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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  August 31, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the taliban have sealed there to cover in a chemist and as the final troops withdraw. this image captured the last us soldier to leave after 20 years of america's military involvement. the taliban has moved involvement. the taliban has moved in to take the us military equipment left behind and it is celebrating victory. translation: ~ ., ., , ,., victory. translation: ~ ., ., , ., translation: we have a message to an ossible translation: we have a message to any possible invader, _ translation: we have a message to any possible invader, that _ translation: we have a message to any possible invader, that anyone - any possible invader, that anyone who looks to afghanistan with bad intentions will face what the united states has faced today. also in this programme, we will turn to the us is risky operations continue in louisiana with floods
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being caused by hurricane ida. millions of people remain without power. there is still heavy rain in mississippi which is causing a crevice to open up in one highway. two people died in that. america s longest war is over. and on tuesday, millions of afghans woke up to a new reality. the taliban is in charge and all foreign forces have left the country. the taliban said its victory belonged to all afghans. but there's widespread concern about how they intend to govern after their brutal rule 20 years ago. more on that later, but first, the withdrawal. late on monday night, minutes before the august 31st deadline, the last us military flight left kabul airport.
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the evacuation missions are 120,000 people airlifted out of afghanistan. it is america's top military commander in the region. the withdrawal signifies the end of the military component of the evacuation but also the end of the nearly 20 year mission that began in afghanistan shortly after september the 11th 2001. it's a mission that brought us up in london to justice along with many co—conspirators. —— that brought osama bin laden. the cost was many servicemen and siblings killed and more than 20,000 injured. ida siblings killed and more than 20,000 in'ured. ., . . siblings killed and more than 20,000 in'ured. ., ., ., ., . ., injured. no fanfare or ceremony for the americans _ injured. no fanfare or ceremony for the americans as _ injured. no fanfare or ceremony for the americans as they _ injured. no fanfare or ceremony for the americans as they left. - injured. no fanfare or ceremony for the americans as they left. instead j the americans as they left. instead taliban fighters marked the moment with volleys of gunfire. the day thatjoe biden said the us military mission, the 20 year military engagement by us led nato forces,
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would formally end. and this is what you're hearing now. within minutes, taliban soldiers had entered the airport and were securing the perimeter. here they are on the runway. translation: my message - to the public and the mujahideen is they must not go for gunfire, they must celebrate this happiness by worshipping god. my message to the public is to come back to the country and to serve their homeland under the sharia system. in the hours that followed, extraordinary images like this began to emerge. the taliban forces taking over the airport were all wearing discarded us military uniforms and carrying us equipment. as one journalist for the la times tweeted from the airport: well, celebrations at the us
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withdrawal have been taking place in other parts of afghanistan too. these are pictures from kandahar in the south — this is the taliban's birthplace. it was also once home to one of the largest nato and coalition bases in the country. not any more. this is the head of nato. when we made the decision, we all knew the risks. we all knew that entailed risks. also the risk of taliban returning, though, no—one anticipated that this should happen so fast, the rapid return of taliban. but we also knew that the alternative to end our military presence also entailed risks. despite the evacuation, we know not everyone who wanted to leave has managed too. and some are now in grave danger. there have been reports of attacks on people who worked for the former government, and examples of women and girls being denied their rights. here's the director of a women's charity in kabul.
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there is a lot of fear and anxiety among people in afghanistan that their safety is not sure. that is why they are fleeing from this country, thinking that remaining in this country will be a bigger challenge for them. among the people who remain in afghanistan are some us citizens. here's the us secretary of state. we believe there are still a small number of americans, under200, number of americans, under 200, likely number of americans, under200, likely closer to 100, who remain in afghanistan and want to leave. we are trying to determine exactly how many. bear in mind, president biden had previously made assurances that there would be safe passage for all americans looking to leave. and this is his national security advisor speaking on august 19th. the president is committed to ensuring that every american who wants to leave afghanistan gets out of afghanistan. he believes that we can accomplish that by august 31. we believe that over the course of the coming days,
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it is completely feasible for us. a number of otherforeign nationals are still in afghanistan. among them british citizens, although it's not clear how many. they bided administration diplomatic efforts to get americans out will continue. a number of otherforeign nationals are still in afghanistan. among them british citizens, although it's not clear how many. here's the british foreign secretary. for me as a foreign secretary, i'm focussed on the immediate priorities. continuing safe passage for the minority, but nonetheless a significant number who haven't yet been able to get out. we're working with third countries in the region. we've held the taliban through this un security council resolution, to their undertaking to allow safe passage. the un resolution mr raab is referring to was passed earlier on monday. among other things, it calls for the taliban "to facilitate safe passage for people wanting to leave
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afghanistan." but with foreign troops gone, and the taliban in charge, whether un resolutions will be respected remains to be seen. gary o'donoghue is with us from the white house. in the next few minutes i understand president biden will be speaking, what do we know about the format of this address? it is speaking, what do we know about the format of this address?— format of this address? it is going to be a fairly _ format of this address? it is going to be a fairly substantial - format of this address? it is going to be a fairly substantial speech . to be a fairly substantial speech as we understand, maybe 35 or a0 minutes, added... a week will pay tribute to those who have served and fought and lost their lives in afghanistan and to the operation over the last couple of weeks but he will also be expected to justify his actions over the last seven months since coming into office, the timetable he set, the nature of this withdrawal, the hurried, shambolic nature of parts of it, and of course this problem he has, having made a
