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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 31, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm ben brown. the headlines at 5: the taliban declares victory after the last american soldier leaves afghanistan. the militants take control of the country once secured by nato forces, but insist they want good relations with the rest of the world. translation: we managed today to regain our independence - and make us forces leave. the tough choices facing gps over who gets a blood test and who doesn't — amid a shortage of test tubes. geronimo the alpaca has been put down by government vets over fears of bovine tuberculosis — his owner calls the action "barbaric". and it's the same old story — dame sarah wins yet another gold at the tokyo paralympics.
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good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the taliban have taken control of kabul airport, after the united states pulled the last of its troops out of afghanistan. the final evacuation flight left at a minute to midnight last night. it brings to an end to the longest war in american history, in which more than 2,000 us servicemen and women lost their lives. the taliban are back in power, as they were 20 years ago. they've declared victory and have been celebrating on the streets. rajini vaidya nathan reports. heading into a new and uncertain era. taliban militia now in control
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of kabul airport — and afghanistan. just weeks ago, this tarmac was packed with afghans desperate to flee. today, taliban fighters lined the runway, their spokesman congratulating them on what he described as a moment of joy and celebration. translation: the islamic emirate | of afghanistan wants to have good | relations with the whole world on behalf of the nation. we want to have strong diplomatic relations with all — including the united states. last night, the last us soldier to leave — major general chris donahue — boarded a cargo plane out of afghanistan. the end of america's longest war. but many who wanted to leave too have been left behind. crowds at the airport prevented several families eligible for resettlement in the uk to board their planes. this week, i've been talking to one man who couldn't get his flight. he says he's now being hunted by the taliban. we've changed his voice.
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i'm currently in hell right now. the last two weeks i've moved to 15 safe houses with my family because the taliban are trying to find me. if i can't get out in the next few days, i'm fearful i'll die. today he once again begged the uk government to honour their promise to get him out. i think right now, for me as foreign secretary, i'm focused on the immediate priorities. continuing safe passage for those... the minority — the small minority, but nonetheless a significant number — who haven't yet been able to get out. we're working with the third countries in the region. we've held the taliban through this un security council resolution to their undertaking to allow safe passage. today in kandahar — where american troops were once stationed — supporters of the taliban celebrated. the militants have promised to govern in an inclusive way, but many we've talked to say promises from the spokesman don't reflect reality. we've heard reports of attacks on those who've worked
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for the former government, and examples of where women and girls have been denied their rights. there is a lot of fear, there is a lot of anxiety among people in afghanistan, that their safety is. . . not sure. so that is why they are fleeing from this country, thinking that remaining in this country will be a big challenge for them. afghans are living in a new, uncertain era. today in kabul, men queued up outside banks. poverty, a drought, and the threat of islamic state — all challenges for the taliban as they move from an insurgency to government. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news. let's speak to our correspondent gary 0'donoghue, who's at the white house. so the end of america's longest war, 20 years, i suppose many americans might be asking themselves what exactly has been achieved with mac we will be hearing from joe biden later.
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we will be hearing from joe biden later. , . . ., , we will be hearing from joe biden later. , ., , ., ., , later. yes, in a couple of hours we are heping — later. yes, in a couple of hours we are hoping although _ later. yes, in a couple of hours we are hoping although his— later. yes, in a couple of hours we l are hoping although his appearances keep slipping nowadays quite significantly, so we will see what actually happens. i think he will try to focus on the wider picture, the fact that america is now finally out of afghanistan, no tricks, no diplomats even, not those 600 plus marines who were meant to be left behind in the original plan, if you remember, they are not there at all. but he will be focusing on the fact that that is what most americans want. they persistently wanted that, more than 60% in the polling wanted that, and while they are not happy about the way the exit has been handled, and joe biden has taken a hit, you can see that in some of his approval ratings over the past couple weeks on that, he will think that this will be, if you like, a price worth paying in the sense of the longer term interests of america. of course, 13 service
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personnel lost their lives, 170 afghans lost their lives at the airport, and he will i'm sure pay tribute to those, to their sacrifice. but this is the right strategic decision, he believes, for america. �* ., , america. and deported to remember this was a peace _ america. and deported to remember this was a peace deal _ america. and deported to remember this was a peace deal with _ america. and deported to remember this was a peace deal with the - this was a peace deal with the taliban that was struck under president trump. —— important to remember. critics of the us say it has proven to be an unreliable ally and also a weak adversary. yes. has proven to be an unreliable ally and also a weak adversary.- and also a weak adversary. yes, i think that — and also a weak adversary. yes, i think that headstart _ and also a weak adversary. yes, i think that headstart signalling i and also a weak adversary. yes, i i think that headstart signalling your departure date is always a problem, has always been a problem in terms of people who want to do you harm. they were committed to this negotiation path, it wasn't really producing the kind of results that it would come and i think the sheer scale of the collapse of the afghan government, the sheer speed of it, took everyone here completely by
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surprise. they were hoping, i think, they would be able to leave and they would be able to say in the longer run, we did our bit, we trained this force, what happened, happened. but the departure appeared to precipitate all that and of course, america is the only country capable of deploying 6000, 7000 troops that quickly in that kind of way it did to the airport and a lot of the allies will feel that they were in fact bounced into the timetable because they simply couldn't do the same. a lot of americans have said, well, european armies are not what they used to be, it is not our fault if they can't do their own thing. but that has created a certain amount of tension across the pond. gary, thank you very much. downing street has said the government is "beefing up the number of staff" in countries neighbouring afghanistan, to help people who are able to leave and eligible to come to the uk.
