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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 14, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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becoming overwhelmed will be outlined later today. meanwhile, vaccinations for children aged 12 to 15 will go ahead in england, after ministers confirmed they would follow the latest advice from the uk's chief medical officers. i don't want to make a decision where it may be i might regret later in life. i just want to take things at a pace where i understand. i definitely want to get the vaccine as soon as possible. i think it will really help me and the people around me. job vacancies have hit a record high rising lawyers for prince andrew tell a court in new york that sexual assault allegations filed against him are "baseless and potentially unlawful". the un secretary general says more than a billion dollars in aid has been pledged for afghanistan as its people face their most perilous hour. the met gala — one of fashion�*s biggest and starriest events — has rolled out its red carpet in new york for some of the planet's
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best—known celebrities. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. in england today, we'll all get more details later from the government on its plans to deal with the pandemic over the coming months. we expect that all over—50s will be offered a covid boosterjab. in it was confirmed last night that children aged 12 to 15 will be offered a single vaccine dose from next week in england. let's take a look at what other countries are doing. germany, like the uk, has only been vaccinating children over 16, and some younger children who are clinically vulnerable. but spain, france and italy have been vaccinating children above 12 for the past few months. across the atlantic, canada and the us have been vaccinating children above 12
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since may here's what some teenagers think of the decision in england. i don't want to make a decision where maybe i might regret later in life or... i just want to take things at a pace where i know i understand. it's very cloudy recently. a lot of people recite that source and other sources. it is not one clear idea behind it one person will say is not safe and another will say it's safe. it's kind of contradictory. so it sounds like you are a bit confused at the moment about what is the right thing to do. me and many other people, yes. i definitely want to get the vaccine as soon as possible. _ i think it will really help me - and the people around me if i try and stay as safe as possible. invitations for the vaccine will begin next week , here's the vaccines minister nadhim zahawi what will happen is that clinicians will share information with parents, with the children, leaflets, online as well.
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then there will be a consent form sent from the school in the usual way that schools do it. some schools do it in hard copy, they will put it in a letter for parents to sign, some do it electronically, so they will e—mail parents to gain... share information and gain their consent, so parental consent is required and then the vaccination programme will take place. molly kingsleigh is from the parent campaign group, us for them. i think ithinkl i think i am right in saying that you are — i think i am right in saying that you are a — i think i am right in saying that you are a pro—vaccine - i think i am right in saying that you are a pro—vaccine as - i think i am right in saying that you are a pro—vaccine as a - i think i am right in saying that i you are a pro—vaccine as a group, i think i am right in saying that - you are a pro—vaccine as a group, is correct? _ you are a pro-vaccine as a group, is correct? , ., ., , ., ., .. correct? yes, we are a pro-vaccine, we are not _ correct? yes, we are a pro-vaccine, we are not proud — correct? yes, we are a pro-vaccine, we are not proud of— correct? yes, we are a pro-vaccine, we are not proud of this _ correct? yes, we are a pro-vaccine, we are not proud of this vaccine at l we are not proud of this vaccine at this moment in time but we are very supportive of other essential childhood immunisation programmes. absolutely. what are your concerns about this? i absolutely. what are your concerns about this? ~ . absolutely. what are your concerns about this?— about this? i think there are a few concerns. about this? i think there are a few concerns- i _ about this? i think there are a few concerns. i think— about this? i think there are a few concerns. i think the _ about this? i think there are a few concerns. i think the first - about this? i think there are a few concerns. i think the first concern | concerns. i think the first concern looking at where we are is that we are very worried that this is being
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rolled out in circumstances where a jcb | rolled out in circumstances where a jcb i have felt unable to recommend that roll—out is one of the young men just said there that roll—out is one of the young menjust said there —— that roll—out is one of the young men just said there —— jcb that roll—out is one of the young menjust said there ——jcb i... have lays the parents in a confused position is also set a precedent. we are taking into account wider societal factors, are taking into account wider societalfactors, educational disruption and our viewers think it sets a profoundly concerning precedent actually.— sets a profoundly concerning precedent actually. does it set a precedent? _ precedent actually. does it set a precedent? because _ precedent actually. does it set a precedent? because it _ precedent actually. does it set a precedent? because it is - precedent actually. does it set a i precedent? because it is voluntary. nobody is being forced to have this vaccine. ., ., ~' nobody is being forced to have this vaccine. ~ ., ., , vaccine. so, look, i know that is what chris— vaccine. so, look, i know that is what chris whitty _ vaccine. so, look, i know that is what chris whitty has _ vaccine. so, look, i know that is what chris whitty has said - vaccine. so, look, i know that is what chris whitty has said and l vaccine. so, look, i know that isj what chris whitty has said and it vaccine. so, look, i know that is. what chris whitty has said and it is what chris whitty has said and it is what the jcb i what chris whitty has said and it is what thejcb i have said, but this raises a whole other host of concerns about whether actually this will be truly voluntary because at this point and in the context of such a finely balanced decision that jcvi have been unable to recommend
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this,... jcvi have been unable to recommend this,..., , ., jcvi have been unable to recommend this,... , .,, . ., ., this, . .. just to be clear about what the did this, . .. just to be clear about what they did say _ this, . .. just to be clear about what they did say because _ this, . .. just to be clear about what they did say because it _ this, . .. just to be clear about what they did say because it is - they did say because it is important. you are right, they didn't recommend it for a wide roll—out, but they did say in their statement there are benefits for 12-15 statement there are benefits for 12—15 —year—olds, but because they are marginal benefits, that is why they weren't recommending a roll—out. i they weren't recommending a roll-out. , ., ., they weren't recommending a roll-out. , . ., ., , roll-out. i understand that and they also said there _ roll-out. i understand that and they also said there was _ roll-out. i understand that and they also said there was considerable - also said there was considerable uncertainty about the magnitude of unknown harm and so let's be balanced about that. but going back to your point about consent, and what has been said about that, at the moment we are going to have a roll—out in a school setting, we have the potential for parental, and it wouldn't be consent, it would be refusal, we have ten chauffeur parental refusal to be over ridden by invoking this idea of gallic confidence for children under —— not over 12 and we also —— gillick
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confidence. people feel pressured into doing it. pressure from who? pressure from pears pressure from teachers. one of the head teachers from the union said that it should happen in school context because the peer pressure will increase uptake. so, you know, the pressure is there. there is an nhs advert encouraging strongly children to get the vaccine. , , , ,, ~ , vaccine. this is pressure. and they mi . ht vaccine. this is pressure. and they might argue _ vaccine. this is pressure. and they might argue pressure _ vaccine. this is pressure. and they might argue pressure for - vaccine. this is pressure. and they might argue pressure for good - might argue pressure for good reason, because it protects kids from the damaging effects of long covid and it protects their education, you know, there are lessons won't be disrupted in the way we have seen over the last 18 months or so. way we have seen over the last 18 months or so— way we have seen over the last 18 months or so-_ way we have seen over the last 18 months or so. again, that might be an ued months or so. again, that might be arrued but months or so. again, that might be argued but i — months or so. again, that might be argued but i would _ months or so. again, that might be argued but i would argue _ months or so. again, that might be | argued but i would argue something very different. educational disruption is a policy choice, not a
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clinical health choice. i think if the policy is wrong... fin clinical health choice. i think if the policy is wrong. . .- the policy is wrong... on that oint, the policy is wrong... on that point. being _ the policy is wrong... on that point, being devils _ the policy is wrong... on that point, being devils advocate, | the policy is wrong... on that i point, being devils advocate, it the policy is wrong... on that - point, being devils advocate, it is myjob, you say it is a clinical choice, but chris whitty talks about and others have talked about the effect on young people's mental health from missing school. filth. health from missing school. oh, look, i health from missing school. oh, look. i am _ health from missing school. oh, look, i am not _ health from missing school. oi look, i am not disputing health from missing school. ©“i, look, i am not disputing for a second the school closure or disruption has a catastrophic impact on mental health, what i am saying is that the acts that answer to that is that the acts that answer to that is not vaccine, it's about changing policy. let's agree that actually as long as deaths and hospitalisations are in is going up, which thankfully because vaccine is working, which is great, they are not, then actually, we need to be ended bit tougher about disrupting our schoolchildren because there is cases in school. 0k. and because there is cases in school. ok. and thank you for talking to us. if you have any questions on teenage vaccines,
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boosters for the over 50s, or the government's winter plan, then we'd love to hear them. for viewers in the uk, i'll put them to the virologist professorjonathan ball, on your questions answered at 10.30. get in touch using the hashtag bbc your questions or email... yourquestions@bbc. co. uk. as well as the announcement on 12 to 15 year olds, the government is also going to outline its plan to deal with covid this autumn and winter. joining me now is our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. tell us more about what might be in their so—called too cold —— mccool took it. their so-called too cold -- mccool took it. ~ ., ., ., took it. we will hear more about the lans took it. we will hear more about the plans when — took it. we will hear more about the plans when the... _ took it. we will hear more about the plans when the... there _ took it. we will hear more about the plans when the. .. there will- took it. we will hear more about the plans when the... there will be - took it. we will hear more about the plans when the... there will be a . plans when the... there will be a press conference with the prime minister after and they will unveil this autumn and winter covid plan. plan a is the stuff we have been hearing about and you have been talking about, a boosterjab for over 50s, which we think will follow
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the same age brackets as the original covid vaccination programme, so the elderly and most vulnerable first and then working down the age bands and then there will be a single dose offered to people six months after they have had their second dose of the initial vaccine. then in addition to that, there is the offer for 12—15 —year—olds and that is plan a. ministers hope that will help to depressed levels of a covid in the population. if that doesn't work there will be a plan b, or at least elements to make up a potential plan b. we are having to wait to see what they will be in black and white but there are suggestions it could include things like toughening up the rules on wearing a mask in public places, could you also see a bit of a switch in the emphasis and reminding people to work from home again? and then of course, in the back of the locker and deep down in the back pocket, this idea of covid vaccine certificates for access to crowded venues like nightclubs, which the government said it was going to go ahead with and then
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decided they would keep it in reserve. what we won't get, though, is triggers or thresholds for where restrictions or regulations or guidance could be reintroduced. ministers want to leave it up to the judgment in association with the scientists to take into account loads of factors about what might be happening, ratherthan loads of factors about what might be happening, rather than saying or having a level that triggers these things. having a level that triggers these thins. ., ~' ,, , having a level that triggers these thins. ., ~ , . very much patricia marquis is director for england at the royal college of nursing. how much some of these measures affect some of your members? i think what we are — affect some of your members? i think what we are saying _ affect some of your members? i think what we are saying is _ affect some of your members? i think what we are saying is that _ affect some of your members? i think what we are saying is that the - what we are saying is that the government doesn't need to be mindful about the impact of any of its decisions on the nhs, particularly in social care services and nurses but in particular and it doesn't need to be willing to follow the data when it comes to any restrictions that it needs to put in place to protect the nhs and care services. the nursing staff have been at the forefront of helping to
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fight this pandemic through both vaccination programme and delivering care and treatment to people who have sadly been either hospitalised or had to seek treatment through gps etc. but they are exhausted and there are not enough of them. we absolutely, as a country, need to support our health services to be protected and we expect the government to ensure it follows the data when it makes its decisions and announcements later today. br; data when it makes its decisions and announcements later today. by that, ou mean announcements later today. by that, you mean if — announcements later today. by that, you mean if cases _ announcements later today. by that, you mean if cases go _ announcements later today. by that, you mean if cases go up _ announcements later today. by that, you mean if cases go up and - you mean if cases go up and translate into hospitalisations, then what? bring a lockdown? we are not sa in: then what? bring a lockdown? we are not saying particularly _ then what? bring a lockdown? we are not saying particularly a _ then what? bring a lockdown? we are not saying particularly a lockdown, . not saying particularly a lockdown, but the other measures that were being discussed about reintroducing social distancing, working from home, mask wearing, etc, and again obviously continuing to promote the vaccination programme, which really is a lifeline to many people and is there to protect the nhs. but what we need to remember is that the nhs
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and social care, as i say, are under immense pressure now and that will get much worse if covid rights and hospitalisations as a result of that get much better and continue to rise. so the government has to be prepared to do what it needs to do to protect health and care services and in doing that protect the public of the uk. ., , , and in doing that protect the public of the uk. ., ., , , of the uk. how many nursing vacancies _ of the uk. how many nursing vacancies are _ of the uk. how many nursing vacancies are there _ of the uk. how many nursing vacancies are there at - of the uk. how many nursing vacancies are there at the - of the uk. how many nursing - vacancies are there at the moment across the country? it is vacancies are there at the moment across the country?— across the country? it is very difficult to — across the country? it is very difficult to judge. _ across the country? it is very difficult to judge. there - across the country? it is very difficult to judge. there are l across the country? it is very | difficult to judge. there are at least 40,000 in the nhs in england alone but across the uk the figure is higher and when you start to consider all the other areas that nurses working, it is much, much higher again. nurses working, it is much, much higheragain. so nurses working, it is much, much higher again. so it is really significant number of vacancies and of those nurses that we have in the system are in many cases exhausted by the last 18 months and we have seen very high sickness rates as a result of the mental health pressures that people have suffered
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in recent months. so the pressure is on the system and on the individuals are really significant at the minute. ., ~ are really significant at the minute. ., ,, i. ., are really significant at the minute. . ~' ., . ~' are really significant at the minute. ., ,, ., ., ,, ., , minute. thank you for talking to us, patricia. borisjohnson is mourning the loss of his mother, after she died yesterday at the age of 79. charlottejohnson wahl, who was a painter, died "suddenly and peacefully" at st mary's hospital, paddington, yesterday. prince andrew's lawyers have told a pre—trial hearing that legal action accusing him of sexual assault is "baseless" and should be dismissed. virginia giuffre has launched a civil lawsuit over the alleged abuse, which she says happened two decades ago, when she was 17. the duke of york has consistently denied ms giuffre's claims. our north america correspondent nada tawfik sent this report. well, this first hearing really centred more on procedure rather than the allegations. those allegations, of course, virginia giuffre accusing prince andrew of sexually assaulting her in london,
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new york and the us virgin islands when she was just 17 years old. now the duke of york has strenuously denied those allegations, even saying he has no recollection of ever meeting virginia giuffre. but in court it really did focus on the steps ahead. prince andrew's attorney told the court he had two main arguments. first, that the papers were not properly served to the duke of york, that the uk high court had to weigh in on the legality of service. and secondly, he said they believed this lawsuit was potentially unlawful and baseless. and what they said they wanted was to see a 2009 settlement agreement between virginia giuffre and jeffrey epstein. now they believe there is a release in that agreement which would absolve the duke of york of any legal obligation.
