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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  September 13, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. countries around the world pledge more than one billion dollars in aid, for afghanistan. one and three afghans do not know where their next meal will come from. the poverty rate is spiralling and basic public services are closed to collapse. the situiation is only worsening since the taliban toppled the government, last month — and that's complicating the task of getting aid, to the afghans who need it. we will hear of the global appeal of
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the us open championship, the british teenager who has been taking her fans and british teenager who has been taking herfans and mentoring. the united states is starting to assess how it handled the end of its war in afghanistan. to assess how it handled the end in the first hearing of its type, secretary of state antony blinken is appearing before a government committee to answer questions about the us evacuation. we will listen to what he has to say momentarily. afghanistan has been the focus of the major conference because afghanistan has been the focus
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of the major conference more than a billion dollars has been pledged for afghanistan at an emergency aid conference. the united nations called the meeting in geneva to address what it called a �*mammoth�* humanitarian crisis. it beat its target of 600 million dollars. here's the un secretary general. even before the traumatic events of last week, afghanistan was for his mother was humanitarian crisis in the world. when in three afghans do not know where their next meal will come from. the poverty rate is spiralling and basic public services are closed to collapse. hundreds of thousands of people have been forced to flee their homes and at the same time, afghanistan faces a severe drought, the second to hit the country and for years. many people could run out of food by the end of the month just as winter approaches. one of the many issues
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he mentioned there was people fleeing their homes. estimates put the number of internally displaced people in afghanistan at 3.5 million, about 10% of the population. this graph shows the number of afghans forced to flee per month since 2018. you can see the sharp rise in 2021. but this data only goes up tojuly — so it's likely to be much higher for august and september after the taliban takeover. there's also a healthcare crisis. these are pictures from kandahar in the south of afghanistan. medical supplies there are running dangerously low. it's a similar picture in most of the country. afghanistan's health minister had the same job in the last afghan government. dr wahid maj—roo has been speaking to our chief international correspondent lyse doucet. i'v e i've tried my best not to only physically stay here, but to act and join forces to lobby and advocate for the health care of those mothers and children, which i reiterate,
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they have no hope but the doctors and health care personnel and facilities. . ., facilities. their leaders? to the also have _ facilities. their leaders? to the also have their _ facilities. their leaders? to the also have their children - facilities. their leaders? to the also have their children on - facilities. their leaders? to the | also have their children on their mind? �* , , ., mind? i've been trying to communicate. _ mind? i've been trying to communicate. i- mind? i've been trying to communicate. i see - mind? i've been trying to communicate. i see they| mind? i've been trying to i communicate. i see they are mind? i've been trying to - communicate. i see they are trying to increase capacity to resolve the problem and the one who responds to the messages of nurses and advice and doctors of the health facilities, those with whom i was in touch during the hardest days of conflict which was unprecedented in the last 20 years. they were there to provide wonders. to the last 20 years. they were there to provide wonders.— to provide wonders. to help treat the patient's _ to provide wonders. to help treat the patient's and _ to provide wonders. to help treat the patient's and i _ to provide wonders. to help treat the patient's and i am _ to provide wonders. to help treat the patient's and i am unable - to provide wonders. to help treat the patient's and i am unable to i to provide wonders. to help treat i the patient's and i am unable to do that, unfortunately. one concern for the countries pledging aid money for afghanistan
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is the possibility that it ends up in the hands of the taliban. one major donor, the world bank, it exists to give money to developing nations —— but the bbc recently revealed it won't give anything to afghanistan with the taliban in power. that's one reason the united nations wants to raise money. and around a third of it will go to the world food programme, which is a branch of the un. andrew patterson runs its operations in afghanistan. what we don't want is people to start with just because being born into afghanistan, and separate those two out. the humanitarian appeal is looking for $600 million of which $200 million in the renfrew programme, that is to get food into the warehouses, we do not supply food to the taliban, we can only do this of the markets are operating and let's separate those were going
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hungry from the political situation and whatever happens to be in power at the time. the un high commissioner for refugees has gone to afghanistan to assess the crisis. filippo grandi tweeted that he "will assess the country's acute humanitarian needs and the situation of 3.5 million displaced afghans. " he also posted this photo of him being met by taliban officials as he arrived in kabul. we know he's had meetings with the taliban's interim government. and he's been speaking to the bbc. i heard good commitments to protecting humanitarian operations and ensuring access to all of those in need, this is very important. and it is important to engage with the taliban leadership, both centrally and in provinces, i'm trying to go to in a couple of days because it is
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through engagement that we can ensure effectiveness of our delivery but through that engagement, we also create a space to create more complex issues, issues of minorities, issues of women, issues of education. the bbc has obtained and verified footage showing afghan civilians being killed by the taliban. more than 20 people have been killed in panjshir province, where the taliban have been fighting opposition forces. a taliban spokesperson has denied such killings are taking place. you may find some of the details in yalda hakim's report distressing. this bazaar is famous across panjshir valley, and always bustling. now, it's empty and a ghost town. since the taliban entered the valley, people have taken flight. it used to be the home of resistance, but this now appears futile.
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people have locked their doors and fled and that's not surprising, when people are being shot dead on the side of the street. the bbc has verified this video, which you may find distressing. here, a man in military clothes is dragged away. it is unclear whether he was in the army. this is common dress in the valley. voices are raised. seconds later, he is shot several times and killed. we are not showing you those images. a bystander insists the man they have just killed was not in the military. the bbc has confirmed that more than 20 people have been killed since the taliban entered panjshir province. one of them was this shopkeeper and father of two called abdul sami. his family want his name and story to be known. a taliban spokesperson denies civilians are being targeted. when the taliban entered the valley, they promised peace and stability. translation: they should come out, do their daily activities. _
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if they are shopkeepers, they can go to their shops. if they are farmers, they can go to their farms. we are here to protect them, their lives and their families. but these pictures show that people are not waiting to see if the taliban keep their promises. with telecommunications cut in the valley, it is hard to get information out. but the international community has warned that taliban they are watching and they will be held accountable for their actions. yalda hakim, bbc news. imported coronavirus news. children 12 and over are to get the vaccine. that comes from a senior adviser and here comes the uk's chief medical
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adviser. . , , , , , _, , adviser. the assessment is combining the marginal— adviser. the assessment is combining the marginal but _ adviser. the assessment is combining the marginal but assessed _ adviser. the assessment is combining the marginal but assessed benefit - the marginal but assessed benefit that the jcvi the marginal but assessed benefit that the jcvi made and the marginal but assessed benefit that thejcvi made and taking on board the issues of education and the benefit exceeding the risk to a sufficient degree that we are recommending to our ministers in all four nations that they make a universal offer and i want to stress the word offer of vaccination to children 12 to 15 in addition to the ones that are already being immunised.— ones that are already being immunised. ~ ., g immunised. mentioning the jcvi, the exert immunised. mentioning the jcvi, the med grow) — immunised. mentioning the jcvi, the expert grow) that _ immunised. mentioning the jcvi, the expert group that advises _ immunised. mentioning the jcvi, the expert group that advises the - expert group that advises the government on vaccines. two days ago, they advised the government not to roll out the vaccine to all 12 to 15—year—olds and as shipping hearing, today's recommendation from the chief medical officers goes against advice. to understand the jcvi position, is a member speaking just over a could go to. jcvi position, is a member speaking just over a could go to.— just over a could go to. while the benefits marginally _ just over a could go to. while the benefits marginally outweigh - just over a could go to. while the
