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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 13, 2021 1:30pm-2:00pm BST

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britain is proud to have its nhs. it recognises the pressure staff are under, and applauds their sacrifice. but the evidence suggests too many patients and their families feel they are lost in an institution that often doesn't have the time to listen. mark easton, bbc news. britney spears has revealed she's engaged to her long—term boyfriend, sam asghari. the announcement comes days after the american singer's father filed court papers to end his control of her life and career. britney spears said the legal arrangement had prevented herfrom marrying mr asghari or having more children. time for a look at the weather. here's sarah keith—lucas. it isa it is a mixed picture around the country today, some have got some blue sky and sunshine around but
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most places are looking like this, this is the picture in gloucestershire right now. mostly cloudy during today, some rain around particulate for the west but further east some dry and fine weather lasting through the rest of the day which is down to the fact there is high pressure setting out toward the east. we have met with front end been trying to move in from the west and that has brought some outbreaks of rain for south—west england and wales. that becomes more extensive and moves into north—west england into the evening and south—west scotland as well. for many central and eastern areas of scotland it remains dry with sunshine and towards the south—east of england as well, some glimpses of blue sky with temperatures 20 celsius or so in the warmest spots. this evening and overnight, the rain becomes more widespread, particularly across england and wales. a pretty damp night, some showers as well for scotland and one or two for northern
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ireland. staying mild under the cloud, still air in the south into tuesday morning. tuesday, we will focus on this area of rain, you can see the green, is developing showing heavy and persistent rain for its central and eastern england in particular, perhaps eastern wales for a while as well. could be 50 millimetres or more of rain in quite a short time, could be a fewer localised flooding impacts. dry up to the north and north—west. when the rain clears are still lots of moisture around so wednesday morning could look like this was quite of lot of mist and fog, that will gradually clear on wednesday, certainly a murky start, early rain on wednesday in at the east, that should clear, tends to be an improving picture through the day on wednesday, dry are compared to tuesday for many areas and temperature is not bad for the time of year, 16—21 c. thursday, we are between weather systems so a fairly
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quiet day and this weather system sweeps in from the west as we look towards friday. the weather is up and down over the next few days, largely dry through into thursday but more rain rocking westwards across the country heading into friday. if you are worried about the heavy rain working westwards across the country heading into friday. if you are worried about the heavy rain tomorrow you can find the details on our website. a reminder of our top story... covid vaccines for 12—15 year olds are expected to be approved shortly — the move is likely to become part of the government's plan for coping with the virus over the winter. that's all from the bbc news at one. hello, i'mjane dougall with your latest sports news. emma raducanu has said her
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parents played a huge part us open victory over leyla fermnandez on saturday night. the 18—year—old beat the canadian in straight sets qualifier and first british woman for 44 years, to win a grand slam singles title. raducanu's mum and dad were unable to be at the arthur ashe stadium, but speaking to abc's good morning america, she paid tribute to them. they were pretty tough on me when i was young but they kind of shape the way and i think now it's helping on the bigger stages in the world, the arthur ashe stadium, where you really needed, and it was basically full capacity, so it was very, very cool full capacity, so it was very, very cool. ~ , ., , ., ., cool. when you were young, that sounded funny. _ cool. when you were young, that sounded funny. what _ cool. when you were young, that sounded funny. what is - cool. when you were young, that sounded funny. what is not - cool. when you were young, that| sounded funny. what is not going cool. when you were young, that. sounded funny. what is not going to be like? what _ sounded funny. what is not going to be like? what the _ sounded funny. what is not going to be like? what the reaction - sounded funny. what is not going to be like? what the reaction from - sounded funny. what is not going to | be like? what the reaction from your parents _ be like? what the reaction from your parents when — be like? what the reaction from your parents when you _ be like? what the reaction from your parents when you talk— be like? what the reaction from your parents when you talk to _ be like? what the reaction from your parents when you talk to them - be like? what the reaction from your parents when you talk to them on i be like? what the reaction from youri parents when you talk to them on the phone _ parents when you talk to them on the phone after— parents when you talk to them on the phone after you — parents when you talk to them on the phone after you won? _ parents when you talk to them on the phone after you won? it— parents when you talk to them on the phone after you won?— phone after you won? it was really nice to talk — phone after you won? it was really nice to talk to _ phone after you won? it was really nice to talk to them _ phone after you won? it was really nice to talk to them after- phone after you won? it was really nice to talk to them after i - phone after you won? it was really nice to talk to them after i won. i nice to talk to them after i won. they werejust so nice to talk to them after i won. they were just so happy and proud of me. they are my toughest critics and
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very, very hard to please, but, yeah, i got down with just one. they couldn't resist. laughter good to hear. daniil medvedev says he's incredibly happy after winning his first grand slam title. the russian number two seed beat novak djokovic in straight sets at the us open to end the world number one's hopes of taking the calendar slam. djokovic had won this year's three other major tournaments, but looked completely lost at times, particularly when he was on the way to losing the second set. frustration boiling over there. the end wasn't long in coming and medvedev completed an emphatic victory to win his first grand slam. he was going for huge history. and knowing that i managed to stop him definitely makes it sweeter. and brings me confidence for what is to come. i wasjust below par, you know, with my game.