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promise to all americans and to those tens of thousands of afghans not to leave until they are all out, having apparently had to leave before all of those promises are fulfilled. the state department is saying they will work on that from their new pseudo— embassy in qatar but they will have nobody on the ground to try and implement that or make it happen. is ground to try and implement that or make it happen-— make it happen. is mr biden's democratic — make it happen. is mr biden's democratic party _ make it happen. is mr biden's democratic party aligned - make it happen. is mr biden's i democratic party aligned behind make it happen. is mr biden's - democratic party aligned behind him on this? hat democratic party aligned behind him on this? ., , on this? not entirely filter there has been criticism _ on this? not entirely filter there has been criticism from - on this? not entirely filter there has been criticism from some i has been criticism from some democrats about the way this has been handled. it's worth saying that the majority of americans favour an end to the war in afghanistan, that's been a pretty solid political reality for some time but president biden has taken a real hit in terms of his popularity ratings over the last couple of weeks in the way this has been handled. so at home he is
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facing criticism across the spectrum from various quarters, and abroad he is also facing criticism from some of his allies, noticeably in europe, who believe america acted pretty unilaterally here, having told them earlier in the year that america was back and the old reliable ally once again. back and the old reliable ally once aaain. , ., ., back and the old reliable ally once aiain. , ., ., ., ~' again. gary, for the moment, thank ou ve again. gary, for the moment, thank you very much- _ now that the americans are out, attention is turning to what the taliban will do. we know the group's leaders have held extensive talks about forming a government — no details yet but there's growing pressure for the country to have a government. here's the former governor of nangahar province. the capital there is jalalabad — the last city to tall to the taliban before kabul. the sooner they make the government and form the government, the better for everyone. and we are waiting for that. second, the taliban leadership
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has promised afghans they are going to respect the fundamental rights of afghans, and we see that if they really respect, if they make the commitment, another was the promises they have done with the afghan people, absolutely there will be positive changes. if they do not meet the commitment to the promises they made to the afghan people, there is no doubt the people will be disappointed, and a lot of the young generation will leave the country, then the businessmen will leave the country and there will be a big crisis for the future of afghanistan. we don't yet know what form a government would take. sources in the taliban have told the bbc that they may re—establish the islamic emirate they created in the 1990s. at that time, the taliban leader mohammed omar had the highest role of emir — with a prime minister, essentially a deputy, below him. there's a possibility this could be replicated. if that happened, the taliban's overll leader, hibatullah akhund—zada,
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could be line to be the emir. his spokesman told the afghan islamic press: that might mean two different power structures. one scenario is an emir in kandahar and a prime minister in kabul. dawood azami from the bbc world service can explain this possibility further. one will be the emirate, which might be based in kandahar, and the other one will be the government, the executive, which will be based in the capital, kabul. so that is the likely scenario. then there will be a counsellor, maybe a couple of councillors, one will be advising the emir in kandahar, then there will be something similar to a parliament sitting in kabul. so
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there are different scenarios but there are different scenarios but the important point is that the taliban say they are also talking to other politicians who are part of the previous government, and the name will change, it is clear, the name will change, it is clear, the name ann turner has been the islamic republic of afghanistan submitted a republic part will be replaced with the state of afghanistan or the islamic emirate of afghanistan, that will be clear in the next few days. another update to bring you — one of osama bin laden�*s closest aides, amin al—haq, is reported to have returned to afghanistan after two decades. he fled shortly after the september 11th attacks, but a video appears to show him back in nangahar province. here's our security correspondent, frank gardner. he isa he is a glibly designated terrorist according to the united states. there has been no official
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confirmation from the us government about this very but it appears to show him arriving in a car, to a rapturous welcome, escorted by a number of cars flying taliban flags, that doesn't mean to say they are taliban, they could be al-qaeda flying taliban flex because the organisations were close in the past and some would say still r. he was also the arms procurement chief for osama bin laden. he fled afghanistan soon after the 9/11 attacks along with many other members of al-qaeda, he fled across the border into pakistan, and he was arrested there, he spent some years in prison but was released. and the fact he has returned, eight feet is confirmed it is him, is worrying for the region and for the world for two reasons, one, it would show that al-qaeda feel safe enough to return to the former stronghold it lived in
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before, close to the tora bora mountains, and secondly the fact he seems to be getting a strong local welcome, which will make it that much harder to root out al-qaeda from the local population. i think this is going to be a real problem, a real challenge for counter terrorism for all countries going ahead. we've talked a lot about those who have left afghanistan — but most haven't. life goes on there for millions of people. our chief international correspondent lyse doucet has been out on the streets of kabul. this is one of the main streets at the centre of kabul. the first day where there are no foreign troops in this country. they have ended the 20 year long engagement. this scene is no different than it has been for many days. look at the queue of people, look at how they are pushing on. this is a queue for the bank. only the main branches of the main banks are open. afghans have been
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told they can only take out the equivalent of $200 a week. minitel here they have been standing in this queue for days. look at this straight. on one side, it's the banks and other offices where they can get money from abroad. but on the other side of the street, this is where there is the turkish embassy, the iranian embassy, the queues are also forming on that side for those who want to leave. for the vast majority of afghans, in a country of nearly a8 million people, life feels no different from the day before or the week before. it is still a struggle to survive, or still a struggle to survive, or still a struggle to survive, or still a race to try and escape as fast as they can. as you saw there, there are people who still want to leave. one of them, an english teacher in kabul who worked as an interpreter for british forces, has spoken to the bbc.