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benefits marginally outweigh the | benefits marginally outweigh the risks, the risks of heart inflammation is still uncertain and we want to see what wider societal and educational benefits there are two children before recommending universal vaccination.— universal vaccination. referring to a side effect _ universal vaccination. referring to a side effect that _ universal vaccination. referring to a side effect that causes - universal vaccination. referring to a side effect that causes heart - a side effect that causes heart inflammation. given the 12 and 15 euros, there are between three and 17 cases that heart inflammation. an 87 hospital admissions due to covid—19 are prevented. there are risks to bouncy. here's one medical professor. risks to bouncy. here's one medical rofessor. , ., h, ., professor. given the large portion of children. _ professor. given the large portion of children, certainly _ professor. given the large portion of children, certainly teenagers, l of children, certainly teenagers, younger teenagers have already had the infection and have recovered, the infection and have recovered, the benefits against the disadvantaged are quite difficult to judge. i personally wouldn't
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advocate for vaccinating that age group. they say they take into account those factors in his the head of the medicines and health care regulators which is the government that talks about the safety of vaccines speaking with the professor. we have taken a very — speaking with the professor. we have taken a very thorough _ speaking with the professor. we have taken a very thorough review - speaking with the professor. we have taken a very thorough review with - taken a very thorough review with the international report as a consistent pattern, there are slightly more and often frequently we see cases in young males and after the second dose. but overall, the conclusion of her expert advisers is that these are mild cases and individuals usually recover within a short period of time with standard treatment. aha, time with standard treatment. a crucial treatment between today's recommendation and the one from the jcvi, they do there is entirely on health grounds for the chief medical officer said other factors to consider. including the destruction the covid—19 is brought to education. principal quite rightly say that if
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my child is in france and germany, italy or canada and the usa, then they are routinely vaccinating and particularly, given the amount of disruption ten people in the uk, particularly in england has been so significant. i'm not dismissing in any way the science, but if i'm saying is we have to look beyond the science of what the reassurance that the sciences in place, it's the aspects as well.— the sciences in place, it's the aspects as well. the sciences in place, it's the asects as well. ., , ., aspects as well. education is at the heart of the — aspects as well. education is at the heart of the recommendation - aspects as well. education is at the heart of the recommendation and l heart of the recommendation and another point that is raised is what is happening outside of the uk. several countries have been vaccinating this age group for some time and in europe, at least 29 countries have started vaccinating children aged 12 and over or are planning to do so in the near future. i of europe, countries such as singapore, japan, the uae, israel, the us, china and the philippines have decided to give jobs to all of those age 12 and over.
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several countries have got higher vaccination levels than others and thatis vaccination levels than others and that is largely because they have rolled out vaccinations of 1215 —year—olds and if you want to stop this wave, we have to boost the population. consent, but habits of a child once the vaccine but the parents do not and if the child refuses the vaccine but the parents are keen was make here is one teen in the us on that dilemma. i here is one teen in the us on that dilemma. ., ., .. , .., dilemma. i want the vaccines i can rotect dilemma. i want the vaccines i can protect myself _ dilemma. i want the vaccines i can protect myself at _ dilemma. i want the vaccines i can protect myself at school _ dilemma. i want the vaccines i can protect myself at school because l protect myself at school because there's _ protect myself at school because there's so — protect myself at school because there's so many people. but i also want _ there's so many people. but i also want to— there's so many people. but i also want to protect others who might not be able _ want to protect others who might not be able to _ want to protect others who might not be able to get the vaccine. ijust want _ be able to get the vaccine. ijust want to— be able to get the vaccine. ijust want to protect them and i want to protect— want to protect them and i want to protect myself. they do not listen to what _ protect myself. they do not listen to what i— protect myself. they do not listen to what i have to say about my own health _ to what i have to say about my own health they— to what i have to say about my own health. they tell me that i am stunid, — health. they tell me that i am stupid, that i cry a lot. it hurts a lotto _ stupid, that i cry a lot. it hurts a lotto hear— stupid, that i cry a lot. it hurts a
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lot to hear from your family. here in the uk, that the dilemmas being referenced. it is with the health secretary said last week. he said if there's a difference of opinion between the child and the parent, we have specialists that work in this area. they would usually sit with the parent and child and try to reach some type of consensus. if ultimately that does not work as long as you believe that the child is competent enough to make that decision, and the child will prevail. this issue of consent has also been raised of the press conference earlier in years professor with you again. children and their parents come to the same decision. it is an irrelevant question. for a small number of cases, there is some debate around this and doctors, gps, people involved in vaccination programmes are really used to doing this. that speak to our correspondent here an outside source computer, help me out here. there is a recommendation saying don't and there's one thing to do. when will the government decide which way to go? we
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to do. when will the government decide which way to go?- decide which way to go? we are exectin: decide which way to go? we are exaecting a _ decide which way to go? we are expecting a statement - decide which way to go? we are expecting a statement this - expecting a statement this evening from a health minister around about ten o'clock when the business closed for the day in the house of commons, the expectation is that they will go with the recommendation of the chief medical officers of the four nations of the united kingdom and yes, press the button, the go—ahead for vaccination over 12 to 15—year—olds in the doses are ready, the nhs is ready to do that too and at the same time, we are expecting confirmation tomorrow that a booster programme will be announced by the government and that will be for all adults over 50 and that will go under way fairly imminently too and it will largely follow the same order that they followed earlier on in the roll—out. so start with people of the older age spectrum, vulnerable groups as well with the being a gap of six months between people getting the second dose and their booster dose
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which initially will at least be a dose of the pfizer vaccine, although some of those details are yet to be confirmed and we are expecting another statement from a health minister tomorrow around lunch time in a news conference in the afternoon and the prime minister was set out his wider plan to help the country through the autumn and winter of this pandemic. the country through the autumn and winter of this pandemic.- winter of this pandemic. the uk cominu winter of this pandemic. the uk coming to _ winter of this pandemic. the uk coming to this _ winter of this pandemic. the uk coming to this decision - winter of this pandemic. the uk coming to this decision after- winter of this pandemic. the uk coming to this decision after a l coming to this decision after a number of countries of already pushed on with doing this evidence to the fact that the prime minister has a bit of a split within his conservative party was shallow to an extent, yes but i do not think the concerns of the backbenchers for the 12 to 15 euros, think it's about ensuring crossing teasing darting eyes for the scientific advice for them to go through all the evidence and i think the chief medical officer subdivides today's the for now, 12 to 15—year—olds only get one dose. and for other adults in order
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people, it's been two doses and that is been the case across the world. they want to see with the evidence is in the impact that it has on children for having both doses before they move in and giving british children the second dose. and they want to see this before the evidence and data before they can proceed and as ever, there needs to be a balance of risks and clearly the thing that is tipped them over to its recommending this is the impact that it has been having on children's education. they are not a particularly high risk of getting seriously ill from covid—19, but the professor referencing the fact that a lot of them have suffered with mental health issues and that kind of things because they miss so many hours of school and another thing they can do to help prevent the virus being transmitted in preventing children from being so ill they need to spend several days off school, is where they're going ahead with it now. i want to bring you a full update on the the uk government's