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my legs were not there. i was trying. i did my best. but, yeah, i made a lot of unforced errors. i didn't have no serve. the draw has taken place for the group stages of the women's champions league. last year's finalists chelsea have a tough group withjuventus, wolfsburg and servette. but so do arsenal — they'll play the holders barcelona, and hoffenheim, plus danish side hb koge. the stage is set for the ryder cup later this month, with europe captain padraig harrington making his wildcard picks. but england's lee westwood didn't need one after qualifying automatically. he just did enough at the pga championship at wentworth to get into the places to compete for europe for the 11th time against the united states. the tournament was won by america's billy horschel. shane lowry didn't play himself into the team automatically,
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but was last night named as a wildcard, as were ian poulter and sergio garcia. however, justin rose misses out. it is amazing. you're never really sure until are sure, so to have that firmed up was great. to know you are going to be part of your seventh ryder cup team, a team travelling to away soil, a team on paper which looks very strong, up against a very strong us team. more details on those teams on the bbc sport website. australia cricket captain tim paine has said he will be fit for the ashes, despite needing surgery to treat a pinched nerve in his neck. the test captain has been suffering pain in his neck and left arm, caused by a bulging disc. he's scheduled to undergo surgery soon, and expects to be back in full training by next month, with the first ashes test against england to begin in brisbane on the 8th of december. i'll have more for
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you in the next hour. lovely. thank you very much. staying with sports — the british stars at this year's paralympic games reached the podium more than 120 times and finished second on the medal table behind china. last night, around 200 athletes across 19 sports were welcomed home with a special concert, to celebrate their achievements. 0ur reporter matt graveling was there. higher, come on! i am so excited today. i think it's going to be absolutely phenomenal. i haven't actually seen my parents yet, so they're coming down to go to the arena with me. and i can't wait to see them. they haven't seen the medals yet. and it's just so exciting to be able to let our hair down and to celebrate as a team. to actually have the opportunity to come out here and celebrate, not only with our friends and family but with everybody else supporting us, it's actually awesome. yeah, it's a really good opportunity. move away from sort of like being in a bubble, being in a hotel room, just go and see people a little bit and just be almost normal again. paralympics gb did phenomenally well in tokyo, bagging 124 medals.
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so, they need a party. 7,000 lucky national lottery players, as well as the athletes�* friends and family, are now converging right here at wembley arena. my sleep pattern was absolutely all over the place, but i wouldn't have missed it. and to be here today is an absolute privilege to thank the athletes. just to see them work through these past 18 months, for it to work so well and come home, i think it'sjust absolutely fabulous. there we go. we watched everything that they done and theyjust inspire us. just amazing. so, we thought we'd come down and support them. but hang on a minute, these are elite athletes. surely they are on a strict diet? i think the second i crossed the line for my last race, i've definitely not been watching what i eat. i probably do have to now though, because the belly is starting to just grow outwards. just treat yourself. i've literally got two kilos of pick n mix at home that are waiting for me! so, yeah, the diet is totally gone out of the window! cheering. # so you want to be a boxer, want to be the champ...#.
