search teams known as the cajun navy have been out trying to reach the most desperate. even on dry land, many were overwhelmed by the damage to their homes, to their lives. i've got nothing. all i got here, i got a backpack with a few clothes in, in case i had to run out. but i didn't know where... i didn't know where... i would end up in. so ijust stayed here. it's the worrying i don't like. but when you're away you are worried too because you don't know what you're coming back to. i'm just happy i'm here and i can start doing what i need to do to start all over again. it's a lot. more resources are beginning to pour into the region. 5,000 national guard members have been deployed to help local authorities. the storm has left behind a massive mess.
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nearly1 million households in louisiana are still without power. on monday, crews from the energy company began repairs where it was safe. still it could take weeks before things are up and running again. ida was one of the most powerful storms to hit the united states. it is certainly one residents here will not soon forget. nada tawfik, bbc news, new orleans cbs's correspondent michael george gave this update from bridge city, louisania where recovery efforts are underway. more than a million people who are still without power two days after the hurricane hit, and the reason why is right behind me. this is a three—storey transmissions tower that was brought down by ida, and there are holes throughout the power grid right now, so officials are saying it will take weeks, not days, to fully restore the system. it's very hot and humid during the daytime here in louisiana, so people suffering through without any power or air conditioning, it's a very difficult situation for people who are already dealing with flood conditions. tragically, we know two people have
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lost their lives and we do expect that toll to increase. right now, there are rescue operations under way throughout the state, there are search helicopters that are going through different areas. fortunately, it doesn't appear we have had the enormous loss of life we had during katrina, and the reason for that is the flood walls and the levees were greatly improved over these past 16 years, they appear to have held, and that may be why we're not seeing the extent of the damage that we saw during hurricane katrina 16 years ago. thousands of people in california have been fleeing the popular tourist spot of lake tahoe as a huge wildfire rages. the fire is heading towards the main resort town, in an area which straddles the border between california and nevada. more than three thousand firefighters are working to contain the blaze. police officers have arrived at the farm in gloucestershire which is home to geronimo the alpaca
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— the animal which has been the focus of intense campaigning opposing his destruction following positive tests for bovine tuberculosis. officers could be seen speaking to three people dressed in blue overalls, masks and goggles outside the farm in wickwar, before leading geronimo away. he has now been loaded into a trailer and taken from the farm. police confirmed they were on the farm to support the animal and plant health agency, who are executing a court warrant. it comes just days before the destruction warrant expires ends on september 4th. geronimo has twice tested positive for bovine tuberculosis, which his owner believes are false positives. staff at nike's corporate headquarters in oregon have been given a week off to support their mental health. from today until friday, the us firm will "power down" to give employees a rest after a tough year. it follows similar moves from dating app bumble and linkedin,
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as a growing number of employees have reported feeling burnt out due to the pandemic. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. the one thing people have got is a lot of cloud, that loud at times thin enough to reveal spells of sunshine but equally thick enough to give the odd smell of drizzle and this is the sort of weather we keep for the rest of the week. equally some glimmers of sunshine. through the rest of today, through central scotland and northern ireland, should do well for sunny spells. many sports holding onto cloudy conditions, highest temperature 20, 21. we keep extensive cloud overnight. again, clear slots. central scotland, temperatures will dip away, if you keep the crowd it
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stays relatively mild. tomorrow more of the same, still the odd bit of drizzle. the best of the sunshine tomorrow in parts of scotland, that could live temperatures to 21 degrees. if you are looking for a dramatic changes, they are not coming through thursday or friday. a little bit of sunshine but the odd spot of drizzle. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the taliban have taken control of kabul airport. the militant group says the us withdrawal is a lesson for the world and future generations. the final us evacuation flight has left kabul airport as the country formally ends its military involvement there after nearly two decades. the uk says the immediate priority is getting more people out, as one man left behind told the bbc of his desperation to leave.