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now, virginia giuffre's attorneys, in response, said they thought that was a mischaracterisation of that settlement. they also said if prince andrew does feel that he was not properly served, that he needs to put in a formal motion through the court, so that could be litigated. the judge will hear oral arguments in october, october 13, and that will be in person. the next chance these parties will have to once again debate whether this case can get under way. the headlines on bbc news... a uk—wide programme of boosterjabs for those aged over 50 is expected to be confirmed. it's part of the government's autumn and winter plan for managing covid. measures that could be brought in in england if the nhs risks becoming overwhelmed will be outlined later today. meanwhile, vaccinations for children aged 12 to 15 will go ahead in england, after ministers confirmed they would follow the latest advice from the uk's
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chief medical officers. the un secretary general, antonio guterres, says more than a billion dollars in aid has been pledged for people in afghanistan he described as facing their most perilous hour. speaking at an emergency aid conference in geneva, mr guterres said one in three afghans did not know where their next meal was coming from. the people of afghanistan need a lifeline. after decades of war, suffering and insecurity, they face perhaps their most perilous hour. now is the time for the international community to stand with them, and let us be clear, this conference is not simply about what we will give to the people of afghanistan. it is about what we owe. the number ofjob vacancies in the uk have hit a record high as the economic recovery continues.
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new figures from the office for national statistics show the number of people in work, has also rebounded to levels not seen since before the pandemic. but business groups said there remained high demand for more staff, and there was a risk labour shortages would dampen growth. three people have died after a car crashed into a residential building in west london overnight. police say they arrived at the scene on the great western road in notting hill to find the car on fire, and evacuated a number of residents from the building as a precaution. officers say they don't believe any other vechicles were involved. it is another disturbing indicator of the speed of climate change. new bbc global research shows a significant increase in the number of days temperatures around the world are hitting 50 degrees — that's 122 in fahrenheit. in other words — the world is seeing far more extreme heat. since the 1980s,
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the number has tripled. back then there were eight days a year on average. in the last decade we've seen 26 days a year. temperatures of 50c happen most often in the middle east and gulf regions. but they are now happening in more areas of the world than before. north africa has seen them with increasing frequency. and here we can see what happened this year: canada hit 49 degrees and italy 48. in nigeria, climate change has destroyed much of the fertile land. the country's oil production has added to the problem, as millions have been forced to live near toxic gas flares. peter okwoche reports. this is my mum. she's going to the city fire. under the scorching sun, and in front of an open gas flare in nigeria's oil—rich south, joy risks her life to support her family.
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temperatures here reach boiling levels. but, despite the risks, joy uses the heat to speed up drying time for her tapioca sweet puddings. translation: the reason i have short hair is, - if i grow my hair long, it could burn my head if the flare shifts direction and explodes. the use of fossil fuels worldwide has had a devastating impact on nigeria's climate. the country suffers from severe droughts in the north, and flash floods in the south. when i was a kid, the rain was not like this, the weather is not like this. so i think that life isn't about to end. but nigeria is also a major producer of oil, with a particular admission problem. —— emission problem. this is the flare of the gas that the inhabitants - of this land are suffering, with the abject poverty. l flaring is the process of burning the natural gas that is released when oil is extracted from the ground. the process is a large source
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of greenhouse gases, and a major contributor to climate change in nigeria. it is also illegal in the country. yet about two million nigerians live within four km of a gas flare — including joy and her children. these are my children. forjoy, working around the gas flare is one way of making ends meet. translation: it'sj bad for our health. but we say, to hell with the consequences. we need to support our families. joy and her children have been working extra hard translation: it'sj bad for our health. for four days straight. they are processing the tapioca to help herfamily pay for the funeral of her mother. when i came here, i had no work, nojob. i saw the women working this tapioca. then i asked them, could you let me? although they need the money, joy�*s family still wants the gas flares to stop.
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translation: in my view, - the government should lead efforts to end gas flaring in the oil industry and hopefully that j . will significantly reduce the heat l wave and associated health hazards. nigeria's economic development is highly dependent on oil revenue. yet the industry's making it one of africa's largest emitters of greenhouse gases. and, until the government fulfils its promise to end gas flaring by 2030, the country's landscape and the lives and livelihoods of millions likejoy remain at risk. peter okwoche, bbc news. the u.k. is delaying the introduction of post—brexit checks on plant and agriculture imports. some measures which were expected to come into force next month will be introduced injanuary orjuly next year instead. in a written statement to parliament the cabinet office minister penny mordaunt blamed disruption
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from the pandemic and pressure on global supply chains.this is the second time this year that delays have been introduced to the uk's border operating model. travel body abta is calling for a significant overhaul of the government's traffic light system. the group says measures, including the use of pcr testing, means the industry is still not able to function fully and are putting people off from travelling. the government says it recognises the challenging time facing the sector and keeps the system under review. i asked mark tanzer, chief executive of abta, what he would like ministers to do. we would like them to do away with the traffic light system, there is no meaningful difference now between amber and no meaningful difference now between amberand green no meaningful difference now between amber and green categories, so we think they should receive a red category for a high priority countries that have variants of concern. but more importantly, to abolish the need for a pcr test when
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people come back if they have been double vaccinated from these lower risk countries. all the evidence suggest there is no meaningful difference between positivity of people coming back from these countries and people living in the uk anyway. so i think we have gone through the time when they were useful and they still act as a real deterrent from people travelling. because of the cost and hassle? yes, indeed. and it's notjust international travel is business travel and we need to get this market moving again as part of the economic recovery. you market moving again as part of the economic recovery.— market moving again as part of the economic recovery. you want a pcr test and return _ economic recovery. you want a pcr test and return to _ economic recovery. you want a pcr test and return to be _ economic recovery. you want a pcr test and return to be scrapped. - economic recovery. you want a pcr test and return to be scrapped. are j test and return to be scrapped. are you bothered if it is a lateral flow test or scrap all types completely? yes, i think scrap the test for these low risk countries that are at these low risk countries that are at the same risk as domestic. we have opened up the uk economy to large—scale events and people travelling to them and participating and there is no logical reason why you would make a different set of tests for people who are coming back from other countries with similar
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levels of infection.— from other countries with similar levels of infection. how would you assess the — levels of infection. how would you assess the summer _ levels of infection. how would you assess the summer holiday - levels of infection. how would you assess the summer holiday period levels of infection. how would you . assess the summer holiday period for your members? it assess the summer holiday period for your members?— assess the summer holiday period for your members? it has been, well, the international— your members? it has been, well, the international travel _ your members? it has been, well, the international travel is _ your members? it has been, well, the international travel is still _ your members? it has been, well, the international travel is still very - international travel is still very much in the doldrums. we are nowhere near the recovery seen in the uk economy and we are lagging far behind european countries. we have just done our research with our member companies, which is travel agents, tour operators and they are 83% down where they were on 2019. so a very long way to go and of course, these companies have been going for 18 months now without any meaningful revenue... �* ., y 18 months now without any meaningful revenue... . ., , ., , revenue... although they have been able to benefit _ revenue... although they have been able to benefit from _ revenue... although they have been able to benefit from the _ revenue... although they have been able to benefit from the furlough . able to benefit from the furlough scheme. ~ ., ., scheme. well, to a degree. the difference _ scheme. well, to a degree. the difference of _ scheme. well, to a degree. the difference of travel _ scheme. well, to a degree. the difference of travel companies | scheme. well, to a degree. the | difference of travel companies is that they have had to have people in working because they have been rebooking and giving refunds and so forth and so they haven't been able to benefit to the same degree and we have seen already we estimate 95,000 job losses where people have either been made redundant or through natural turnover, they haven't been replaced and of course, a lot of
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members and people are still are on furlough and when that unwinds at the end of this month, 70% are saying they will see more redundancies. so this is a really hard news story for the people who are working, but also the companies themselves who are right on the edge as we go into the winter season now. it's thousands of years old and one of the world's most famous prehistoric monuments. the question is, how do you keep stonehenge standing? after assessing the stones, english heritage has launched a major conservation project to keep the site safe for the future, as john maguire has been finding out. metal scaffolding may be an incongruous sight next to the ancient structure. and it will be taken down every evening over the next few weeks, such is the determination to keep stonehenge open and looking as normal as possible. this conservation work is, in itself, historic. the last time something of this scale was undertaken was more than 60 years ago, when the ladders were wooden, you could smoke a pipe
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while working, and protective headgear was a woolly hat. much has changed over the decades, but the problems remain. a few years ago we did do a laser scan of every single stone, so we got a very good record now of all the cracks and the holes, a lot of which are natural and geological. but also, one of the lintels, for example, was stitched together in the 1950s, so we're going to be doing some repair work to that, because at the time they used a mortar that was very hard and we are going to replace that with lime mortar. surveying the earlier work at the time was eight—year—old richard woodman—bailey. his father was the chief architect, and young richard concealed a coin within the stones. today, 63 years on, despite being older and wiser, he will do the same again with a £2 coin, struck specially for the occasion by the royal mint. it's a real honour for me to be
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able to do this today. over 60 years has passed, and to find it's something that's been remembered and has been recorded, in fact, is happening, to be able now, as they are going to be doing some further minor repairs to some of the stones this year, to follow up that 1958 coin with a 2021 britannia £2 coin, is really a great honour indeed. repairing, restoring, conserving — there are subtle differences. and at this world heritage site everything is tightly controlled. after all, they are working in the footsteps of giants. they may not have used phrases like structural engineer or architect 4500 years ago, but they were very clever people. on top of each pillar there's a tenonjoint, that bit of rock that you can see sticking up. they would then go
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inside this mortise hole. so the lintels would have sat on top of the pillars. we think this one was never actually placed on top of the pillar. we don't know why. as with so much in stonehenge, it remains a mystery. with our changing climate, english heritage is aware the stones will face different weather patterns, so the hope is to future proof the work for at least the next 60, 70, maybe 100 years. which, of course, when this place is 4500 years old, is the merest blink of an eye. john maguire, bbc news, stonehenge. the headlines on bbc news... a uk—wide programme of boosterjabs for those aged over 50 is expected to be confirmed. it's part of the government's autumn and winter plan for managing covid. measures that could be brought in in england if the nhs risks becoming overwhelmed will be outlined later today. meanwhile, vaccinations
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for children aged 12 to 15 will go ahead in england, after ministers confirmed they would follow the latest advice from the uk's chief medical officers. lawyers for prince andrew tell a court in new york that sexual assault allegations filed against him are "baseless and potentially unlawful". the un secretary general says more than a billion dollars in aid has been pledged for afghanistan as its people face their most perilous hour. all school children aged 12 to 15 in england will be invited to get a coronavirus vaccine from next week. it comes after the uk's four chief medical officers recommended the rollout, saying the jab will help reduce disruption to education. professor chris whitty, the chief medical officer for england, said it was about weighing up the risks and benefits. there are around 3 million 12—15 year olds in the uk — england will offerjabs to children from next week, while a rollout is yet to be confirmed in scotland, wales and northern ireland.