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this homecoming event marked a day of returns, but notjust for the athletes. well, this is the first time we've performed as a band in, i don't even know, almost two years. it's crazy. but it's such an amazing honour and privilege to be invited. we were quite shocked. and, yeah, we arejust so excited to do it. today's arena was jumping, but in tokyo it was a different story. with fans forced to watch at home, social media videos sent thejoy to japan. cheering. it'sjust so nice to see all the support, because when i was there i didn't realise the amount of support i was getting. so, after the race i watched all of this and then, seeing andy get emotional, it kind of gave me a sense of pride to know they are all helping me and cheering me on as well. it's just, yeah, lovely to watch. while maisie picked up herfirst two golds, another athlete made history, claiming her 17th. the games were completely different
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to any games i'd been to, not least because i was there without any family and friends, and my parents are almost the founder members of the paralympics gb supporters' club. so, it was a very different games, but i think it's coming home, celebrating these medals, that have meant those memories will always be held high in my list of achievements. # welcome to the house of fun...# while dame sarah will now turn her attention to paris, for other paralympic stars today's event will also be a farewell party. i knew going into it it was going to be my last games. to have a paralympics homecoming is something so special. we also bring ourfriends, ourfamilies, our loved ones, to come for a party, because they missed out at the games. they couldn't go to tokyo. they couldn't be there to cheer us on. and to have a thing today where everyone comes, it's a whole celebration, it's so exciting. matt graveling, bbc news.
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when former singer tanya beige was told she would lose her voice to throat cancer, she immediately began to create a video diary, so that her young children would remember what she sounded like. now, thanks to a special project, she's able to do something she never thought would be possible again — perform live on stage. fiona lamdin reports. this is my voice, and i'm not going to have it for much longer. well, not this one, anyway. tanja made this recording just hours after being told she had throat cancer. two days later, as the country went into the first lockdown, tanja had a laryngectomy to remove her voicebox. i was absolutely devastated. like, my daughter was not even two, so she was learning to talk. once upon a time there was a boy called charlie cook who curled up in a cosy chair
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and read his favourite book. every time i spoke, or sang a nursery rhyme with the kids or read a story, i was like, this is the last time, not much longer. you know, three days, two days, one day before surgery. so it's so weird when you know that something is going to get taken away from you. when tanja first woke up she couldn't speak but she was fitted with a valve in her neck. when she presses it, it produces sound. when you heard your new voice for the first time, what did you think? i was absolutely horrified. i think i sounded like a tractor or something, it was just like this weird, low, guttural vibrating noise that came out. this is what i sound like this evening. i've just come downstairs from putting the kids to bed. i managed to get through an entire storybook. and for the next few months,
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she had chemo and radiotherapy while she relearned how to speak. when i dream, i dream in my old voice, and i'm like, oh, i've got my old voice back. shall we see what it looks like on my neck? yeah. sticky. it's going to be sticky. tanja has always been open with her children. before the operation she prepared them for the changes, and sometimes her five—year—old son rudy still needs to talk about them. he said, "i miss your voice, mummy," and i'm like, yeah, i miss it too. and we went and sat on the sofa and had a cuddle and got a little bit, we were a bit sad, had a bit of a cry. and hejust said, "your old voice was so lovely and beautiful, mummy." i'm going to the party. going to the party? tanja used to love to sing on stage, around the house, and in the car. he's going to sleep, he's gone to sleep.
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not being able to sing happy birthday, you know, kind of regretting that. but i'm like, why didn't i record myself singing happy birthday? and then i could play it for the kids on their birthdays. things like that, i think, that gets me almost more than the talking bit. and after 18 months, for the first time, she is back on stage. performing a duet all about herjourney. singing together. the soprano represents her old voice. it makes me really happy and it makes me really sad because obviously what comes out is not at all what used to come out. i miss my voice. i think i'll always miss it. you know, i can be ok with it and i can accept it,
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but there will always be an element of, you know, it's part of me and now it's gone. i love you both, oh, so very much. fiona lamdin, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... covid vaccines for 12—15 year olds are expected to be approved shortly — the move is likely to become part of the government's plan for coping with the virus over the winter. nearly one in three people arriving in england and northern ireland may have broken the rules on travel quarantine at a time when the delta variant was spreading the nhs starts trials of a revolutionary new blood test that detects more than 50 types of cancer before the patient has any symptoms. now let's take a look at some of the stories
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happening across the uk. the uk government has pulled out of a deal to buy 100 million doses of a covid—i9 vaccine made by the french company valneva, at its plant in west lothian. the firm says it's received a termination notice alleging a breach of contract, which it denies. 0ur scotland science and innovation correspondent laura goodwinjoins us now. laura, what more do we know about this? ~ _, ., ~ ., , laura, what more do we know about this? . .., ., ~ ., , ., this? welcome what we know is that the company — this? welcome what we know is that the company were — this? welcome what we know is that the company were informed - this? welcome what we know is that the company were informed over - this? welcome what we know is that| the company were informed over the weekend of this decision. they released a statement this morning which you have just laid released a statement this morning which you havejust laid out released a statement this morning which you have just laid out saying that the government alleged the company was in breach of its obligations over the supply agreement, something they strenuously deny. now we don't yet