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position on vaccine passports. first of all — here's boris johnson today. what we wanted to do is avoid vaccine passports and that is the course we are on. but i think you've got to be prudent and you've got to keep things in reserve in case things change. that's the prime minister saying vaccine passports aren't his first choice but are part of his contigency plans. this was monday. this was the health secretary sajid javid on sunday. while we should keep it in reserve, i am pleased to say will not be going ahead with plans vaccine passports. so — no plans to use vaccine passports says the health secretary. two days before that — this was the culture secretary. we will almost certainly be doing it for nightclubs. that's right — what the health secretary says there are no plans for — and the prime minister says he doesn't want to do — is almost certainly happening
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according to the culture secretary. and then on wednesday last wee, the vaccines minister too suggested this plan was happening. s the reason that we are moving forward on this is because if you look at what is happening in other countries, were nightclubs are opening and shutting again, opening and shutting again. we want to avoid that disruption. the vaccines minister says the government is pushing on — but it's proving hard to work out if that's the case. and it's not the first time the governent�*s policy has been hard pin down. back in february, borisjohnson couldn't have been clearer. but couldn't have been clearer. i don't think we will ha' this but i don't think we will have in this country is as it were, vaccination passports to allow you to go to the pub. but what was a hard no in february — had evolved by march. you have to be careful how you do this. you might on the be able to implement a thoroughgoing vaccination passports scheme, even
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if you wanted such a thing in the context of, when absolutely everyone had been offered a vaccine. which brings us right back to today — with downing street has insisting that vaccine passports remain part of its strategy to prevent a winter wave of covid—19. and everyone else waiting to see what the government says and does next. help me out here. what is going on? it is lovely to be here but you might want to try this on outside source for every policy of every government in the world and see what they said in the past and then keep looking at how it changed over time. look, what's going on as i suppose the generous version is this immensely difficult and complex balance of civil liberties, how do you spot the night—time industry and
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concerns of her health and maybe you could say it's just not surprising that it has been difficult for ministers to settle on an outcome. look avoid they are saying and i sang in the nightclub industry that it's all rather chaotic but i think where we are as we speak, it is that the government is keeping this one up the government is keeping this one up its sleeve at downing street single, current data suggest that the uk's current defences are sufficient in his yard, the prime minister was saying that if you like the passport issue is up their sleeve of defences.— the passport issue is up their sleeve of defences. this is partly to do with _ sleeve of defences. this is partly to do with the _ sleeve of defences. this is partly to do with the fact _ sleeve of defences. this is partly to do with the fact that _ sleeve of defences. this is partly to do with the fact that this - sleeve of defences. this is partly to do with the fact that this is - sleeve of defences. this is partly to do with the fact that this is a l to do with the fact that this is a profoundly uncomfortable question for the conservatives because i imagine borisjohnson and many of his colleagues really do not like the idea of asking people to share a piece of paper when they go to the pub. piece of paper when they go to the ub. , ., , piece of paper when they go to the ub. , ~ , ., pub. yes, i think it is important that and of— pub. yes, i think it is important that and of course _ pub. yes, i think it is important that and of course pressure - pub. yes, i think it is importantl that and of course pressure from what is known as the night—time industry we thought that this was chaotic and surreal. they're making
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a point that if it was safe to go to a point that if it was safe to go to a nightclub without a passport in july, why would it be at the end of this month? it is a very difficult issue but civil liberties and that issue but civil liberties and that is been the case all along and it has to be said that this governments handling of the covid—19 crisis, of course the government all over the western world in particular. taste western world in particular. we appreciate you coming in. straight from oxford to washington, dc. anthony is answering questions and the congress to do with the us withdraw from afghanistan. it's a quick listen to what is being said. epic proportions. i never thought in my lifetime that i would see an unconditional surrender to the taliban. for weeks, unconditional surrender to the taliban. forweeks, our offices were flooded with requests to get people out of afghanistan, requests that were coming to us because the state department failed to provide help
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and then the unimaginable happened. on august 26, 13 american servicemen and women were brutally murdered by isis k, trained up american citizens and our african partners escape from the taliban. two days ago, we commemorated the 20th anniversary of 9/11. and while we mourn the loss of almost 3000 innocent people, the taliban at the same time celebrated by raising theirflag taliban at the same time celebrated by raising their flag over the presidential palace days before they emblazoned their flag on the wall of our united states embassy. proclaiming the defeat of the united states of america. shockingly, the white house as described this taliban regime as businesslike and professional. so, let's meet a few
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of these professionals of the so—called new and improved taliban. the acting prime minister, one of the taliban's founding leaders. he is also sanctioned by the united nations and sheltered osama bin laden for years. the infamous members of the taliban five released from guantanamo under the obama administration also all hold senior positions in the new government. and finally the worst, acting interior minister. he is responsible for overseeing policing in counterterrorism and he is also wanted by the fbi. this counterterrorism and he is also wanted by the fbi.— wanted by the fbi. this is the republican — wanted by the fbi. this is the republican and _ wanted by the fbi. this is the republican and a _ wanted by the fbi. this is the republican and a short - wanted by the fbi. this is the | republican and a short notice, wanted by the fbi. this is the - republican and a short notice, so much asking questions about people appearing in front of these politicians and them making their own points. we will come
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back to this in the second half of outside source. see you then. good afternoon. we are starting on a rather unsettled note and things like they will calm down on the middle part of the week and storage of high—pressure building and with some good spots of sunshine around and by the end of the week, another weather system will arrive to bring some water and wind your whether through friday. and that we have this cluster of other fronts moving friday. and that we have this cluster of otherfronts moving in from the near continent in the spring to be quite heavy as he pushed through this evening inserting the overnight. the rain started to pep up across southern areas and become quite heavy but the room will be pretty extensive across western parts of the country here in variable cloud and some low clouds and mist and places too, quite a muqqy and mist and places too, quite a muggy night to come across several places in 15 degrees here in ten to 12 for the north. it looks like
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tuesdayis 12 for the north. it looks like tuesday is going to be pretty wet across central and eastern england in that room will pep up through the day use inbred echoes to get to some very rainfall and thunder in central and eastern parts of england. it conditions improving across wells in southwest england and later in the day, some sunshine for scotland and northern ireland. the place where we had the rain and hides in the brighter spots and touching around 19 or 20 degrees. that weather front clears away during the course of tuesday night and wednesday, rich high—pressure building and for both wednesday and sunday for thursday. probably in the better day of the week i'm particularly thursday where we will see quite a bit of sunshine because wednesday look rather grey, misty and murky to begin the day, even with the handbag of rain from the weather front which is eventually clearing away with a few showers must in scotland and northern ireland but it should be a drier day and we should start to see increasing months of sunshine across southern and western areas and they'll push temperatures during 21
