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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  August 31, 2021 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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today at 6:00pm, the taliban declare independence, as 20 years of foreign military presence in afghanistan comes to an end. last man out — america's longest war, but it leaves behind an uncertain future for the afghan people. american uniforms, american weapons, but now worn by the taliban. the spoils of a war that was the us's longest military mission. now it has ended in the worst of ways, and it will live long in memory, here in afghanistan, in america, and far beyond. from fallen heroes to scarred survivors — what do british veterans and theirfamilies make of the afghan campaign? we'll be live in kabul and washington, and asking what this says aboutjoe biden's presidency. also tonight...
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who gets a blood test, and who doesn't — the tough choices facing gps as they deal with a shortage of tubes. wherever we can we will make a clinicaljudgment and only do tests that are absolutely necessary, but with the proviso that no patient should be put at risk. geronimo the alpaca is put down after testing positive for bovine tb. a case that pitches activists against farmers. and she crosses the line, she knows she's won. 16 and counting — dame sarah storey equals the record for paralympic gold medals, and she's still got another race to go. and coming up on the bbc news channel... as the transfer window draws to a close we'll round up all the key deals after a busy summer of spending.
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good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. it was just one flight out of kabul but it brought to an end the 20—year presence of foreign forces in afghanistan. as america pulled out it left behind an uncertain future for the afghan people and huge questions for the international coalition about what had been achieved. the taliban claim they have won their independence. but they too have questions — can they make the transition from brutal insurgents to responsible government? ourfirst report this evening is from our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, and her cameraman robbie wright, in kabul. american uniforms, american guns, but these are taliban special forces. badri unit 313. they are in charge at kabul airport.
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translation: our message - to the americans is they should not have any plans to attack muslims again. our message to all afghans is we are going to protect them. the last us flight took off yesterday, just before midnight. the last moments of america's military mission here. the skies exploded with taliban celebration once it was clear the last us soldier, major general chris donahue, was on his way home. this is what they left behind. hangars full of helicopters, even blackhawks, all disabled, destroyed, so the taliban can't use them. the best of american military hardware, the best of its generals, were part of its longest war. and now it has ended in the worst of ways, and it will live long in memory, here in afghanistan,
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in america, and far beyond. today, an airfield flooded by taliban. their urgent task, repairing the runways so commercial airlines can fly again. translation: as you can see, these infidels destroyed - the entire airport. they haven't left any machinery in good repair. we had a team ready to fix this mess ever since we came to kabul. now that the americans have left we are ready to clean it up. all flights have stopped, but afghans still keep trying to get in, to find a way out of this country. taliban guards turn them away. when we drive through the streets of kabul, the city seems much the same, until we get to the banks. to the queues stretching
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all the way down the street. most banks are shut, most don't have any money. some people have stood here for days wondering if they can withstand this for long. i should build a future, i should study. so definitely if the situations are like that, you should stay for one weekjust to take 10,000 afghani... $100 from the bank, so it's not possible to live here. a country turned upside down and inside out. an old order suddenly ripped away, a new one suddenly started, in chaos and uncertainty. lyse doucet, bbc news, kabul. dozens of countries, including britain, may have had forces in afghanistan but there is no question that it was a mission conceived in the us and led by the us. the numbers alone tell the story. america is thought to have spent more than $2 trillion over the last 20 years.