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the government has promised to take up the government has promised to take up to 20,000 refugees with as many as 5000 in the first year. the communities secretary, robertjenrick, has said it is a "challenge" for councils in england to find suitable housing for afghan families being resettled in the uk. but speaking this afternoon, he insisted ministers are working hard with local authorities. i'm really pleased that almost a third of the councils in england, scotland and wales have already agreed to take interpreters and those afghans who stood shoulder to shoulder with us during 20 years of conflict, and i'm confident many more so will do so in the days and weeks to come. there is a challenge because these are larger families and councils and housing associations will need to find family sized homes. we are working closely with them, ensuring it is a fully funded package for them, and we have announced an additional £5 million scheme to help them find those larger properties as quickly as possible. eu ministers have been holding talks on the impact
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of the situation in afghanistan. a news conference is expected shortly. let's speak to our correspondent in brussels, nick beake. it's fair to say there is in complete unanimity within the european union on this issue of afghan refugees coming into europe? good evening. yes, there is no doubt that the politicians of brussels and beyond across mainland europe have been scarred by the experience of the syrian refugee crisis which began some six or seven years ago. so although brussels and the key players here are keen to present themselves as being compassionate, looking to help afghans in their hour of need, i think the message we are getting today is that europe is willing to open its wallet rather than open its borders. that's because we saw in the case of syria more than a million refugees trying to seek refuge on the continent and
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we know the political fallout for that. angela merkel famously said, we can do this, and she encouraged other countries to take people in, and we saw a resurgence in right—wing parties, anti—immigration parties, and i think that sort of memory is in people's mines, and so there is a press conference probably in the next ten or 15 minutes and we will get a better idea on what the interior minister and thejustice interior minister and the justice ministers interior minister and thejustice ministers from the 27 eu countries have been talking about today and possibly what they may have agreed on. , ., possibly what they may have agreed on. , . ., .,, possibly what they may have agreed on. , . ., ., possibly what they may have agreed on. they have had those talks, what sort of areas — on. they have had those talks, what sort of areas are _ on. they have had those talks, what sort of areas are they _ on. they have had those talks, what sort of areas are they looking - on. they have had those talks, what sort of areas are they looking at? i sort of areas are they looking at? it seems this time round, if there is a contrast from the syrian experience, for afghanistan specifically, it seems that brussels will now be working on these plans to give financial support to afghanistan's neighbours. so that is a real change, so rather than
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welcoming people to the european countries, they will be —— there will be financial support for countries around afghanistan so that they can take people in and in effect prevent them from moving on in that very long trip towards europe and in a way this will be based on the deal that was reached with turkey back in 2016, a financial incentive for ankara to absorb some of the people leaving syria in that case and preventing them moving on. so we might get a bit more detail about some of the figures involved, the funding, and of course the countries that may well receive cash from the eu. 0f well receive cash from the eu. of course, iran is one key neighbour currently under international sanctions, could it be that iran receives money as part of this incentive was what we will look out for that one. thank you very much, nick beake in brussels. are correspondent has more for us on the situation on the ground in kabul now that the caliban are fully back in control.
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everyday life in afghanistan has been continuing away from the chaotic scenes at the airport. you walk around the streets here, shops and restaurants are open, you see people walking around but there are still far fewer people out and about, businesses complaining they are getting far fewer customers than usual. many people are struggling financially now as well, unable to get enough money out of the bank. of course, many afghans are still thinking about leaving despite the fact the eviction —— evacuation flights are now over. i was at a bus stand in kabul yesterday evening, employees there telling me the number of people heading to the borders of iran and pakistan hoping to be smuggled across has doubled or even quadrupled in recent weeks. my colleague lyse doucet has been out and about around kabul and sent us these reports. drive nye from the civilian side of the airport —— driving now in this
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vehicle that we found to the military side of the airfield. there was an elite taliban unit which was wearing american uniforms. look at the airfield here. so much destroyed vehicles, razor wire. luggage left by people. this is one of the main streets in the centre of kabul. the first day for afghanistan, where there are now foreign troops in this country. they have ended their 20 year engagement. this scene is no different than it has been for many days. look at the queue of people, look at how they are pushing in. this is a queue for the bank. 0nly are pushing in. this is a queue for the bank. only the main branches of the bank. only the main branches of the main banks are open, and afghans
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have been told they can only take out the equivalent of $200 a week. many tell us here they have been standing in this queue for days. look at the street. 0n standing in this queue for days. look at the street. on one side, it is the banks. at other offices where they can get money for abroad. but let us look at the other side of the street. this is where there is the turkish embassy, the iranian embassy, the queues are also forming on that side for those who want to leave. forthe on that side for those who want to leave. for the vast majority of afghans in a country of nearly a0 million people, life feels no different from the day before or the week before. it is still a struggle to survive, or still a race to try to survive, or still a race to try to escape as fast as they can. it’s to escape as fast as they can. it's been a to escape as fast as they can. it�*s been a tumultuous period for afghans, particularly for many afghans, particularly for many afghan women, given the history of the taliban, the manner in which
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they ruled in the 1990s, and i'm pleased to say i'm joint live here in kabul by the president of the afghan women's network. if i could start by asking you, the taliban clearly see today is a great victory, what are your emotions today? victory, what are your emotions toda ? ~ , victory, what are your emotions toda 7~ , ., ., , ., victory, what are your emotions toda? , ., ., , ., today? well, my emotions today was kind of actually _ today? well, my emotions today was kind of actually last _ today? well, my emotions today was kind of actually last night, _ today? well, my emotions today was kind of actually last night, at - kind of actually last night, at about— kind of actually last night, at about one minute to 12 when all of the us— about one minute to 12 when all of the us forces left afghanistan, it was: _ the us forces left afghanistan, it was, to— the us forces left afghanistan, it was, to tell you the truth, a feeling _ was, to tell you the truth, a feeling of— was, to tell you the truth, a feeling of relief, really. that is counterintuitive, _ feeling of relief, really. that is counterintuitive, why - feeling of relief, really. that is counterintuitive, why do - feeling of relief, really. that is counterintuitive, why do you i feeling of relief, really. that is. counterintuitive, why do you say that? �* .. , counterintuitive, why do you say that? �* , ., counterintuitive, why do you say that? ~ , ., y counterintuitive, why do you say that? , ., i, , that? because of the very simple fact that there _ that? because of the very simple fact that there was _ that? because of the very simple fact that there was a _ that? because of the very simple fact that there was a lot - that? because of the very simple fact that there was a lot of - fact that there was a lot of confusion, a lot of miscommunication, a lot of terrible things— miscommunication, a lot of terrible things that — miscommunication, a lot of terrible things that actually happened, in the past — things that actually happened, in the past especially two weeks in afghanistan and before that, in the past two _ afghanistan and before that, in the past two months or whatever. and the years _ past two months or whatever. and the years before. so i wasjust it was
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good _ years before. so i wasjust it was good that— years before. so i wasjust it was good that that era is finished so we are going _ good that that era is finished so we are going to into another era in afghanistan. are going to into another era in afghanistan-— are going to into another era in afuhanistan. . ~ ., , afghanistan. talking about this new era, so afghanistan. talking about this new era. so much _ afghanistan. talking about this new era, so much of— afghanistan. talking about this new era, so much of the _ afghanistan. talking about this new era, so much of the discussion - afghanistan. talking about this newl era, so much of the discussion about particularly women's rights has been about the fragile progress made over the past two decades. i know you've been deeply involved in that. when you see what the taliban have been doing since taking power over the last ten days and in the kind of preceding months, does it give you cause for concern or cause for cautious optimism?— cause for concern or cause for cautious optimism? well, you know, actually both — cautious optimism? well, you know, actually both and _ cautious optimism? well, you know, actually both and none. _ cautious optimism? well, you know, actually both and none. because - cautious optimism? well, you know, actually both and none. because to l actually both and none. because to be either— actually both and none. because to be either or— actually both and none. because to be either or at this point is not going — be either or at this point is not going to — be either or at this point is not going to serve the purpose. we have to actually— going to serve the purpose. we have to actually sit back and little bit and watch and see that —— see what they are _ and watch and see that —— see what they are going to be doing this because — they are going to be doing this because afghanistan is still a country— because afghanistan is still a country that has no government, the banks_ country that has no government, the banks are _ country that has no government, the banks are not open, the system of the country— banks are not open, the system of the country is completely collapsed. so first, _ the country is completely collapsed. so first, we — the country is completely collapsed. so first, we have to get that in order— so first, we have to get that in order to — so first, we have to get that in order to avoid any kind of anarchy