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it's estimated that up to 30,000 infections could be prevented in england, between october and march, if enough children take up the offer of a jab. that, in turn, would save 110,000 days of missed face—to—face schooling — or one day for every 20 pupils. only one dose will be offered — the chief medical officers say that is related to the very rare risk of a condition called myo—card—itis, also known as inflamation of the heart. it's estimated there will be between three to 17 cases for every one million doses. symptoms of myocarditis include chest pains, shortness of breath and palpatations, but these are usually mild and short lived. our correspondent zoe conway has been getting reaction from teachers, pupils and parents. soon it won't be lateral flow tests on offer in the sports hall. 12 to
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15—year—olds will be able to get their first covid vaccine in school. they welcome the idea of vaccinating their pupils. they welcome the idea of vaccinating their --uils. ~ ., they welcome the idea of vaccinating their --uils. . ., , ., , they welcome the idea of vaccinating their--uils. ., , ., , , they welcome the idea of vaccinating their huils, . ., , ., , , ., their pupils. what it provides is an opportunity _ their pupils. what it provides is an opportunity to _ their pupils. what it provides is an opportunity to reduce _ their pupils. what it provides is an opportunity to reduce any - their pupils. what it provides is an i opportunity to reduce any disruption that we see to schooling across the next academic year. over the last two years there has been unavoidable disruption to education and i think any steps that we can take as a country to avoid that again ensuring students can remain in school, learning our important steps to take. �* , ., ., ., ., take. because we are at a young age, i don't take. because we are at a young age, i don't want _ take. because we are at a young age, i don't want to — take. because we are at a young age, i don't want to make _ take. because we are at a young age, i don't want to make a _ take. because we are at a young age, i don't want to make a decision - take. because we are at a young age, i don't want to make a decision i - idon't want to make a decision i might— i don't want to make a decision i might regret later in life, ijust want _ might regret later in life, ijust want to— might regret later in life, ijust want to take things at place where i know— want to take things at place where i know i_ want to take things at place where i know i understand. it�*s want to take things at place where i know i understand.— know i understand. it's very cloudy recentl , know i understand. it's very cloudy recently. a — know i understand. it's very cloudy recently. a lot _ know i understand. it's very cloudy recently, a lot of _ know i understand. it's very cloudy recently, a lot of people _ know i understand. it's very cloudy recently, a lot of people recite - recently, a lot of people recite that source _ recently, a lot of people recite that source and _ recently, a lot of people recite that source and another- recently, a lot of people recite. that source and another source. recently, a lot of people recite - that source and another source. it is not _ that source and another source. it is not one — that source and another source. it is not one clear— that source and another source. it is not one clear idea _ that source and another source. it is not one clear idea behind - that source and another source. it is not one clear idea behind it. - that source and another source. iti is not one clear idea behind it. one
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person— is not one clear idea behind it. one person witi— is not one clear idea behind it. one person will say _ is not one clear idea behind it. one person will say it _ is not one clear idea behind it. one person will say it safe _ is not one clear idea behind it. one person will say it safe and - is not one clear idea behind it. one person will say it safe and anotherl person will say it safe and another person _ person will say it safe and another person will— person will say it safe and another person will say _ person will say it safe and another person will say it _ person will say it safe and another person will say it is _ person will say it safe and another person will say it is not _ person will say it safe and another person will say it is not safe, - person will say it safe and another person will say it is not safe, it. person will say it is not safe, it is contradictory. _ so it sounds like you're a bit confused at the moment about what is the right thing to do? me and many other people, yes. i definitely want to get the vaccine as soon as possible. i think it'll really help me and the people around me if i try and say as soon as possible. the government is encouraging families to make the decision together over whether to vaccinate. but they say it's the child who will have the final say. will parents be comfortable with that? i feel at the moment, there is a lot of information that's open and available for young people. so i feel that they are able to make a decision based on what they've learned in schools, what they've read in media. i would never force them to have it if they didn't want it. i think if we give them the information that they need, and then they can make their own decision, i would let my children make that decision. but what if a family can't agree? teaching unions are warning that schools are going to be put in a difficult position.
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head teachers are wary of being stuck in the middle. it is not the job of schools and academies up and down the country to make decisions about what's in the best interests of individualfamilies. that's a decision that families need to come to together. you're being put in a really difficult position, aren't you? it's a challenging situation, but i think as a head teacher in a secondary school, i'm not going to be forcing anyone to do anything that they choose not to. the fear of more empty classrooms, of more school lockdowns, that's what's driving this latest vaccination policy. it's why the government says it will move with urgency to implement it. zoe conway, bbc news.
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let's try and answer some of your questions. to answer your questions i'm joined byjonathan ball, who's a professor of molecular virology at the university of nottingham, alan watkins. we have selected about ten questions, let see if we can get through them. the first one asks, we have been told two vaccinations provide better protection against the delta variant, so why is this different for children? we the delta variant, so why is this different for children?— the delta variant, so why is this different for children? we know from vafious different for children? we know from various trials — different for children? we know from various trials around _ different for children? we know from various trials around the _ different for children? we know from various trials around the world - different for children? we know from various trials around the world we i various trials around the world we have had a uk trial as well, children respond incredibly well to vaccines and natural infection. your immunity is at its peak during those adolescent years and early adulthood. and therefore you don't need two doses to have a very good response. i think the other factor that came into play is the fact that
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we are around twice, three times more likely to see serious adverse effects you mentioned, particularly this myocarditis, inflammation of the heart of the sac that surrounds the heart of the sac that surrounds the heart, you are more likely to see that on the second dose and therefore by giving a single dose, you have the benefit of a good immune response to the virus without the increased risk of serious side effects. ., ., ., ,~' the increased risk of serious side effects. ., ., ., ., effects. ok, i want to ask about side effects. — effects. ok, i want to ask about side effects, gabrielle - effects. ok, i want to ask about side effects, gabrielle as, - effects. ok, i want to ask about side effects, gabrielle as, i - effects. ok, i want to ask about side effects, gabrielle as, i am| side effects, gabrielle as, i am worried about the potential side effects, why haven't we heard more about them? i effects, why haven't we heard more about them?— effects, why haven't we heard more about them? i think we have heard a lot about the — about them? i think we have heard a lot about the various _ about them? i think we have heard a lot about the various side _ about them? i think we have heard a lot about the various side effects - lot about the various side effects for the vaccines as they have been introduced. one of the benefits of the pace at which we have deployed the pace at which we have deployed the covid vaccines is we have been able to report on very many immunisations which have taken place over a very short time period and therefore when you get these very,
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very faint signals of rare side effects, we are able to pick them up easily because they happen over a short period of time. so you can see that spike in that adverse side effect. very early on we started to hear of reports of the blood clot issues with the astrazeneca vaccine and then also the risk of myocarditis with the mrna vaccines. it has been a benefit to have these vaccines rolled out a pace because we have been able to get the vaccines into these huge numbers of people that allows us to see these incredibly rare side effects, side effect you would not say in clinical trials because you don't give enough people the vaccine in those clinical trials. fin people the vaccine in those clinical trials. , ., ., trials. on the question of myocarditis, _ trials. on the question of myocarditis, an - trials. on the question of - myocarditis, an inflammation of trials. on the question of _ myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart, joanna says, what is the rate of myocarditis in boys after one
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jab? it of myocarditis in boys after one 'ab? , , , . of myocarditis in boys after one 'ab? , ,'~ jab? it is very difficult because the number — jab? it is very difficult because the number of _ jab? it is very difficult because the number of children - jab? it is very difficult because the number of children who i jab? it is very difficult because l the number of children who have received the jab is very low. we know the united states and israel in particular have had a longer period of time vaccinating children. and we still think the risk is around one in 100,000, but depending on the study and the report, that will increase and decrease slightly. but we do know that boys are more likely to get myocarditis. but oddly enough, yesterday i was doing some general reading about myocarditis and myocarditis in boys is more frequently observed anyway, through other causes. i don't think it is simply down to the vaccination. there is something about the way boys are wired that makes them slightly more susceptible to this type of disease. what i would say, it is usually short lived and it
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resolves without particular hard intervention. if you do need to have treatment, there is treatment available to help with the recovery. alan watkins wants to know, what if schoolchildren don't have the vaccination? in schoolchildren don't have the vaccination?— schoolchildren don't have the vaccination? in essence, if the children don't _ vaccination? in essence, if the children don't have _ vaccination? in essence, if the children don't have the - vaccination? in essence, if the. children don't have the vaccine, vaccination? in essence, if the - children don't have the vaccine, we will see very, very rare cases of serious disease in children, but they are so rare that is the reason they are so rare that is the reason the jcvi aware they are so rare that is the reason thejcvi aware of they are so rare that is the reason the jcvi aware of the they are so rare that is the reason thejcvi aware of the view they are so rare that is the reason the jcvi aware of the view there wasn't a particular direct health benefit to children. but i think the thing that swayed the decision yesterday is the fact that because children are not vaccinated, they are highly susceptible to the virus and therefore we see quite a lot of transmission, particularly in secondary schools. and as we go into autumn and winter when we expect to see respiratory infections including
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this coronavirus increase, there will be more risk of children becoming infected in school and therefore having their education disrupted. and i think that was the main additionalfactor disrupted. and i think that was the main additional factor that was brought into play by the chief medical officers.— brought into play by the chief medical officers. police are in london asks. _ medical officers. police are in london asks, why _ medical officers. police are in london asks, why is - medical officers. police are in london asks, why is a - medical officers. police are in - london asks, why is a 12-year-old in london asks, why is a 12—year—old in a class going to be vaccinated and not an 11—year—old in the same class? not an 11-year-old in the same class? , , ., ., not an 11-year-old in the same class? , ., , ., ., class? this is a great question and unfortunately _ class? this is a great question and unfortunately there _ class? this is a great question and unfortunately there is _ class? this is a great question and unfortunately there is no - class? this is a great question and | unfortunately there is no biological explanation for that. there is no significant difference in the immune response or indeed the risk between somebody who is 11 and 11 months and somebody who is 11 and 11 months and somebody who is 11 and 11 months and somebody who has just hit their 12th birthday. it is generally the cut—off of secondary school age. we know secondary school are more likely to be infected and infect each other, there is more transmission in a secondary school
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setting than there is in a primary school setting. we should read it more as a cut—off for secondary school rather than primary school. it wouldn't surprise me if we start to see the boundaries are blurred and smudged a little bit, as we did with the previous policy on the 18—year—olds. if you remember, it was 18—year—olds and then they allowed 17—year—olds who were 17 years and eight months to get their vaccine. . ., years and eight months to get their vaccine. . . _ , ., ., vaccine. richard says, what are the secific vaccine. richard says, what are the specific health _ vaccine. richard says, what are the specific health benefits _ vaccine. richard says, what are the specific health benefits for - vaccine. richard says, what are the specific health benefits for 12 - vaccine. richard says, what are the specific health benefits for 12 to - specific health benefits for 12 to 15—year—olds in getting the vaccination? 15-year-olds in getting the vaccination?— 15-year-olds in getting the vaccination? , , . . ., vaccination? the specific, we do know that _ vaccination? the specific, we do know that serious _ vaccination? the specific, we do know that serious covid - vaccination? the specific, we do know that serious covid disease | vaccination? the specific, we do - know that serious covid disease and deaths in children is thankfully an incredibly rare event. i think throughout the pandemic there was something like 25 deaths in children and most of those where in children who had serious other diseases that made them particularly vulnerable to
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covid. we have been offering vaccines to those especially vulnerable people, children for a few months now. and so i think it is more to do with the fact of the problems with long covid, they can still be hospitalised, although it is less frequent and it is the impact of being away from school. so the short term mental health issues with that isolation, but also the impact on their long—term career prospects, you know, we also need to understand that doesn't play out across society fairly. there are particular people within our society who are more damaged and more impacted by the brakes in education. milton greene wants to know, if a 12 to 15—year—old has already had covid, is this still a benefit in getting them vaccinated? that covid, is this still a benefit in getting them vaccinated? that is a ureat getting them vaccinated? that is a great question- —