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and then there was the cost in lives — more than 2,400 us military personnel died in the line of duty. but that's dwarfed by more than 116,000 afghan civilians, police and military forces killed in the conflict. 0ur washington correspondent aleem maqbool has more. these already iconic images of a commanding officer of the evacuation mission, major general chris donahue, caught in night vision, the last soldier out of afghanistan. more disconcerting for americans are the imagesjust hours more disconcerting for americans are the images just hours later of taliban forces in us military fatigues inspecting the same airfield. and it wasn'tjust equipment the us military left behind, but american citizens and vulnerable afghans, but the us insists the work to get them out continues. fix, insists the work to get them out continuu— continues. a new chapter of america's — continues. a new chapter of america's engagement - continues. a new chapter of america's engagement in i continues. a new chapter of -
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america's engagement in afghanistan has begun. it's one in which we will lead with diplomacy. the military mission is over, a new diplomatic mission is over, a new diplomatic mission has begun. it mission is over, a new diplomatic mission has begun.— mission has begun. it was an incredible — mission has begun. it was an incredible logistical - mission has begun. it was an incredible logistical effort - mission has begun. it was an incredible logistical effort to | incredible logistical effort to evacuate more than 123,000 civilians over the last month. of course it came at a cost. scores of civilian deaths and 13 more us military lives lost, adding to the more than 2300 americans already killed in afghanistan and heaping more pressure on president biden. for a country renowned for honouring its service men and women one looks too many inescapably like it if it has been a huge blow and military veterans have been especially vocal about their display. —— what looks like. i about their display. -- what looks like. ~' about their display. -- what looks like. ~ ., , ., about their display. -- what looks like. ~ ., ., ~ like. i think it was a waste of... a waste of time _ like. i think it was a waste of... a waste of time over _ like. i think it was a waste of... a waste of time over there - like. i think it was a waste of... a waste of time over there and - like. i think it was a waste of... a waste of time over there and it i waste of time over there and it wasn't run properly. i don't think. $2 trillion spent over there, and
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nothing has changed, it seems like. the taliban is back in, they were just waiting for us to leave. i the taliban is back in, they were just waiting for us to leave. i love this country- _ just waiting for us to leave. i love this country. it _ just waiting for us to leave. i love this country. it will _ just waiting for us to leave. i love this country. it will come - just waiting for us to leave. i love this country. it will come back- just waiting for us to leave. i love | this country. it will come back but it's not_ this country. it will come back but it's not in— this country. it will come back but it's not in a — this country. it will come back but it's not in a good place right now, thate— it's not in a good place right now, that's for— it's not in a good place right now, that's for sure.— it's not in a good place right now, that's for sure. and there has been much discussion _ that's for sure. and there has been much discussion here _ that's for sure. and there has been much discussion here about - that's for sure. and there has been much discussion here about what l that's for sure. and there has been i much discussion here about what this humbling, chaotic end to its longest war means for america's standing in the world. and president biden is due to address the nation in the coming hours and if his speeches of recent days are anything to go by then he will unequivocally stand by his decision making during this withdrawal process. and while it is true americans will no longer be killed in battle in afghanistan, the fact so many americans have been left behind has of course made it all the harderfor left behind has of course made it all the harder for people left behind has of course made it all the harderfor people here to see any positives in the way this war was brought to an end. studio: aleem maqbool in washington, thank you. from the start of the afghan mission
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britain played a key role, as the prime minister at the time tony blair said we were shoulder to shoulder with america. now that the military mission is over and the taliban is in charge it is up to the diplomats to work out how they deal with those who were sworn enemies just weeks ago. 0ur diplomatic affairs correspondent, james landale, has been looking at the options. 20 years, the relationship between the west and afghanistan has been shaped by military force. but those boots are no longer on the ground, so how now might the world engage with the taliban from outside? well, it certainly requires a new kind of diplomacy. western powers want the taliban to ensure afghans can leave if they want. they say the rights of women and children should be protected. i women and children should be protected-— women and children should be rotected. , ., , ., protected. i should put the draft resolution to _ protected. i should put the draft resolution to the _ protected. i should put the draft resolution to the vote _ protected. i should put the draft resolution to the vote now. - protected. i should put the draft resolution to the vote now. that protected. i should put the draft i resolution to the vote now. that is what they called _ resolution to the vote now. that is what they called for _ resolution to the vote now. that is what they called for last _ resolution to the vote now. that is what they called for last night - resolution to the vote now. that is what they called for last night but | what they called for last night but the united nation works better when it is united and china and russia abstained. ministers insist there is