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i worked for english forces, i worked for english language, so they owe me and they have to take me out of here. i am feeling in bad condition, they have to take me out of here. i worked for them, i worked for their country. in the wake of hurricane ida, thousands of soldiers and emergency workers are deployed in the us state of louisiana to help with the rescue operation. officials say it could take weeks to restore electricity. a new study suggests playing just one season of professional rugby is enough to start having adverse effects on the brain. after a high—profile campaign to save him following his positive tests for tb, geronimo the alpaca has been taken from his farm by government vets, supported by a number of police officers. in her eighth paralympics, sarah storey wins a record—equalling 16th gold medal in tokyo. and coming up — the environmental campaigner greta thunberg tells us she'll only attend the un climate change conference in glasgow later this
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year, if the event is covid—safe and democratic. the bbc�*s moscow correspondent has left russia today, expelled by the authorities after being labelled a threat to national security. sarah rainsford, who first reported from moscow for the bbc over 20 years ago, just as vladimir putin came to power, has been told she can never return to the country. moscow claims the move is in response to the expulsion of a russian journalist from the uk two years ago, but the move comes amid a severe crackdown on independentjournalists and opposition activists within russia. here's sarah's report on her last days in russia. this was the moment i discovered i was being expelled from russia... according to a specific law, i've been designated a threat to national security and as such,
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i'm not allowed into the country. pulled aside at passport control, i was told the fsb security service had banned me for life. i recorded the conversation. i was returning from belarus, where i'd confronted alexander lukashenko on the mass repression and torture of peaceful protesters. his loyal supporters rounded on me in a coordinated attack. vladimir putin's presenting this as just another working visit. .. i've reported from russia for two decades, the whole span of vladimir putin's presidency. there have been highs, like the world cup, but i've also charted the slow erosion of freedoms here, the crackdown on dissent. a year ago, the government put me
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on short—term visas. then i became in the news, as state television announced i had to leave. after tense negotiations, i had been allowed to enter russia... they let me in. for now! ..but only to pack. i was then told my visa wouldn't be renewed, supposedly what happened to a russian reporter in london, though that was two years ago. i was called in here to the foreign ministry. they kept insisting my expulsion was nothing personal, they talked about it as a reciprocal move. but they refused to even engage with the fact i'd been labelled a national security threat, they said that was just a technical moment. but at a time when russia is increasingly seeing enemies all around, it really feels like i've now been added to the list. it's happening as the pressure on russian journalists who don't toe the kremlin line is intensifying.
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this tv station has just been added to growing black list of media labelled foreign agents for getting funds from abroad. the status of foreign agents means that we are enemies of the state. the pretending of being democracy is over. it is very bad. and it could become much worse any time. so, i'm leaving a country i first came to as the soviet union fell apart, when free speech or freedoms were new and precious. it feels like today's russia is moving in reverse. a new study, seen exclusively by the bbc, reports that afterjust one season of rugby, professional players saw a decline in both blood flow to the brain and cognitive function. the university of south wales' research followed a team, testing players pre—season,
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mid—season and post—season. the sport's governing body world rugby has welcomed the findings and has doubled its investment into concussion research. tomos morgan has the story. shane williams. big step of the left. and there is the crunching south african tackle. it was one of the biggest hits i've evertaken, really, ithink. shane williams became wales' top try scorer, a lion and one of the best ever to have played on the wing, but he also took his fair share of big tackles and head impacts, most notably the one sustained against bakkies botha of south africa in 2004. it just totally wiped me out. i knocked the ball on and south africa scored on the other side of the field, apparently. the funny thing is i don't remember that. it probably wasn't until after the game i felt a bit groggy and sick that i realised that something was wrong. a new study, seen exclusively by the bbc, by the university of south wales and published in tomorrow's edition of experimental physiology