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getting them vaccinated? that is a great question. what _ getting them vaccinated? that is a great question. what we _ getting them vaccinated? that is a great question. what we do - getting them vaccinated? that is a great question. what we do knowl great question. what we do know about natural infection, you do get good immunity and if you have a child who has prior infection then it is likely they have got an immune level similar to somebody who has received one dose of vaccine. what i would say is the additional dose, the additional exposure to the virus will boost that antibody response and the immunity overall. it should also make it longer lived. so they are less likely to be infected in future and if they are infected, less likely to suffer from serious symptoms. and so i think the bottom line is, the more immunity we have, the less likely we are to be infected and the less likely we are to have serious disease.— to have serious disease. emma in coventry says. — to have serious disease. emma in coventry says. is _ to have serious disease. emma in coventry says, is the _ to have serious disease. emma in coventry says, is the mother- to have serious disease. emma in coventry says, is the mother of i to have serious disease. emma in i coventry says, is the mother of two teenage girls i have concerns about the effect on their fertility? yes, this is a concern _
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the effect on their fertility? yes, this is a concern that _ the effect on their fertility? yes, this is a concern that has - the effect on their fertility? i'eis, this is a concern that has been around for awhile. i think it is very much by social media and it is something i have kept my eye on constantly, because it is a serious concern for people who want to have children now or want to have children now or want to have children in the future. there is absolutely no evidence whatsoever that the vaccines can impact on fertility. what we do know is occasionally, it may interfere or seem to interfere with a girl's woman's menstrual cycle. but in terms of overall fertility, there is no impact. the royal college of obstetrics and gynaecology, the specialists who deal in women's health, they looked at the evidence very carefully and they didn't find any reason to suggest that people, women who wanted to have children shouldn't have the vaccine.-
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shouldn't have the vaccine. helen in hertfordshire _ shouldn't have the vaccine. helen in hertfordshire says, _ shouldn't have the vaccine. helen in hertfordshire says, do _ shouldn't have the vaccine. helen in hertfordshire says, do we _ shouldn't have the vaccine. helen in hertfordshire says, do we know - shouldn't have the vaccine. helen in hertfordshire says, do we know how the vaccine could affect the risk of long covid in children aged 12 to 15? ~ ., �* long covid in children aged 12 to 15? . ., �* ~ ., long covid in children aged 12 to 15? _ long covid in children aged 12 to 152 _ ., 15? we don't know directly in that are 15? we don't know directly in that age group- _ 15? we don't know directly in that age group- iout — 15? we don't know directly in that age group. but what _ 15? we don't know directly in that age group. but what we _ 15? we don't know directly in that age group. but what we do - 15? we don't know directly in that age group. but what we do knowl 15? we don't know directly in that. age group. but what we do know in general is that the likelihood of getting long covid is halved in people who have been immunised. that is one of the advantages of having the vaccine, it does significantly reduce your chance of getting these long—term, debilitating impacts of covid and therefore that is one reason... i think many of my colleagues, i was airing towards in favour of vaccinating children for that reason. children still get ill, they still get long covid and we have very safe and very effective vaccines and that is why i am a great fan of this new policy. thank ou ve great fan of this new policy. thank you very much _ great fan of this new policy. thank you very much for _ great fan of this new policy. thank you very much for talking - great fan of this new policy. thank you very much for talking to - great fan of this new policy. thank you very much for talking to us - great fan of this new policy. thank| you very much for talking to us and answering the questions. we appreciate it. have a lovely day.
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the headlines on bbc news: a uk—wide programme of boosterjabs for those aged over 50 is expected to be confirmed. it's part of the government's autumn and winter plan for managing covid. measures that could be brought in in england if the nhs risks becoming overwhelmed will be outlined later today. meanwhile, vaccinations for children aged 12 to 15 will go ahead in england, after ministers confirmed they would follow the latest advice from the uk's chief medical officers. a social media influencer is giving evidence to politicians this morning about the challenges they face in the industry. mps are holding an inquiry into so—called "influencer culture" — examining their impact in promoting products and their role in raising awareness for campaigns.
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today's hearing is examining what drives online harassment. in the last session, influencer em sheldon, spoke about being the target of internet abuse. shejoins me now. i wonder if you could start by telling our audience what kind of abuse you have received? the reason i soke in abuse you have received? the reason i spoke in parliament _ abuse you have received? the reason i spoke in parliament was _ abuse you have received? the reason i spoke in parliament was to - abuse you have received? the reason i spoke in parliament was to discuss l i spoke in parliament was to discuss topics around social media and one of the things that came up was trolling. this was picked up on because it is very bad. it can be anything from someone's appearance tojudging their home anything from someone's appearance to judging their home and family. this is so much more than someone saying, i don't like her dress, she looks ugly, i think she is overweight. it is so much more, people contacting legal means about these people, whether it is the asa, hmrc, social services, this is people trying to ruin someone's
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livelihood and business. hagar people trying to ruin someone's livelihood and business. how do you co -e with livelihood and business. how do you cope with that? _ livelihood and business. how do you cope with that? i _ livelihood and business. how do you cope with that? i have _ livelihood and business. how do you cope with that? i have to _ livelihood and business. how do you cope with that? i have to ensure - livelihood and business. how do you cope with that? i have to ensure i i cope with that? i have to ensure i am bullet-proof, _ cope with that? i have to ensure i am bullet-proof, take _ cope with that? i have to ensure i am bullet-proof, take as - cope with that? i have to ensure i am bullet-proof, take as much i am bullet—proof, take as much protection as i can and make sure i have the right people around me to protect me. you have the right people around me to protect me— have the right people around me to rotect me. ., ., i. ., ., , protect me. you mean you have to be absolutely legit. _ protect me. you mean you have to be absolutely legit, basically _ protect me. you mean you have to be absolutely legit, basically is _ protect me. you mean you have to be absolutely legit, basically is what - absolutely legit, basically is what you are saying, i think? absolutely and making — you are saying, i think? absolutely and making sure _ you are saying, i think? absolutely and making sure everything - you are saying, i think? absolutely and making sure everything i - you are saying, i think? absolutely and making sure everything i do i you are saying, i think? absolutely and making sure everything i do is| and making sure everything i do is marked with ad, and i speak to the asa, lawyers and the police, to make sure these people cannot win. you are ultra—transparent, which is a good thing for the people who are following you? it good thing for the people who are following you?— following you? it is, but it is confusing- — following you? it is, but it is confusing. the _ following you? it is, but it is confusing. the even - following you? it is, but it is confusing. the even label. following you? it is, but it is - confusing. the even label everything with an ad, which lead to more confusion because we might not be paid. it is easier to add that. you can ut paid. it is easier to add that. you can put that _ paid. it is easier to add that. you can put that and _ paid. it is easier to add that. you can put that and say _ paid. it is easier to add that. you can put that and say you are not endorsing it. have you ever been tempted to take yourself off—line
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because the abuse so horrific? it has been so horrific, i thought i should do anotherjob. but then i thought, why should i do that. i am told pretty much, if you don't like the heat, get out of the kitchen. just because people don't like an occupation it doesn't mean it isn't valid and enjoyable to others. it doesn't mean i deserve the abuse. abuse should not be tolerated in any industry and there is abuse in every job. but for some reason we are told that because we put ourselves online, we deserve it and i should quit. but i should never tell anyone else to quit theirjob just because other people cannot be nice. that else to quit theirjobjust because other people cannot be nice. that is a really good _ other people cannot be nice. that is a really good point. _ other people cannot be nice. that is a really good point. what _ other people cannot be nice. that is a really good point. what do - other people cannot be nice. that is a really good point. what do you - a really good point. what do you think is driving that abuse? i have no idea, these _ think is driving that abuse? i have no idea, these people _ think is driving that abuse? i have no idea, these people say - think is driving that abuse? i have no idea, these people say it - think is driving that abuse? i have no idea, these people say it is - no idea, these people say it is constructive criticism, but i always think if it is constructive, would they be happy if their colleagues and theirfamily read it? would they be happy if their colleagues and their family read it? would they be happy if their boss was to read
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it? if it is constructive, why are they hiding behind fake accounts are deep, dark forums on the web. it is not constructive and i don't think their children would be happy if they were receiving the same. fine their children would be happy if they were receiving the same. one of they were receiving the same. one of the tests i think, _ they were receiving the same. one of the tests i think, would _ they were receiving the same. one of the tests i think, would they - they were receiving the same. one of the tests i think, would they say - they were receiving the same. one of the tests i think, would they say it. the tests i think, would they say it to your face if they met you in the street? 99% of the time there is no way they would say it.— way they would say it. absolutely. thank ou way they would say it. absolutely. thank you for _ way they would say it. absolutely. thank you for talking _ way they would say it. absolutely. thank you for talking to _ way they would say it. absolutely. thank you for talking to us, - way they would say it. absolutely. thank you for talking to us, we . way they would say it. absolutely. i thank you for talking to us, we wish you all the best. apple has issued a software patch to block so—called "zero—click" spyware that could infect iphones and ipads. apple said it took action after reports surfaced of new spyware thought to be used by the israeli company nso group. an independent watchdog, citizen lab, identified the flaw, which lets hackers access devices through the imessage service even if users do not click on a link or file. with me now is cyber security and data protection expert, emma green.
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what is the software patch? the software patch _ what is the software patch? i“ie: software patch is updating what is the software patch? i“i9 software patch is updating my vulnerability in apple have discovered. what is called zero day attacks have been around for some time. it means there is a flaw or a software bug that even the manufacturer is unaware of. and what is happening with this cyber attack is happening with this cyber attack is the has been discovered, a flaw in the eye message software and therefore the hackers are found away in without you not having to click on anything and take advantage and exploit the vulnerability.— exploit the vulnerability. wants the hackers aet exploit the vulnerability. wants the hackers get in. _ exploit the vulnerability. wants the hackers get in, what _ exploit the vulnerability. wants the hackers get in, what can _ exploit the vulnerability. wants the hackers get in, what can they - exploit the vulnerability. wants the hackers get in, what can they do i exploit the vulnerability. wants the hackers get in, what can they do to j hackers get in, what can they do to your phone or you? thea;r hackers get in, what can they do to your phone or you?— your phone or you? they have complete _ your phone or you? they have complete control— your phone or you? they have complete control of _ your phone or you? they have complete control of your - your phone or you? they have l complete control of your phone your phone or you? they have - complete control of your phone and the he would be unaware of it. technically they could extrapolate data, messages, photos, personal
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data, messages, photos, personal data, they would be able to extract that information. haifa data, they would be able to extract that information.— data, they would be able to extract that information. how did it emerge, do ou that information. how did it emerge, do you know? _ that information. how did it emerge, do you know? it _ that information. how did it emerge, do you know? it was _ that information. how did it emerge, do you know? it was discovered, - do you know? it was discovered, pe . asus, do you know? it was discovered, pegasus. as _ do you know? it was discovered, pegasus. as you _ do you know? it was discovered, pegasus, as you mentioned - do you know? it was discovered, pegasus, as you mentioned in i do you know? it was discovered, i pegasus, as you mentioned in the introduction is a company that have developed some software that allows remote surveillance of smartphones. it appears that the hackers have found this zero day, this vulnerability with the apple imessage and accessing people's underlying phones, installing this software and turning your device into a piece of surveillance. ok. software and turning your device into a piece of surveillance. ok, so the software _ into a piece of surveillance. ok, so the software patch _ into a piece of surveillance. ok, so the software patch that _ into a piece of surveillance. ok, so the software patch that has - into a piece of surveillance. ok, so the software patch that has been i the software patch that has been issued, everyone with an iphone needs to what?— issued, everyone with an iphone needs to what? ~ . , ., ., , , needs to what? what should happen, eve bod needs to what? what should happen, everybody anyway — needs to what? what should happen, everybody anyway should _ needs to what? what should happen, everybody anyway should make - needs to what? what should happen, everybody anyway should make sure l everybody anyway should make sure you enable software patches. for
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example, if everybody will remember one in the past and it would not have been so rife if people had updated their systems. these updates are for a reason and this is another example, they are there to help combat and fight cybercrime so it is really important people today go and update their phones with the latest software update.— software update. thank you very much, software update. thank you very much. emma- — tuxedo sweatpants, a suit of armour and a floor—length feather cape were some of the outfits on display at the met gala in new york last night — one of the biggest events in fashion. billie eilish, kim kardashian and the new us open champion emma raducanu were there, as mark lobel reports. celebrating the best of american fashion, billie eilish in step with marilyn monroe. meanwhile, taking off next — possibly the world's newest grammy award—winning superhero.