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degrees. thursday will be looking at the best day of the week with the rich high—pressure across many areas it's going to be drive some good spots of sunshine around and later in the day, cloudy breeze will go for western and northern ireland and the new weather system. but the warm response on thursday, will see the low 20s celsius quite easily. as we head into thursday, this new weather front and the low pressure sweeping across the country on friday and it looks like be wet across western areas is a soft friday and rain pushing towards the east later in sunshine and follow behind.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. countries around the world pledge more than $1 billion in aid for afghanistan.— more than $1 billion in aid for aft hanistan. ., ~ ., , afghanistan. one and three afghans do not know — afghanistan. one and three afghans do not know where _ afghanistan. one and three afghans do not know where their _ afghanistan. one and three afghans do not know where their next - afghanistan. one and three afghans do not know where their next meal. do not know where their next meal will come from. the poverty rate is spiralling and basic public services are closed but not close to collapse. are closed but not close to collapse-— are closed but not close to collase. , ., ., , ., , collapse. the situation is worsening still since the _ collapse. the situation is worsening still since the taliban _ collapse. the situation is worsening still since the taliban took- collapse. the situation is worsening still since the taliban took over - still since the taliban took over the last month. that's complicating the last month. that's complicating the task of getting the age of afghans who need it. in the us congress is getting ready to question secretary anthony blinking over that us withdrawal of troops. like pictures coming in from capitol hill. we will listen in to the questions being asked and some of mr
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clinton's responses to. a new your court is to become —— blinking. click prince andrew of sexual assault. he denies the allegations. also in this new blood test that can detect 50 of cancers before symptoms appear begins trials in england. we are also going to talk about the global appeal of the us open champion emma raducanu. the british teenager is the daughter of a romanian father and a chinese mother and she's been saying thanks to her parents in mandarin. the united states is starting to assess how it handled the end of its military involvement in afghanistan. this is first hearing of its type
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and secretary blinken will be answering questions about that evacuation. here is the feed coming in from washington, dc. let's listen to what's being said put up... fin to what's being said put up... on janua to what's being said put up... q�*i january 2021. this will be the third time secretary blinken testifies before this committee and we are grateful for his appearance before us today. i will now recognise the witness for his testimony which i understand will be a little bit longer than five minutes but being that he's going to be here for all of our questions, i think it's important for his statement to be heard in its entirety. secretary blinken, i now recognise you. mr chairman, thank you very much. mr chairman, _ chairman, thank you very much. mr chairman, thank you very much. mr chairman, thank you. today i welcome this opportunity to discuss our policy— this opportunity to discuss our policy on —
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this opportunity to discuss our policy on afghanistan including where — policy on afghanistan including where we are, —— weird we are going inthe— where we are, —— weird we are going ihthe weeks— where we are, —— weird we are going in the weeks months ahead. for 20 years— in the weeks months ahead. for 20 years -- _ in the weeks months ahead. for 20 years —— where we are. provided funding — years —— where we are. provided funding for— years —— where we are. provided funding for the mission in afghanistan. i know from my own time as a staff— afghanistan. i know from my own time as a staff member and then senator biden— as a staff member and then senator biden how— as a staff member and then senator biden how important congress is. is it when— biden how important congress is. is it when i_ biden how important congress is. is it when i was nominated, i believe strongly— it when i was nominated, i believe strongly in— it when i was nominated, i believe strongly in congresses traditional role in _ strongly in congresses traditional role in foreign policy making, i'm committed — role in foreign policy making, i'm committed to working with you on the path forward in afghanistan and to advance _ path forward in afghanistan and to advance the interests of the american people. on this 20th anniversary of 9/11 as we honour the nearly _ anniversary of 9/11 as we honour the nearly 3000 men, women and children lost their— nearly 3000 men, women and children lost their lives, we are reminded why we _ lost their lives, we are reminded why we went to afghanistan in the first place — why we went to afghanistan in the first place. to bring justice to those — first place. to bring justice to those who attacked us and to ensure that it _ those who attacked us and to ensure that it would not happen again. we achieve _ that it would not happen again. we achieve those objectives long ago. osama _ achieve those objectives long ago. 0sama bin— achieve those objectives long ago. osama bin laden was killed in 2011,
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a decade _ osama bin laden was killed in 2011, a decade ago. al-qaeda is capabilities were degraded significantly including its ability to plan— significantly including its ability to plan and conduct external operations. after 20 years 2641 american — operations. after 20 years 2641 american lives lost, 20,000 injuries, _ american lives lost, 20,000 injuries, $2 trillion spent it was time _ injuries, $2 trillion spent it was time to— injuries, $2 trillion spent it was time to end america's longest war. when _ time to end america's longest war. when president biden took office in january— when president biden took office in january he — when president biden took office in january he inherited an agreement that his _ january he inherited an agreement that his predecessor had reached with the — that his predecessor had reached with the taliban to remove all remaining forces from afghanistan by may one _ remaining forces from afghanistan by may one of— remaining forces from afghanistan by may one of this year. part of that agreement— may one of this year. part of that agreement the previous agreement pressed _ agreement the previous agreement pressed the afghan government to release _ pressed the afghan government to release 5000 taliban prisoners including — release 5000 taliban prisoners including top war commanders. meanwhile it reduce our own presence to 2500 _ meanwhile it reduce our own presence to 2500 troops. they returned the taliban _ to 2500 troops. they returned the taliban agreed to stop attacking us partner— taliban agreed to stop attacking us partner forces and to refrain from threatening afghans major cities. but the _
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threatening afghans major cities. but the taliban continued a relentless march on remote outposts, villages, _ relentless march on remote outposts, villages, districts as well as major roads— villages, districts as well as major roads connecting them. byjanuary 2021 b _ roads connecting them. byjanuary 2021 b taliban was at the strongest military— 2021 b taliban was at the strongest military position it'd been in since 911. military position it'd been in since 9ii~ and _ military position it'd been in since 9ii~ and we — military position it'd been in since 911. and we had the smallest number of troops _ 911. and we had the smallest number of troops on — 911. and we had the smallest number of troops on the ground since 2001. as a result, — of troops on the ground since 2001. as a result, upon taking office, resident — as a result, upon taking office, resident biden immediately face the choice _ resident biden immediately face the choice between ending the war or escalating — choice between ending the war or escalating it. had he not follow through— escalating it. had he not follow through it on his predecessors commitment attacks on our forces and those _ commitment attacks on our forces and those allies _ commitment attacks on our forces and those allies would've resumed and the tele- _ those allies would've resumed and the tele— bands nationwide assault on afghans major cities would've commenced. —— taliban. that would've required _ commenced. —— taliban. that would've required substantially more forces into afghanistan to defend themselves and prevent a tele— band takeover~ _ themselves and prevent a tele— band takeover. taking caleb two casualties and at best the prospect of a stalemate and remaining in
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afghanistan under fire indefinitely. there _ afghanistan under fire indefinitely. there is— afghanistan under fire indefinitely. there is no— afghanistan under fire indefinitely. there is no evidence that staying longer _ there is no evidence that staying longer would've made the afghan security— longer would've made the afghan security forces are the afghan government any more result to be not resilient _ government any more result to be not resilient or— government any more result to be not resilient or self—sustaining. for 20 years— resilient or self—sustaining. for 20 years and — resilient or self—sustaining. for 20 years and hundreds of billions of dollars— years and hundreds of billions of dollars in— years and hundreds of billions of dollars in support include equipment and training did not cyst vice why would _ and training did not cyst vice why would another year, another five, and of? _ would another year, another five, and of? conversely, there is nothing in our— and of? conversely, there is nothing in our strategic competitors like china _ in our strategic competitors like china or— in our strategic competitors like china or russia or our adversaries like iran— china or russia or our adversaries like lran and— china or russia or our adversaries like iran and north korea would've liked more — like iran and north korea would've liked more than for the united states— liked more than for the united states to _ liked more than for the united states to re—up to 20 year war and remained— states to re—up to 20 year war and remained bogged down in afghanistan for another decade. remained bogged down in afghanistan foranother decade. in remained bogged down in afghanistan for another decade. in advance of the presidents decision i was in constant — the presidents decision i was in constant contact with our allies and partners _ constant contact with our allies and partners to— constant contact with our allies and partners to hear their views and factor— partners to hear their views and factor them into our thinking. when the president announced the withdrawal nato immediately and unanimously embraced it. we all said together— unanimously embraced it. we all said together on— unanimously embraced it. we all said together on the drawdown and similarly, we were intensely focused