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iam i am feeling to mendis fair in here, especially when i hear —— feeling tremendous fare, especially when i watched the tv and i listen to the radio or i watch social media, i hear that they killed military personnel or an interpreter, they are killing people. they ask for forgiveness but they have not committed to it. they have not announced the government yet, but when they do, i am sure they are killing us, especially those that were engaged or involved with the international forces, were engaged or involved with the internationalforces, and were engaged or involved with the international forces, and for those that worked for the english language to english people. that's the worst thing. that's the worst experience i'm having in these days. given the taliban's history of persecution, it's been a particularly tumultuous period for many afghan women. and they still don't know what life will be
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like long—term under taliban rule. mahbooba seraj, president of the afghan women's network, has been speaking to the bbc�*s secunder kermani. one of the things i notice from the brief period of time i spent with the taliban as they seem to be a big discrepancies, i have been in the north where they seem to be in favour of women's education, but i get reports from colleagues in the south where they stop girls going to school beyond the age of 12. do you get a sense from the taliban about which direction we are headed in and whether it may be a more progressive one on one that is equally reactionary?— one on one that is equally reactionary? one on one that is equally reactiona ? . �*, , ., reactionary? that's why i am saying it is important _ reactionary? that's why i am saying it is important we _ reactionary? that's why i am saying it is important we have _ reactionary? that's why i am saying it is important we have to _ reactionary? that's why i am saying it is important we have to really - it is important we have to really wait _ it is important we have to really wait and — it is important we have to really wait and see where they are, because the taliban_ wait and see where they are, because the taliban are extremely fragmented now, the taliban are extremely fragmented now. some _ the taliban are extremely fragmented now, some of them want one thing, some _ now, some of them want one thing, some of— now, some of them want one thing, some of them want something else and as far as— some of them want something else and as far as the _ some of them want something else and as far as the leadership of the taiihan— as far as the leadership of the taliban is— as far as the leadership of the taliban is concerned, i don't think there _ taliban is concerned, idon't think there is— taliban is concerned, i don't think there is complete control. i don't there is complete control. idon't think— there is complete control. idon't think they— there is complete control. i don't think they really know who is doing what and _ think they really know who is doing what and where and how. so because
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of that, _ what and where and how. so because of that, it _ what and where and how. so because of that, it has to be other things that have — of that, it has to be other things that have to be put in place an order— that have to be put in place an order for— that have to be put in place an order for all of the taliban to talk from _ order for all of the taliban to talk from the — order for all of the taliban to talk from the same ideology, and we should _ from the same ideology, and we should put that into practice. because _ should put that into practice. because afghanistan is not going to accept _ because afghanistan is not going to accept it. _ because afghanistan is not going to accept it, nor will it be good for afghanistan to have this kind of wishy—washy, you know, things being implemented one place, not being permitted another piece, someplace the girls— permitted another piece, someplace the girls can go to school, another place _ the girls can go to school, another place they— the girls can go to school, another place they cannot. they have to realise — place they cannot. they have to realise one _ place they cannot. they have to realise one thing, that the women of afghanistan, they are half of them make _ afghanistan, they are half of them make of— afghanistan, they are half of them make of this country. they are half of the _ make of this country. they are half of the population of this country. there _ of the population of this country. there are — of the population of this country. there are 18 million people and you there are18 million people and you cannot— there are 18 million people and you cannot take 18 million people for granted — cannot take 18 million people for granted. they have to go and get educated — granted. they have to go and get educated. right now we do have a lot of women _ educated. right now we do have a lot of women that are educated, they are very skilled, _ of women that are educated, they are very skilled, they know a whole lot and they— very skilled, they know a whole lot and they can be a fantastic power next _ and they can be a fantastic power next to— and they can be a fantastic power
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next to afghan men, and actually working _ next to afghan men, and actually working not for the taliban but for afghanistan. that's the whole idea. a recovery effort is under way in the southern united states after widespread flooding from hurricane ida. the storm has moved inland, batterring mississippi with strong wind and torrential rain. but the damage is worst in louisiana where it first hit. this was the scene earlier on tuesday. an area close to the city of slidell is currently accessible only by boat. ayerin gomez and herfamily were among thousands of people evacuated from new orleans — she's now in atlanta. they have no idea what remains of the home they left behind. we don't know when power is going to be back, there is no cell phone towers because they are down. i don't know if my co—workers are ok, if my kids are ok, if my friends are
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ok. it is overwhelming. footage of the storm itself contiunues to emerge. these pictures came in to us earlier, this was from sunday — the wind making the windows shudder violently, in la bouettejust outside of new orleans. and here's more of the aftermath. the biggest problem facing louisiana as the waters begin to recede is that much of the state is still without electrical power. michael george is in new orleans for cbs. more than a million people who are still without power two days after the hurricane hit, the reason why it is right behind me. this is a three—storey transmission tower that was brought down by the hurricane and there are holes in the power grid right now so officials say it will take weeks, not days, to fully restore the system. it's very hot and humid during the daytime here, so people are suffering without any power or air conditioning, a very difficult for search —— —— very difficult for search —— —— very difficult situation for people already dealing with flood conditions.
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losing power has made it much harder for all the different organisation invoved in the relief effort to do their work. nate mook, is chief executive of world central kitchen which is providing food to people in the city. even cell phone service went down yesterday for much of the day, even the first responder network, there is not supposed to go down, went down, so you had police and fire couldn't communicate with each other, so everything takes longer thanit other, so everything takes longer than it should, but we are hoping over the next couple of days that we get further ramped up support families. but the reality is folks don't have anywhere to go. they are here, they have no power so they need services quick. two people died when the storm hit louisiana. there have been further fatalities as it continued inland. across the bayou from new orleans in the city of slidell, police have been searching for the body of a man who was attacked by an alligator. the incident happened in a flooded outbuilding, attached to the man's property. cbs reported the 71—year—old lost his arm in the attack.