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is believed to be one of the first that's followed a professional rugby team that plays in the united rugby championship over the course of one season, testing players in pre—, mid— and post—season. the players recorded just six concussions between them. however, all of them saw a decline in blood flow to the brain and a decline in cognitive function. the evidence is showing - now that there is a cumulative impact on the brain, i so we are moving away from concussion per se - and focusing more on contact. the research team say more evidence on the topic is needed and are in the process of completing further studies comparing past and present players with a control group. some former players like shane believe, as well as educating, limiting substitutions only when players are injured, rather than as fresh legs against tired opponents, could prevent further injuries. however, the game's governing body says research is ongoing, looking into this specific issue. in response to the new study�*s
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findings, world rugby said that they welcome the new research, that they have recently committed to doubling their investment in player welfare and new concussion research and initiatives, and that player welfare is at the heart of everything we say and do as a sport. steyn puts him down. with the introduction of more severe penalties for dangerous tackles, shane believes the game has become safer, but anything that can be added to mitigate the potential risk of head injuries is welcome. people still ask, would you change anything, would you change the way you played, would you have not played? i wouldn't have because i was playing a game that i absolutely loved. the children's commissioner for england will push for social media companies to stop children accessing pornography on their platforms. dame rachel de souza warned age verification could be brought in if websites fail to do more to stop
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youngsters accessing them. up to 60% of aged 11—13s stumbling across porn online and they shouldn't even be on these social media sites, and that's why i'm really pleased that the two secretaries of state, dcms and education, have asked me to look into what more can be done to keep children safe online. and i'm very keen, and i've called in the tech companies and had a roundtable with the adult companies, because i think one of the key things we need to do is ensure these companies take responsibility, along with all the other adults, and we actually can get those age gates on and prevent young people being on there. i'm joined now by dr elena martellozzo, associate professor of criminology at middlesex university, who advises the government on young people's attitudes to pornography.
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welcome people's attitudes to pornography. to bbc news, g you welcome to bbc news, good to have you with us. i know you have conducted research into pornography and young people, can you tell us a little bit about that? we and young people, can you tell us a little bit about that?— little bit about that? we conducted the study with _ little bit about that? we conducted the study with over _ little bit about that? we conducted the study with over 1070 _ little bit about that? we conducted the study with over 1070 young i the study with over 1070 young people, all children from the uk aged 11—16. we found that roughly half of our sample had seen pornography, which did not surprise us. pornography�*s ubiquity is unprecedented, as we know. i would go as far to argue that it is more difficult to avoid online pornography than to see it. what we also found out, which was also interesting, isn't pornography seems to have become the default sex educator for a to have become the default sex educatorfor a large number of young people, meaning that those children
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who are curious about sex, they want to learn about sex and they go online, and they watch pornography to find more about it. which, to me, is rather alarming. we also found that boys react to pornography differently from girls. girls, for example, who we spoke to, felt humiliated, concerned, upsetabout pornography. boys seemed to react differently, in the sense that more excited about it, but the first time they see it, they're also upset and troubled by what they see. we need to recall that what's available online is rather concerning, talking about pornography that even adults would find disconcerting. it's violence against women, it's
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aggressive, it's misogynist, so many negative connotations to what's available freely on line. you make so many points — available freely on line. you make so many points there, _ available freely on line. you make so many points there, i _ available freely on line. you make so many points there, i perhaps i available freely on line. you make i so many points there, i perhaps want to pick you up on something rather startling that you said that it's more difficult now to avoid online pornography than to see it, and we know that children's commissioner and many social media firms this week and challenge them to grasp this nettle keeping children safe and keeping the children who should not be on their sites off their sites and getting unsuitable material off their sites. given what you've said there, what are her chances of success? i you've said there, what are her chances of success?— you've said there, what are her chances of success? i think it would be fantastic — chances of success? i think it would be fantastic if _ chances of success? i think it would be fantastic if social _ chances of success? i think it would be fantastic if social media - chances of success? i think it would be fantastic if social media sites i be fantastic if social media sites take more responsibility but children should not have to depend on them to deliver the protection they deserve and they need to. many experts argue that perhaps tighter
