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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 1, 2021 3:00am-3:31am BST

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welcome to bbc news — i'm david eades. our top stories. president biden issues a forceful defence of the chaotic us withdrawal from afghanistan — ending america's longest war. we succeeded in what we set out to do in afghanistan over a decade ago and we stayed for another decade. it was time to end this war. the taliban take the spoils of war — american uniforms, american weapons left behind in the rush to get out. now it is ended and the worst of ways. and it will live long in memory here in afghanistan, in america and far beyond. rescue operations continue in louisiana
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after hurricane ida left millions of people without power. the million dollarfund, encouraging green innovation — and the quest for net zero emissions. — we have a special report. and — could it be double �*jeopardy�* for the long—running us quiz show? — after the departure of the executive producer, over allegations of past offensive comments. president biden has delivered a strident defence of the us evacuation mission from afghanistan — labelling it an extraordinary success. the president struck a defiant tone, in his televised address from the white house, the day after america's 20 year presence in
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the country came to an end. he described the operation to fly more than 120,000 people out of kabul in recent weeks as one of the biggest airlifts in history. and said the decision to leave now was on the unanimous recommendation of all his advisers. we have succeeded in what we set out to do in afghanistan over a decade ago. then we stayed another decade. it was time to end this war. this is a new world. the terror threat has metastasized across the world well beyond afghanistan. we are left with a simple decision. either follow through on the commitment made by the last administration and leave afghanistan or say we were not leaving and commit another tens of thousands more troops going back to war. that was the choice. in kabul — the taliban have
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been making the most of their first day in full control of afghanistan — an �*enjoyable moment of victory�* , according to its leaders. their fighters have been showing off some of the equipment and weapons left behind by us forces, while pointing out that they now control more of afghanistan than they did 20 years ago. 0ur chief international correspondent lyse doucet, and cameraman robbie wright, sent this report from kabul. american uniforms, american guns, but these are taliban special forces. badri unit 313. they are in charge at kabul airport. translation: our message i to the americans is they should not have any plans to attack muslims again. 0ur message to all afghans is we are going to protect them. surreal to enter
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what was a us hub. whiteboards from a moment in time just days before kabul fell, when us soldiers plotted an orderly pull—out. this is what they left behind. hangers are full of helicopters. all disabled, destroyed, so the taliban cannot use them. the best of american military hardware, the best of its generals, were part of its longest war. and now it has ended in the worst of ways, and it will live long in memory, here in afghanistan, in america, and far beyond. today, an airfield flooded with fighters. their first urgent task, repairing the runways so commercial airlines can fly again. translation: as you can see, these infidels destroyed - the entire airport.
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they haven't left any machinery in good repair. we had a team ready to fix this mess ever since we came to kabul. now that the americans have left we are ready to clean it up. all flights have stopped, but afghans still keep trying to get in, to find a way out of this country. taliban guards turn them away. the last us flight lifted off last night, and the skies exploded with taliban celebration, after the last american soldier, major general chris donahue, was on his way home. when we drive through the streets of kabul, the city seems much the same, until we get to the banks. to the queues stretching all the way down the street. most banks are shut, most don't have any money. some people have stood here for days wondering
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if they can withstand this for long. i should build a future, i should study. so definitely if the situations are like that, you should stay for one weekjust to take 10,000 afghani...$100 from the bank, so it's not possible to live here. a country turned upside down and inside out. an old order suddenly ripped away, a new one suddenly started, in chaos and uncertainty. lyse doucet, bbc news, kabul. let's speak to peter galbraith former us diplomat and former deputy un envoy to afghanistan. thank you very much forjoining us. if thank you very much forjoining us. ican i can put it this way, joe biden again, i guess, came out fighting, didn't t. e is very forthright in his and i wonder what she made of his address? i think you made the case, the
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correct case that the united states had done everything it could in afghanistan and he expected the afghan army would be an adversary to the taliban and that the project had failed, that he had no choice but to withdraw based on the agreement that donald trump had negotiated. the alternative would have been to escalate. and he said something very significant. he said that the everin significant. he said that the ever in which the united states goes abroad in major military endeavours and engages in nation—building is over. that in terms of us national security the country is going to focus narrowly on threats like terrorism and not in these large—scale enterprises that have been so costly in lives