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abstained. ministers insist there is a shared international agenda. i am a shared international agenda. i am focused on — a shared international agenda. i am focused on the _ a shared international agenda. i:n focused on the immediate priorities, continuing safe passage for those, the my minority, a small minority but nonetheless significant number, who haven't yet been able to get out. we are working with other countries in the region. we come back to that point, we will use all the levers at our disposal and we need to bring a wider cast of countries to exercise maximum moderating influence on the taliban. 0ne moderating influence on the taliban. one way of doing that is through humanitarian aid. afghanistan is desperately poor, with about one third of the population facing food insecurity. the taliban government will need money for health and education. so there is a need for the international community to continue getting aid in on the ground. another key priority is security. most countries agree afghanistan shouldn't become once again a base for terrorism but can western powers cooperate with the taliban in tackling shared opponents
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like the local islamic state group, isis k, and will that give them influence in kabul?— isis k, and will that give them influence in kabul? now the key leveraued influence in kabul? now the key leveraged you — influence in kabul? now the key leveraged you have _ influence in kabul? now the key leveraged you have is _ influence in kabul? now the key leveraged you have is aid - influence in kabul? now the key| leveraged you have is aid money. those two levers will be key in forcing the taliban to do something. the problem is the west has a number of priorities in afghanistan right now, from counter terrorism, to human rights, to women's rights. what will be the one overriding priority they push the taliban on? so as britain replaces its military with diplomacy it and other western powers will need a new clarity of purpose and when it comes to afghanistan that can be hard to achieve. james landale, bbc news. over the last 20 years in afghanistan there have been a57 deaths of uk armed forces personnel. our special correspondent, ed thomas, has been hearing from veterans and the mother of one of those killed in the conflict about how they feel about the way
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the military operation has ended. the 20 year afghanistan war is over. but for those who served and their families, the stories of grief, pride and survival will last a lifetime. i pride and survival will last a lifetime. .., �* pride and survival will last a lifetime. �* ., ~ pride and survival will last a lifetime. �* . ~ , lifetime. i can't talk very well. i can't live _ lifetime. i can't talk very well. i can't live by _ lifetime. i can't talk very well. i can't live by myself— lifetime. i can't talk very well. i can't live by myself because - lifetime. i can't talk very well. i can't live by myself because i i lifetime. i can't talk very well. i i can't live by myself because i can't reach up to the cupboards. can't wash myself, can't do anything myself. wash myself, can't do anything m self. �* ., ~ , ., myself. ben parkinson served and in 2006 his land _ myself. ben parkinson served and in 2006 his land rover _ myself. ben parkinson served and in 2006 his land rover was _ myself. ben parkinson served and in 2006 his land rover was hit - myself. ben parkinson served and in 2006 his land rover was hit by - myself. ben parkinson served and in 2006 his land rover was hit by a - 2006 his land rover was hit by a mine. today he questions everything. what was it like for you watching the taliban sweep in, take over, in days? i the taliban sweep in, take over, in da s? . , the taliban sweep in, take over, in da s? , the taliban sweep in, take over, in das? , days? i was disappointed, i lost my lens days? i was disappointed, i lost my le . s for days? i was disappointed, i lost my legs for nothing. _ days? i was disappointed, i lost my legs for nothing. so _ days? i was disappointed, i lost my legs for nothing. so it's _ days? i was disappointed, i lost my legs for nothing. so it's been - days? i was disappointed, i lost my legs for nothing. so it's been a - legs for nothing. so it's been a waste of time.—
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legs for nothing. so it's been a waste of time._ it j legs for nothing. so it's been a - waste of time._ it has. waste of time. afghanistan? it has. a total waste _ waste of time. afghanistan? it has. a total waste of _ waste of time. afghanistan? it has. a total waste of time. _ waste of time. afghanistan? it has. a total waste of time. it _ waste of time. afghanistan? it has. a total waste of time. it has - a total waste of time. it has destroyed — a total waste of time. it has destroyed my _ a total waste of time. it has destroyed my life. - a total waste of time. it has destroyed my life. my - a total waste of time. it has destroyed my life. my heart| a total waste of time. it has l destroyed my life. my heart is broken — destroyed my life. my heart is broken and it will be broken for ever _ broken and it will be broken for ever. , , , ., ever. this is where lisa comes to reflect on — ever. this is where lisa comes to reflect on the _ ever. this is where lisa comes to reflect on the life _ ever. this is where lisa comes to reflect on the life of _ ever. this is where lisa comes to reflect on the life of private - reflect on the life of private daniel wade. herson reflect on the life of private daniel wade. her son was 20 when he was killed in afghanistan. he daniel wade. her son was 20 when he was killed in afghanistan.