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that might — order to avoid any kind of anarchy that might happen here. so it should hem _ that might happen here. so it should hem it— that might happen here. so it should hem it is— that might happen here. so it should hem it is my— that might happen here. so it should be... it is my main concern and it should _ be... it is my main concern and it should he — be... it is my main concern and it should he the _ be... it is my main concern and it should be the main concern of the taliban, _ should be the main concern of the taliban, to — should be the main concern of the taliban, to put some kind of order in here _ taliban, to put some kind of order in here. then from there, we can take— in here. then from there, we can take it— in here. then from there, we can take itand— in here. then from there, we can take it and see what else is first and second and third and take care of that— and second and third and take care of that as — and second and third and take care of that as we go on. fine and second and third and take care of that as we go on.— of that as we go on. one of the thins i of that as we go on. one of the things i have — of that as we go on. one of the things i have noticed _ of that as we go on. one of the things i have noticed from - of that as we go on. one of the things i have noticed from the l of that as we go on. one of the - things i have noticed from the brief periods of time i have spent with the taliban is there seem to be big discrepancies. i have been in the north of the country where they seem to be in favour of women's education but i get reports from colleagues in the south where they stop girls going to school beyond the age of 12. do you get a sense from the taliban about which direction we are headed in, a more progressive one or more that is equally reactionary? that's why i'm saying it is important that we really have to wait and — important that we really have to wait and see what they are doing because — wait and see what they are doing because the taliban are extremely fragmented as a group now. some of them _ fragmented as a group now. some of them want _ fragmented as a group now. some of them want one thing, some of them want something else. as far as the
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leadership— want something else. as far as the leadership of the taliban is concerned, i don't think there is a complete — concerned, i don't think there is a complete control. i don't think they complete control. idon't think they really— complete control. idon't think they really know— complete control. i don't think they really know who is doing what and where _ really know who is doing what and where and — really know who is doing what and where and how. so because of that, it has— where and how. so because of that, it has to _ where and how. so because of that, it has to he — where and how. so because of that, it has to be other things that have to he _ it has to be other things that have to he put— it has to be other things that have to he put in— it has to be other things that have to be put in place an order for all of the _ to be put in place an order for all of the taliban to talk from the same ideology, _ of the taliban to talk from the same ideology, and we should put that into practice. because afghanistan is not _ into practice. because afghanistan is not going to accept it, nor will it he _ is not going to accept it, nor will it be good — is not going to accept it, nor will it be good for afghanistan to have this kind — it be good for afghanistan to have this kind of wishy—washy thing being implemented in one place, not being implemented in one place, not being implemented another piece, someplace the girls— implemented another piece, someplace the girls can go to school and another— the girls can go to school and another they cannot because they have to _ another they cannot because they have to realise one thing, that the women _ have to realise one thing, that the women of— have to realise one thing, that the women of afghanistan, they are half of the _ women of afghanistan, they are half of the make—up of this country, they are half— of the make—up of this country, they are half of— of the make—up of this country, they are half of the population of this country — are half of the population of this country. 18 million people. you cannot— country. 18 million people. you cannot take 18 million people for granted — cannot take 18 million people for granted because they have to go and -et granted because they have to go and get educated. right now we have a
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lot of— get educated. right now we have a lot of women that are educated, they are very— lot of women that are educated, they are very skilled, they know a whole lot, and _ are very skilled, they know a whole lot, and they can be a fantastic power— lot, and they can be a fantastic power next to afghan men and actually — power next to afghan men and actually working not for the taliban but for _ actually working not for the taliban but for afghanistan. that's the whole — but for afghanistan. that's the whole idea. but for afghanistan. that's the whole idea-— but for afghanistan. that's the whole idea. ,, .,~ ., , whole idea. when you speak to these women, whole idea. when you speak to these women. are — whole idea. when you speak to these women. are they _ whole idea. when you speak to these women, are they afraid _ whole idea. when you speak to these women, are they afraid right - whole idea. when you speak to these women, are they afraid right now? i women, are they afraid right now? what is the sentiment you are up? the sentiment i am picking up is absolutely not knowing what is happening. because as you know, things— happening. because as you know, things are — happening. because as you know, things are so kind of, you know... they— things are so kind of, you know... they are _ things are so kind of, you know... they are not — things are so kind of, you know... they are not very clear in any way and that _ they are not very clear in any way and that lack of clarity in the country _ and that lack of clarity in the country for the women, all of them, it has— country for the women, all of them, it has affected us in a very bad way _ it has affected us in a very bad way so— it has affected us in a very bad way so we _ it has affected us in a very bad way. so we really would like for this to — way. so we really would like for this to end _ way. so we really would like for this to end and we really would like for this— this to end and we really would like for this to _ this to end and we really would like for this to be explained so we will know— for this to be explained so we will know exactly where we are. one final brief answer. — know exactly where we are. one final brief answer, do _ know exactly where we are. one final brief answer, do you _ know exactly where we are. one final brief answer, do you feel _ know exactly where we are. one final brief answer, do you feel safe - know exactly where we are. one final brief answer, do you feel safe here . brief answer, do you feel safe here as a woman's rights activist? i as a woman's rights activist? i don't really need know what is the
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meaning _ don't really need know what is the meaning of that. feeling safe is not something — meaning of that. feeling safe is not something that i have done in afghanistan for the past 20 years. so i afghanistan for the past 20 years. so i cannot— afghanistan for the past 20 years. so i cannot tell you. right now i am neither— so i cannot tell you. right now i am neither safe — so i cannot tell you. right now i am neither safe nor unsafe.— neither safe nor unsafe. thank you so much. neither safe nor unsafe. thank you so much- as _ neither safe nor unsafe. thank you so much. as you _ neither safe nor unsafe. thank you so much. as you heard, _ neither safe nor unsafe. thank you so much. as you heard, the - so much. as you heard, the predominant feeling amongst so many people here is still one of uncertainty. we are hoping we will get some more announcements and more clarity from the taliban in the coming days. some forces telling me we are likely to see an instance of cabinet ministers, some sources saying the taliban have not yet ruled out re—establishing their islamic emirate that they had in the 19905. but islamic emirate that they had in the 1990s. but we will have to wait and see. back to you in london. afghanistan correspond with the latest from kabul. we mention to eu ministers have been meeting in brussels to talk about afghan asylum seekers and refugees and how to deal with the possible
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influx into europe. in fact they have come up with a proposal to put funding into neighbouring countries close to afghanistan to support their dealing with the afghan asylum seekers rather than have them come into europe. let's have a listen to the news conference now. translation:— the news conference now. translation: , . . the news conference now. translation: , , ., . . ., translation: very dynamic. we also have to take — translation: very dynamic. we also have to take a — translation: very dynamic. we also have to take a break— translation: very dynamic. we also have to take a break at _ translation: very dynamic. we also have to take a break at some - translation: very dynamic. we also have to take a break at some point - have to take a break at some point of the discussion, but at the very end, we were able to adopt the joint statement, which is very important indeed. of course, the statement is not all. one of the results is the fact that we are now all committed to turn words into actions in the next weeks and months. thank you.