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and money. have been so costly in lives and money-— have been so costly in lives and mone. ., ., ., , and money. you could hear ears ickin: and money. you could hear ears picking up _ and money. you could hear ears picking up all— and money. you could hear ears picking up all over _ and money. you could hear ears picking up all over the _ and money. you could hear ears picking up all over the world - picking up all over the world without commentary. and i guess from within as well because the military will have to bear some of that brunt, won't they? there are those who felt that the military have had too much sway over the last couple of decades and the way in which the us president has been running afghanistan.- the us president has been running afghanistan. that is absolutely _ running afghanistan. that is absolutely true. _ running afghanistan. that is absolutely true. i _ running afghanistan. that is absolutely true. i put - absolutely true. i put responsibility squarely on the military commanders. they promoted a strategy of counterinsurgency and lay themselves said in order for counterinsurgency to work, you need to have a partner, local partner. the afghan government was corrupt, ineffective with three successive fraudulent election is widely illegitimate. there was no partner and yet they pretended they had one. basically, they
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had a strategy tied for fifth fax to the strategy and the proper way to go about it is to look at the facts and have a strategy based on the facts. it strategy based on the facts. if you withdraw as indeed the united states has now from a theatre, if i can put it that way where are great concerns about threats to us national security which have been dealt with, if he withdrawn full you do lose the purchase of those threats, don't you?— threats, don't you? there's clearly some _ threats, don't you? there's clearly some degrading - threats, don't you? there's clearly some degrading of i threats, don't you? there's . clearly some degrading of your capability but the point that president biden was making, and my view, making well, was basically at what cost do we spend $2 trillion to try to remake afghanistan when the
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problem we had was terrorist threats or do we focus on the terrorist threat at a much lower cost. and he does think this is one of the most consequential definitions of american national security that a us president has made. i dare say, in my lifetime. he really said we're going to focus on the threats to the united states. we are not going to be sending tens or hundreds of thousands of troops around the world than try to make other countries. it is too expensive and more importantly, it doesn't work.— and more importantly, it doesn't work. . , doesn't work. certainly sounded like the closing _ doesn't work. certainly sounded like the closing of— doesn't work. certainly sounded like the closing of a _ doesn't work. certainly sounded like the closing of a chapter - like the closing of a chapter there. thank you very much indeed. ,., ., ., there. thank you very much indeed. ., , there. thank you very much l indeed._ you. thousands of people in california have been fleeing the popular tourist spot of lake tahoe as a huge wildfire rages. the caldorfire is heading towards the main resort town,
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in an area which straddles the border between california and nevada. more than 3000 firefighters have been working to contain the blaze. at least four people have died and more than a million stay with us on bbc news, still to come the million dollarfund, encouraging green innovation — and the quest for net zero emissions. she received the nobel peace prize for her work
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with the poor and the dying in india slums. the head of the catholic church had said mother teresa was a wonderful example of how to help people in need. we have to identify the bodies and round the coffins and take them back home. parents are waiting and wives are waiting. hostages appeared, some carried, some running, trying to escape the nightmare behind them. britain lost a princess today, | described by all to whom she reached out as irreplaceable. an early—morning car crash in a paris underpass ended | a life with more than its share of pain and courage, - warmth and compassion.
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this is bbc news, the latest headlines. president biden describes the us evacuation mission from afghanistan as an extraordinary success — the day after the end of america's 20 year presence in the country. britain's energy regulator, 0fgem, has launched a 600 million dollarfund to encourage energy firms to come up with ambitious new ideas to help the uk reach net zero emissions by 2050. similar schemes are cropping up the world over, while investment in renewables like wind and solar is soaring. for all that though, fossil fuels still supply 80 % of the world's energy needs. and governments are still finding it very difficult to end their financial support for — and reliance on — fossil fuels. look at the figures: investment in renewables has
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been galloping had in recent years to an estimated $250 billion globally in 2019. and yet continuing investment in coal oil and gas van to nearly $80 billion in 2019. governments contributed to that funding, bumping up to $250 billion into renewables every year. but still they dig deeper for fossil fuels with subsidies and g20 countries alone totalling $660 billion on average every year. those are the figures. those are the figures. well let's bring in bronwen tucker, analyst at oil change international in edmonton, canada and gauri singh, deputy director general of the international renewable energy agency. shejoins us from abu dhabi. thank you very much indeed for being with us. ijust want to start with you with some of these figures. because it does look as if investment in renewables, whether it is private or public, actually, it's growing at a pace. is it good enough for you, though?