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rap man lil nas is certainly in touch with himself. tennis star naomi osaka's heritage was centre court in this colourful mixture of herjapanese and american backgrounds. and fresh from her a—levels, oh, and that tennis match, look, it's emma raducanu. new york is back! the us open, the met. i've kind of gotten used to being a little introvert but i'm back on site, so. i'm excited to see everybody. we've had a tough time so to be back, to be here at my first met, to take up space, to chop my hair off, it's just a whole thing. horn band plays. actress nicola peltz wasjoined by her beau brooklyn beckham. and one leading radical democratic politician used her gown as a visual frown to the many tuning in to this expensive fundraiser.
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while others just chose to dress less. or go full feather. the showstopping outfits kept coming. after last year's show was cancelled, it seems these mainly young celebrities couldn't wait to get back out into the limelight. mark lobel, bbc news. following emma raducanu's historic win at the us open over the weekend, royal mail have released a special congratulatory postmark for the 18—year—old tennis star. it reads: "congratulations emma raducanu, 2021 us open women's champion, a first class performance!" the stamp will appear on all envelopes sent with royal mail until thursday.
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the uk is delaying checks on plant imports. it will be introduced in july imports. it will be introduced in july next year instead. the cabinet office minister penny mordaunt blamed disruption from the pandemic and pressure on global supply chains. this is the second time this year that delays have been introduced to the uk's border operating model. scientists say they've successfully "potty—trained" cows to urinate in a designated area as part of a project aimed at slashing greenhouse gases. calves were trained with food rewards to go in a latrine pen. the benefit is to catch nitrogen in the cow urine, which breaks down over time into a potent greenhouse gas. you're watching bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. while some western areas
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will brighten up today to some sunny spells, better than yesterday, better than how we started the morning, further east, particularly across england there's going to be some very heavy rain around, maybe as much as a month's worth of rain in just one or two spots. that can give the risk of flooding, some travel disruption as well. not looking great on the roads. you can see the extent of that heavy rain as we go into the start of the afternoon, central and eastern england especially. parts of the east midlands, lincolnshire and in two parts lincolnshire and into parts of yorkshire, these other zones where we could see as much as 70 millimetres of rain — that's around a month's and that's why we could see the issues i was talking about. but further west skies will brighten, one or two showers may be put many places will see some sunny spells, highs of around 22 and brightening up through the channel islands and southern england compared to the heavy rain we've seen so far today. this evening and overnight, that heavy, persistent rain gradually pushes out into the north sea. most places become dry, there will be the odd spot of light drizzle or rain around but because the ground is damp, winds are light and we could see
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lost of mist and low cloud develop, some fog patches into the morning and it will be just a little bit fresher than it was this morning, but not cold. as we going to wednesday, a ridge of high pressure builds which will last into thursday. we will see some morning fog patches but by and large the middle part of the week, after some wet weather around to start with, it's going to be dry and there will be some sunshine at times too. on wednesday, not a huge amount of sunshine in england and wales, particularly misty and murky here with some dense fog patches. slowly brightening up, a bit cool in the breeze towards eastern england. bright conditions across eastern scotland will continue but western scotland, northern ireland a bit cloudy at times, threatening some light rain or drizzle but temperatures still holding up reasonably well, highs of 18, may be low 20s. thursday, much more in the way of sunshine around, although there will be some dense fog patches across central and western areas to begin with. clearing by mid morning and then we are looking at sunny spells for most of the day. although a bit more cloud into western scotland and also towards the west of northern ireland later on could bring some patchy drizzle. very pleasant where
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you've got the sunshine. as we go the end of the week where we start to see low pressure is trying to push its way in, not much in the way of push on this, so just how far eastwards these weather fronts get is the one thing we will have to keep an eye on over the next few days. but at the moment it looks like western areas will turn wet and may be breezy through the day. central, eastern parts particularly three scotland and england should stay dry with sunny spells. highest of the temperatures in the east, a little bit cooler in the west. see you soon.
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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh. the headlines at 11am — a uk—wide programme
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of booster jabs for over—50s is expected to be confirmed. it's part of the government's autumn and winter plan for managing covid. measures to tackle covid in england over the coming months will be outlined later today. and in half an hour, the uk's vaccination committeee is meeting — and we expect it to announce its decision on boosterjabs. we'll bring that to you live. meanwhile, vaccinations for children aged 12 to 15 will go ahead in england, after ministers confirmed they would follow the latest advice from the uk's chief medical officers. i don't want to make a decision where it may be i might regret later in life. i just want to take things at a pace where i know i understand. i definitely want to get the vaccine as soon as possible. i think it will really help me and the people around me. lawyers for prince andrew tell a court in new york that sexual assault allegations filed against him are "baseless and potentially unlawful". travel body abta is calling for a significant overhaul of the government's traffic light system.
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the met gala — one of fashion's biggest and starriest events — has rolled out its red carpet in new york for some of the planet's best—known celebrities. good morning. more details are expected later from the government on its plans to deal with the pandemic over the coming months in england. it's thought all over—50s will be offered a covid boosterjab, and some measures which could be brought in if the nhs risks becoming overwhelmed. we'll have more on the winter plan in a few minutes, and we'll bring you that decision on boosterjabs from the uk's vaccination committee live in half an hour. but first, let's focus on the news
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confirmed last night, that children aged 12—15 will be offered a single vaccine dose from next week in england. speaking this morning, the vaccines minister nadhim zahawi outlining how the roll—out will work. what will happen is that clinicians will share information with parents, with the children, leaflets, online as well. then there will be a consent form sent from the school, in the usual way that schools do it. some schools do it in hard copy, they will put a letter for parents to sign, some do it electronically, so they will e—mail parents to gain, share information and gain their consent, so parental consent is required and then the vaccination programme will take place.
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our correspondent zoe conway has been getting reaction from teachers, pupils and parents. our correspondent zoe conway has more. soon, it won'tjust be lateral flow tests on offer in the sports hall. in the next few weeks, 12 to 15—year—olds will be able to get their first covid vaccine in school. bexleyheath academy experienced severe disruption during lockdown. they welcome the idea of vaccinating their pupils. what it provides is an opportunity to reduce any disruption that we see to schooling across the next academic year. over the last two years, there's been unavoidable disruption to education, and i think that any steps that we can take as a country to avoid that again, ensuring that students can remain in school, learning, they are important steps to take. it's because we are at a young age, and we don't want to make, i don't want to make a decision where maybe i might regret later in life. ijust want to take things at a pace where i know i understand. it's very cloudy recently, - a lot of pupils recite that source, and other sources, it's not one
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clear idea behind it. _ one person will say it's not safe and another will say it's safe, i kind of contradictory. so it sounds like you're a bit confused at the moment about what is the right thing to do? me and many other people, yes. i definitely want to get the vaccine as soon as possible. i think it'll really help me and the people around me if i try and stay as safe as possible. the government is encouraging families to make the decision together over whether to vaccinate. but they say it's the child who will have the final say. will parents be comfortable with that? i feel at the moment, there is a lot of information that's open and available for young people. so i feel that they are able to make a decision, based on what they've learned in schools, what they've read in media. i would never force them to have it if they didn't want it. _ i think if we give them - the information that they need, and then they can make their own | decision, i would let my childrenl make that decision. but what if a family can't agree?
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teaching unions are warning that schools are going to be put in a difficult position. head teachers are wary of being stuck in the middle. it is not the job of schools and academies up and down the country to make decisions about what's in the best interests of individualfamilies. that's a decision that families need to come to together. you're being put in a really difficult position, aren't you? it's a challenging situation, but i think as a head teacher in a secondary school, i'm not going to be forcing anyone to do anything that they choose not to. the fear of more empty classrooms, of more school lockdowns, that's what's driving this latest vaccination policy. it's why the government says it will move with urgency to implement it. zoe conway, bbc news. as well as the government announcement on 12 to 15—year—olds, the government is also going to outline its plan to deal
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with covid this autumn and winter. our political correspondent adam fleming has more details. we will hear more about the plans and a couple of hours in parliament when the health secretary tells mps. then at 3:30pm, there will be a press conference with the prime minister in downing street, where they will unveil this autumn and winter covert plan. —— covid plan. plan a is the stuff we have been hearing about and you have been talking about, a boosterjab for over—50s, which we think will follow the same age brackets as the original covid vaccination programme, so the elderly and most vulnerable first, and then working down the age bands, and then there will be a single dose offered to people six months after they have had their second dose of the initial vaccine. then in addition to that, there is the offer for 12— to 15—year—olds, and that is plan a. ministers hope that will help to depressed levels of a covid in the population.
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if that doesn't work there will be a plan b, or at least elements to make up a potential plan b. we are having to wait to see what they will be in black and white but there are suggestions it could include things like toughening up the rules on wearing of masks in public places, could you also see a bit of a switch in the emphasis and reminding people to work from home again? and then of course, in the back of the locker, and deep down in the back pocket, this idea of covid vaccine certificates for access to crowded venues, like nightclubs, which the government said it was going to go ahead with, and then decided they would just keep in reserve. i think what we won't get, though, is triggers or thresholds for where restrictions or regulations or guidance could be reintroduced. i think ministers want to leave it up to theirjudgment, in association with the scientists, to take into account loads of factors about what might be happening, rather than saying or having a level that triggers these things. let's try to get right up to date and discuss everything that is happening, in terms of this winter plan. happening, in terms of this winter plan.