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legislation should be in place, so the online safety bill, for example, needs to get moving very quickly in this case. . �* , , needs to get moving very quickly in this case. . v , ~ ., this case. that's interesting. who is ultimately _ this case. that's interesting. who is ultimately responsible, - this case. that's interesting. who is ultimately responsible, do i this case. that's interesting. who is ultimately responsible, do you | is ultimately responsible, do you think? or does everybody have a part to play, i'm thinking social media company but also governments, we have been talking about legislation, and parents as well.— and parents as well. that's very aood and parents as well. that's very good point- _ and parents as well. that's very good point- i— and parents as well. that's very good point. ithink— and parents as well. that's very good point. i think it's- and parents as well. that's very good point. i think it's a - and parents as well. that's very good point. i think it's a shared| good point. i think it's a shared responsibility. of course, that's a lot of politics involved, legislation we absolutely need, but society in general, parents and schools also have a massive responsibility. talking about pornography is still a taboo subject, it's very controversial to talk about it to your children, but i think we have a massive
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responsibility to ensure that children are aware of what pornography is, from a very young age, what is in a healthy sexual relationship and also to make them aware that what they see online is not really what happens in real life. so, hopefully, they can become critical consumers of pornography when they see it, when they search for it, or when, sadly, they stumble across it. ., , ., across it. you must leave it there but very good _ across it. you must leave it there but very good to _ across it. you must leave it there but very good to have _ across it. you must leave it there but very good to have you - across it. you must leave it there but very good to have you with i across it. you must leave it there l but very good to have you with us. thank you. breaking news that geronimo the alpaca has been killed. that news comes after a court ordered the destruction warrant was carried out following the animal twice testing positive for bovine tuberculosis. so, the news that geronimo the
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alpaca has been killed. this has come from the department for environment, food and rural affairs. will be showing you pictures earlier here of officials arriving at the farm in south gloucestershire where geronimo has been. he came to this country in 2017 and since then, had tested positive twice for bovine tuberculosis. geronimo's owner has always maintained that the tests results are returning false positives. but nonetheless, a destruction warrant was ordered. that was due to expire on september the 4th and as i said a little earlier, we saw officials arriving at the farm and we have now received information that geronimo the alpaca has been killed after testing twice
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positive for bovine tuberculosis. more and that news coming up in the next hour or so. it's the seventh day of the paralympic games in tokyo and cyclist dame sarah storey has won her 16th gold in the women's c5 time trial. she dominated the time trial, winning by 92 seconds as british team—mate crystal lane—wright took silver. it puts her on par with the record of britain's most decorated paralympian, swimmer mike kenny. sarah has the opportunity to win a 17th gold in thursday's road race. earlier, we heard from the chair of uk sport, dame katherine grainger who said sarah's passion and drive makes her one of a kind. she is, she is genuinely one of a kind. this is her eighth paralympic
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games, she was talking about paris, which would be her ninth. she has an amazing physical ability to set new standards and push the barriers every time the games come around. but she still has the same passion and drive, she still wants to break her own records and she's loving it. i don't when she will ever stop, maybe she won't! she has one more day back on the roads, and we never know put too much pressure on anyone, with the two event so far, it shows a good herform is. plenty could happen, but we have great terms and then she could become the most decorated of all time, a title fully deserved, if and when she gets that one. that was dame catherine grainger chair of uk sport, talking there about cyclist dame sarah storey who has won her 16th gold in the women's c5 time trial at the paralympics. the headlines on bbc news: the taliban have taken control of kabul airport. the militant group says the us withdrawal is a lesson for
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the world and future generations. the final us evacuation flight left kabul airport a minute before midnight as it formally ended its military involvement in the country after nearly two decades. in the wake of hurricane ida, thousands of soldiers and emergency workers are deployed in the us state of louisiana to help with the rescue operation. officials say it could take weeks to restore electricity. thanked afghanistan and people escaping the crisis there are a revving uk with virtually nothing. the chief executive of the refugee council explain to our the process of what happens when refugees arrive in the uk.