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yes, sell, in short, no. it is going faster than it did and thatis going faster than it did and that is the good news so the jump that is the good news so the jump between this year and last was twice as fast as years prior and the bigger, worse news as it is still only about one third of what it should be to meet private targets. and then also, you know, fossil fuel production is else needed and alongside these spendings and alongside these spendings and these are not happening yet. and these are not happening et. ., , ., and these are not happening et. . ,.,. ., ., yet. that is a critical area, the transitional _ yet. that is a critical area, the transitional phase. - the transitional phase. nonetheless, in terms of what you are looking at, whether subsidies are coming into fossil fuels, subsidies are coming into fossilfuels, they are subsidies are coming into fossil fuels, they are still massive. why is that when we see all these commitments to tackling climate change? yes. i es, tackling climate change? yes. i yes. they _ tackling climate change? yes. i yes. they are — tackling climate change? yes. i yes, they are massive - tackling climate change? yes. i yes, they are massive and - tackling climate change? yes. i | yes, they are massive and much too high and, you know, the money figures can be hard to
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translate into what that means for energy systems are just to say these are prolonging the lives of existing fields that need to be coming and there may be projects that wouldn't be able to go ahead. and the reason, you know, we have packs going back ten or 15 years and the government saying that i think it comes down to corporate power and especially the power of the fossil fuel industry. and so we are seeing those companies, challenge more and more. but it is not happening quickly enough. and we need to book in the subsidies. the government need to go a step further and also make sure that seeking approvals for new projects and regulating production. let approvals for new projects and regulating production.- regulating production. let me brin: ou regulating production. let me bring you in. _ regulating production. let me bring you in. if— regulating production. let me bring you in, if i _ regulating production. let me bring you in, ifi can. - regulating production. let me bring you in, if i can. what. bring you in, if i can. what sort of rate of growth do you
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need to get to the net serial targets that we are aiming for. we've got the international energy agency saying, look, forget it when it comes to oil and gas and certainly forget coal so the messages are routed there but is it happening quick enough? there but is it happening quick enou~h? ~ ~ i. enough? well, i think, you know, it — enough? well, i think, you know, it clear— enough? well, i think, you know, it clear that - enough? well, i think, you know, it clear that the - enough? well, i think, you i know, it clear that the energy transition _ know, it clear that the energy transition is happening but, as you said. _ transition is happening but, as you said, it is the pace that is reaiiy— you said, it is the pace that is really the key question so that— is really the key question so that we _ is really the key question so that we put it in perspective. you — that we put it in perspective. you know. _ that we put it in perspective. you know, you are looking at electricity— you know, you are looking at electricity becoming the major carrier— electricity becoming the major carrier of— electricity becoming the major carrier of energy by 2015 and what — carrier of energy by 2015 and what that means is that the electricity generation will grow— electricity generation will grow threefold. with renewables being _ grow threefold. with renewables being nearly 90% of it. and that — being nearly 90% of it. and that then means that the pace of investment that we currently
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have _ of investment that we currently have around 300 billion us dotters— have around 300 billion us dollars annually needs to more than _ dollars annually needs to more than double and reach $800 billion— than double and reach $800 billion annually and to put it stightiy— billion annually and to put it slightly differently, what it also — slightly differently, what it also means is if we have to reach — also means is if we have to reach the _ also means is if we have to reach the 1.5 in this scenario, as per— reach the 1.5 in this scenario, as per our— reach the 1.5 in this scenario, as per our analysis, you need an additional 33 trillion us dollars_ an additional 33 trillion us dollars above what is planned which — dollars above what is planned which is — dollars above what is planned which is around 100 trillion. to be — which is around 100 trillion. to be able to reach that. these are mind _ to be able to reach that. these are mind boggling _ to be able to reach that. these are mind boggling figures, - are mind boggling figures, obviously. there was a danger, obviously, isn't there? they become and to looking at these things as fossil fuels are the devil incarnate in renewables are the sort of the great hope for the future. but the fossil fuel world we live in is also employing many millions of people in that transitional phase has got to be handled