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the man's wife tried to save him before going for help. this is a capain in the local sherriff�*s office. when she went downstairs, she heard the commotion, opened the back door and saw— the commotion, opened the back door and saw he _ the commotion, opened the back door and saw he was getting attacked by the alligator. she went down the steps _ the alligator. she went down the steps and — the alligator. she went down the steps and tried to do her best to fend _ steps and tried to do her best to fend off— steps and tried to do her best to fend off the alligator. the deputies -ot fend off the alligator. the deputies got out _ fend off the alligator. the deputies got out here and noticed there was a large _ got out here and noticed there was a large amount of blood, but the body was no _ large amount of blood, but the body was no longer present. further inland, in the state of mississippi two people died when a crevasse opened up on a busy highway. these pictures from mississippi highway patrol show a trench six metres deep, which seven vehicles fell into. this all happened after the road collapsed in heavy rain. back in new orleans, the clean up is under way in the city centre. buildings there were damaged by ida's hurricane winds — but the area was largely spared the storm surges which have caused so much damage
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when hurricane katrina hit in 2005. 1,800 people died back then. the authorities invested heavily in flood defences afterwards. these levees — or defence walls — were crucial, this time round. chris mccrory a reporter for the new orleans station wwltv. in new orleans especially, the levees help, that's one of the biggest concerns, and one of the biggest concerns, and one of the biggest questions we had, we thought they would and they did. we spent $1.a billion and storing —— —— mr lim after hurricane katrina. it hit on the 16th anniversary of hurricane katrina which brought back a lot of bad memories. the city has not yet fully recovered, and now to have this, such widespread devastation, we still can't get in touch with a lot of the people in lower lying
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coastal parishes, so we still do not fully understand the situation down there. it's a very different scene to the one in the us state of california, where thousands of residents have been forced to evacuate the tourist town of south lake tahoe as the caldor fire draws closer. these were the scenes in south lake tahoe after evacuation order was issued — long queues of traffic as residents rushed to leave the area. and these are the latest pictures from the area — intense fire and smoke. the fire broke out more than two weeks ago and has so far burned an area larger than chicago. more than 650 structures have been destroyed and at least 20,000 more are under threat. three first responders have been injured in the blaze, along with two civilians. this is what the fires look like from a space satellite. the bbc�*s james clayton is following the story from san francisco.
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south like taha is beloved by many californians, it's the kind of place where people go on summer holidays to swim, to hike, and in the winter there are lots of ski resorts. but there are lots of ski resorts. but there was slopes have been turned into an inferno. this caldorfar has been approaching the town for a number of days and i think a lot of residents were hopeful the winds would push it in another direction or firefighters would be able to control it. neither of those things have happened. residents have looked on in horror as the fires have got closer and closer and closer. on monday the entire town was asked to evacuate. there were trafficjams that spread from throughout south lake tahoe north into nevada. the californian governor has claimed a state of emergency, the governor in nevada has done exactly the same thing. but firefighters on the ground say now they are really embroiled in a hand fight on the ground to try and save this town,
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that fight will continue for the next few days.. that's all for now. hello. there are some changes to the weather towards the end of this week, certainly through the second part of the weekend. but it looks like for the time being, the area of high pressure will continue to bring a lot of dry and settled the rather cloudy weather, occasional drizzle in the east, any sunny spells reserved for western errors. high pressure has parked itself across the north—west of the uk, allowing the north—west of the uk, allowing the cloud to stream in from the north and north—east, off the north sea. mainly central and eastern areas holding on to the thickest of the clinton, maybe a little drizzle. a few clearer spells further south and waste —— west. could turn chilly again in one or two spots, otherwise where you have the cloud, 10 to 12
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celsius. wednesday looking similar, again, rather cloudy and grey skies, again, rather cloudy and grey skies, a bit of drizzle across and eastern areas. a few holes appearing to allow some sunshine across the southeast, midwest wells, parts of northern ireland and quite a bit of sunshine for scotland. it will feel quite warm. 21 or 22 celsius. versus the mid to high teens for elsewhere. the area of high pressure is still with us and are pretty similar position for thursday and friday so again, a lot of cloud, quite breezy particularly across southern and eastern areas and it is these which will see the thickest cloud because further south and west in the bit of shelter we should see that sunshine poking through, pushing temperatures up poking through, pushing temperatures up to 20 or 21. enter the weekend, some changes, the area of high pressure pulse away to the east and allows low pressure to invade from the west. these weather fronts mean it will turn more and settled
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generally, an increasing chance of showers or longer spells of rain in wind will pick up. but the wind will be coming in from the south, though slightly warmer, but more humidity, so it will feel a bit warmer, but variable amounts of cloud but some good spells of sunshine, the first signs of their own push into southern and western portions of the country towards the latter part of the day, otherwise for most it should stay dry, temperatures 16 to 21. sunday, quite a windy day, the wind coming from the south—east, sunny spells and a chance of some rain, some of which could be heavy infantry. —— mccann thundery.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. the this is outside source. taliban has sealed its takeo of the taliban has sealed its takeover of afghanistan is the final american troops complete their withdrawal. this image capture the last us soldier to leave the tarmac after 20 years of american military involvement. the taliban has moved on to take the us equipment that was left behind and they celebrated their victory. tote left behind and they celebrated their victory-— left behind and they celebrated their victo . ~ . ., , left behind and they celebrated theirvicto . ~ . ., ., their victory. we have a message to any possible — their victory. we have a message to any possible invader _ their victory. we have a message to any possible invader that _ their victory. we have a message to any possible invader that anyone i any possible invader that anyone that looks to afghanistan with bad intentions, they will face what the united states has faced today. president biden is due to make an announcement from the white house defending his decision to withdraw.
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we will bring you that when it happens. in louisiana, floods caused by hurricane ida, millions remain without power. on the bbc�*s russian correspondent has left moscow after being expelled by the authorities. we will hear her last report before she got on the plane. the 20—year presence of foreign forces in afghanistan has come to an end. as america pulled out it left behind an uncertain future for the afghan people and huge questions for the international coalition about what had been achieved. the taliban claim they have won their independence. but they too have questions — the most pressing being whether they make the transition from brutal insurgents to responsible government. that would appear to be a long journey. our chief international correspondent, lyse doucet, and her cameraman robbie wright, sent this report from kabul. american uniforms, american guns, but these are taliban
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special forces. badri unit 313. they are in charge at kabul airport. translation: our message - to the americans is they should not have any plans to attack muslims again. our message to all afghans is we are going to protect them. the last us flight took off yesterday, just before midnight. the last moments of america's military mission here. the skies exploded with taliban celebration once it was clear the last us soldier, major general chris donahue, was on his way home. this is what they left behind. hangars full of helicopters, even blackhawks, all disabled, destroyed, so the taliban can't use them. the best of american military hardware, the best of its generals, were part of its longest war.
