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tv   Newswatch  BBC News  September 4, 2021 3:45am-4:01am BST

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some viewers have expressed concern, though, for the safety of those staff and also that of afghan journalists who worked at the bbc in the past. a group of the latter are still hiding from the taliban in kabul and they have accused the corporation and the uk government of ignoring their cries for help. in response, the bbc stresses it is making every possible effort to get both current and former stuff out of the country but that it can only work within the permitted government frameworks. a bbc spokesperson said:
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that statement didn't satisfy this caller to our phone line. i believe the corporation's official response is ethically, let's say, highly questionable and troubling and so i am leaving this message in support of the calls for help by ex— bbcjournalists of the calls for help by ex— bbc journalists and of the calls for help by ex— bbcjournalists and presenters, the bbc does have responsibility for its
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ex—employees in this situation. now occupying the time over the summer was geronimo, the alpaca who twice tested positive for bovine tuberculosis and was ordered to be euthanised to stop the spread of the disease. for some this was a classic silly season story, piped up to bill sparse running orders but for some, bill sparse running orders but forsome, it bill sparse running orders but for some, it was a specific legal injustice and accrual infringement of animal rights. on tuesday the row over geronimo�*s eight was resolved once and for all. i geronimo's eight was resolved once and for all.— once and for all. i want to brin: once and for all. i want to bring you _ once and for all. i want to bring you some _ once and for all. i want to bring you some breakingl once and for all. i want to - bring you some breaking news into the bbc here that geronimo the alpaca has been killed. now, that news comes after a court order destruction warrant was carried out following the animal twice testing positive for bovine tuberculosis. some viewers objected _ for bovine tuberculosis. some viewers objected to _ for bovine tuberculosis. some viewers objected to the - for bovine tuberculosis. some viewers objected to the tone i viewers objected to the tone used there and in the headlines on line, with sally lester asking:
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other viewers were concerned that some of the footage shown on the news at six on the website was unnecessarily upsetting. kirsten french wondered: but when almost 30,000 cattle are put down after contracting disease, was one alpaca's debt worthy of a breaking news event on the bbc news app? andrew thought not: now what's the most popular news bulletin on uk television? you may be surprised to learn
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that it's the early evening regional news on bbc one but recent cuts made to the bbc�*s local and regional budgets have led some to question the corporation's commitment to those services. take the local news, traffic and weather summaries shown twice an hour during breakfast untiljuly when they disappeared. hundreds of viewers complained to the bbc and on social media and two of them, vivian barthe from manchester and martin from plymouth joined us on manchester and martin from plymouthjoined us on new manchester and martin from plymouth joined us on new thank you. i want to ask when both of you. i want to ask when both of you noticed the first time that the regional news wasn't on. vivian first. through the coverage of the olympics which didn't worry me particularly because that was something different and it was important. but when it didn't come back the week following the coverage of the olympics, and then not for the week after, that's when
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i contacted you.— for the week after, that's when i contacted you. what about for ou, i contacted you. what about for you. martin. — i contacted you. what about for you, martin, wendy— i contacted you. what about for you, martin, wendy did - i contacted you. what about for you, martin, wendy did come l i contacted you. what about for you, martin, wendy did come a concern for you? the you, martin, wendy did come a concern for you?— concern for you? the same, reall . concern for you? the same, really- i _ concern for you? the same, really. i noticed _ concern for you? the same, really. i noticed that - concern for you? the same, really. i noticed that there l really. i noticed that there was — really. i noticed that there was no _ really. i noticed that there was no local bulletin during the olympics coverage and then as soon— the olympics coverage and then as soon as — the olympics coverage and then as soon as the normal bbc first came _ as soon as the normal bbc first came back, _ as soon as the normal bbc first came back, i noticed pretty much — came back, i noticed pretty much from day one, from six o'clock. _ much from day one, from six o'clock. i_ much from day one, from six o'clock, i watched as per normal— o'clock, i watched as per normal and when the half—hour came _ normal and when the half—hour came i— normal and when the half—hour came i thought, that's a bit odd, _ came i thought, that's a bit odd. but_ came i thought, that's a bit odd. but i_ came i thought, that's a bit odd, but i thought there might have _ odd, but i thought there might have been a technical issue and of course, — have been a technical issue and of course, there was no second bulletin— of course, there was no second bulletin and i thought, this is odd that _ bulletin and i thought, this is odd that it's not come back after— odd that it's not come back after the _ odd that it's not come back after the olympics. can odd that it's not come back after the olympics.