— was killed in afghanistan. he was such a lovely _ was killed in afghanistan. he was such a lovely lad, _ was killed in afghanistan. he was such a lovely lad, his _ was killed in afghanistan. he was such a lovely lad, his smile - was killed in afghanistan. he was| such a lovely lad, his smile would li-ht such a lovely lad, his smile would light up— such a lovely lad, his smile would light up a — such a lovely lad, his smile would light up a room. he had the most beautiful— light up a room. he had the most beautiful blue eyes and he was such a cheeky— beautiful blue eyes and he was such a cheeky chappie as well. after watchin: a cheeky chappie as well. after watching television _ a cheeky chappie as well. after watching television over - a cheeky chappie as well. after watching television over the i a cheeky chappie as well. he watching television over the past two weeks how do we reflect on daniel's sacrifice?— two weeks how do we reflect on daniel's sacrifice? then pulling out of afghanistan _ daniel's sacrifice? then pulling out of afghanistan and _ daniel's sacrifice? then pulling out of afghanistan and now, _ daniel's sacrifice? then pulling out of afghanistan and now, what - daniel's sacrifice? then pulling out| of afghanistan and now, what about the people they have left behind? daniel's _ the people they have left behind? daniel's sacrifice and 456 others, families— daniel's sacrifice and 456 others, families are feeling so hurt that the sacrifice, is it for nothing, or do i _ the sacrifice, is it for nothing, or do i try— the sacrifice, is it for nothing, or do i try and _ the sacrifice, is it for nothing, or do i try and take comfort that he
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has brought dream's to people that could _ has brought dream's to people that could never dream at one point? people _ could never dream at one point? people say— could never dream at one point? people say did you feel anything, a click or anything like that? i didn't feel anything, the next thing i was aware of, i was laying on the floor on my back. in i was aware of, i was laying on the floor on my back.— i was aware of, i was laying on the floor on my back. in 2009, andy reid ste ed on floor on my back. in 2009, andy reid stepped on an — floor on my back. in 2009, andy reid stepped on an improvised _ floor on my back. in 2009, andy reid stepped on an improvised explosive l stepped on an improvised explosive device on patrol in afghanistan. he refuses to blame or question his service. if refuses to blame or question his service. iii refuses to blame or question his service. ., , ., service. if i did it, it was worth it, 10096. _ service. if i did it, it was worth it, 10096. we _ service. if i did it, it was worth it, 100%. we were _ service. if i did it, it was worth it, 10096. we were changing i service. if i did it, it was worth i it, 10096. we were changing lives service. if i did it, it was worth - it, 10096. we were changing lives on it, 100%. we were changing lives on a daily basis will stop every time we got out of camp we were putting ourselves at risk but we were changing kids' lives and ours will stop adults lives, women's lives, young girls' lies. those kids now have seen a taste of freedom, have seen what democracy can look like. i think they will want that for the future. . �* , future. veteran andy reid ending that report _ future. veteran andy reid ending that report by _ future. veteran andy reid ending that report by ed _ future. veteran andy reid ending that report by ed thomas. - let's speak to secunder kermani our correspondent in the afghan capital, kabul.
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just a few minutes ago we saw lyse doucet�*s report and the taliban parading around the airport. the big question is, can they make the transition from insurgents to a government?— transition from insurgents to a government? transition from insurgents to a rovernment? . �*, ., , , government? that's absolutely right. the taliban do _ government? that's absolutely right. the taliban do have _ government? that's absolutely right. the taliban do have experience - government? that's absolutely right. the taliban do have experience of. the taliban do have experience of being in power before but back in the 1990s only a handful of countries recognise their regime and many here have terrible memories of it with its brutal interpretation of shari law and its sweeping restrictions preventing women from getting an education and from working. in recent years they have implemented a kind of shadow system of rule in the rural areas they have taken control of, overseeing for example schools and hospitals but keeping the staff that were employed by and paid for by the government. now they are in control of the whole country and it will be their biggest challenge, particularly what to do in big cities like kabul with young more educated and more socially liberal populations. how can they
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persuade those afghans they can represent them while at the same time not alienating hardliners within their own ranks. many think this is why the taliban have always been deliberately vague about their vision for the future, so as not to cause a kind of fracturing within their own forces. now the final international troops have been withdrawn from afghanistan, we are finally expecting to hear the taliban announce a new government in the coming days. their elusive leader we are told has been holding discussions in the southern city of kandahar and afghans across the country will be hoping at the very least to put an end to this period of deep uncertainty.— of deep uncertainty. secunder kermani and _ of deep uncertainty. secunder kermani and kabul, _ of deep uncertainty. secunder kermani and kabul, thank- of deep uncertainty. secunder| kermani and kabul, thank you. our top story this evening. the taliban declare independence as 20 years of foreign military presence in afghanistan comes to an end. and still to come. 0ur woman in moscow files herfinal report from russia —