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we'rejoined by dr adrian boyle, an emergency physician and vice president of the royal college of emergency medicine. dr boyle, very good to have you with us today. so the prime minister setting up the winter plan for managing covid in england, with measures, as we have been hearing, to be brought in if the nhs is at risk of being overwhelmed. in your opinion, how close are we to that scenario right now? you opinion, how close are we to that scenario right now?— opinion, how close are we to that scenario right now? you look at what noes on scenario right now? you look at what aoes on in scenario right now? you look at what goes on in emergency _ scenario right now? you look at what goes on in emergency departments i goes on in emergency departments now, and i think we are pretty much overwhelmed already, so, in august, we have had our worst performance against our target that we have ever seen. 66% of people were able to leave, either be admitted or discharged, within four hours. that's a measure of how long people are having to wait in hospitals, thatis are having to wait in hospitals, that is because there's too much work, to new patients, not enough beds in the hospital and hospitals are crowded. so beds in the hospital and hospitals are crowded-— are crowded. so 'ust to reiterate and to you — are crowded. so just to reiterate and to you believe _ are crowded. so just to reiterate and to you believe that - are crowded. so just to reiteratej and to you believe that hospitals are already overwhelmed, overwhelmed, and is that a pattern
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thatis overwhelmed, and is that a pattern that is being repeated right around england? that is being repeated right around encland? , ~ :, that is being repeated right around encland? , : ., , england? yes. we are seeing winter levels of performance _ england? yes. we are seeing winter levels of performance that - england? yes. we are seeing winter levels of performance that we - england? yes. we are seeing winterj levels of performance that we would normally see, the figures we are seeing now are the sort of things that get your media interested in january and february, when there is an a&e winter crisis. we are having those levels now. 50 an a&e winter crisis. we are having those levels now.— those levels now. so with the government _ those levels now. so with the government talking _ those levels now. so with the government talking about - those levels now. so with the - government talking about measures to be brought in if the nhs is at risk of being overwhelmed, clearly not enough of a stitch in time element, by the sounds of things, for your liking, in that?— liking, in that? well, i think we have to look — liking, in that? well, i think we have to look at _ liking, in that? well, i think we have to look at the _ liking, in that? well, i think we have to look at the setting - liking, in that? well, i think we l have to look at the setting we've got, the infrastructure we've got to deal with the problems we are asked to deal with. before covid, we had the least number of beds for almost any country in europe. covid has taken about 5% of that out because of the need for social distancing. in addition we have another 8000 patients in hospital with covid at the moment. we've got this tightest
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possible bed base, and we are desperately tried to do everything we can do, in terms of cancelling surgery, elective surgery and backlog, but we don't have the space to do it. : , ., , backlog, but we don't have the space todoit. , , to do it. and 'ust to be absolutely clear, the to do it. and just to be absolutely clear, the pressure _ to do it. and just to be absolutely clear, the pressure you _ to do it. and just to be absolutely clear, the pressure you are - to do it. and just to be absolutely| clear, the pressure you are talking about right now, a bit of that pressure is covid, but it's a lot of other things as well, isn't it? ifleiiiii other things as well, isn't it? call it rima other things as well, isn't it? call it primary covid. _ other things as well, isn't it? call it primary covid, and secondary covid, and the secondary effects of covid, and the secondary effects of covid are people who don't have covid are people who don't have covid but their care is disrupted, delayed undiluted because of all the other things we've had to do. to what extent do you think booster jabs for the over 50s, widely expected to be announced today, vaccinations for 12 to 15—year—olds, flu jabs, to what extent will all those helped ease the pressure, though? so those helped ease the pressure, thou~h? those helped ease the pressure, thou.h? :, �* i’ those helped ease the pressure, thoth? :, �* i’ those helped ease the pressure, thouh? ., �* ,, ., though? so i don't think it will do much to help _ though? so i don't think it will do much to help ease _ though? so i don't think it will do much to help ease the _ though? so i don't think it will do much to help ease the pressure. | though? so i don't think it will do i much to help ease the pressure. it will certainly help the health of the nation. my perspective is very much hospital focus. the nation. my perspective is very much hospitalfocus. we are the nation. my perspective is very much hospital focus. we are already at the stage where people who come into hospital who have been vaccinated don't need to stay as
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long. i think doing booster vaccinations, the balance of this will be helpful, but it is not going to help us with the big, structural gap that we've got within our hospitals. 50 gap that we've got within our hospitals-— gap that we've got within our hositals. i. ., gap that we've got within our hositals. , ., ., ., hospitals. so you are painting a very clear _ hospitals. so you are painting a very clear picture _ hospitals. so you are painting a very clear picture of _ hospitals. so you are painting a very clear picture of extreme i very clear picture of extreme pressure, obviously, a workforce thatis pressure, obviously, a workforce that is still depleted from the efforts of the last 18 months or so. would you want the government to bring in asap measures like mask wearing on transport, making it mandatory again, encouraging people to work from home if possible? would any of that help, given the sort of pressures you are currently under? yeah, i think one of those things would help a little bit, but the problem is, you know, the problems we got now are reflective of the problems we had prior to the pandemic, you know, there is a concern that the delta variant will be less amenable to things like mask wearing and social distancing, these non—formatted to logical ——
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non—pharmacological interventions. to be honest we are reaping what we sow by not investing in a decent health structure. 50 sow by not investing in a decent health structure.— sow by not investing in a decent health structure. so you are talking about structural _ health structure. so you are talking about structural issues? _ health structure. so you are talking about structural issues? one - health structure. so you are talking about structural issues? one of- health structure. so you are talking about structural issues? one of the thins about structural issues? one of the thin i s we about structural issues? one of the things we would _ about structural issues? one of the things we would be _ about structural issues? one of the things we would be anxious - about structural issues? one of the things we would be anxious to - about structural issues? one of the| things we would be anxious to avoid is short—term crisis payments. over the years we have seen this, a&e gets a bit busy, or ambulances get a bit busy, let'sjust gets a bit busy, or ambulances get a bit busy, let's just throw a bit of winter money. this is a very inefficient and very expensive way of trying to deal with the problems. what is required is actually a proper strategic vision on what sort of health service we want and how we are going to pay for it, that is actually a longer term problem. i anxious about this winter but i want this to be fixed for the future. dr adrian boyle, thank you very much for your time today. so dr boyle painting a picture, as far as the royal college of emergency medicine is concerned, of an nhs already under extreme pressure, and he did use the word overwhelmed. let me
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just tell you that the prime minister is hosting a news conference at 3:30pm from downing street to present the government's covid autumn and winter plan. this is for england. he will be accompanied by the chief scientific adviser sir patrick vallance and the chief medical officer professor chris whitty. we haven't seen the three of them together for a little while, have we, so very reminiscent of when we were absolutely in the thick of lockdown previously. but this is the plan for covid in england for the autumn and winter, with the hope very much that the sort of lockdowns we saw previously can be avoided. travel body abta is calling for a significant overhaul of the government's traffic light system. the group says measures, including the use of pcr testing, mean the industry is still not able to function fully and are putting people off from travelling. the government says it recognises the challenging time facing the sector and keeps
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the system under review. earlier the chief executive of abta, explained what he wants ministers to do. we would like them to do away with the traffic light system. but more importantly to abolish the need for a pcr test. so people come back if they have been double vaccinated from these lower risk countries, all the evidence suggest there is no meaningful difference in positive iupati between people coming back from these countries and people living in the uk anyway, so i think we have gone through the time when they were useful, and they still act as a real deterrent to people travelling. borisjohnson is mourning the loss of his mother, after she died yesterday, at the age of 79. charlottejohnson wahl, who was a painter, died "suddenly and peacefully" at st mary's hospital, paddington, yesterday.
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prince andrew's lawyers have told a pre—trial hearing that legal action accusing him of sexual assault is "baseless", and should be dismissed. virginia giuffre has launched a civil lawsuit over the alleged abuse, which she says happened two decades ago, when she was 17. the duke of york has consistently denied ms giuffre's claims. our north america correspondent nada tawfik sent this report. well, this first hearing really centred more on procedure rather than the allegations. those allegations, of course, virginia giuffre accusing prince andrew of sexually assaulting her in london, new york and the us virgin islands, when she was just 17 years old. now the duke of york has strenuously denied those allegations, even saying he has no recollection of ever meeting virginia giuffre. but in court, it really did focus on the steps ahead. prince andrew's attorney told the court he had two main arguments. first, that the papers were not properly served to the duke of york, that the uk high court had to weigh
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in on the legality of service. and secondly, he said they believed this lawsuit was potentially unlawful and baseless. and what they said they wanted was to see a 2009 settlement agreement between virginia giuffre and jeffrey epstein. now, they believe there is a release in that agreement, which would absolve the duke of york of any legal obligation. now, virginia giuffre's attorneys, in response, said they thought that was a mischaracterisation of that settlement. they also said if prince andrew does feel that he was not properly served, that he needs to put in a formal motion through the court, so that could be litigated. the judge will hear oral arguments in october, october 13, and that will be in person. the next chance these parties will have to once again debate whether this case can get under way.
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the headlines on bbc news: a uk—wide programme of booster jabs for those aged over—50 is expected to be confirmed. it's part of the government's autumn and winter plan for managing covid. measures that could be brought in in england if the nhs risks becoming overwhelmed will be outlined later today. meanwhile, vaccinations for children aged 12 to 15 will go ahead in england, after ministers confirmed they would follow the latest advice from the uk's chief medical officers. the number ofjob vacancies in the uk have hit a record high as the economic recovery continues. new figures from the office for national statistics show the number of people in work has
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also rebounded to levels not seen since before the pandemic. but business groups said there remained high demand for more staff, and there was a risk labour shortages would dampen growth. the uk is delaying the introduction of post—brexit checks on plant and agriculture imports. some measures, which were expected to come into force next month, will be introduced injanuary orjuly next year instead. in a written statement to parliament, the cabinet office minister penny mordaunt blamed disruption from the pandemic and pressure on global supply chains. this is the second time this year that delays have been introduced to the uk's border operating model. it is another disturbing indicator of the speed of climate change. new bbc global research shows a significant increase in the number of days temperatures around the world are hitting 50 degrees — that's122 in fahrenheit. in other words, the world is seeing far more extreme heat. since the 1980s,
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the number has tripled. back then, there were eight days a year, on average. in the last decade, we've seen 26 days a year. temperatures of 50c happen most often in the middle east and gulf regions. but they are now happening in more areas of the world than before. north africa has seen them with increasing frequency. and here we can see what happened this year: canada hit 49 degrees and italy 48. in nigeria, climate change has destroyed much of the fertile land. the country's oil production has added to the problem, as millions have been forced to live near toxic gas flares. peter okwoche reports. this is my mum. she's going to the flare now, close to the fire. under the scorching sun and in front of an open gas flare in nigeria's oil—rich south, joy risks her life to support her family. temperatures here reach boiling
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levels, but despite the risks, joy uses the heat to speed up drying time for her tapioca sweet puddings. translation: the reason i have short hair is, - if i grow my hair long, it could burn my hair if the flare shifts direction and explodes. the use of fossil fuels worldwide has had a devastating impact on nigeria's climate. the country suffers from severe droughts in the north, and flash floods in the south. when i was a kid, living was not like this, the weather was not like this, so i think that life is now going to end. but nigeria is also a major producer of oil with a particular emission problem. this is how they flare the gas. the inhabitants of this land are suffering with abject poverty. flaring is the process of burning the natural gas that is released when oil is extracted from the ground. the process is a large source of greenhouse gases and a major
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contributor to climate change in nigeria. it is also illegal in the country, yet about two million nigerians live within four kilometres of a gas flare. of a gas flare, including joy and her children. these are my children. forjoy, working around the gas flare is one way of making ends meet. translation: it's bad - for our health, but we say to hell with the consequences, we need to support our families. joy and her children have been working extra hard for four days straight. they are processing the tapioca to help herfamily pay for the funeral of her mother. when i came, i had no work, nojob. i saw the women working this tapioca and i asked them if they would let me.
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although they need the money, joy�*s family still want gas flares to stop. translation: in my view, - the government should lead efforts to end gas flaring in the oil industry and, hopefully, that will significantly reduce the heatwave and associated health hazards. nigeria's economic development is highly dependent on oil revenue, yet the industry is making it one of africa's largest emitters of greenhouse gases and, until the government fulfils its promise to end gas flaring by 2030, the country's landscape, and the lives and livelihoods of millions likejoy, remain at risk. a global survey has highlighted the depth of anxiety many young people are feeling about climate change. nearly 60% of young people approached said they felt very worried or extremely worried. more than 45% of those questioned said feelings about the climate affected their daily lives.
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the survey across ten countries was led by bath university in collaboration with five universities. it claims to be the biggest of its kind, with responses from 10,000 people aged between 16 and 25. the un secretary general, antonio guterres, says more than a billion dollars in aid has been pledged for people in afghanistan he described as facing their most perilous hour. speaking at an emergency aid conference in geneva, mr guterres said one in three afghans did not know where their next meal was coming from. the people of afghanistan need a lifeline. after decades of war, suffering and insecurity, they face perhaps their most perilous hour. now is the time for the international community to stand with them and, let us be clear, this conference is not simply about what we will give to the people of afghanistan. it is about what we owe.
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apple has issued a software patch to block so—called "zero—click" spyware that could infect iphones and ipads. apple said it took action, after reports surfaced of new spyware, thought to be used by the israeli company nso group. an independent watchdog — citizen lab — identified the flaw, which lets hackers access devices through the imessage service, even if users do not click on a link or file. tuxedo sweatpants, a suit of armour and a floor—length feather cape were some of the outfits on display at the met gala in new york last night — one of the biggest events in fashion. billie eilish, kim kardashian and the new us open champion emma raducanu were there, as mark lobel reports. celebrating the best of american fashion, billie eilish in step with marilyn monroe. meanwhile, taking off next — possibly the world's newest grammy award—winning superhero.
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rap man lil nas is certainly in touch with himself. tennis star naomi osaka's heritage was centre court in this colourful mixture of herjapanese and american backgrounds. and fresh from her a—levels, oh, and that tennis match, look, it's emma raducanu. new york is back! the us open, the met. i've kind of gotten used to being a little introvert, but i'm back on side, so i'm excited to see everybody. we've had a tough time so to be back, to be here at my first met, to take up space, to chop my hair off, it's just a whole thing. horn band plays. actress nicola peltz wasjoined by her beau, brooklyn beckham. and one leading radical democratic politician used her gown as a visual frown to the many tuning in to this expensive fundraiser.