- odd that it's not come back after the olympics. can i ask what it is _ after the olympics. can i ask what it is about _ after the olympics. can i ask what it is about those - after the olympics. can i ask. what it is about those regional summaries in the mornings that is so important, that you missed?— missed? yes, well, it's everything. _ missed? yes, well, it's everything, really. - missed? yes, well, it's everything, really. it's| missed? yes, well, it's i everything, really. it's the local— everything, really. it's the local news, and local views and events, — local news, and local views and events, the travel in particular because i commute, so i'm — particular because i commute, so i'm going to work every morning _ so i'm going to work every morning and i like to know what the traffic— morning and i like to know what the traffic is going to be
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like _ the traffic is going to be like i_ the traffic is going to be like. i know there are other ways— like. i know there are other ways you _ like. i know there are other ways you can access local news but when — ways you can access local news but when you enjoy watching bbc breakfast every morning and the locat— breakfast every morning and the local news is an important that, _ local news is an important that, every half—hour, when it's not— that, every half—hour, when it's not there, you really notice _ it's not there, you really notice it's not there. we did ask bbc management - notice it's not there. we did ask bbc management for i notice it's not there. we did j ask bbc management for an interview on why it's been off for so long and this is the statement we've got because no—one was available for interview. this is a statement from bbc england who made the decision about breakfast. what do you think of the reason?—
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what do you think of the reason? a, , �*, . reason? martin first. it's nice to know that _ reason? martin first. it's nice to know that now _ reason? martin first. it's nice to know that now but - reason? martin first. it's nice to know that now but at - reason? martin first. it's nice to know that now but at the l to know that now but at the time — to know that now but at the time when itjust wasn't to know that now but at the time when it just wasn't there, it was— time when it just wasn't there, it was like _ time when it just wasn't there, it was like it had disappeared. it it was like it had disappeared. it was — it was like it had disappeared. it wasjust strange it was like it had disappeared. it was just strange there was no mention of it, it's almost like — no mention of it, it's almost like it— no mention of it, it's almost like it wasn't important and i know— like it wasn't important and i know that when i switched over to the — know that when i switched over to the other side, they are still— to the other side, they are still doing local news bulletins at breakfast and in the evening as well, but not wanting _ the evening as well, but not wanting to be interested in winning _ wanting to be interested in winning a caravan or anything, i winning a caravan or anything, i really— winning a caravan or anything, i really don't want to watch it. ~ , , , . ., , it. well, i did suspect, as in so many — it. well, i did suspect, as in so many cases, _ it. well, i did suspect, as in so many cases, it _ it. well, i did suspect, as in so many cases, it was - it. well, i did suspect, as in so many cases, it was to . it. well, i did suspect, as in l so many cases, it was to save money, but i was assured it wasn't that. and i accept their assurance and hope they will be able to bring it back as soon as possible. just so you know, that was the bbc�*s position in july. they've now told us the regional morning bulletins are coming next week but i wonder if you both think the bbc undervalues local news perhaps,
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vivian? yes, i definitely think they undervalue it. evening programme is usually very good, it gives quite a wide coverage but apart from that, we don't get an awful lot of news. the lunchtime one is quite often shortened a bit. if there is something more important nationally, the new perhaps only get about ten minutes at lunchtime. only get about ten minutes at lunchtime-— lunchtime. martin, what are our lunchtime. martin, what are your thoughts _ lunchtime. martin, what are your thoughts on _ lunchtime. martin, what are your thoughts on how - lunchtime. martin, what are your thoughts on how far . lunchtime. martin, what are| your thoughts on how far the bbc values and appreciates the importance of regional tv news? well, i hope the bbc values local— well, i hope the bbc values local and regional news. we've -ot local and regional news. we've got an— local and regional news. we've got an excellent nightly litton, _ got an excellent nightly litton, spotlight here in the south—west, and they do an amazing _ south—west, and they do an amazing job, and recently with what's — amazing job, and recently with what's been going on, the shootings, they've been incredible, and locally on the radio— incredible, and locally on the radio as _ incredible, and locally on the radio as well, on bbc radio