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the first thing that happens to them is they have to quarantine in a hotel for ten days because of the pandemic. so, they're taken to that hotel and they stay there for ten days. they should be getting some support in those hotels. after that period, what should ideally be happening is they are then allocated to a council across the country, and that council has a house for them to go to and agencies like mine, the refugee council, provides all the needs that family has. these families are often arriving with just the clothes they have on their backs, so we give them cash, food parcels, toiletries, help them work out where they are, understand where they are, because they're often extremely bewildered. but because there is a shortage of housing for these families, because of the problems with housing stock nationally, what's happening is they are not all being given a house, they are having to go
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to another hotel and wait when they'll be getting a house. the challenge is getting support to them when they're in that hotel. you paint a very clear picture there, and you mention about people arriving with no clothes on their backs. i was reading about people arriving literally not wearing shoes. it seems to me that we're talking about different types of support, we're talking about that immediate support when people first arrive and then longer—term support. talk me through the different kinds of support that is available. the support, the immediate support that families need, because they're often very traumatised, they don't have the basics, so an organisation like mine will make sure they have clothing, toiletries, they've got all the things they need that we take for granted. they won't have money, they might have a phone but they won't know how to get a sim card. all those things. so they can stay in contact with family at home,
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which is so important for them. then it's about thinking about the children because a lot of these families have children, making sure they have toys, things they can do and they get registered at the local school. making sure that family knows how to get help for health problems, because some families will have long—term health needs. all these vital services and vital support, the everyday things that we take for granted, like having money, having food, having a toothbrush, having shoes, clothes to wear, these are the things each family needs, and that's before you start thinking about the longer term and their mental health well—being, flashbacks, stress, trauma that they will have. it often takes time for that to come out. we have experts working with families that have post—traumatic stress disorder and we will find that it really needs a building of relationships with the family to build trust
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so you can start to provide the help they need to. the environmental campaigner greta thunberg says she will only attend the un climate change conference in glasgow later this year, if the event is safe and democratic. for her, that means ensuring participants from poorer countries are fully vaccinated and able to travel to take part. our environment correspondent kevin keane has more. she sailed across the atlantic twice to get to the last un climate conference in 2019, but this time she's not so sure. greta thunberg wants to go to the glasgow talks, but says her participation is conditional. hi, greta. in an interview for bbc scotland, i asked what was stopping herfrom coming. well, of course, i'm not 100% sure yet. but if it's considered safe and democratic, then i will of course go there. i take it you mean by that
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that it's accessible to the world's poorer nations. how important and why is that to you? because that's the essence of this meeting. it should be all about climate justice and of course we can't achieve climate justice if everyone is not contributing on the same terms. it won't be the first time greta has visited the uk. she addressed a large crowd in bristol last year before the pandemic, but it will be her first time in scotland. she famously clashed online with donald trump and doesn't seem too impressed with his successor. the biden administration doesn't seem to take the climate crisis the least bit serious, since they are actually expanding fossil fuel infrastructure, so it shows that they are not ready to take action. and she says the same applies to the uk government, which is considering whether to approve a new oil field off shetland. i think that maybe summarises the whole situation that we are in. the fact that these kinds
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of countries who are actually hosting the cop is actually planning to expand fossil fuel infrastructure, to open up new oil fields and so on. what do we want? climate justice... with such a large following, greta's absence from cop26 will be felt. but she says if all participants are vaccinated and allowed to travel, so will she. the lockdown—inspired surge in takeaway food has continued as restrictions have eased. nearly a quarter of people are spending more on takeaways and food deliveries now than before the pandemic, according to market research group mintel. while the growth in home deliveries is an opportunity for some, many restaurants are also wary of it. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith has more.