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while others just chose to dress less or go undercover, finding beauty in the balaclava, as kim and kanye were caught masking their appearances. some plumped for full feather. the showstopping outfits kept coming. after last year's show was cancelled, it seems these mainly young celebrities couldn't wait to get back out into the limelight. mark lobel, bbc news. following emma raducanu's historic win at the us open over the weekend, royal mail have released a special congratulatory postmark for the 18—year—old tennis star. it reads: "congratulations emma raducanu, 2021 us open women's champion, a first class performance!". the stamp will appear on all envelopes sent with royal mail until thursday. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor.
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rain ra i n clears rain clears after tonight into tonight in the north sea. one or two spots of light rain or drizzle around. some dense fog patches forming into tomorrow morning. slightly cooler tomorrow morning compared to this morning but not cold by any means. is you go into tomorrow, the cloud and rain continues to pull away from eastern coasts. most m ost pla ces most places after that mystic of a murky start, brightening up, just a bit patchy rain, western scotland and northern ireland. dried by a day as we go through
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hello, this is bbc news with anita mcveigh. the headlines: a uk—wide programme of boosterjabs for those aged over—50 is expected to be confirmed. it's part of the government's autumn and winter plan for managing covid — measures that could be brought in in england if the nhs risks becoming overwhelmed will be outlined later today. meanwhile, vaccinations for children aged 12 to 15 will go ahead in england, after ministers confirmed they would follow the latest advice from the uk's chief medical officers. lawyers for prince andrew tell a court in new york that sexual assault allegations filed against him are "baseless and potentially unlawful". lawyers for prince andrew tell a court in new york that sexual assault allegations filed against him are "baseless and potentially unlawful". travel body abta is calling for a significant overhaul of the government's traffic light system. the met gala, one of fashion's biggest and starriest events, has rolled out its red carpet in new york for some of the planet's best—known celebrities.
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new will be heading to downing street very shortly where we expect the chief medical officer to lead a briefing on boosterjabs, as well as other issues for us. and i can update is now with some breaking news just coming into us on the boosterjabs. let mejust news just coming into us on the boosterjabs. let me just say before i go to you, they were were expecting the chair of the jcvi i go to you, they were were expecting the chair of thejcvi and the chief executive of the nhra, the medicines and health care agency to be at that briefing as well. what news do you have then on booster
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jabs for the over—50s? it news do you have then on booster jabs for the over-50s?— news do you have then on booster jabs for the over-50s? it was one of those discussions _ jabs for the over-50s? it was one of those discussions that _ jabs for the over-50s? it was one of those discussions that has _ jabs for the over-50s? it was one of those discussions that has been i those discussions that has been happening a lot. we have already heard about young people, between 12 and 15, that was confirmed yesterday that they will be getting a job. around 30 million people in the uk should be offered a boosterjab this winter. should be offered a booster 'ab this winter. �* , ., ., ., should be offered a booster 'ab this winter. �*, ., ., ., , winter. let's go to that briefing in downing street. _ good morning and welcome to today's technicalevi briefing from number nine downing st. and jonathan van tam, deputy chief medical officer for england. as is my practice, and john, left by doctorjune range, chief executive of the nhra, and the chair of the covid—19 vaccine subcommittee of the jcvi. thanks chair of the covid—19 vaccine subcommittee of thejcvi. thanks all forjoining. it remains nice to see
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people in person, rather than down the camera. today's briefing is about the uk booster programme. we won't be taking questions on other subjects. we will be sticking to the technical detail of the booster briefing. i will make a few opening remarks and then i shall pass to my colleagues. i think i will begin by saying, reminding people, that the uk has had one of the most successful covid—19 vaccine programmes in the whole world. we have already seen the vaccine is having a major impact on infections, but an even bigger impact on hospitalisations and deaths. our latest estimates are that since we began deploying these vaccines, they have probably averted in the region of 24 million cases of covid—19 in
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the uk, and a perch at around 112,000 deaths, so incredibly successful to day. and remain so. but we also know that this pandemic is still active, we are not passed the pandemic, we are still in an active phase. we know that this winter could be quite bumpy at times i do know that other respiratory viruses, such as flu, are highly likely to make their returns. with all of that in mind, the name of the game, the mantra if you like, is to stay on top of things. that is why we asked jcvi to begin thinking and framing its thoughts are the booster programme back in the summer, and why did jcvi give us some interim advice on the 30th ofjune. that set the direction of travel, but at the
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time it was too soon to boost people, and there were not enough data to understand how, when and with what that might need to occur, but it set the direction of travel and, most importantly, it frames the possibility of a booster programme for nhs england and for the vaccine task force, who have been working really incredibly hard behind—the—scenes to prepare extensively for both the supply and the potential deployment of boosters, if that moment came. so, todayis boosters, if that moment came. so, today is the time to clarify that announcement, to clarify the advice that has now gone to ministers and we await your response. the technical components of the briefing is divided into two parts. the first will be delivered by doctor rain from the nhra in relation to the
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booster vaccines, then i will turn to professor lin for the details of the recommendations themselves. thank you and good morning. the medicines and health care products regulatory agency is committed to getting safe and effective covid—19 vaccines to the public. this means ensuring that existing vaccines can continue to be used in the most effective way possible. last week, as you know, we confirmed that the covid—19 vaccines made by pfizer and astrazeneca can be used as safe and effective booster doses, as well as their doses in people who are immunocompromised. this is an important regulatory change, gives further options for the vaccination programme, which is saved many tens of thousands of lives. the regulatory decision followed a careful review of all the available
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data on safety and effectiveness of booster or supplementary vaccine doses by the nhra, and by the independent, on human medicines, which advises the government. the, took into account data regarding waning vaccine effectiveness after the second dose, which provided important insights into potentially waning immunity. we have also now looked at the moderna vaccine, to be used as a booster, and this has also been reviewed by experts, who concluded that the moderna vaccine could also be used as a safe and effective booster dose, including and a half dose, which also gives an effective booster antibodies. the data reviewed show that giving the boosterjabs data reviewed show that giving the booster jabs with flu vaccines data reviewed show that giving the boosterjabs with flu vaccines at the same time is safe and does not affect an individual�*s immune response to either vaccine. therefore, covid—19 booster doses may be given at the same time as flu
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vaccines. finally, we have in place a comprehensive safety surveillance strategy for monitoring the safety of all covid—19 vaccines and this surveillance includes the booster jabs. as with first and second doses, if anyone has a service —— suspected side effect, please report using yellow card. i will! suspected side effect, please report using yellow card.— using yellow card. i will not pass over to professor _ using yellow card. i will not pass over to professor lynn _ using yellow card. i will not pass over to professor lynn for - using yellow card. i will not pass over to professor lynn for the i over to professor lynn for the technical advisory detail from jcvi. thank you very much. we will all remember— thank you very much. we will all remember that the covid—19 vaccine programme started about ten months a-o, programme started about ten months ago. in _ programme started about ten months ago, in december2020. the programme started about ten months ago, in december 2020. the strategic aim of— ago, in december 2020. the strategic aim of the _ ago, in december 2020. the strategic aim of the vaccine programme at that time was _ aim of the vaccine programme at that time was to— aim of the vaccine programme at that time was to prevent severe covid—19 disease _ time was to prevent severe covid—19 disease. that is to say, to prevent people _ disease. that is to say, to prevent people from being hospitalised or, sadly. _ people from being hospitalised or, sadly, from dying from covid—19.
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that— sadly, from dying from covid—19. that primary aim has not changed. it is the _ that primary aim has not changed. it is the same — that primary aim has not changed. it is the same major strategic aim for the booster— is the same major strategic aim for the booster programme, as well. in the booster programme, as well. in the uk, _ the booster programme, as well. in the uk, we — the booster programme, as well. in the uk, we used a two dose vaccine schedule _ the uk, we used a two dose vaccine schedule with an extended dose interval— schedule with an extended dose interval between the first and the second _ interval between the first and the second dose for all the approved vaccines, — second dose for all the approved vaccines, that is to say that the first— vaccines, that is to say that the first dose — vaccines, that is to say that the first dose was followed by a second dose eight up to 12 weeks later for the majority of people. that extended dose interval is relevant when _ extended dose interval is relevant when we — extended dose interval is relevant when we are considering the booster programme. if we could have the first light, — programme. if we could have the first light, please. when we are estimating the duration of protection provided by vaccination, the time _ protection provided by vaccination, the time period in question is from the time period in question is from the start— the time period in question is from the start of— the time period in question is from the start of the second dose, and not the _ the start of the second dose, and not the start of the first dose. that _ not the start of the first dose. that means that we can only really measure _ that means that we can only really measure levels of protection out to about _
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measure levels of protection out to about five — measure levels of protection out to about five or six months at this time _ about five or six months at this time points. therefore, we have to project _ time points. therefore, we have to project what the levels of protection might be nine or 12 months — protection might be nine or 12 months after the second dose. that is moving _ months after the second dose. that is moving forward into time into december— is moving forward into time into december 2021 when we are in winter. the second _ december 2021 when we are in winter. the second thing to note about the extended _ the second thing to note about the extended dose interval for the second — extended dose interval for the second dose is that it gives a higher— second dose is that it gives a higher level of protection compared to a shorter dose interval for the first two— to a shorter dose interval for the first two doses, and that higher level— first two doses, and that higher level of— first two doses, and that higher level of protection may also be relevant — level of protection may also be relevant for the duration of protection because if we are starting _ protection because if we are starting from a higher level, then it may— starting from a higher level, then it may be — starting from a higher level, then it may be that even with waning there _ it may be that even with waning there remains a high level of protection for a longer period of time _ protection for a longer period of time. next slide, please. the uk has one of— time. next slide, please. the uk has one of the _ time. next slide, please. the uk has one of the world's best vaccine surveillance systems and public
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health — surveillance systems and public health england had been monitoring and analysing data related to vaccine — and analysing data related to vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisations. this is an important point, because we are interested — important point, because we are interested particularly in hospitalisations and severe covid—19. this data relates to vaccine — covid—19. this data relates to vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisation up to about five or six months. because of the way the vaccine _ six months. because of the way the vaccine programme was deployed, we have no— vaccine programme was deployed, we have no data for people who are older _ have no data for people who are older the — have no data for people who are older. the data shows that over time there _ older. the data shows that over time there is— older. the data shows that over time there is a _ older. the data shows that over time there is a small decrease in vaccine effectiveness from a little over 90% to a little _ effectiveness from a little over 90% to a little under 90%. that still means — to a little under 90%. that still means there is a very high level of protection, — means there is a very high level of protection, but we need to be aware that the _ protection, but we need to be aware that the suggestion here is of some decrease _ that the suggestion here is of some decrease in— that the suggestion here is of some decrease in that protection as time ioes decrease in that protection as time goes by _ decrease in that protection as time goes by. when examined more closely, this data _ goes by. when examined more closely, this data also shows that the most
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marked _ this data also shows that the most marked decrease in protection occurs in the _ marked decrease in protection occurs in the oldest people and in people with underlying health conditions that puts — with underlying health conditions that puts them at risk of covid—19. jcvi that puts them at risk of covid—19. jcvi has— that puts them at risk of covid—19. jcvi has therefore taken into account— jcvi has therefore taken into account these sorts of surveillance data as _ account these sorts of surveillance data as well as data from recent trials. _ data as well as data from recent trials. and — data as well as data from recent trials, and operational considerations in coming to our advice — considerations in coming to our advice. next slide, please. jcvi advises — advice. next slide, please. jcvi advises that adults who are more vulnerable — advises that adults who are more vulnerable to severe covid—19 disease — vulnerable to severe covid—19 disease should be offered a booster vaccination in order to maintain a high _ vaccination in order to maintain a high level— vaccination in order to maintain a high level of protection through the next few— high level of protection through the next few months, so through this winter— next few months, so through this winter particularly. these people are identified as those who receive their vaccinations during phase one of the _ their vaccinations during phase one of the vaccine programme. that includes — of the vaccine programme. that includes a — of the vaccine programme. that includes a list of people that is on the slide — includes a list of people that is on the slide. older adults living in