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kicked out after being accused of being a threat to national security. coming up in sportsday on the bbc news channel, britain's golden girl does it again. dame sarah storey win another gold at the tokyo paralympics — the 16th of her career — and there could be more to come. gps are having to make tough choices as they are forced to decide which patients get blood tests. it follows an ongoing shortage of the vials used to collect blood across england and wales. the nhs is stopping all non—urgent testing for the time being. today, the company manufacturing the tubes says it will deliver millions more tubes later this week. 0ur health editor, hugh pym, reports. these are some of the tubes for blood tests which are now in short supply, and at least until the middle of september, that will affect some patients at gp
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practices. the nhs has sent out warnings that all blood tests will be stopped for the next few weeks unless they are for emergency cases, but gp leaders are frustrated. it’s but gp leaders are frustrated. it�*s concerning because sometimes there isn't a very sharp dividing line between what is urgent and what is routine, so as gps we are having to make a choice on the ground and it's very difficult as a gp when you are held to account and blamed by a patient, for example, for not doing a blood test when the responsibility for it lies outside our control. in for it lies outside our control. in practice tubes like this will continue to be used in some urgent cases like cancer and also to assess whether it is safe to put patients on certain medications, but, routine monitoring for a range of different conditions will be put on hold. the shortage may only last a few weeks, but even so, doctors argue it will cause disruption. brute but even so, doctors argue it will cause disruption.— cause disruption. we have to understand _ cause disruption. we have to understand that _ cause disruption. we have to understand that general - cause disruption. we have to . understand that general practice cause disruption. we have to - understand that general practice in particular doesn't do blood tests willy—nilly. we only do tests that are clinically indicated and
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anything we have to push down the road is going to delay the care for another patient that we should have been seeing in that timeframe. so it's a difficult one. fine been seeing in that timeframe. so it's a difficult one.— it's a difficult one. one ma'or supplier. d it's a difficult one. one ma'or supplier. the d it's a difficult one. one ma'or supplier, the us i it's a difficult one. one major supplier, the us company, i it's a difficult one. one major - supplier, the us company, becton dickinson said in a statement that there had been the most unpredictable demand in 70 years of producing these products because of the pandemic and added there had been global transportation delays and raw material suppliers had been challenged to keep up with demand. the company said it was diverting more supplies from other countries to the nhs and that the uk factory in plymouth was boosting production by 20%. geraldine had a blood test injune after by 20%. geraldine had a blood test in june after feeling by 20%. geraldine had a blood test injune after feeling very by 20%. geraldine had a blood test in june after feeling very tired. the doctor said injune after feeling very tired. the doctor said she might have a condition needing treatment and follow—up test was booked for august, but the day before she was called by the surgery and was told it was postponed because of the tube shortages. i it was postponed because of the tube shortaaes. . , ., it was postponed because of the tube shortaues. ., , ., ., ., it was postponed because of the tube shortaaes. . , ., ., ., ., shortages. i am still not aware of whether i have _ shortages. i am still not aware of whether i have this _ shortages. i am still not aware of whether i have this condition, - shortages. i am still not aware of. whether i have this condition, which
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is worrying. — whether i have this condition, which is worrying, because i am still tired — is worrying, because i am still tired and _ is worrying, because i am still tired and i_ is worrying, because i am still tired and i would just like to get some _ tired and i would just like to get some decision about it. it would be good _ some decision about it. it would be good to— some decision about it. it would be good to know i haven't got it, basically _ good to know i haven't got it, basicall . good to know i haven't got it, basically-— good to know i haven't got it, basicall . , ., ., basically. the department of health said safety was _ basically. the department of health said safety was the _ basically. the department of health said safety was the top _ basically. the department of health said safety was the top priority - basically. the department of health said safety was the top priority and | said safety was the top priority and work was continuing to minimise the impact on patients but there are still uncertainties over how long the shortages will last. the latest uk coronavirus figures show there were 32,181 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, which means an average of 33,776 per day in the last week. the latest figures show there were 7,015 people in hospital being treated for coronavirus on friday. 50 deaths were reported in the latest 24 hour period, that's people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. that takes the average deaths per day over the last week to 97. 0n vaccinations, 88.4% of people aged 16 and over have now had their firstjab