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translation:— next weeks and months. thank you. translation: thank you very much. let me first — translation: thank you very much. let me first say _ translation: thank you very much. let me first say congratulation. - let me first say congratulation. it let me first say congratulation. it also — let me first say congratulation. it also shows that member states can agree _ it also shows that member states can agree also— it also shows that member states can agree also on migration issues, we are showing — agree also on migration issues, we are showing that we are doing that with the _ are showing that we are doing that with the portuguese presidency and also we _ with the portuguese presidency and also we have managed to find a joint statement _ also we have managed to find a joint statement and i think that is a strength— statement and i think that is a strength from this council and from member— strength from this council and from member states. i arrived this morning _ member states. i arrived this morning directly from the us, where i morning directly from the us, where i have _ morning directly from the us, where i have been— morning directly from the us, where i have been meeting with several colleagues in the un, for example the director—general, antonio guterres. _ the director—general, antonio guterres, and also with under general— guterres, and also with under general secretary vladimir warren, who is— general secretary vladimir warren, who is responsible for the counterterrorism. and what we see now m _ counterterrorism. and what we see now m afghanistan, of course nobody can make _ now m afghanistan, of course nobody can make a _ now m afghanistan, of course nobody can make a forecast what is going to happen, _ can make a forecast what is going to
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happen, because things change almost hour to _ happen, because things change almost hour to hour, not even day by day, but it's _ hour to hour, not even day by day, but it's important to see what we can do— but it's important to see what we can do now— but it's important to see what we can do now to avoid a humanitarian crisis _ can do now to avoid a humanitarian crisis this — can do now to avoid a humanitarian crisis this is — can do now to avoid a humanitarian crisis. this is the best way to avoid a — crisis. this is the best way to avoid a migration crisis, to avoid a humanitarian crisis. that's why we need _ humanitarian crisis. that's why we need to— humanitarian crisis. that's why we need to support afghans in afghanistan. the un remains on the ground _ afghanistan. the un remains on the ground. they have people there, we can help _ ground. they have people there, we can help and support them. people that have _ can help and support them. people that have been internally displaced have already started to move back to their homes. the un have also been supporting _ their homes. the un have also been supporting safe houses for women. there _ supporting safe houses for women. there are _ supporting safe houses for women. there are a — supporting safe houses for women. there are a lot of things that we also can— there are a lot of things that we also can support in afghanistan and we should _ also can support in afghanistan and we should do that. that's also part of the _ we should do that. that's also part of the statement and of course, to support— of the statement and of course, to support also neighbouring countries. we have _ support also neighbouring countries. we have so— support also neighbouring countries. we have so far not seen any big movements of afghans out of
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afghanistan to neighbouring countries but of course, that could change _ countries but of course, that could change. but so far there has been very little — change. but so far there has been very little movement. but we need to prepare _ very little movement. but we need to prepare for— very little movement. but we need to prepare for different scenarios. we also need — prepare for different scenarios. we also need to give protection to those — also need to give protection to those in — also need to give protection to those in need, in immediate need of international protection. many member— international protection. many member states have already come together— member states have already come together with the accreditation of their own — together with the accreditation of their own citizens, have also been working _ their own citizens, have also been working for— their own citizens, have also been working for the eu and member states, — working for the eu and member states, have also evacuated female prosecutors, women's rights activists. _ prosecutors, women's rights activists, fundamental rights activists, fundamental rights activists, journalists, authors, others — activists, journalists, authors, others that are under immediate threat _ others that are under immediate threat in — others that are under immediate threat in afghanistan. but we need to continue that. and the way to do it is through — to continue that. and the way to do it is through resettlement. so let me put— it is through resettlement. so let me put it — it is through resettlement. so let me put it like this. we need to prevent— me put it like this. we need to prevent people from going on smuggling routes towards the european union, by working with people _
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european union, by working with people in— european union, by working with people in afghanistan, in the neighbouring countries but also be clear that — neighbouring countries but also be clear that we need to prevent people from going _ clear that we need to prevent people from going down that route. it is mainly— from going down that route. it is mainly men who go on the irregular roots— mainly men who go on the irregular roots with _ mainly men who go on the irregular roots with smugglers to europe, that is our— roots with smugglers to europe, that is our experience. instead, we need to forgive _ is our experience. instead, we need to forgive -- — is our experience. instead, we need to forgive —— might need to give protection — to forgive —— might need to give protection to the most vulnerable, women _ protection to the most vulnerable, women and girls. and other activists. _ women and girls. and other activists, for example as ijust mentioned. i will convene a high level— mentioned. i will convene a high level resettlement forum already next month to continue this discussion with member states, but also in _ discussion with member states, but also in a _ discussion with member states, but also in a global context together with other countries that are also ready— with other countries that are also ready to — with other countries that are also ready to step up on resettlement. 0f ready to step up on resettlement. of course _ ready to step up on resettlement. of course the _ ready to step up on resettlement. of course, the solution for people in afghanistan is not resettlement, but there are _ afghanistan is not resettlement, but there are individuals that need to have _ there are individuals that need to have the — there are individuals that need to have the help to get to safety in a european — have the help to get to safety in a european union and another countries, and this is important. just a _ countries, and this is important. just a few— countries, and this is important. just a few words also on security. 0ne just a few words also on security. one of—
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just a few words also on security. one of the — just a few words also on security. one of the most important aspects is to avoid _ one of the most important aspects is to avoid that afghanistan turns into a safe _ to avoid that afghanistan turns into a safe haven for terrorist groups. we now — a safe haven for terrorist groups. we now they have a close relation between _ we now they have a close relation between the taliban and al-qaeda and we have _ between the taliban and al-qaeda and we have seen the recent attacks from the daesh _ we have seen the recent attacks from the daesh branch in afghanistan. so of course _ the daesh branch in afghanistan. so of course this is a huge threat, and this was— of course this is a huge threat, and this was also — of course this is a huge threat, and this was also an opportunity to discuss — this was also an opportunity to discuss directly with the under general— discuss directly with the under general secretary how we can cooperate, and he told me that the un is— cooperate, and he told me that the un is also— cooperate, and he told me that the un is also ready to step up on counterterrorism programmes, if the new government in afghanistan will make _ new government in afghanistan will make a _ new government in afghanistan will make a strong commitment to actually avoid the _ make a strong commitment to actually avoid the safe haven for terrorists and work — avoid the safe haven for terrorists and work together with the international community to fight terrorists. i also had the opportunity to meet with the