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and now it has ended in the worst of ways, and it will live long in memory, here in afghanistan, in america, and far beyond. today, an airfield flooded by taliban. their urgent task, repairing the runways so commercial airlines can fly again. translation: as you can see, these infidels destroyed - the entire airport. they haven't left any machinery in good repair. we had a team ready to fix this mess ever since we came to kabul. now that the americans have left we are ready to clean it up. all flights have stopped, but afghans still keep trying to get in, to find a way out of this country. taliban guards turn them away. when we drive through the streets of kabul, the city seems much the same,
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until we get to the banks. to the queues stretching all the way down the street. most banks are shut, most don't have any money. some people have stood here for days wondering if they can withstand this for long. i should build a future, i should study. so definitely if the situations are like that, you should stay for one weekjust to take 10,000 afghani... $100 from the bank, so it's not possible to live here. a country turned upside down and inside out. an old order suddenly ripped away, a new one suddenly started, in chaos and uncertainty. lyse doucet, bbc news, kabul. dozens of countries — may have had forces in afghanistan but there is no question that it was a mission conceived in the us and led by the us. the numbers alone tell the story:
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america is thought to have spent more than two trillion dollars over the last 20 years. and then there was the cost in lives — more than 2,a00 us military personnel died in the line of duty. but that's dwarfed by more than 116,000 afghan civilians, police and military forces killed in the conflict. these already iconic images of a commanding officer of the evacuation mission, major general chris donahue, caught in night vision — the last soldier out of afghanistan. more disconcerting for americans are the images just hours later of taliban forces in us military fatigues inspecting the same airfield. and it wasn'tjust equipment the us military left behind, but american citizens and vulnerable afghans, but the us insists the work to get them out continues. a new chapter of america's engagement with afghanistan has begun. it's one in which we will lead
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with our diplomacy. the military mission is over, a new diplomatic mission has begun. it was an incredible logistical effort to evacuate more than 123,000 civilians over the past month. but of course it came at a cost. scores of civilian deaths and 13 more us military lives lost, adding to the more than 2300 americans already killed in afghanistan and heaping more pressure on president biden. for a country renowned for honouring its servicemen and women, what looks to many inescapably like a defeat has been a huge blow, and military veterans have been especially vocal about their dismay. i think it was a waste of... a waste of time over there, because it wasn't run properly, i don't think. $2 trillion spent over there, and nothing has changed, it seems like. the taliban is back in, they were
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just waiting for us to leave. i love this country. it'll be... it will come back but it's not in a good place right now, that's for sure. and there has been much discussion here about what this humbling, chaotic end to its longest war means for america's standing in the world. more than 123,000 people have been evacuated from kabul in a mass airlift coordinated by the united states and its allies over the past two weeks — but it is unclear exactly how many of these are afghan nationals and how many are miilitary and diplomatic staff. begin by looking at the different countries involved. the us says it has evacuated nearly 80,000, many were taken to europe and the middle east as a first step and it is expected most will travel on to the
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us. in the uk the ministry of defence says it has flown out more than 15,000. some 8000 were afghan nationals. britain says it plans to accept 20,000 refugees over the long term. edward solomon is the ceo of the refugee council. what term. edward solomon is the ceo of the refugee council.— the refugee council. what should ideall be the refugee council. what should ideally be happening _ the refugee council. what should ideally be happening as - the refugee council. what should ideally be happening as they - ideally be happening as they allocate to counsel across the country and they have a house to go to our agency like mine, the refugee council provides all the needs that family have because they are often arriving with just the clouds they have on their backs. we can give them cash, a food parcel, toiletries, help them work out where they are and understand where they are because they are often extremely bewildered. �* , ., ., ~' are because they are often extremely bewildered. �* , ., ., ~ ., are because they are often extremely bewildered. �* , ., bewildered. next let's look at some ofthe bewildered. next let's look at some of the countries _ bewildered. next let's look at some of the countries closest _ bewildered. next let's look at some of the countries closest to - of the countries closest to afghanistan. the us is called on neighbouring countries to keep their borders open saying 500,000 afghans could try to flee the country this year. one crossing on the border to
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pakistan is reported to still be open allowing afghans to enter despite pakistan saying it would close the border of the taliban came to power. iran is saying afghans who enter their territory will be sent back. among their other neighbours, tajikistan says it is preparing to take up to 100,000 refugees, uzbekistan says it has already seen around 1500 come across the border and set up camp. next let's look at the european union. eu ministers have been meeting today to discuss the displacement of afghans. let's begin with the eu commissioner for home affairs. it's important to see what we can do now to avoid a humanitarian crisis. this is the best way to avoid a migration crisis, is to avoid a humanitarian crisis, is to avoid a humanitarian crisis, and that's why we need to support afghans in afghanistan. the eu may want afghans to remain in afghanistan but a considerable number are already making their way
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to europe. france has evacuated more than 2600 afghan nationals, according to the country's defence minister. the government says it intends to help those most in danger but cannot bear the responsibility for resettlement alone. among those who have fled as a women's football player. who have fled as a women's football -la er. ., , ., who have fled as a women's football -la er. ., , who have fled as a women's football -la er. ., player. leaving your country and our player. leaving your country and your dreams. — everything is so hard for everyone. we have lots of hope and future plans and now we will start with zero. germany, which has one of the highest refugee populations in the world, has said it will accept some afghans — although without giving specifics. the german military says it has evacuated more than 5,000 people — including more than a,100 afghans. the chancellor has today been laying out the country's priorities when it comes to getting more people out of the country. the focus at the moment as local staff, _ the focus at the moment as local staff, and — the focus at the moment as local staff, and that is not 300, more like 10-a0,000 staff, and that is not 300, more like 10—a0,000 people and we will have to _ like 10—a0,000 people and we will have to see how many want to leave the country —