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and 78.7% of the population aged 16 and over have had both doses. an alpaca which twice tested positive for bovine tuberculosis has been put down, following a failed attempt in the courts to save it. government officials and police arrived to collect geronimo this morning. his owner had claimed the tests used to confirm the animals tb status gave false positive results. our environment and rural affairs correspondent claire marshall is in south gloucestershire. this morning, the moment geronimo's supporters had been dreading. a team of deaf officials and police officers came to take the alpaca away. —— defra officials. it was
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taken away in this trailer to be euthanised. mrs macdonald had brought geronimo to the uk from new zealand in 2017. the alpaca had tested positive twice for bovine tv but mrs macdonald maintained the tests were flawed. == but mrs macdonald maintained the tests were flawed.— tests were flawed. -- bovine tb. i heard itoris _ tests were flawed. -- bovine tb. i heard boris johnson _ tests were flawed. -- bovine tb. i heard boris johnson has _ tests were flawed. -- bovine tb. i heard boris johnson has sympathy tests were flawed. -- bovine tb. i. heard boris johnson has sympathy for heard borisjohnson has sympathy for me, but stop your sympathy, boris johnson, why didn't you sort this out? why am i stood here today with the media surrounding me as my animal was dragged off with a rope around its neck. the animal was dragged off with a rope around its neck.— around its neck. the case has highlighted — around its neck. the case has highlighted the _ around its neck. the case has highlighted the deep - around its neck. the case has highlighted the deep divide i around its neck. the case has i highlighted the deep divide over around its neck. the case has - highlighted the deep divide over how to control the disease in cattle. in england, the highly controversial badger cull sees tens of thousands of the animals, a protected species, shot each year. farmers believe it is a key part of the strategy. tb cost the taxpayer millions each year and can devastate farming businesses.— and can devastate farming businesses. �* ., ., businesses. we've lost around hundred and _ businesses. we've lost around hundred and 60 _ businesses. we've lost around hundred and 60 cattle - businesses. we've lost around hundred and 60 cattle and - hundred and 60 cattle and unfortunately when it happens, i don't _ unfortunately when it happens, i don't like — unfortunately when it happens, i don't like it, but i accept that if it has— don't like it, but i accept that if
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it has failed a test and if some of my cattle — it has failed a test and if some of my cattle had failed a test, unfortunately their fate is sealed and that— unfortunately their fate is sealed and that is what has to happen. the and that is what has to happen. government and that is what has to happen. tue: government said and that is what has to happen. tte: government said it and that is what has to happen. "tt2 government said it was and that is what has to happen. tt2 government said it was following the scientific evidence. they will now be a postmortem examination on geronimo. and this examination could potentially throw up new evidence, confirming that the animal as the most recent two test showed was infected or, as its owner believed, it was actually healthy when it was destroyed. the bbc s moscow correspondent has left russia today, expelled by the authorities after being labelled a threat to national security. sarah rainsford, who first reported for the bbc from moscow over 20 years ago just as vladimir putin came to power, has been told she can never return to the country. the bbc has condmened the move, calling it a "direct assault on media freedom". here is sarah's last report from moscow. this was the moment i discovered i was being expelled from russia.
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according to a specific law, i've been designated a "threat to national security" and as such i'm not allowed into the country. man speaks russian pulled aside at passport control, i was told the fsb security service had banned me for life. i recorded the conversation. i was returning from belarus, where i'd confronted alexander lukashenko on the mass repression and torture of peaceful protesters. his loyal supporters rounded on me... ..in a coordinated attack. vladimir putin's presenting this as just another working visit. .. i've reported from russia for two decades — the whole span of vladimir putin's presidency. there've been highs — like the world cup — but i've also charted the slow
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erosion of freedoms here. the crackdown on dissent. a year ago, the government put me on short—term visas. sarah rainsford... then i became the news, as state television announced i had to leave. after tense negotiations, i had been allowed to enter russia... they've let me in. for now. ..but only to pack. i was then told my visa wouldn't be renewed — supposedly what happened to a russian reporter in london, though that was two years ago. when i was called in here, to the foreign ministry, they kept insisting that my expulsion was nothing personal — they talked about it as a reciprocal move — but they refused to even engage with the fact that i've been labelled "a national security threat". they said that was just a technical moment. but at a time when russia is increasingly seeing enemies all around, it really feels like i've now been added to the list. it's happening as the pressure on russian journalists who don't toe the kremlin line is intensifying.