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secretary of homeland security and it's clear _ secretary of homeland security and it's clear that when it comes to both— it's clear that when it comes to both security and migration and resettlement issues for afghanistan, we have _ resettlement issues for afghanistan, we have a _ resettlement issues for afghanistan, we have a lot in common and it's very— we have a lot in common and it's very important for close cooperation also with _ very important for close cooperation also with the us. in the meeting today, _ also with the us. in the meeting today, many ministers also recalled the importance of taking further steps _ the importance of taking further steps in — the importance of taking further steps in adoption of the new pact on migration— steps in adoption of the new pact on migration and asylum. we are much better— migration and asylum. we are much better prepared than we were in 2015. _ better prepared than we were in 2015, we — better prepared than we were in 2015, we are acting much earlier, we should _ 2015, we are acting much earlier, we should not— 2015, we are acting much earlier, we should not wait until we have people standing _ should not wait until we have people standing at our external borders. but its— standing at our external borders. but it's also important that we have our legislation in place, that's why we need _ our legislation in place, that's why we need to— our legislation in place, that's why we need to progress, and many ministers — we need to progress, and many ministers mentioned, as has also been _ ministers mentioned, as has also been mentioned by the presidency, and i_ been mentioned by the presidency, and i will— been mentioned by the presidency, and i will also add we are screening dish-mac— and i will also add we are screening dish—mac we have a screening proposal— dish—mac we have a screening proposal because this is also important for security reasons. . we
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are now available _ important for security reasons. . we are now available for _ important for security reasons. . we are now available for your _ important for security reasons. . - are now available for your questions so please raise your hand physically or digitally. let me also for one year we are slightly pressed for time but we will make every effort to take as many questions as we can but we may not take all of them. studio: they are talking there are about what the european union is going to be doing to help asylum seekers and refugees coming out of afghanistan in the current crisis. that is the very latest from brussels. let me bring you the latest figures on coronavirus in the uk. in terms of the number of cases in the number of deaths. the government —— bored with the latest data. 50 deaths recorded
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today. —— the government dashboard. the number of people who tested positive, 32,181. 50 deaths come as you can see. the number of first dose vaccinations, 19,6a3. second dose, 66,000. so that takes the percentages on who has been vaccinated, 88.a% have had a first dose, 78.7% who have had both doses of the vaccination. more on those figures coming up. dinerfor diner for a dinerfor a look at diner for a look at the weather. good afternoon. we are probably getting fed up of this dreary weather, a lot of cloud around and some drizzle. there are changes on the horizon by the time we get to the horizon by the time we get to the weekend but for the rest of this week we are holding on to the area of high pressure. the best of any
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sunshine will be in western areas. this area of high pressure has parked itself across the north west, bringing these north and north—easterly winds, a lot of moisture, low cloud moving and off the north sea. pushing on across most of the country overnight. 0ther cloudy skies, some chilly spots where skies are clear. wednesday, we do it allagain, where skies are clear. wednesday, we do it all again, another rather a grey day with spots of drizzle across the east, more of a breeze. some holes in the cloud across the south—east, perhaps the west of wales and england, northern ireland and scotland, could be quite a nice afternoon with temperatures into the low 20s. 0therwise, mid to high teens. a similar story on thursday and friday, a lot of cloud, the best of any sunshine will be across the south and west. hello, this is bbc news with ben brown. the headlines... the taliban declares victory after the last american soldier leaves afghanistan.
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the militants take control of the country once secured by nato forces, but insist they want good relations with the rest of the world. translation: we managed today to regain our independence _ and make us forces leave. the tough choices facing gps over who gets a blood test and who doesn't amid a shortage of test tubes. geronimo the alpaca has been put down by government vets over fears of bovine tuberculosis. his owner calls the action �*barbaric�*. sport and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's gavin. those medals keep coming. absolutely, it's been a superb day. dame sarah storey has won her 16th paralympic gold medal, making her britain's joint most successful paralympian of all time. she hit the milestone after winning the c5 time trial in tokyo overnight.
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patrick gearey has the details. the time trial is dame sarah storey�*s favourite event, and why wouldn't it be? just her against the clock, perfect for a woman who is constantly to find time. she is a3, but but continues to be judged by seconds and minutes. fellow britt crystal lane wright was closer to her, but storey says her motivation was herself. she makes history seem predictable. bud was herself. she makes history seem redictable. �* , was herself. she makes history seem redictable. . , . , predictable. and she crosses the line! she's _ predictable. and she crosses the line! she's already _ predictable. and she crosses the line! she's already britain's - predictable. and she crosses the | line! she's already britain's most successful paralympian _ line! she's already britain's most successful paralympian overall. | line! she's already britain's most| successful paralympian overall. a chance for other british riders to follow her marks. ben watson rode bikes as a hobby. his talent was spotted. now we saw the end result. gold in the secret three on a glorious day for british para—
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cycling. when the road race and she'll have won more goals than any british paralympian. it feels as inevitable as the ticking of the clock. patrick gearey, bbc news. in the pool, britain's reece dunn has won his third gold medal of the games, complete with a new world record. dunn's haulfrom the games now stands at three golds and a silver after he left the other trailing in the final of the 200 metre individual medley brazil's gabriel bandeira took silver, with bronze going to the ukrainian vasyl krainyk. england captainjoe root says his side need to build on their peformance from the third test with india at headingley. england won the test to draw the series level heading into the fourth test at the oval on thursday, but they will be without their wicketkeeperjos buttler, who will miss the game to be at the birth of his second child. i think we got to use it as a bit of a template moving forward. everything we speak about as a team, how we want to paly test cricket, we pretty much delivered. good
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partnerships, 100 partnerships in there, and we were clinical in the wicket. we built pressure for a long time and controlled the game and felt very much in command of things from the end of the first hour of the test match. just over five hours left of this summer's football transfer window, so not long left for those last—minute deals. manchester united have confirmed the signing of cristiano ronaldo, a decade after he left the club tojoin real madrid. the portuguese striker will be heading back to united from juventus, in a deal worth nearly 13 million pounds, with potential additional payments. he's signed a two—year contract with the option to extend for a further year and says he is doing it for sir alex ferguson. so, ronaldo on the way in, for this return to old trafford. danieljames is leaving. the winger has joined leeds united on a five—year deal. the wales international joined manchester united in the summer of 2019, and was the club's player of the month in his first