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have to see how many want to leave the country and how many don't. this number— the country and how many don't. this number will— the country and how many don't. this number will be influenced by the way the taliban— number will be influenced by the way the taliban decide to rule the country _ italy is also playing its part, evacuating nearly 5,000 afghan nationals — more than half of which are women and children, according to the defence ministry. while many countries are making commitments to help resettle afghan nationals — there are reports coming out that not all of them are being accepted. poland has evacuated more than 900 people but for the past two weeks, a group of 32 have been camped on the border with belarus. poland insists they are the responsibility of the belarusian authorities because they are located just inside the border. meanwhile, two children evacuated from afghanistan have fallen seriously ill after eating poisonous mushrooms. mark easton reports. there have been some reports to suggest that the family were hungry but the service says they were receiving three meals a day. two of the brothers aged five and six are
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now in a critical condition in hospital and procedures are under to give the six—year—old a liver transplant. unfortunately, his younger brother has suffered irreversible rain damage and is unable to have the procedure. a17—year—old girl was in a stable condition and her prognosis is quite good. the family were among more than 1000 afghans who previously worked with nato forces in the country to be evacuated from kabul by the polish military. broadly speaking, people here are supportive of accepting afghans fleeing the taliban and a majority of people in a survey published today said that the country should accept afghan refugees. and then there are eastern european countries like albania and north macedonia, who say they will temporarily look after hundreds of afghan nationals before being resettled in the us. here is the first group of 1a9 people arriving at skopje international airport in northern macedonia
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on tuesday night. however the total figure will be around a,000 people, according to the albanian foreign minister. but will any be allowed to stay? this was the response of the prime minister. we know that the situation is quite complicated and with so many people applying for a us visa, it may take more than what was said. in the meantime, we know that for sure we are ready to welcome them to stay and if they want to settle in albania, they can do it. and finally in europe, let's look at turkey, which is thought to have evacuated around a00 afghanistan nationals but says it cannot take what the foreign minister described as a new refugee "burden" after hosting thousands of syrians who have fled the civil war. among the feelings of fear and uncertainty that we've been hearing afghans who are embarking on new lives after leaving their country are enduring — there are also moments ofjoy. two afghan athletes
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are currently participating in the tokyo paralympics, having arrived in the city on saturday after being evacuated to france. hossain rasouli, who lost his left hand in a mine explosion, came last in the men's long jump event but managed to achieve a personal best. rasouli's only teammate, zakia khuda—dadi will compete in the women's taekwondo event later this week. best of luck to her. stay with us on outside source — still to come. from fallen heroes to survivors, we hear what british veterans and their families make of the afghan campaign. an alpaca which twice tested positive for bovine tuberculosis has been put down following a failed attempt in the courts to save it. government officials
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and police arrived to collect geronimo this morning. the animals owner had claimed the tests used to confirm the animals tb status gave false positive results. our environment and rural affairs correspondent claire marshall is in south gloucestershire. this morning, the moment geronimo's supporters had been dreading. a team of death row officials and police officers came to take the alpaca away. it was taken in this trailer with a police escort to be euthanised. mrs macdonald had brought geronimo to the uk from new zealand in 2017. the alpaca had tested positive twice for bovine tb but she maintains the tests were flawed. i but she maintains the tests were flawed. ., ., but she maintains the tests were flawed. . ., �* ., , but she maintains the tests were flawed. . ., 1, _ ., ,., flawed. i heard that boris johnson has sympathy _ flawed. i heard that boris johnson has sympathy for _ flawed. i heard that boris johnson has sympathy for me. _ flawed. i heard that boris johnson has sympathy for me. stuff - flawed. i heard that boris johnson has sympathy for me. stuff your | has sympathy for me. stuff your sympathy! why didn't you sort this out? why am i stood here today surrounded by media and my animal was dragged off with a rope around its neck. the was dragged off with a rope around its neck. .., ,
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was dragged off with a rope around its neck. .. , ., , its neck. the case has highlighted the deep divide _ its neck. the case has highlighted the deep divide over— its neck. the case has highlighted the deep divide over how - its neck. the case has highlighted the deep divide over how to - its neck. the case has highlighted l the deep divide over how to control the deep divide over how to control the disease in cattle. in england the disease in cattle. in england the highly controversial badger cull sees tens of thousands of the animals, a protected species, shot each year. farmers believe it is a key part of the strategy and tb costs the taxpayers millions each year and can devastate farming businesses. brute year and can devastate farming businesses.— year and can devastate farming businesses. ., ., ., '~:: businesses. we have lost around 160 cattle and unfortunately _ businesses. we have lost around 160 cattle and unfortunately when - businesses. we have lost around 160 cattle and unfortunately when it - cattle and unfortunately when it happens i don't like it but i accept it has failed the test and if they have failed the test, their fate is sealed, that's what has to happen. the government says it was following the scientific evidence. there will now be a postmortem examination on geronimo. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom.
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our lead story, president biden is about to address the american public to defend the withdrawal of american troops from afghanistan. the bbc s moscow correspondent has left russia. she was expelled by the authorities after being labelled a threat to national security. sarah rainsford, who first reported from moscow for the bbc over 20 years ago, just as vladimir putin came to power, has been told she can never return to the country. moscow claims the move is in response to the expulsion of a russian journalist from the uk two years ago, but the decision comes at the same time as a severe crackdown on independentjournalists and opposition activists within russia. here s sarah s report. this was the moment i discovered i was being expelled from russia. according to a specific law, i have been designated a threat to national security and as such i am not allowed into the country.