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sensibly. phase has got to be handled sensibl . ~ , sensibly. absolutely. the transition _ sensibly. absolutely. the transition has _ sensibly. absolutely. the transition has a _ sensibly. absolutely. the transition has a human i sensibly. absolutely. the l transition has a human face sensibly. absolutely. the i transition has a human face of people — transition has a human face of people are not numbers. and i think— people are not numbers. and i think policymakers have a choice _ think policymakers have a choice of whether they respond to the — choice of whether they respond to the shifts that are happening and, you with the support— happening and, you with the support of policies and creating social nets. otherwise they— creating social nets. otherwise they will— creating social nets. otherwise they will be in a very unenviable position of reacting to the — unenviable position of reacting to the social and economic fallouts _ to the social and economic fallouts. so that it is important. fallouts. so that it is imortant. , ~ fallouts. so that it is imortant. , . important. absolutely. we can see private _ important. absolutely. we can see private investment - important. absolutely. we can| see private investment growing all the time and there is a sort of sense that this is worth putting your money into. governments have a massive role to play. we've got the cop 26, the conference of parties coming up in glasgowjust a couple of months. cannot a difference and what do you need to see there? i difference and what do you need to see there?— to see there? i think despite the cop taking _ to see there? i think despite the cop taking place - to see there? i think despite the cop taking place in i to see there? i think despite the cop taking place in very l the cop taking place in very
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challenging times the factors also — challenging times the factors also that the momentum for climate _ also that the momentum for climate action has never been stronger~ _ climate action has never been stronger. sol climate action has never been stronger. so i can do vision underpinned by clear actions and backed by finance would give — and backed by finance would give us — and backed by finance would give us a _ and backed by finance would give us a fighting chance to reach — give us a fighting chance to reach our— give us a fighting chance to reach our goal of limiting global— reach our goal of limiting global warming to 1.5 reach our goal of limiting globalwarming to 1.5 and reach our goal of limiting global warming to 1.5 and i sincerely hope that the cop at can help _ sincerely hope that the cop at can help us achieve that. will can help us achieve that. will have to wait _ can help us achieve that. will have to wait to _ can help us achieve that. will have to wait to see _ can help us achieve that. ii have to wait to see but thank you both very much indeed for your analysis there. thank you. thank you. in other climate news, a un drive to tackle plastic pollution in the world's oceans has been launched at the world trade organisation in geneva. the global treaty on plastic waste would encourage the recycling of plastic products by taxing those made with virgin plastic. more than eight million tonnes of plastic enter the world's oceans every year. greta thunberg has played down expectations for this year's climate summit, cop26, saying the talks — in glasgow — are doomed to fail. the teenage environmental
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activist said no country in the " global north' was doing enough on the issue and change could only come " when there were enough people on the streets demanding it'. and the use of leaded petrol has finally been eradicated from the globe . the un environment programme says it will prevent more than a million premature deaths a year. no more leaded petrol is the point the un is making there. let's look at some of the issues. couple of words. one is mitigation and another is adaptation.
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climate critical habit for you next week and will be back at the same time next week. a bit of mitigation for you. they explain all that on twitter. one of america's most coveted jobs in television is back up for grabs, after mike richards was fired as the host ofjeopardy three weeks ago, and relagated to executive producer, but has now been fired from that role too — over offensive and sexist comments he made on a podcast several years ago. for more on this, we're joined now by michael schneider, deputy tv editor at variety. he joins us live now from los angeles. you better just explain you betterjust explain why this is quite such a big deal, it is a hugejob this is quite such a big deal, it is a huge job and jeopardy is one of the most watched shows on a live these transitions don't come along that often. of course, the
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previous host for many years, beloved by viewers, sadly passed away earlier this year and so it has been a big sort of issue since then on he was going to replace him and it came down to this. it was really botched from the beginning and that is why it is remaining headlines right now in the united states.— in the united states. these references _ in the united states. these references to _ in the united states. these references to offensive i in the united states. these i references to offensive remarks dating back years, i presume this is just the zeitgeist, and this is just the zeitgeist, and this is just the zeitgeist, and this is the world we are caught up this is the world we are caught up in. it this is the world we are caught u- in. , ., this is the world we are caught u- in. , . ., this is the world we are caught uin. , up in. it started with a couple of things- _ up in. it started with a couple of things. they _ up in. it started with a couple of things. they went - up in. it started with a couple of things. they went through | of things. they went through the whole process of bringing on guesthouse. he ended up being named the host of jeopardy. i did not sit well with a lot of folks. a lot of people thought he had an unfair advantage and to put his thumb on the scale a little bit and somehow managed to make himself the host of the show so that opened him up to a lot of