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know exactly what the breach is meant to have been. i understand it's a great shock to valneva. i filmed in the premises a couple of times, since december, charting its success. the prime minister came up at the beginning of this year when it went into commercial production. they where producing vaccine so that they were ready to go. much was made of the fact this would be a domestically made vaccine and perhaps would be immune to some of the supply issues we've seen with some of the other vaccines, much more traditional type of vaccine which is why it had taken longer to produce. i always said to them where did you think you would fit in the overall programme? they were pretty confident three weeks ago when i last interviewed them that they would be part of the booster programme. they invested really heavy, build new premises and advertised for more jobs. it's not yet clear what this pulling out no means. they are still going to try to seek approval we understand and perhaps try and find another buyer
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for their vaccine.— for their vaccine. laura, thank you very much- _ for their vaccine. laura, thank you very much. laura _ for their vaccine. laura, thank you very much. laura goodman - for their vaccine. laura, thank you i very much. laura goodman reporting there. a global pandemic institute has been launched in liverpool today to look at the threats facing the world from new viruses. it will bring together organisations from across the city, as well as overseas, to examine the best way to predict, and deal with, the next big outbreak. gill dummigan reports over the past year hundreds of volunteers have taken part in trials for the oxford astrazeneca vaccine at the liverpool school of tropical medicine. the school's renowned for testing all kinds of vaccines, and treatments, and providing quick, and reliable, results. the work tackling covid is still going on here but what this lab is also now going to be concentrating on is the next pandemic. and the odds are that there will be another one. in the past 20 years alone six other major viruses, from swine flu to ebola, have spread from animals and started killing humans. this new pandemic institute is about making sure we're ready for it. we want to be able to do work, identifying where the risks
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are so we can address those, but also to prepare the world better forfuture pandemics. liverpool's already run a number of ambitious trials — from pilot nightclub events to mass testing. and that covid response has helped the institute secure £10 million of backing from a global medical group. it was highly equitable, it was an outreach to the community. there were high quality institutions involved full to end, you know, the uk has been a leader, the administration has been a leader in the world in terms of how to control pandemics. so we thought it was a good mix. the school of tropical medicine will be just one of seven key players, including the hospitals, councils, and universities, looking at every aspect of how we deal with the next threat. i think really we have to be considering how we structure society, how we organise supply chains, our travel patterns and many different areas. every last person in the world has been affected by this pandemic. i think that will mean that there will be a global response.
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liverpool is doing its bit. we are stepping up to the plate to try to address that future risk. gill dummigan, bbc north west today, liverpool. it's almost five weeks since the grouse shooting season got under way. but grouse numbers are low and estates across parts of northern england are reporting one of the worst seasons on record. and that's had a major knock—on for the rural economy. phil connell reports from the north york moors. it's a place of beauty where vast areas of heather are normally home to thousands of red grouse. here on the north york moors, though, the birds this year are difficult to find and difficult to film. jimmy shuttleworth has been a gamekeeper on the moors for 36 years. he says it's the worst period for grouse he can remember. a crisis blamed on two consecutive years of poor spring weather. this was typical of what they had to eat.
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they should have been eating the greener heather. so, i mean, if we all had vegetables on our plate like that, we'd be happy. but if our vegetables looked like that, we wouldn't be happy. and it was the same for the grouse. so they had to have a whole year eating this. in normal years, shooting is said to generate around £2 billion for britain's economy. and in rural north yorkshire, for many, it provides a valuable income. on this estate there would normally be 25 shoots this year, but this season there will be no more than eight. it's a massive blow the local economy and the thousands of people whose livelihoods depend on it. with a young family to support, for caterer becky housman, the timing couldn't be worse. she was booked to provide food at 30 grouse shoots this season but now almost every booking has been cancelled. if you haven't got shooting in these tiny economies, what have you got? you haven't got any income to these places, so then people don't want to live here,
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and it willjust go to rack and ruin. that is the knock—on effect of losing shoot days. there'sjust no money. a few miles down the road in the village of laskhill mandy has the similar concerns. she runs a bed and breakfast but this year shooting guests are as hard to find as grouse on the moor. the whole ethos of this area - in the winter months is shooting. and, love it or hate it, i i can't knock it because it provides me with a business. to take that revenue out - of the equation is a significant part and concerning, really. with green flowering heather there are signs of better things next year. five weeks though since the shooting season start of the so—called glorious 12th has this year been far from that.