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pulled aside at passport control, i was told the fsb security service had banned me for life. i recorded the conversation. i was returning from belarus where i had confronted alexander lukashenko on the mass repression and torture of peaceful protesters. his loyal supporters rounded on me. in a coordinated attack. vladimir putin is presenting this as just another working visit... i have reported on russia for two decades, the whole span of vladimir putin's presidency. highs like the world cup but i have also charted the slow erosion of freedoms here, the crackdown of dissent. a year ago the government put me on short—term visas. then i
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became the news. state television announced i had to leave. after tense negotiations i had been allowed to enter russia. they let me in, for now. but only to pack. i was then towed my visa wouldn't be renewed. supposedly what happened to a russian reporter in london, but that was two years ago. i was called in here to the foreign ministry and they kept insisting my expulsion was nothing personal. they talked about it as a reciprocal move but refused to even engage with the fact i had been labelled a national security threat. they said that was just a technical moment. but at a time when russia is increasingly seeing enemies all around it really feels i have now been added to the list. it is happening as the pressure on russian journalists who don't toe the kremlin line is intensifying. one network has been added to a growing black list of media labelled foreign agents were getting funds
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from abroad. it foreign agents were getting funds from abroad-— from abroad. it means that we, dozhd, are _ from abroad. it means that we, dozhd, are enemies _ from abroad. it means that we, dozhd, are enemies of- from abroad. it means that we, dozhd, are enemies of the - from abroad. it means that we, i dozhd, are enemies of the state. from abroad. it means that we, - dozhd, are enemies of the state. the pretending _ dozhd, are enemies of the state. the pretending of being democracy is over~ _ pretending of being democracy is over~ it _ pretending of being democracy is over~ it is — pretending of being democracy is over. it is not there. it could become _ over. it is not there. it could become much worse any time. sol over. it is not there. it could become much worse any time. so i am leavin: a become much worse any time. so i am leaving a country _ become much worse any time. so i am leaving a country i _ become much worse any time. so i am leaving a country i first _ become much worse any time. so i am leaving a country i first came _ become much worse any time. so i am leaving a country i first came to - become much worse any time. so i am leaving a country i first came to as - leaving a country i first came to as the soviet rain fell apart, when free speech are freedoms for new and precious. it feels like today's russia is moving in reverse. let's turn back to afghanistan because of the last 20 years there have been a57 deaths of uk armed forces personnel. a special correspondent has been hearing from veterans and the mother of one of those killed in the conflict about how they feel about the way the military operation ended. the 20
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year afghanistan war is over, but for those who served and their families, the stories of grief, pride and survival will last a lifetime. i pride and survival will last a lifetime. .., �* pride and survival will last a lifetime. �* ., ~ , lifetime. i can't talk very well. i can't live _ lifetime. i can't talk very well. i can't live by _ lifetime. i can't talk very well. i can't live by myself— lifetime. i can't talk very well. i can't live by myself because - lifetime. i can't talk very well. i can't live by myself because i l lifetime. i can't talk very well. i i can't live by myself because i can't reach up to the cupboards or wash myself, or do anything myself. ben parkinson served with seven para rha. in 2006, his land rover was hit by a mine. today he questions everything. what was it like for you watching the taliban sweep in, and to take over in days? i watching the taliban sweep in, and to take over in days?— to take over in days? i was feeling i lost m to take over in days? i was feeling i lost my legs _ to take over in days? i was feeling i lost my legs for _ to take over in days? i was feeling i lost my legs for nothing, - to take over in days? i was feeling i lost my legs for nothing, so i to take over in days? i was feeling i lost my legs for nothing, so it i i lost my legs for nothing, so it was a waste of time. afghanistan?
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yes. total waste _ was a waste of time. afghanistan? yes. total waste of _ was a waste of time. afghanistan? yes. total waste of time. - was a waste of time. afghanistan? yes. total waste of time. it i was a waste of time. afghanistan? yes. total waste of time. it has i yes. total waste of time. it has destroyed _ yes. total waste of time. it has destroyed my — yes. total waste of time. it has destroyed my life, _ yes. total waste of time. it has destroyed my life, my - yes. total waste of time. it has destroyed my life, my heart i yes. total waste of time. it has destroyed my life, my heart is. destroyed my life, my heart is broken — destroyed my life, my heart is broken and will be broken forever. this is— broken and will be broken forever. this is where lisa comes to reflect on the life of private daniel wade. her son was 20 when he was killed in afghanistan? he her son was 20 when he was killed in afghanistan?— afghanistan? he was such a lovely lad, his smile _ afghanistan? he was such a lovely lad, his smile would _ afghanistan? he was such a lovely lad, his smile would light - afghanistan? he was such a lovely lad, his smile would light up i afghanistan? he was such a lovely lad, his smile would light up the i lad, his smile would light up the room. _ lad, his smile would light up the room. the — lad, his smile would light up the room, the most beautiful blue eyes in such— room, the most beautiful blue eyes in such a _ room, the most beautiful blue eyes in such a cheeky chappie. sifter in such a cheeky chappie. after watchin: in such a cheeky chappie. after watching television _ in such a cheeky chappie. after watching television of - in such a cheeky chappie. after watching television of the i in such a cheeky chappie. after watching television of the last l in such a cheeky chappie. ire watching television of the last two weeks, how do you reflect on daniel's sacrifice?— weeks, how do you reflect on daniel's sacrifice? from pulling out of afghanistan _ daniel's sacrifice? from pulling out of afghanistan to _ daniel's sacrifice? from pulling out of afghanistan to now, _ daniel's sacrifice? from pulling out of afghanistan to now, what i daniel's sacrifice? from pulling out of afghanistan to now, what about| of afghanistan to now, what about the people they have left behind? daniel's _ the people they have left behind? daniel's sacrifice among 456 other families— daniel's sacrifice among 456 other families as well, feeling so hurt, that the — families as well, feeling so hurt, that the sacrifice, is it for nothing? _ that the sacrifice, is it for nothing? 0r that the sacrifice, is it for nothing? or do i try and take comfort— nothing? or do i try and take comfort that he has brought dreams to people _