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on the _ similarly, we were intensely focused on the safety of americans in afghanistan. in march we began urging _ afghanistan. in march we began urging them to leave the country. in total between march and august we sent 19 _ total between march and august we sent 19 specific messages with that warning _ sent 19 specific messages with that warning. and with offers to help including — warning. and with offers to help including financial assistance to pay for — including financial assistance to pay for plane tickets. despite this effort, _ pay for plane tickets. despite this effort, at — pay for plane tickets. despite this effort, at the time the evacuation began _ effort, at the time the evacuation began there were still thousands of american _ began there were still thousands of american citizens in afghanistan. almost— american citizens in afghanistan. almost all— american citizens in afghanistan. almost all of them we evacuated by august _ almost all of them we evacuated by august 3t _ almost all of them we evacuated by august 31. many were dual citizens living _ august 31. many were dual citizens living in— august 31. many were dual citizens living in afghanistan for years, decades, — living in afghanistan for years, decades, generations deciding whether— decades, generations deciding whether or not to leave a place they know _ whether or not to leave a place they know as _ whether or not to leave a place they know as home was in incredibly wrenching — know as home was in incredibly wrenching decision. in april we began — wrenching decision. in april we began drawing down our embassy ordering — began drawing down our embassy ordering nonessential personnel to depart _ ordering nonessential personnel to depart. we also used this time to significantly speed up the processing of the special immigrant visas for— processing of the special immigrant
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visas for afghans who had worked for us and _ visas for afghans who had worked for us and by— visas for afghans who had worked for us and by our side these past 20 years _ us and by our side these past 20 years. when we took office we inherited — years. when we took office we inherited a programme with a 14 step process— inherited a programme with a 14 step process based on a statutory framework, enacted by congress and involving _ framework, enacted by congress and involving multiple government agencies and a backlog of more than 17,000 _ agencies and a backlog of more than 17,000 applicants. there have not been _ 17,000 applicants. there have not been a _ 17,000 applicants. there have not been a single interview in the sib programme in kabul going back march 2020 that— programme in kabul going back march 2020 that the programme was basically in a stall. within two weeks — basically in a stall. within two weeks of— basically in a stall. within two weeks of taking office we restarted the sib _ weeks of taking office we restarted the sib interview process in kabul. on february four one of the very first executive orders issued by president — first executive orders issued by president biden directed us to immediately review the sib programme, identify causes undue delay— programme, identify causes undue delay and — programme, identify causes undue delay and to find ways to process applications more quickly. this spring — applications more quickly. this spring i— applications more quickly. this spring i directed significant resources to the programme was up expanding _ resources to the programme was up expanding the team in washington of people _ expanding the team in washington of people processing applications from ten to— people processing applications from ten to 50 _ people processing applications from
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ten to 50 and doubling the number of sib in— ten to 50 and doubling the number of sib in kabul. even as many embassy personnel— sib in kabul. even as many embassy personnel returned to the united states _ personnel returned to the united states we sent more council officers to kabut— states we sent more council officers to kabul to — states we sent more council officers to kabul to process sib applications. as a result of these and other— applications. as a result of these and other steps including working with congress by may we had reduced the average processing time for special— the average processing time for special immigrant visas by more than a year~ _ special immigrant visas by more than a year~ even— special immigrant visas by more than a year. even amid a covid search with— a year. even amid a covid search with in— a year. even amid a covid search with in kabul injune we continue to issue _ with in kabul injune we continue to issue the _ with in kabul injune we continue to issue the service 100 uses per week in march _ issue the service 100 uses per week in march to— issue the service 100 uses per week in march to more than 1000 per week in march to more than 1000 per week in august _ in march to more than 1000 per week in august. when our evacuation and relocation— in august. when our evacuation and relocation efforts began. that emergency evacuation was sparked by the collapse of the afghan security forces _ the collapse of the afghan security forces in _ the collapse of the afghan security forces in government. throughout the year we _ forces in government. throughout the year we were constantly assessing the staying power and considering multiple _ the staying power and considering multiple scenarios. even the most pessimistic assessments did not predict — pessimistic assessments did not predict the government forces in kabut— predict the government forces in kabul would collapse while us forces
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remained _ kabul would collapse while us forces remained. as the chair of the joint chief— remained. as the chair of the joint chief of— remained. as the chair of the joint chief of staff has said, nothing i or anyone — chief of staff has said, nothing i or anyone else saw indicated a collapse — or anyone else saw indicated a collapse of this army and this government in 11 days. nonetheless, we planned _ government in 11 days. nonetheless, we planned and exercise a wide range of contingencies. because of the plan we — of contingencies. because of the plan we were able to draw down our embassy— plan we were able to draw down our embassy and move our remaining personnel— embassy and move our remaining personnel to the airport within 48 hours _ personnel to the airport within 48 hours in — personnel to the airport within 48 hours. in the military placed on standby— hours. in the military placed on standby by president biden was able to secure _ standby by president biden was able to secure the airport and start the evacuation — to secure the airport and start the evacuation within 72 hours. the evacuation _ evacuation within 72 hours. the evacuation itself was an extraordinary effort under the most difficult _ extraordinary effort under the most difficult conditions imaginable by her diplomats, military, intelligence professionals. they worked — intelligence professionals. they worked around the clock to get american — worked around the clock to get american citizens, afghans who helped — american citizens, afghans who helped us, citizens of our allies and partners in average afghans on planes _ and partners in average afghans on planes out — and partners in average afghans on planes out of the country and off to the united — planes out of the country and off to the united states for the board to transit— the united states for the board to transit locations that our diplomats
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had free _ transit locations that our diplomats had free did not arrange a negotiated in multiple countries. a counsellor— negotiated in multiple countries. a counsellor team 24/7 negotiated in multiple countries. a counsellor team 24 /7 to reach out to americans that could still be in the country— to americans that could still be in the country making in those couple of weeks _ the country making in those couple of weeks 55,000 uncle sending 33,000 e-mails _ of weeks 55,000 uncle sending 33,000 e-mails and _ of weeks 55,000 uncle sending 33,000 e—mails and they are still at it. in the midst— e—mails and they are still at it. in the midst of— e—mails and they are still at it. in the midst of this heroic effort and isis the midst of this heroic effort and lsis k_ the midst of this heroic effort and isis k attack killed 13 servicemembers working the gates at the airport _ servicemembers working the gates at the airport. wounding 20 others and killing _ the airport. wounding 20 others and killing and _ the airport. wounding 20 others and killing and wounding scores of afghans _ killing and wounding scores of afghans. these american service members — afghans. these american service members gave their lives so that otherwise — members gave their lives so that otherwise could continue. in the end, _ otherwise could continue. in the end. we — otherwise could continue. in the end, we completed one of the biggest airless _ end, we completed one of the biggest airless in _ end, we completed one of the biggest airless in history with 125,000 people — airless in history with 125,000 people evacuated to safety. on august — people evacuated to safety. on august 31 in kabul the military mission — august 31 in kabul the military mission in afghanistan officially ended _ mission in afghanistan officially ended and a new diplomatic mission began _ ended and a new diplomatic mission began i_ ended and a new diplomatic mission began. i want to acknowledge the more _ began. i want to acknowledge the more than — began. i want to acknowledge the more than two dozen countries that had help— more than two dozen countries that had help with the relocation effort put up _ had help with the relocation effort put up some served as transit hubs,