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month with the team. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories and the lastest on transfer deadline day on the bbc sport website and app. and there'll be a comprehensive round—up in sportsday at half past 6. no sign of liverpool buying anybody in the last few hours? i no sign of liverpool buying anybody in the last few hours?— in the last few hours? i don't think the need in the last few hours? i don't think they need anyone, _ in the last few hours? i don't think they need anyone, they're - in the last few hours? i don't think they need anyone, they're doing i in the last few hours? i don't think| they need anyone, they're doing all right. it's going to be interesting to see, but renaldo is confirmed. all eyes will be at old trafford. you never know. a few hours left. gavin, thank you very much. the bbc�*s moscow correspondent has left russia today, expelled by the authorities after being labelled a threat to national security. sarah rainsford, who first reported from moscow for the bbc over 20 years ago, just as vladimir putin came to power, has been told she can
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never return to the country. moscow claims the move is in response to the expulsion of a russian journalist from the uk two years ago, but the move comes amid a severe crackdown on independentjournalists and opposition activists within russia. here's sarah's report on her last days in russia. this was the moment i discovered i was being expelled from russia. according to a specific law, i've been designated a "threat to national security" and, as such, i'm not allowed into the country. pulled aside at passport control, i was told the fsb security service had banned me for life. i recorded the conversation. i was returning from belarus,
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where i'd confronted alexander lukashenko on the mass repression and torture of peaceful protesters. his loyal supporters rounded on me... ..in a coordinated attack. vladimir putin's presenting this as just another working visit. .. i've reported from russia for two decades — the whole span of vladimir putin's presidency. there've been highs — like the world cup — but i've also charted the slow erosion of freedoms here. the crackdown on dissent. a year ago, the government put me on short—term visas. sarah rainsford... then i became the news, as state television announced i had to leave. after tense negotiations, i had been allowed to enter russia... they let me in — for now. ..but only to pack. i was then told my visa wouldn't be renewed — supposedly what happened to a russian reporter in london, but that was two years ago. when i was called in here,
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to the foreign ministry, they kept insisting that my expulsion was nothing personal — they talked about it as a reciprocal move — but they refused to even engage with the fact that i've been labelled "a national security threat". they said that was just a "technical moment". but, at a time when russia is increasingly seeing enemies all all around, it really feels like i've now enemies all around, it really feels like i've now been added to the list. it's happening as the pressure on russian journalists who don't toe the kremlin line is intensifying. dozhd tv has just been added to a growing blacklist of media labelled "foreign agents" — for getting funds from abroad. this terror of "foreign agents" means that we — dozhd — we are enemies of the state. the pretending of being democracy is over. it is very bad, and it could become much worse — any time. so, i'm leaving a country i first came to as the
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soviet union fell apart. when free speech — orfreedoms — were new and precious. it feels like today's russia is moving in reverse. sarah rainsford, bbc news, moscow. luke harding is a former moscow correspondent and author of mafia state, which tells his story of being expelled from russia in 2011. hejoins me now. good to have you with us. does this bring back memories for you? yeah, i have to say. — bring back memories for you? yeah, i have to say, watching _ bring back memories for you? yeah, i have to say, watching sarah's - bring back memories for you? yeah, i have to say, watching sarah's last - have to say, watching sarah's last report, it is, i was told it was very different, but for you, russia is closed. i was put in a deportation cell and sent back to london on the same flight, so there was a scandal then. of course, the
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world moved on, but i think what we've seen in recent months, is a real roll—out of the media. her case is very sad. it's the russian journalists who have been branded forward agents, whose websites have been shut down —— foreign agents. you get the sent that dissent in russia has come a crime, and there seems a determined effort to extinguish alljournalism in the country. is extinguish all “ournalism in the count . , ., , , country. is there any independent media left in _ country. is there any independent media left in russia? _ country. is there any independent media left in russia? yes, - country. is there any independent media left in russia? yes, there. country. is there any independent i media left in russia? yes, there are some very. — media left in russia? yes, there are some very. very _ media left in russia? yes, there are some very, very fine _ media left in russia? yes, there are some very, very fine and _ media left in russia? yes, there are some very, very fine and brave - some very, very fine and brave correspondence who are still working in russia, but they're increasingly vulnerable. you fear the direction of travel that ultimately russia, a bit like china, could be one of those countries that becomes almost impossible to report in. foreign
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correspondents trying to do their job from elsewhere, and where russian journalists have to make really tough choices about whether they carry on and publish or go into exile, which is what we've seen in recent months. journalists going to the baltic states or elsewhere. you know the press secretary of alexei navalny, who was poison last summer and is injail, fled yesterday. she left the country and we're in a similar situation. without the ideology, more and more similar to the soviet union. fir ideology, more and more similar to the soviet union.— the soviet union. or international “ournalists the soviet union. or international journalists like _ the soviet union. or international journalists like sarah _ the soviet union. or international journalists like sarah rainsford, l journalists like sarah rainsford, the who think it's getting harder to be there and ask tough questions to the authorities? i be there and ask tough questions to the authorities?— the authorities? i think that's riuht. the authorities? i think that's right- it's _ the authorities? i think that's right. it's hard _ the authorities? i think that's right. it's hard to _ the authorities? i think that's right. it's hard to know - the authorities? i think that's right. it's hard to know whatl the authorities? i think that's| right. it's hard to know what it the authorities? i think that's - right. it's hard to know what it was that prompted her expulsion. clearly, her reporting from belarus made the regime in moscow unhappy.
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in my case, i think it was my investigation into the colonial murder. in 2006, the russian dissident, by two assassins. if you do yourjob properly, you never know when it happened. this state of uncertainty is deliberate. all i would say is we have to be clear that there's a big distinction between russia, a great country with wonderful people, and the government, which is made up of kgb people and is kind of deeply paranoid unfortunately and conspiratorial.— paranoid unfortunately and conspiratorial. what is it like emotionally _ conspiratorial. what is it like emotionally as _ conspiratorial. what is it like emotionally as a _ conspiratorial. what is it like emotionally as a reporter- conspiratorial. what is it like emotionally as a reporter to | conspiratorial. what is it like i emotionally as a reporter to be expeued emotionally as a reporter to be expelled from a country, not to be able to work in a country that you love, that you find completely fascinating and you've invested a lot in? suddenly, one day you find you can't be there any more. well.