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devon— radio as well, on bbc radio devon they've an amazing and it would _ devon they've an amazing and it would be — devon they've an amazing and it would be a — devon they've an amazing and it would be a shame if there were more _ would be a shame if there were more cut— would be a shame if there were more cut tax and we lost so much — more cut tax and we lost so much more of that important local— much more of that important local input because it is important to know what's going on locally. i know there is so much — on locally. i know there is so much going on nationally and internationally but locally, it's right on your own doorstep and everybody needs to know what — and everybody needs to know what is — and everybody needs to know what is going on in their own doorstep _ what is going on in their own doorstep and i really hope those _ doorstep and i really hope those bulletins don't come back _ those bulletins don't come back. and that there is more investment in local news, because _ investment in local news, because it is so important. martin— because it is so important. martin burgess moon and vivian barthe, thank you so much. thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs or even appear on the programme, do email newswatch you can find us on twitter at newswatch bbc, you can call us on 0370 0106676 and do have a look at previous discussions on our website, bbc .co .uk/ newswatch. we will be
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back with your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. hello. weather changes on the way — many areas that have been stuck under cloud for the past week or so, especially in england and wales, gradually breaking out into brighter skies on sunday. if not then, at the start of next week. why? because high pressure is moving away, a flow of air around that bringing something clearer and warmer in from the south—east. where we have seen some sunshine occasionally this week in northern ireland and scotland, a change here to something wetter, gradually, during sunday. it may not be a bad thing, though, where things have been so very dry recently. it's as you were, though, as we start off on saturday morning. a lot of cloud around, some hill fog, some poor visibility, some patches of fog in wales and south—west england, where there may well be a few sunny spells around to begin the day. the cloud in the east thick enough for some drizzly rain at times, and for many, it'll stay cloudy. a few sunny spells trying
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to come through northern scotland, northern ireland, more especially wales and south—west england. this easterly breeze, with the cloud, the chance of drizzle as well on the eastern coast of scotland, north—east england, keeping the temperature around 15 celsius. for many, 17—20. into the low 20s, though, in wales and south—west england with prolonged sunny spells. and there mayjust be an increase in sunny spells more widelyjust before sunset on saturday. overnight and into sunday, cloud continuing across eastern parts, some clear spells to the west, double figure temperatures as sunday begins. and then on sunday, well, that changes to something a bit brighter and warmer across england and wales. there will still be some stubborn areas of cloud visibility, some patches of fog in wales and south—west england, where there may well be a few sunny spells around to begin the day. the cloud in the east thick enough for some drizzly rain at times, and for many, it'll stay cloudy. a few sunny spells trying to come through northern scotland, northern ireland, more especially wales and south—west england. this easterly breeze, with the cloud, the chance of drizzle as well on the eastern coast of scotland, north—east england, keeping the temperature around 15 celsius. for many, 17—20. into the low 20s, though, in wales and south—west england with prolonged sunny spells.
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that moves south overnight and into monday before fizzling out, but on monday, we could well start across central parts of the uk with cloud and some outbreaks of rain. south of that, in some sunny spells on monday, it's going to be warming up, with the warm spots here into the mid—20s. and that warmth on monday is, for tuesday and wednesday, going to spread northwards. so for tuesday and wednesday, most of the uk are going to be warm to very warm for the time of year, some temperatures reaching into the upper 20s, before another weather change later next week, as we see temperatures come down again and an increasing chance of showers and thunderstorms.
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this is bbc news i'm maryam moshiri. our top stories: the uk and the eu say they won't recognise afg hanistan's new government. taliban ministers are yet to be announced, but every day it's clearer what their agenda might be. the taliban have told decorators to paint over all of this, replacing it with these black and white slogans. this one reads, "the blood of the martyrs have washed away the occupation". a glimpse of what the new afghanistan is going to look like. president biden promises the infrastructure of hurricane—hit states will be "built back better". a sharp slowdown in job creation in the us, as the spread of the delta variant hits hospitality and leisure. and — going, going gone — the banksy painting that self—shredded is heading back under the hammer.

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