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some _ put up some served as transit hubs, some welcoming evacuees for longer periods _ some welcoming evacuees for longer periods of— some welcoming evacuees for longer periods of time. and i want to recognise _ periods of time. and i want to recognise the extraordinary efforts by congress as well. to name just a few examples, congressman fitzpatrick worked with the state department to reunite an afghan family— department to reunite an afghan family in— department to reunite an afghan family in newjersey. commerce do not congressman keating work with our folks _ not congressman keating work with our folks on the ground to help a reporter— our folks on the ground to help a reporter and his family get to the airport _ reporter and his family get to the airport. congresswomanjacobson and airport. congresswoman jacobson and congressman airport. congresswomanjacobson and congressman agnes at work across party _ congressman agnes at work across party lines _ congressman agnes at work across party lines to draw put in a draw attention— party lines to draw put in a draw attention to legal residents and afghans — attention to legal residents and afghans at risk. please note, your e-mails. — afghans at risk. please note, your e—mails, your calls made a real difference — e—mails, your calls made a real difference in getting people out and we continue to use the information you're _ we continue to use the information you're providing in the next phase of the _ you're providing in the next phase of the mission. let me nowjust briefly— of the mission. let me nowjust briefly outline what the department has done _ briefly outline what the department has done over the last couple of weeks — has done over the last couple of weeks. and where we are going in the days of— weeks. and where we are going in the days of weeks ahead. first, we moved our diplomatic operations from carpal— our diplomatic operations from carpal to — our diplomatic operations from carpal to doha where our new afghan affairs _ carpal to doha where our new afghan affairs are _ carpal to doha where our new afghan affairs are hard at work —— kabul.
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many— affairs are hard at work —— kabul. many key— affairs are hard at work —— kabul. many key partners have joined us there _ many key partners have joined us there was— many key partners have joined us there was up second, we are continuing our relentless efforts to help any— continuing our relentless efforts to help any remaining americans as well as afghans— help any remaining americans as well as afghans and citizens of allied partner— as afghans and citizens of allied partner countries leave afghanistan if they _ partner countries leave afghanistan if they so _ partner countries leave afghanistan if they so choose. this past thursday— if they so choose. this past thursday qatar chief charter flight with us _ thursday qatar chief charter flight with us citizens to depart kabul and waited _ with us citizens to depart kabul and waited into her. on friday a second us flight— waited into her. on friday a second us flight carrying citizens and others — us flight carrying citizens and others departed afghanistan. these flights— others departed afghanistan. these flights were coordinated by a coordinated effort by the united states _ coordinated effort by the united states and turkey to reopen the airport— states and turkey to reopen the airport and intense diplomacy to start— airport and intense diplomacy to start the — airport and intense diplomacy to start the flights. in addition to those — start the flights. in addition to those flights a half—dozen american citizens. _ those flights a half—dozen american citizens, about a different look dozen — citizens, about a different look dozen permanent residents of the united _ dozen permanent residents of the united states have also left afghanistan by a in overland route with our— afghanistan by a in overland route with our help. we are in constant contact _ with our help. we are in constant contact with american citizens still in afghan— contact with american citizens still in afghan who told us they wish to leave _ in afghan who told us they wish to leave each — in afghan who told us they wish to leave. each is been assigned a case management team to offer specific
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guidance _ management team to offer specific guidance and instruction. some declined — guidance and instruction. some declined to be on the first flights on thursday and friday for reasons including _ on thursday and friday for reasons including needing more time to make arrangements, wanted to remain with extended _ arrangements, wanted to remain with extended family financial or medical issues _ extended family financial or medical issues that precluded travelling last week. we will continue to help them _ last week. we will continue to help them and _ last week. we will continue to help them and we will continue to help any american who still wants to leave _ any american who still wants to leave at— any american who still wants to leave at afghans whom we have a special _ leave at afghans whom we have a special commitment just as we've done _ special commitment just as we've done in _ special commitment just as we've done in other countries where we've evacuated _ done in other countries where we've evacuated our embassy and hundreds or even— evacuated our embassy and hundreds or even thousands of americans remained — or even thousands of americans remained behind. for example, in libya, _ remained behind. for example, in libya, syria. — remained behind. for example, in libya, syria, venezuela, yemen, somalia — libya, syria, venezuela, yemen, somalia there is no deadline for this mission. third, we are focused on counterterrorism. the taliban is committed — on counterterrorism. the taliban is committed to using afghan as a base for external operations that could threaten — for external operations that could threaten the united states are allies— threaten the united states are allies including al-qaeda and isis k. allies including al-qaeda and isis k~ we _ allies including al-qaeda and isis k~ we will— allies including al-qaeda and isis k. we will hold them accountable for that. k. we will hold them accountable for that that _ k. we will hold them accountable for that. that does not mean we will rely on _ that. that does not mean we will rely on them. we will remain a
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vigilant and moderate threats, contain — vigilant and moderate threats, contain robust counterterrorism and neutraliser— contain robust counterterrorism and neutraliser threats as necessary. and we _ neutraliser threats as necessary. and we will do that in places around the world _ and we will do that in places around the world where we do not have military— the world where we do not have military forces on the ground. fourth — military forces on the ground. fourth, we continue our intense diplomacy— fourth, we continue our intense diplomacy with allies and partners. we initiated a statementjoined by more _ we initiated a statementjoined by more than — we initiated a statementjoined by more than half of the world countries, over100 more than half of the world countries, over 100 countries as countries, over100 countries as well— countries, over100 countries as well as— countries, over 100 countries as well as the _ countries, over 100 countries as well as the united nations security council— well as the united nations security council resolution. setting out the international communities expectation of a child in my government. we expect the taliban to ensure _ government. we expect the taliban to ensure freedom of travel, to make order— ensure freedom of travel, to make order in— ensure freedom of travel, to make order in its— ensure freedom of travel, to make order in its premises terror risen. to uphold — order in its premises terror risen. to uphold the rights of women and -irls to uphold the rights of women and girls and _ to uphold the rights of women and girls and minorities with up to name a ugly— girls and minorities with up to name a ugly recognise government. the legitimacy— a ugly recognise government. the legitimacy and support the talent and seeks from the international community will depend on its conduct _ community will depend on its conduct. we've organised contact groups— conduct. we've organised contact groups in— conduct. we've organised contact groups in key countries to ensure the international community continues to speak with one voice on