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dozhd tv has just been added to a growing blacklist of media labelled "foreign agents" — for getting funds from abroad. this terror of "foreign agents" means that we — dozhd — we are enemies of the state. the pretending of being democracy is over. it is very bad, and it could become much worse — any time. so i'm leaving a country i first came to as the soviet union fell apart. when free speech — orfreedoms — were new and precious. it feels like today's russia is moving in reverse. sarah rainsford, bbc news, moscow. paralympicsgb have claimed three more gold medals on day seven of the games in tokyo. there was a record—breaking performance in the pool, plus two victories in the cycling, with dame sarah storey taking a 16th gold medal,
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to equal the british record. 0ur sports correspondent andy swiss reports from tokyo. it was, she said, a dream come true. for dame sarah storey, another remarkable milestone. she began the time trial knowing another gold would equal the all—time british record and it was never really in doubt. storey was a minute and a half faster than anyone else and history was hers. and she crosses the line! her 16th paralympic title, equalling the british record equalling the record set by mike kenny. storey started out in the pool, winning her first gold as a 14—year—old and now, nearly three decades later, the tears of joy flowed, to the delight of another sporting dame. she still has the amazing physical ability to set new standards and push the barriers every single time the games come around, but importantly, she still has the same passion, the same drive, she wants to break her own records
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and she is loving it. dame sarah storey could yet make even more history. if she wins the road race here on thursday, she will clinch her 17th paralympic gold and no british athlete has ever done that. the cycling also brought a more unexpected gold. during the last games, ben watson was working as a chartered surveyor. now, he is a paralympic champion. cue exhaustion and, eventually, elation. every member of britain's cycling team has now won a medal here. it's an amazing feeling. the fact that this has been the result of so many years, i'm eternally grateful, happy and excited. yeah, and a bit gobsmacked really. in the pool meanwhile there was another gold for one of britain's breakthrough stars, reece dunn, surging to his third title here and a new world record to boot. it's gold to reece dunn! but this was the most poignant moment. just days after arriving
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following his evacuation from kabul, afghanistan's hossain rasouli competed in the long jump. he finished 13th but merely being here was a victory in itself. andy swiss, bbc news, tokyo. time for a look at the weather. here's stav daneos. definitely a chill in the air this morning in london at least. absolutely and it does not feel like the end of august. it's because we have an area of high pressure, a blocking high we have had for a while but it's position is coming in the wrong place —— place and bring a lot of cloud to our shores and even some drizzle at time and you will be lucky if you get some sunshine which is reserved for western areas in his the position of the high and it will be like this through the week, feeding in the cloud and breeze through the north sea and that is why we are seeing a lot of cloud around. through the evening and overnight most places will stay cloudy with the odd spot of drizzle around the eastern coastal areas. clear spells developing like last
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night, particularly across scotland and parts of northern ireland, the south—west of the country and here we will see chilly spots under the clear skies but for most under the brees double figure values. 0n brees double figure values. on wednesday, little change, we hold onto grey, leaden skies and light rain and drizzle across eastern areas exposed to the north—east breeze which will be fresh along coastal areas as you can see that and the best of the sunshine will be across scotland and we could see a bit more across the north and the odd glimmerfurther south bit more across the north and the odd glimmer further south and south—west. 0therwise, most places will see temperatures in the mid to high teens, cooler along the north sea coast and up to 21 may be in the sunny spots across western scotland. very little change on thursday and friday with an area of high pressure not really moving and it is a blocking high and it will continue to feed the stream of cloud, mainly to feed the stream of cloud, mainly to the eastern parts because through thursday and friday, southern and western areas see glimmers of sunshine pushing temperatures into the low 20s. finally a change for the low 20s. finally a change for the weather, not the change many
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people would like, but at

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