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tomato growers in northern spain, are battling it out to win an award for the ugliest tomato. it's become a tradition in the village of tudela, as courtney bembridge explains. there is no doubt these are really ugly tomatoes. but are they the ugliest? the answer to that is serious business in this village of tudela. competitors young and old line up at the fruits of their labour and various theories about what makes the perfect or imperfect ugly tomato. translation: they come out ugly because we have some bees that l pollinate the plants. they take the pollen from one place together, but in this case, something went wrong. a jury of their peers decides the winner, and in the end, tomato number 115 up on the top left was crowned with the honour of ugliest. the winners say there's nothing to it but luck.
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translation: we didn't grow ugly ones to come to the contest. - an ugly lot came out and that was it. this variety is known for its juicy and tender flesh, and it's said that they taste a lot better than they look. a true tale of beauty coming from within. courtney bembridge, bbc news. fans at an american football match in florida saw an incredible catch over the weekend and it didn't even happen on the field. this cat was seen dangling inside the hard rock stadium in miami during a college football game. it eventually fell around 50 feet but a pair of quick—thinking fans used their american flag to catch it. the cat was unharmed, but it's safe to say it has probably used one of its nine lives. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas.
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good afternoon. this time last week, we had temperatures as high as 30 degrees in one or two spots but things this week are feeling much more typical for the time of year, a bit more of an autumnal and unsettled feel to the weather. through the rest of the day, most places fairly cloudy, some rain pushing into the west courtesy of a couple of weather fronts that you can see on the map here. we have still got high pressure setting out towards the east and that is keeping things largely dry and settled for parts of southern and eastern england, eastern scotland, too. so, some late sunshine through the afternoon and into the evening hours here. but we have got that thick cloud moving on from the west and outbreaks of rain. now, into this evening, they become particularly heavy for the south—west of england, wales, northern england, too. so quite a lot of wet weather moving its way in from the south this time last week, we had temperatures as high as 30 as we head through into the early hours of tuesday morning. temperatures for most of us remaining pretty mild, quite humid still overnight. perhaps we willjust see single figures across the north of scotland. but, through the day tomorrow, then, we are watching this area of rain, which becomes quite heavy and persistent, moving up to central
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southern england and the midlands, up towards the likes of lincolnshire and east yorkshire as well. could be 50 millimetres or more of rain falling in quite degrees in one or two spots but things this week a short space of time, leading to potential localised flooding issues. things do look drier for scotland, northern ireland, later for wales and the south—west, but still a few showers moving on here. and, then, overnight tuesday into wednesday morning, after all that rain, moist surfaces, we could see quite a foggy start to the day on wednesday, so light winds, some for lingering through the morning, should lift and clear. are feeling much more typical for the time of year, any rain towards parts of eastern england gradually shifting away, so i think, wednesday, a drier day across england and, certainly compared to tuesday. some sunny spells, too, for scotland and northern ireland and temperatures typically around 16 to 21 degrees on wednesday, not far off what we would expect for the time of year. thursday again could start with some mist, some fog and some low cloud, which should tend to break up through the day with sunny spells still developing. not a bad day, most places dry for much of the day, a bit more of an autumnal and unsettled feel to the weather. although there will be some rain just waiting in the wings moving in from the west,
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but temperatures in the warmest spots 22, possibly 23 degrees, a little bit cooler up towards the north—west. now, heading towards the end of the working week and you will see this weather front moving its way in from the west. that could bring some fairly heavy spells of rain as we move through friday. it looks like it mainly clears away towards the east, so come on saturday probably a little bit drier and brighter. through the rest of the day, most places fairly cloudy, not quite as warm, though, as it has been lately. bye for now.
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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines: covid vaccines for 12—15—year—olds have just been approved shortly by the four uk chief medical officers. they say it should mean fewer children should have their education disrupted this year. nearly one in three people arriving in england and northern ireland may have broken the rules on travel quarantine at a time when the delta variant was spreading. the nhs starts trials of a revolutionary new blood test that detects more than 50 types of cancer before the patient has any symptoms. the bbc obtains new evidence that the taliban are killing civilians in afghanistan. nicola sturgeon says the success of other small european countries shows that independence could work for scotland as well.

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