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you can't be there any more. well, i miss it and — you can't be there any more. well, i miss it and i think— you can't be there any more. well, i miss it and i think sarah _ you can't be there any more. well, i miss it and i think sarah will- miss it and i think sarah will probably miss it already, because it's kind of a glorious place with great literature, theatre, books and so on. it's an enormous, too. there's a huge amount to see. i came to siberia, and i think the bbc has done an impressive and brave reporting in a tricky circumstance. i have to fake hope that one day i'll be allowed to go back. sarah said she was been —— has been expeued said she was been —— has been expelled indefinitely. the unpredictable could happen quite swiftly. we've had these two revolutions in the 20th century. putin looks in trench at the moment. but who knows? maybe one day, sarah, myself and others will be able to return, but i don't think it will be anytime soon. return, but i don't think it will be anytime soon-—
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return, but i don't think it will be anytime soon. return, but i don't think it will be an ime soon. ~' ., ., ., ., ,, ., anytime soon. luke, go to to talk to ou. let's anytime soon. luke, go to to talk to you- let's hope _ anytime soon. luke, go to to talk to you. let's hope you _ anytime soon. luke, go to to talk to you. let's hope you both _ anytime soon. luke, go to to talk to you. let's hope you both can - anytime soon. luke, go to to talk to you. let's hope you both can get - you. let's hope you both can get back someday. there's a warning this afternoon that gps are facing difficult decisions about which patients get blood tests because of a shortage of test tubes. the nhs in england and wales is temporarily stopping all non—urgent testing. 0ur health editor hugh pym told us how serious the problem was. the royal college of gps has put out a statement saying it is extremely worrying for patients and usually for frustrating for gps. the messages if it's an urgent blood test, that will go ahead for cancer patients and those with quite serious long—term health conditions. but gps are saying there's a bit of a blurring and lack of clarity about what the difference between urgent and routine actually is. the manufacturer, the us company, has also put out a statement this morning saying that they are diverting supplies in essence from
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other parts of the world to the uk of the tubes that are required to help the nhs, and also boosting production in the uk. they say that this should be resolved through september. the situation should stabilise, they say, but that remains a bit of a question mark — how long will this go on for? some gps say a couple of weeks, and that's the message from the government, they think this is unfortunate, but it can be dealt with in a matter of a few weeks. but it remains very unclear as one gp put it, it's quite difficult with all the other pressures on general practice and patients being alarmed and uneasy about what's happening and uneasy about what's happening and getting appointments, but this has been added to the situation. keep them there. the headlines on bbc news... the taliban declares victory after the final american soldier leaves afghanistan. the tough choices facing gps over who gets a blood test and who doesn't
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amid a shortage of test tubes. geronimo the alpaca has been put down by government vets over fears of bovine tuberculosis. his owner calls the action �*barbaric�*. let's stay with that news about geronimo. government vets and a police escort arrived to remove the animal from the farm in gloucestershire this morning after it twice tested positive for bovine tuberculosis. helen macdonald, his owner, called the decision �*barbaric�*. she's been giving her reaction to our correspondent claire marshall. we've been bullied and threatened for four— we've been bullied and threatened for four years over a very simple question. — for four years over a very simple question, which was where is there
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evidence _ question, which was where is there evidence to — question, which was where is there evidence to say the test is accurate? only wanted for four years. — accurate? only wanted for four years. we _ accurate? only wanted for four years, we have been abused by the government. 50 years, we have been abused by the government-— years, we have been abused by the government. so you think this goes more widely — government. so you think this goes more widely than _ government. so you think this goes more widely than the _ government. so you think this goes more widely than the case - government. so you think this goes more widely than the case of- more widely than the case of geronimo? it more widely than the case of geronimo?— more widely than the case of geronimo? . , .,, 2 ., geronimo? it always has. it's about fair treatment _ geronimo? it always has. it's about fair treatment and _ geronimo? it always has. it's about fair treatment and it's _ geronimo? it always has. it's about fair treatment and it's about - geronimo? it always has. it's about fair treatment and it's about being l fair treatment and it's about being treated _ fair treatment and it's about being treated with respect. they have an endemic— treated with respect. they have an endemic that's not being solved. he policy— endemic that's not being solved. he policy is _ endemic that's not being solved. he policy is not — endemic that's not being solved. he policy is not working, so they can't make _ policy is not working, so they can't make up— policy is not working, so they can't make up test and say someone is disease — make up test and say someone is disease, especially when geronimo came _ disease, especially when geronimo came from — disease, especially when geronimo came from new zealand from a very healthy_ came from new zealand from a very healthy herd. he has not been exposed — healthy herd. he has not been exposed to tb. they had an antibody test and _ exposed to tb. they had an antibody test and manipulated the second one so they— test and manipulated the second one so they could say this. here we are. now they're — so they could say this. here we are. now they're using bully tactics and they could — now they're using bully tactics and they could have been using lessons. we offer— they could have been using lessons. we offer them a research opportunity, that's now published today _ opportunity, that's now published today. theyjust bumped us off. we had police _ today. theyjust bumped us off. we had police and drones and god knows what _
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had police and drones and god knows what. the _ had police and drones and god knows what. ., �* , ~ what. the government said it's kind of paul followed _ what. the government said it's kind of paul followed a _ what. the government said it's kind of paul followed a process - what. the government said it's kind of paul followed a process and - what. the government said it's kind of paul followed a process and this| of paul followed a process and this is the procedure —— this has followed. we've had some sympathies related by the prime minister. how do you feel? flick related by the prime minister. how do you feel?— related by the prime minister. how do oufeel? _ , do you feel? pick your sympathy, you should have — do you feel? pick your sympathy, you should have sorted _ do you feel? pick your sympathy, you should have sorted this _ do you feel? pick your sympathy, you should have sorted this mess out. - should have sorted this mess out. we've _ should have sorted this mess out. we've been— should have sorted this mess out. we've been telling you this is a problem — we've been telling you this is a problem. no one has taken any notice — problem. no one has taken any notice. they've allman duke listed in their— notice. they've allman duke listed in their lives, and they have lied -- they've — in their lives, and they have lied —— they've all been complicit. i don't _ —— they've all been complicit. i don't need _ —— they've all been complicit. i don't need boris's sympathy, i need him to— don't need boris's sympathy, i need him to do— don't need boris's sympathy, i need him to do hisjob. everybody else that have — him to do hisjob. everybody else that have allowed this to happen, every— that have allowed this to happen, every single farmer in this country that's— every single farmer in this country that's been— every single farmer in this country that's been through this deserves better~ _ that's been through this deserves better. we need respect and we need to work— better. we need respect and we need to work with government and not be abused _ to work with government and not be abused by— to work with government and not be abused by them. these bully tactics have to _ abused by them. these bully tactics have to stop. you abused by them. these bully tactics have to stop-— have to stop. you said you have su ort have to stop. you said you have support of _ have to stop. you said you have support of farmers. _ have to stop. you said you have support of farmers. there - have to stop. you said you have support of farmers. there are i have to stop. you said you have - support of farmers. there are some who say this is one alpaca and they have to face tens of thousands of cattle every year killed. how do you
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feel this has caught the attention of the world? aha, feel this has caught the attention of the world?— feel this has caught the attention of the world? . .., , ., , of the world? a couple farmers need to stand up- — of the world? a couple farmers need to stand up. not— of the world? a couple farmers need to stand up. not when _ of the world? a couple farmers need to stand up. not when we've. .. - to stand up. not when we've... restrictions get lifted and go down again _ restrictions get lifted and go down again. we're in this horrific cycle because — again. we're in this horrific cycle because tests aren't good enough. they're _ because tests aren't good enough. they're not— because tests aren't good enough. they're not looking at security, not joining _ they're not looking at security, not joining up — they're not looking at security, not joining up the policy work and have involvement on the ground. this is 'ust involvement on the ground. this is just abuse — involvement on the ground. this is just abuse. this is bug re. there's people _ just abuse. this is bug re. there's people in— just abuse. this is bug re. there's people in this government. we're paying _ people in this government. we're paying their taxes. these people to ask them _ paying their taxes. these people to ask them the law and thank god —— play god _ ask them the law and thank god —— play god with people's lives. all i asked for— play god with people's lives. all i asked for was a valid test and look at this— asked for was a valid test and look at this mess. asked for was a valid test and look at this mess-— asked for was a valid test and look at this mess. helen mcdonald, the honour of geronimo _ at this mess. helen mcdonald, the honour of geronimo talking - at this mess. helen mcdonald, the honour of geronimo talking to - at this mess. helen mcdonald, the honour of geronimo talking to our| honour of geronimo talking to our correspondent —— the owner.