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afghanistan and to leverage our combined influence. last week i let a ministerial meeting of 22 countries, the eu, the united nations— countries, the eu, the united nations to continue to align our efforts — nations to continue to align our efforts. and fifth, we will continue to support — efforts. and fifth, we will continue to support humanitarian aid to the afghan— to support humanitarian aid to the afghan people. consistent with sanctions that they will not flow through— sanctions that they will not flow through the government but rather through— through the government but rather through independent organisations like ngos. just today we announce at the united _ like ngos. just today we announce at the united states is providing nearly— the united states is providing nearly 60 for million dollars in new humanitarian assistance to the people of afghanistan. to meet critical— people of afghanistan. to meet critical nutrition needs, address the concerns of women, children and minorities, _ the concerns of women, children and minorities, to help my children including — minorities, to help my children including girls go back to school. this additional funding means the united _ this additional funding means the united states is provided nearly $330 _ united states is provided nearly $330 million in assistance to the afghan— $330 million in assistance to the afghan people this year. in delhi and ram — afghan people this year. in delhi and ram sign i toured the facilities -- joe _ and ram sign i toured the facilities -- joe r — and ram sign i toured the facilities —— joe r. bef process before moving
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onto the _ —— joe r. bef process before moving onto the next destination. karen home _ onto the next destination. karen home i_ onto the next destination. karen home i spent some time at the dallas expo home i spent some time at the dallas e>
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it as well. thank you very much for listening and with that, mr chairman i listening and with that, mr chairman i look— listening and with that, mr chairman i look forward to your questions. thank— i look forward to your questions. thank you — i look forward to your questions. thank you-— thank you. thank you secretary banen thank you. thank you secretary itlinken for— thank you. thank you secretary blinken for your _ thank you. thank you secretary blinken for your testimony. - thank you. thank you secretary blinken for your testimony. i i thank you. thank you secretary l blinken for your testimony. i will now recognise members for five minutes and pursuant to house rules all time yielded is for the purposes of questioning our witness. i will recognise the members by committee seniority, alternating between democrats and republicans. please note that i will be strict in enforcing the five minute time limitation for questioning. what i mean? i don't want members to ask questions... we mean? i don't want members to ask questions- - -— questions... we will come back to the questions _ questions... we will come back to the questions in _ questions... we will come back to the questions in a _ questions... we will come back to the questions in a moment. - questions... we will come back to the questions in a moment. firstl questions... we will come back to l the questions in a moment. first of all experian barbara but a short live from washington. we heard a detailed statement there what did you make of it?— detailed statement there what did you make of it? that's basically the administration _
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you make of it? that's basically the administration position _ you make of it? that's basically the administration position that - you make of it? that's basically the administration position that we - you make of it? that's basically the | administration position that we have been hearing from mr blinken and other administration officials because they've already had to respond to a lot of criticism was up the defence of the decision to leave afghanistan, the way the state department tried to accelerate the efforts to evacuate americans and allies in how that all became very much a problem when the government fell and how they then managed to get the airless going and evacuate many people and that they would continue to do so. and then he outlined where things were going in the future including efforts to continue counterterrorism from outside the country and also working together with allies. all of that is very much the administration argument. his laid it out in some detail, it took him at least five minutes to do that and that's because he knows he's going to be question very closely now. i think both democrats and republicans have questions, especially about the evacuation and why didn't it happen
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faster or sooner. evacuation and why didn't it happen faster orsooner. in evacuation and why didn't it happen faster or sooner. in the opening statements of the two parties that lead the committee, the democrat and a republican, you can see how partisan this is going to be. because the democratic chair said basically, we are looking at 20 years of mistakes. we have to face hard truths of what america got wrong and we are going to be looking at witnesses from all the administrations who were involved. the republicans that were going to be looking at how this administration got it so terribly wrong, how it surrendered to the taliban, how at betrayed this administration got it so terribly wrong, how it surrendered to the taliban, arbitrator afghan allies behind the lines on the left and began the lines in how it has reduced confidence in us from our allies. that's the kind of approach that each side is going to take. as i said, there are people on both sides of the aisle who do want to ask mr blinken questions especially about how the evacuation descended into such chaos.— into such chaos. thank you. the questions _ into such chaos. thank you. the questions have _ into such chaos. thank you. the questions have become - into such chaos. thank you. the questions have become as - into such chaos. thank you. the questions have become as have| into such chaos. thank you. the . questions have become as have the answers. let's listen in again.
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residin: answers. let's listen in again. residing in _ answers. let's listen in again. residing in afghanistan for all their lives. afghanistan is their home. they have extended families and it's very hard for them, understandably to make the decision. but that is the group that we are working with. what also happens is, people will identify themselves, including since the end of the evacuation as american citizens in afghanistan but wish to leave. so they get added to the picture. we get information from you, from ngos, veterans groups about people as garrisons and americans. we immediately seek to contact them, to engage with them, to find out if in fact they are in afghanistan an infant that they want to leave. this is a picture that will continue to change over time. that is the rough population that we are working with right now. population that we are working with riaht now. population that we are working with ri . ht now. , ., population that we are working with riaht now. , ., ~ ., right now. next question. i know that the trump _ right now. next question. i know that the trump administrations l right now. next question. i know i that the trump administrations deal with the _ that the trump administrations deal with the taliban meant that they were _ with the taliban meant that they were 2500 troops remaining with less
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than five _ were 2500 troops remaining with less than five months to complete the withdrawal. at any time did the biden— withdrawal. at any time did the biden administration consider whether— biden administration consider whether to renegotiate the deal with the taliban? the whether to renegotiate the deal with the taliban? ., ., the taliban? the taliban made abundantly _ the taliban? the taliban made abundantly clear _ the taliban? the taliban made abundantly clear in _ the taliban? the taliban made abundantly clear in many - the taliban? the taliban made | abundantly clear in many public statements, private statements to us, to others around the world that it was going to hold us to the deadline that the previous administration negotiated in terms of withdrawing the remaining american forces was up and made very clear that if we lose path. deadline it would resume the attacks that it'd stopped on our forces it would resume the attacks that it'd stopped on ourforces in on our allies and partners as well as to commence the on the cities that we've seen in recent months. and so that was it exactly the choice that president biden face put up whether to go forward with the agreement and the commitments that his predecessor had made in terms of withdrawing all
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forces by may one or returned to war with the taliban and escalate, not end the war. as you know what the president to do was to take some risk in extending past may one the time we were used to actually withdraw our forces so that we could do it in the safest and most orderly way possible. we extended the deadline to september. balsa way possible. we extended the deadline to september. also we know that there was — deadline to september. also we know that there was a _ deadline to september. also we know that there was a point _ deadline to september. also we know that there was a point recently - deadline to september. also we know that there was a point recently in - that there was a point recently in the government hardliners, and the new taliban group, telegrams commitment to share power with other afghan— commitment to share power with other afghan and _ commitment to share power with other afghan and social groups excludes women _ afghan and social groups excludes women and minorities. how does this appointment this new government factor— appointment this new government factor into— appointment this new government factor into the administration strategy— factor into the administration strategy to engage with the taliban or assumptions the taliban may have changed _ or assumptions the taliban may have changed was that so the interim government made by the taliban falls very short _