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three burgers, smoking joe, lots of milk... i grub's up at frank's burgers. sizzling, sliced, and stacked — it's ready in minutes. but like so much restaurant food, this order won't be eaten here. a mile or so down the road... ..sarah and her family are waiting for lunch to arrive. we usually get one once a week, don't we, sophie? it's like a fun night. i don't know whether they prefer a takeaway to mummy�*s cooking — i wouldn't like to say that's what it is, but... itjust feels as if you're doing something kind of fancy, you know? even if you are not. and you think you're eating a little bit more takeaway then you had been pre—pandemic? i don't want to put it on camera that i'm eating more takeaways than i normally would. i've even managed to rope my mum and dad into getting takeaways, and they've never been big fans. definitely in this area, we are quite rural, so it's not quite as easy to get things delivered — but i think it's ramped up a lot. takeaways boomed during lockdown as one of the few remaining treats. but 18 months on, habits have stuck
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— the average spend on takeaways has gone up by more than 40% over the last couple of years. in 2019, it was £452 per person each year. in 2021, that's jumped to £641 per person. i've got a burger and some fries. even small players are having to keep up with the changes. a third of the orders at this pan—asian chain are now for delivery, and they'rejuggling diners and riders coming down the same stairs. there's operational challenges. on a sunday night, you're getting a few orders, you would avoid setting people close to the entrance. so we will always prioritise dine—in customers. are you worried that delivery could grow too big, and almost take over the business here? yes. there's definitely an erosion of dine in, so people can get restaurant quality food at home. quite a large percent of it what we are generating are going to the delivery platform.
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but that's the challenge restaurants will have to face... i think we've just got into a bit of a habit when we couldn't go out, i guess, so it's kind of stuck since then, really. ithink, you know, friday nights, it was like, "what can we do? let's get a takeaway." ..as the trend for takeaways continues to take off. environmental groups have welcomed the announcement that leaded petrol is no longer used anywhere in the world. the united nations described the fuel�*s eradication in the last country where it was used, algeria, as a huge milestone for global health and the environment. the un estimates that its abolition will prevent more than a million premature deaths each year. now it's time for a look at the weather with ben hello. no rapid changes on the way in our weather, the sort of weather we have now is the sort who have for the rest of the week, meaning a lot
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of cloud with occasional spots of drizzle, but that cloud breaking occasionally for sunshine. drizzle, but that cloud breaking occasionally forsunshine. high occasionally for sunshine. high pressure to occasionally forsunshine. high pressure to the northwest of us, that flows in a clockwise direction and dragging a lot of cloud in our direction but there are breaks and that cloud. you could see from the picture where we have breaks across northern ireland and central scotland, these area seeing the spells of sunshine through the rest of the day. elsewhere the cloud breaking to give the odd spot of drizzle. cian, northeasterly breeze, so feeling cool where you are stuck under cloud. temperatures up to 21 degrees. tonight, we keep extensive cloud, it could be low enough to give mist over the hills of northern england, but the same time, some gaps in parts of central scotland, that could allow temperatures to drop away. most places, where it stays cloudy, will remain in double
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digits. into tomorrow, more of the same, more very cloudy weather for the most part but not completely cloudy conditions. one way of sunshine across parts of scotland, maybe the cloud breaking in northern ireland, more in the southern counties of england and the channel islands. in places, thick enough for drizzle. cool for north seacoast, the best of the sunshine lifting temperatures to 21 degrees. on thursday, high—pressure remaining with us, if anything, moving further eastwards, allowing for more breaks in the cloud. for many places, there will be a lot of cloud through thursday into friday, still the odd spot of drizzle, some sunny glimpses and temperatures at best up to 21. things to start to change into the weekend — high—pressure slipping away northeastwards allowing frontal systems to push on from the atlantic. things are looking like
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they are going to turn more unsettled, with rain working on from the west as we head through the weekend but no big changes before that.
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the taliban declare victory in afghanistan after the final american withdrawal last night. this was the last us soldier to leave, on the final flight out at midnight — ending america's longest war. the taliban have now taken control of kabul airport — and say they want good relations with the rest of the world. translation: we managed today to regain our independence, i and make us forces leave. we'll be live in kabul and washington. also this lunchtime... after hurricane ida, more than a million people without power in the us state of louisiana. geronimo the alpaca has been put down because of bovine tuberculosis, despite a campaign to save him. research on professional
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rugby players shows that after just one season, they suffer a loss of blood flow

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