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the vice president of sinn fein tweeted she would remain in isolation. executive office minister will take forward department business in the meantime. the co—leaders of the scottish green party have been madejunior government ministers. the appointments were confirmed by 69 votes to 56 in holyrood as part of a power—sharing arrangement with the snp, making them the first green ministers in the uk. patrick harvie is the scottish government's new minister for zero carbon buildings, active travel and tenants' rights, while lorna slater is the minister for green skills, circular economy and biodiversity. the environmental campaigner greta thunberg says she will only attend the un climate change conference in glasgow later this year if the event is "safe and democratic". for her, that means ensuring
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participants from poorer countries are fully vaccinated and able to travel to take part. our environment correspondent kevin keane reports. she sailed across the atlantic twice to get the last un climate conference in 2019, but this time she's not so sure. but this time, she's not so sure. greta thunberg wants to go to the glasgow talks, but says her participation is conditional. hi, greta. in an interview for bbc scotland, i asked what was stopping herfrom coming. well, of course, i'm not 100% sure yet, but if it's considered safe and democratic then i will, of course, go there. i take it you mean by that that it's accessible to the world's poorer nations. yeah. how important and why is that to you? because that's the essence of this meeting. it should be all about climate justice and, of course, we can't achieve climate justice if everyone is not contributing on the same terms. cheering. it won't be the first time greta has visited the uk.
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she addressed a large crowd in bristol last year before the pandemic. but it will be her first time in scotland. she famously clashed online with donald trump and doesn't seem too impressed with his successor. the biden administration doesn't seem to take climate, the climate crisis, the least bit serious, since they are actually expanding fossil fuel infrastructure. so, it shows that they are not ready to take action. and she says the same applies to the uk government, which is considering whether to approve a new oil field off shetland. i think that maybe summarises the whole situation that we are in. the fact that these kinds of countries who are actually hosting the cop is planning to actually expand fossil fuel infrastructure, to open up new oil fields and so on. chanting: what do we want? climate justice! when do we want it? now! with such a large following, greta's absence from cop26 will be felt, but she says if all participants
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are vaccinated and allowed to travel, so will she. kevin keane, bbc news. lockdown brought a surge in demand for takeaway food, but it looks like the habit has stuck. figures suggest nearly a quarter of us are spending more money on takeaways now than we did before the pandemic. our consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith reports. three burgers, smoking joe... grub's up at frank's burgers. sizzling, sliced and stacked — it's ready in minutes. but like so much restaurant food, this order won't be eaten here. a mile or so down the road... hi, guys, burgers. ..sarah and her family are waiting for lunch to arrive. we usually get one once a week at least, don't we, sophie? it's like a fun night. i don't know whether they prefer
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a takeaway to mummy�*s cooking.
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i think i've just got into a bit of a habit when we couldn't go out, i guess, so it's kind of stuck since then, really. i think friday night, it was like, what can we do? that was get a takeaway. as the trend for takeaways continues to take off. colletta smith, bbc news. i'm off to get a takeaway! george is “p i'm off to get a takeaway! george is up next with the news at
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at the weather. good evening. the weather is stuck in a rut at the moment and for the rest of this week we will hold on to the area of high pressure which is across the north west. it will feed on a lot of cloud, particularly across central, northern and eastern areas where we could see drizzle but the will be some sunshine, much like we have seen across the last couple of days. this is the area of high pressure, allowing this cloud and breeze, which will be quite fresh at times. bringing the cloud often sea. carried this evening for many, overnight as well, that will be thicker with the odd spot of drizzle in the east. but if you holding onto that cloud where it could turn quite chilly over the clear skies but for most where we have the breeze and cloud, 10 to 12 celsius. starting wednesday on a dell note, the cow to cow enough —— they cloud thicker. making it feel quite cool. a few
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holes in the cloud, the odd sunny spot across the north of the uk, winds will be lighter, a fresh breeze across southern and eastern areas. so cooler, along the coast, 15 to 17 celsius, generally the high teens, where it is under cloud. we could see 21 or 22 in the sunny spots. the area of high pressure stays with us, feeding and lots of cloud across the country, the best of this centre and towards the west. but thursday and friday, it's going to be rather cloudy for most of us, a little bit of drizzle across eastern areas. the best of the sunny spells towards the south and west, temperatures in the sunshine, 20 or 21. then comes a change, finally into the week in our area of high pressure moves east, allowing the area of high pressure to movement of the atlantic. more isobars in the chart so the wind will be stronger. coming in from the south so it should be a bit warmer with more humidity but the increasing chance of rain. for the start of the
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weekend, saturday not looking that bad, we will have variable cloud and sunny spells. the wind beginning to pick up from the south—east. that will start to push in the first signs of the showers into southern and western areas towards the end of the day. but many of us should stay dry. northern and eastern parts, temperatures lifting into the low 20s. for sunday, a band of rain spreading across the country, followed by some showers and sunny spells, some of which could be on the heavy side. see you later.
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today at 6:00pm, the taliban declare independence, as 20 years of foreign military presence in afghanistan comes to an end. last man out — america's longest war, but it leaves behind an uncertain future for the afghan people. american uniforms, american weapons, but now worn by the taliban. the spoils of a war that was the us's longest military mission. now it has ended in the worst of ways, and it will live long in memory, here in afghanistan, in america, and far beyond. from fallen heroes to scarred survivors — what do british veterans and theirfamilies make of the afghan campaign? we'll be live in kabul and washington, and asking what this says aboutjoe biden's presidency. also tonight...
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who gets a blood test, and who doesn't — the tough choices

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