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comfort that he has brought dreams to people that could never dream at one point _ to people that could never dream at one oint. .,, i. one point. people say, did you feel an hinu , one point. people say, did you feel anything. did _ one point. people say, did you feel anything. did you _ one point. people say, did you feel anything, did you file _ one point. people say, did you feel anything, did you file click - one point. people say, did you feel anything, did you file click on i anything, did you file click on anything, did you file click on anything like that? i didn't feel anything, the next thing i was aware of i was on the floor on my back. in 2009, andy reid stepped on an improvised explosive device on patrol in afghanistan. he refuses to blame or question his service. everything we did was worth it, 100%. we were saving lives on a daily basis. every time we went out the camp we were putting their lives at risk but changing lives and changing hours. saving women and young girls lives. they have had a taste of freedom and seen what it can look like, what democracy can look like. i think they will want that for the future. just look like. i think they will want that for the future.— look like. i think they will want that for the future. just before we finish this hour, _ that for the future. just before we finish this hour, little _ that for the future. just before we finish this hour, little bit - that for the future. just before we finish this hour, little bit of i that for the future. just before we finish this hour, little bit of an i finish this hour, little bit of an update on the paralympics for you. for athletes taking part the event will be the pinnacle of their sporting careers and for thousands of others it will be a motivation. a
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senegalese athlete is determined to represent his country one day. hand cycling as his chosen sport and he has been telling the bbc how it helped him rebuild his life after a devastating accident. speed, endurance and freedom of movement. he turned to hand cycling after being involved in an accident in 2008 whilst on duty in french guyana. he suffered life changing injuries after his army vehicle overturned in the ravine. mr; injuries after his army vehicle overturned in the ravine. my spine was fractured _ overturned in the ravine. my spine was fractured and _ overturned in the ravine. my spine was fractured and the _ overturned in the ravine. my spine was fractured and the spinal-cordl was fractured and the spinal—cord was fractured and the spinal—cord was severed. i had to start from scratch because when you undergo this kind of trauma you have to learn everything again just like a baby. he learn everything again 'ust like a bab . , , ., ., learn everything again 'ust like a bab. ,, ., baby. he spent over a year in hosital baby. he spent over a year in hospital before _ baby. he spent over a year in hospital before beginning i baby. he spent over a year in hospital before beginning a i baby. he spent over a year in i hospital before beginning a long period of rehab. this hospital before beginning a long period of rehab.— hospital before beginning a long period of rehab. this handbag looks like a normal _ period of rehab. this handbag looks like a normal bike _ period of rehab. this handbag looks like a normal bike except _ period of rehab. this handbag looks like a normal bike except it - period of rehab. this handbag looks like a normal bike except it uses i like a normal bike except it uses strengths of the arms. i can go as
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fast as unable to look like able—bodied person and cover similar distances. he able-bodied person and cover similar distances. , ., , ., distances. he is open to strengthening _ distances. he is open to strengthening his i distances. he is open to i strengthening his chances of distances. he is open to _ strengthening his chances of making the paralympics, with a little help from his friends.— from his friends. since his accident. _ from his friends. since his accident, we _ from his friends. since his accident, we have - from his friends. since his accident, we have come i from his friends. since his. accident, we have come back from his friends. since his- accident, we have come back to support— accident, we have come back to support him but she also supports us. support him but she also supports us he _ support him but she also supports us he is — support him but she also supports us he is a — support him but she also supports us. he is a very courageous person, he never— us. he is a very courageous person, he never says— us. he is a very courageous person, he never says he is tired during training — he never says he is tired during training. he he never says he is tired during trainina. , ., . training. he will be watching the to 0 training. he will be watching the tokyo paralympics _ training. he will be watching the tokyo paralympics from - training. he will be watching the tokyo paralympics from home i training. he will be watching the i tokyo paralympics from home but he dreams of qualification for the 202a games which will be held in paris. i games which will be held in paris. 1 have already given part of me to france, if i could go to the paralympics, i would like to carry the senegalese flight to set an example, to motivate others who wish to believe and achieve the same goals as mine. to believe and achieve the same goals as mine-— goals as mine. hand cycling has liven goals as mine. hand cycling has given him _ goals as mine. hand cycling has given him a _ goals as mine. hand cycling has given him a new— goals as mine. hand cycling has given him a new direction i goals as mine. hand cycling has given him a new direction in i goals as mine. hand cycling has| given him a new direction in life.
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and you wouldn't bet against him making it either. thanks for watching, see you soon. there are some changes to the weather towards the end of this week, certainly through the second part of the weekend, but it looks like for the time being our area of high pressure is going to bring a lot of dry and settled but rather cloudy and dull weather with occasional drizzle across the eastern areas and any sunny spells for western areas. this area of high pressure is parked itself across the north—west of the uk allowing cloud to streaming from the north, north—east, of the north sea. central and eastern areas will hold on to the thickest of the cloud tonight and the odd spot of drizzle. a few clear spell south and west, could see clear skies across central, western scotland and it will be quite chilly and one or two
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spots otherwise where you have the cloud, 10—12. wednesday looks very similar, rather cloudy and grey, leaden skies and a bit of drizzle across eastern areas. a few holes here and they are to allow some sunshine across the south—west, wales and parts of northern ireland and quite a bit of sunshine perhaps for scotland where it will feel quite warm. 21 or 22 versus the mid to high teens further east where we will have a more significant north—easterly breeze. our area of high pressure still with us in a similar position for thursday and friday, so again a lot of cloud, quite breezy across southern and eastern areas and that is the east which will see the thickest of the cloud because further south and west with a bit of shelter we should see the sunshine pushing through and pushing the temperature to 21, 22. the area of high pressure pulls away to the east and allows low pressure to the east and allows low pressure to invade from the west so more isobars on the charts and these
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weather fronts which means it will turn more unsettled generally, increasing chance of showers are longer spells of rain, the winds will pick up but winds from the south though picking up a warmer direction, a bit more humidity so it will feel warmer. variable amounts of cloud but also some good spells of cloud but also some good spells of sunshine, first signs of the rain pushing into southern and western portions of the country, towards the latter part of the day but for most it should stay dry, 16—21, 22 and sunniest spots. one is coming in from the south—east, sunny spells and the chance of rain, some could be heavy and sundry. —— thundery.
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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 8pm — the end of america's longest war as the last soldiers leaves afghanistan, but an uncertain future lies ahead for the afghan people. american uniforms, american weapons, but now worn by the taliban as they claim victory and independence. now it has ended in the worst of ways, and it will live long in memory, here in afghanistan, in america and far beyond. who gets a blood test and who doesn't? the tough choices facing gps as they deal with a shortage of test tubes. geronimo the alpaca is put down after testing positive for bovine tb, a case that pitches activists against farmers.

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