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government made by the taliban falls very short of the mark that was set by the _ very short of the mark that was set by the international community. for inclusivi , by the international community. fr?“ inclusivity, that is to have the government that was probably represented of the afghan people not just the taliban and its constituency to include women entering government does not. and as been noted, it includes many key members who have very challenging track records. we've been very clear, when it comes to engaging with that government or any government to be named on a more permanent basis, we are going to do so on the basis of whether or not it advances our interests. and those interests are very clear. they are the expectations that we set and the international community has set. the ongoing freedom of travel for a government that makes good on the tolerance commitments to combat terrorism, not allow afghanistan to be used as a haven for launching attacks directed against other countries, to support the basic rights of the afghan people, including women and minorities and
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to allow humanitarian assistance to get the people who so desperately needed. that will be the basis upon which we engage in any taliban led government whether it's the interim government whether it's the interim government or one named in the days and weeks ahead. i government or one named in the days and weeks ahead.— and weeks ahead. i now yield for questions- _ and weeks ahead. i now yield for questions- mr — and weeks ahead. i now yield for questions. mr secretary, - and weeks ahead. i now yield for questions. mr secretary, in - and weeks ahead. i now yield for questions. mr secretary, in the i questions. mr secretary, in the weeks before — questions. mr secretary, in the weeks before the _ questions. mr secretary, in the weeks before the fall _ questions. mr secretary, in the weeks before the fall of - questions. mr secretary, in the weeks before the fall of travel, j questions. mr secretary, in the - weeks before the fall of travel, the surrender— weeks before the fall of travel, the surrender to— weeks before the fall of travel, the surrender to the _ weeks before the fall of travel, the surrender to the taliban _ weeks before the fall of travel, the surrender to the taliban i - weeks before the fall of travel, the surrender to the taliban i was - weeks before the fall of travel, the surrender to the taliban i was on . surrender to the taliban i was on the phone — surrender to the taliban i was on the phone with _ surrender to the taliban i was on the phone with very— surrender to the taliban i was on the phone with very high - surrender to the taliban i was on the phone with very high ranking| the phone with very high ranking officials — the phone with very high ranking officials at — the phone with very high ranking officials at the _ the phone with very high ranking officials at the state, _ the phone with very high ranking officials at the state, dod - officials at the state, dod white house _ officials at the state, dod white house trying _ officials at the state, dod white house trying to _ officials at the state, dod white house trying to save _ officials at the state, dod white house trying to save lives. - officials at the state, dod white house trying to save lives. we l officials at the state, dod white . house trying to save lives. we had americans— house trying to save lives. we had americans that _ house trying to save lives. we had americans that couldn't _ house trying to save lives. we had americans that couldn't get - house trying to save lives. we had americans that couldn't get out, . house trying to save lives. we had. americans that couldn't get out, we had interpreters— americans that couldn't get out, we had interpreters that _ americans that couldn't get out, we had interpreters that couldn't - americans that couldn't get out, we had interpreters that couldn't get i had interpreters that couldn't get through— had interpreters that couldn't get through the — had interpreters that couldn't get through the perimeter— had interpreters that couldn't get through the perimeter of - had interpreters that couldn't get through the perimeter of the - through the perimeter of the taliban. _ through the perimeter of the taliban, they— through the perimeter of the taliban, they are _ through the perimeter of the taliban, they are left - through the perimeter of the | taliban, they are left behind, through the perimeter of the - taliban, they are left behind, they will be _ taliban, they are left behind, they will be executed, _ taliban, they are left behind, they will be executed, they _ taliban, they are left behind, they will be executed, they do - taliban, they are left behind, they will be executed, they do have - taliban, they are left behind, they will be executed, they do have a l will be executed, they do have a bull's-eye — will be executed, they do have a bull's-eye on _ will be executed, they do have a bull's—eye on their— will be executed, they do have a bull's—eye on their back. - will be executed, they do have a bull's—eye on their back. we - will be executed, they do have aj bull's—eye on their back. we had four buses — bull's—eye on their back. we had four buses of _ bull's—eye on their back. we had four buses of afghan _ bull's—eye on their back. we had four buses of afghan girls, - bull's—eye on their back. we had . four buses of afghan girls, orphans at the _ four buses of afghan girls, orphans at the american _ four buses of afghan girls, orphans at the american universities, - four buses of afghan girls, orphansl at the american universities, school of musicm — at the american universities, school of music- - -— of music... asking a question but also making _ of music... asking a question but also making a _ of music. .. asking a question but also making a political— of music. .. asking a question but also making a political point- of music... asking a question but also making a political point is. also making a political point is well is a quizzing of entity blinken
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continues concerning us withdrawal of afghanistan and of course we will keep a close eye across that as it plays out. that finishes this addition. thanks for watching. this weekend is looking very changeable. we start on a rather unsettled note then things will calm down on the middle part of the week thanks to the ridge of high pressure building and was good spells of sunshine around. by the end of the week and weather system will arrive to bring some whether and when the weather on thursday or friday. we have this cluster of weatherford moving up from the near continent. his reign could be quite heavy as we push through this evening and certainly overnight. the rain will start to pep up across southern areas and become quite heavy for the upgrade will be pretty expensive across wasn't parts the country here, variable cloud and some low cloud and mist in places. quite a muqqy cloud and mist in places. quite a muggy night to come across southern areas with that heavier rain, 13 to
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15 degrees here, closer to ten to 12 further north. does look like tuesdayis further north. does look like tuesday is going to be pretty wet across parts of wales, central southern england that rain will pop up southern england that rain will pop up to the day. could see some very heavy rain perhaps in rumbles of thunder to between central parts of england. conditions improving across wales, southwest england later in the day and some sunshine for western scotland, northern ireland for the disappointing temperatures where we have rain otherwise highs in the brighter spots probably touching around 19 or 20 degrees was up touching around 19 or 20 degrees was up weather clears away during the course of tuesday night into wednesday, ridge of high pressure builds in for both wednesday and certainly for thursday for the probably the better day of the week particularly thursday where we will see quite a bit of sunshine. wednesday looks rather great, misty and murky quite a bit cloud to begin the day. even a hang back of rain across east england for that weather front which will eventually clear wafers or perhaps a few showers of western scotland, northern ireland otherwise for most it should be a drier day. we should see increasing amounts of sunshine across southern and western areas pushing
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temperatures up to around 21 degrees. thursday looks like the best day of the week with that ridge of high pressure across many areas, it's gotta be dry. good sales of sunshine around, later in the day cloud and breeze was doctor in greece for western scotland, northern island with up in this new weather system. northern island with up in this new weathersystem. in northern island with up in this new weather system. in this warmer spots on sunday we see the low 20s celsius quite easily. as we head into thursday this new weather front associated with this area of low pressure sweeps across the country during friday dinner friday to bring rain and strong winds across northern island with what looked like it will be wet to start friday rain pushing towards the east later in the day, sunshine and showers follow behind.
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this is bbc news. i'm james reynolds. the headlines at eight o'clock — all 12— to 15—year—olds in the uk are set to be offered a dose of the pfizer coronavirus vaccine. the uk's chief medical officers hope the move will keep more children in school, cutting the risk to their mental health. it is an important, potentially useful additional tool to help reduce the public health impacts that come through educational disruption. the government is expected to give a statement to the house of commons this evening on vaccinations for 12— to 15—year—olds. also on the programme — nearly a third of all those arriving in england and northern ireland in the spring may have broken quarantine rules. climate protestors cause chaos on the m25, blocking slip roads, the nhs starts trials of a
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revolutionary the nhs starts trials of a revolutionary new blood test revolutionary

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