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criticism and people started digging in his background and they were not fans of his. the optics were not good so he had some skeletons in his closet and was exposed for some of these charges.— and was exposed for some of these charges. doesn't make any real difference _ these charges. doesn't make any real difference at _ these charges. doesn't make any real difference at the _ these charges. doesn't make any real difference at the tv - these charges. doesn't make any real difference at the tv show i real difference at the tv show itself? it is him as one of the top ten of all time in the united states. is it in self in jeopardy?— united states. is it in self in 'eoard ? , ., , ., , jeopardy? this does not help the show- — jeopardy? this does not help the show. it _ jeopardy? this does not help the show. it is _ jeopardy? this does not help the show. it is really - the show. it is really tarnished right now. it can be resolved post and the right producer but i think the company that produces it felt he was no longer that person because this whole process and he himself is too tainted to continue with the show. they have their — continue with the show. they have their own _ continue with the show. they have their own world, - continue with the show. they have their own world, don't l have their own world, don't they? they seem to survive test of time but is it the sort of show that needs a change of
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tack i don't think it is a tonne of refresh. all these shows need a little refresh once in awhile and unfortunately, in this case, the refresh in the host was because of the past. so a lot of the changes were going to come regardless of who became host butjust come regardless of who became host but just the come regardless of who became host butjust the way come regardless of who became host but just the way this was handled means that needs to be some sort of accountability now moving forward and hopefully a calming period of time where they figure out who this new host is going to be. thank you very much indeed. thank you very much indeed. let's lighten the mood a little before we go — i want to show you a weather forecast from canada and the surprise guest who made a slightly surprising, star appearance. anthony farnell was presenting the weather from home, when suddenly he found himself, on screen, with his dog, who brought a little ray of
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sunshine to their many viewers. the dog, called storm, appropriately enough, seemed fairly at ease with it all. you can reach me on twitter —i'm@bbcdavideades. hello there. the last day of august was a rather cloudy cooling with spots of drizzle across eastern areas. best of any sunshine towards the west. indeed the next few days of september are looking pretty similar, often cloudy, occasional drizzle in the east. a little bit of sunshine at times, particularly across more sheltered western parts. for wednesday, it's a rather cloudy picture again. the thickest of the cloud against eastern coast where we will see light rain or drizzle. but through the afternoon we could see quite a bit of sunshine for scotland, maybe northern ireland western fringes of wales and into the southwest. but it will be breezy across the channel. certainly around
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the north sea coast. that will take at the edge of the temperature, highs here around the mid to upper teens. further inland a little bit warmer where you have the sunshine across central western scotland in particular we could see temperatures reaching around 21—22 degrees. as we head through wednesday night it stays mostly cloudy so for england and wales, a bit of cloud continuing for eastern scotland then it will trundle its way eastward although some western parts of scotland, northern ireland could stay clear. it will be fairly cool under clear skies where we have the cloud and the breeze 11—14 degrees. very little change for thursday and friday. an area of high pressure still sitting on top of us and bringing this north, north easterly airflow. it'll bring a lot of cloud again into northern and eastern areas in particular. further west that you are a better chance of seeing some sunny breaks of course, temperatures in the sunshine reaching the low 20s. otherwise it's mid to high teens in the cloudier spots. for the weekend, signs of change was an air of high pressure begins to break down and moves eastward which allows this area of low pressure to slowly push in from the atlantic. that's going to bring in increasing breeze and also the chance of showers or even longer spells of rain particularly for part two of the weekend. saturday doesn't look too bad.
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looks like it will stay mostly dry. variable cloud, light winds. light winds with some sunshine. the winds will start to pick up across southern and western areas as that area of low pressure arrives was up by the end of the day he could start to see showery burst of rain arriving here. temperatures, low 20s in the brighter spots. mid to high teens across the far northeast. into sunday it looks like we will see a band of rain start spreading across the country that could be quite heavy. followed by sunshine and heavy showers.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... president biden has defended his decision to withdraw us troops from afghanistan — a move which led to taliban militants returning to power after 20 years. mr biden said staying longer was not an option, before praising troops for organising an airlift of more than 120,000 people. in kabul, taliban fighters have been showing off some of the military equipment and weapons left behind by us forces. they have also been pointed out that they now control more of afghanistan than they did in 2001. rescue operations are continuing in louisiana as hurricane ida continues to bring life—threatening floods. authorities say it could take weeks to restore electricity and reliable water services to over one million people. now on bbc news, nick miller
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and sarah keith lucas ask

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