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residential care homes. front all adults— residential care homes. front all adults age — residential care homes. front all adults age 50 years or over. front line health— adults age 50 years or over. front line health and social care board workers — line health and social care board workers. those age 16 up to 49 years who are _ workers. those age 16 up to 49 years who are in _ workers. those age 16 up to 49 years who are in a — workers. those age 16 up to 49 years who are in a risk group. we also advise _ who are in a risk group. we also advise that _ who are in a risk group. we also advise that the booster dose is given— advise that the booster dose is given no— advise that the booster dose is given no earlier than six months after— given no earlier than six months after the — given no earlier than six months after the second dose and that the deployments follows the same order as in phase one. we want to suggest this six—month limits, as it wear, as a _ this six—month limits, as it wear, as a lower— this six—month limits, as it wear, as a lower limit, because we don't want _ as a lower limit, because we don't want people to think they have to rush to _ want people to think they have to rush to get a booster dose. getting a booster— rush to get a booster dose. getting a booster dose to early means they might— a booster dose to early means they might get— a booster dose to early means they might get a when they don't a chilly need it— might get a when they don't a chilly need it because they still have a hi-h need it because they still have a high level— need it because they still have a high level of protection. as we have seen with— high level of protection. as we have seen with the first and second dose, it may— seen with the first and second dose, it may be _ seen with the first and second dose, it may be that a longer interval to
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the third — it may be that a longer interval to the third booster dose might a chilly— the third booster dose might a chilly be — the third booster dose might a chilly be beneficial in the longer term _ chilly be beneficial in the longer term on — chilly be beneficial in the longer term. on the other hand, we don't want _ term. on the other hand, we don't want to— term. on the other hand, we don't want to wait— term. on the other hand, we don't want to wait too long before offering _ want to wait too long before offering a booster dose. so trying to find _ offering a booster dose. so trying to find the — offering a booster dose. so trying to find the sweet spot between going too soon _ to find the sweet spot between going too soon and going too late, we are suggesting — too soon and going too late, we are suggesting that the booster dose is iiven suggesting that the booster dose is given no— suggesting that the booster dose is given no earlier than six months after— given no earlier than six months after the — given no earlier than six months after the second dose. as i said, it is deployed — after the second dose. as i said, it is deployed in the same order as it was deployed in phase one. hopefully, this will mean that the levels _ hopefully, this will mean that the levels of— hopefully, this will mean that the levels of protection that people have _ levels of protection that people have wilfully highest during the coldest — have wilfully highest during the coldest months of the winter. in terms _ coldest months of the winter. in terms of— coldest months of the winter. in terms of which vaccine product to use _ terms of which vaccine product to use, we _ terms of which vaccine product to use, we are — terms of which vaccine product to use, we are advising a preference for mrna— use, we are advising a preference for mrna vaccines, either the pfizer/biontech or the moderna. this is based _ pfizer/biontech or the moderna. this is based on _ pfizer/biontech or the moderna. this is based on a range of data from different— is based on a range of data from different clinical trials, including a very— different clinical trials, including a very important trial that was
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performed in the uk. that trial showed — performed in the uk. that trial showed that these vaccines give very iood showed that these vaccines give very good immune boosting after two dosesm — good immune boosting after two doses... after the first two doses of either— doses... after the first two doses of either the pfizer vaccine or the first two— of either the pfizer vaccine or the first two doses of the astrazeneca. in first two doses of the astrazeneca. in other— first two doses of the astrazeneca. in other words, it doesn't matter what _ in other words, it doesn't matter what people received in the first two doses. having the mrna vaccine is your— two doses. having the mrna vaccine is your third — two doses. having the mrna vaccine is your third dose gives a very good response — is your third dose gives a very good response. therefore, the pfizer/biontech vaccine is a preferred choice because of simplicity, it is well tolerated and it has— simplicity, it is well tolerated and it has good effects, and as an alternative we are also suggesting the moderna. the moderna as a booster— the moderna. the moderna as a booster dose is advised as a half dose _ booster dose is advised as a half dose compared to the standard dose that was— dose compared to the standard dose that was given during the primary vaccine _ that was given during the primary vaccine course. this is because the
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half dose _ vaccine course. this is because the half dose works very well, as well. it half dose works very well, as well. it has _ half dose works very well, as well. it has very— half dose works very well, as well. it has very good tolerability and is the dose — it has very good tolerability and is the dose that the manufacturers themselves are putting forward for booster— themselves are putting forward for booster vaccinations in their submissions to the ema and the fda in the _ submissions to the ema and the fda in the united states. their preferences are full dose of pfizer or a half— preferences are full dose of pfizer or a half dose of moderna as the third _ or a half dose of moderna as the third booster dose. there may be a few people — third booster dose. there may be a few people who cannot have an m nra vaccine _ few people who cannot have an m nra vaccine for _ few people who cannot have an m nra vaccine for some other reason, perhaps— vaccine for some other reason, perhaps there is an allergy. in that instance. _ perhaps there is an allergy. in that instance, astrazeneca vaccines should — instance, astrazeneca vaccines should be _ instance, astrazeneca vaccines should be considered for the third booster— should be considered for the third booster dose. can we take the slide downi _ booster dose. can we take the slide down, please? ijust want to end by pointing _ down, please? ijust want to end by pointing out— down, please? ijust want to end by pointing out three important things that this _ pointing out three important things that this advice today does not imply — that this advice today does not imply. the advice does not imply that there — imply. the advice does not imply that there will be a recurrent
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programme of booster doses every six months _ programme of booster doses every six months the _ programme of booster doses every six months. the advice is only relevant for today— months. the advice is only relevant for today and to protect us for the coming _ for today and to protect us for the coming winter whilst we are still in a very— coming winter whilst we are still in a very active phase of the pandemic. we will— a very active phase of the pandemic. we will offer further advice regarding what to do when we come to perhaps— regarding what to do when we come to perhaps a _ regarding what to do when we come to perhaps a more steady states with regards _ perhaps a more steady states with regards to — perhaps a more steady states with regards to covid infections. the second — regards to covid infections. the second thing this advice does not imply— second thing this advice does not imply is— second thing this advice does not imply is that it does not imply that everybody — imply is that it does not imply that everybody under the age of 50 who are otherwise healthy will necessarily need a booster dose to vaccine _ necessarily need a booster dose to vaccine we — necessarily need a booster dose to vaccine. we know from immunological principles— vaccine. we know from immunological principles that younger people tend to generate very good immune responses to primary vaccination, more _ responses to primary vaccination, more so _ responses to primary vaccination, more so than older people. so it may well be _ more so than older people. so it may well be that— more so than older people. so it may well be that younger, healthier people — well be that younger, healthier people do not need an early booster dose _ people do not need an early booster dose the _ people do not need an early booster dose. the third thing to note is
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that— dose. the third thing to note is that the — dose. the third thing to note is that the booster programme does not imply that _ that the booster programme does not imply that other vaccine programmes are no— imply that other vaccine programmes are no longer important. i'm particularly referring to here at the annual seasonal flu vaccine programme. because we have more social— programme. because we have more social mixing, we are returning back to normal— social mixing, we are returning back to normal levels of contact, there will be _ to normal levels of contact, there will be more circulation of respiratory viruses, including the flu. respiratory viruses, including the flu if— respiratory viruses, including the flu. if somebody is eligible for the flu. if somebody is eligible for the flu vaccine, i strongly urge that you flu vaccine, ! strongly urge that you also— flu vaccine, i strongly urge that you also have the flu vaccine. we have _ you also have the flu vaccine. we have heard — you also have the flu vaccine. we have heard from the nhra and clinical— have heard from the nhra and clinical trial data that it so happens that if somebody is cold up to have _ happens that if somebody is cold up to have the — happens that if somebody is cold up to have the covid vaccine and the flu vaccine — to have the covid vaccine and the flu vaccine on the same day, it is safe _ flu vaccine on the same day, it is safe to _ flu vaccine on the same day, it is safe to have _ flu vaccine on the same day, it is safe to have both vaccines administered, usually in different armsi _ administered, usually in different arms. but— administered, usually in different arms, but they can be administered on the _ arms, but they can be administered on the same — arms, but they can be administered on the same day. | arms, but they can be administered on the same day.— on the same day. i will open for questions _ on the same day. i will open for questions very _ on the same day. i will open for questions very shortly. - on the same day. i will open for questions very shortly. i - on the same day. i will open for questions very shortly. i hope i on the same day. i will open for. questions very shortly. i hope that was a good and clear summary of the
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advice. it has been put to ministers, it is subject to ministerial decision, but if the ministerial decision, but if the ministerial decision, but if the ministerial decision is to go ahead, thenit ministerial decision is to go ahead, then it will be full speed ahead on this, but in a purposeful way, rather than a rushed way. it is completely different to the situation back in december and january at the beginning of the vaccine era when we had very, very high levels of disease and a completely unprotected population. it is different this time, but it still needs to be purposeful, steady steps towards the goal. the final thing i want to say is that the data considered and presented to you today and the findings are about boosters, they are not about primary courses and all of the vaccines so far given in the uk for primary courses remain safe and effective
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and really important for people who have not yet come forwards for that primary course. that is really a very big goal indeed. i. there. we have some questions. the first is from hugh pym at the bbc. thank you. first of all, from hugh pym at the bbc. thank you. first of all. can — from hugh pym at the bbc. thank you. first of all, can you _ from hugh pym at the bbc. thank you. first of all, can you give _ from hugh pym at the bbc. thank you. first of all, can you give some - first of all, can you give some hints — first of all, can you give some hints of— first of all, can you give some hints of the _ first of all, can you give some hints of the possibility- first of all, can you give some hints of the possibility of- first of all, can you give some. hints of the possibility of future booster — hints of the possibility of future booster campaigns _ hints of the possibility of future booster campaigns next - hints of the possibility of future booster campaigns next year i hints of the possibility of future i booster campaigns next year and whether — booster campaigns next year and whether astrazeneca _ booster campaigns next year and whether astrazeneca might - booster campaigns next year and whether astrazeneca might have | booster campaigns next year and i whether astrazeneca might have a role in _ whether astrazeneca might have a role in that? — whether astrazeneca might have a role in that? at _ whether astrazeneca might have a role in that? at what _ whether astrazeneca might have a role in that? at what point - whether astrazeneca might have a role in that? at what point will - role in that? at what point will double — role in that? at what point will double jabs _ role in that? at what point will double jabs start, _ role in that? at what point will double jabs start, covid - role in that? at what point will double jabs start, covid in- role in that? at what point will double jabs start, covid in onej role in that? at what point will - double jabs start, covid in one arm, flew in_ double jabs start, covid in one arm, flew in the _ double jabs start, covid in one arm, flew in the other? _ double jabs start, covid in one arm, flew in the other? i— double jabs start, covid in one arm, flew in the other?— flew in the other? i don't think i can say very _ flew in the other? i don't think i can say very much _ flew in the other? i don't think i can say very much about - flew in the other? i don't think i can say very much about future | can say very much about future booster — can say very much about future booster programmes because we just don't have _ booster programmes because we just don't have the data. we don't know what _ don't have the data. we don't know what might— don't have the data. we don't know what might happen if we are projecting into december 2022. it is 'ust projecting into december 2022. it is just too— projecting into december 2022. it is just too difficult to know for now,
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so we _ just too difficult to know for now, so we need — just too difficult to know for now, so we need to keep our options open. i so we need to keep our options open. iwouldn't _ so we need to keep our options open. i wouldn't want to exclude any iwouldn't want to exclude any option— iwouldn't want to exclude any option at— i wouldn't want to exclude any option at this point. so, double 'abs can option at this point. so, double jabs can start — option at this point. so, double jabs can start now, _ option at this point. so, double jabs can start now, subject - option at this point. so, double jabs can start now, subject to l option at this point. so, double l jabs can start now, subject to the availability of both products. we have heard that's we have looked at the data from the trials on giving flu in one arm and covid in the other at the same time and the antibody response to both of those vaccines is not impaired by doing so, and the tolerability of doing that at the same time is also fine. i would add that there is a practical reality to add on top, which is for the nhs to consider in more detail, and it may not always be the case that it is possible to co—administer goes to vaccines in every single patient. sometimes it will be possible and we should gain
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efficiencies and by doing that is where we can, but remember if you have ever been for your flu jab it is quite a rapid process to get on the line. there is a 15 minute waiting period with covid—19 vaccines, and observation period, and mission those two together in practical terms won't always be straight forwards, so people need to understand that if they are offered the chance of getting both together, please do take it. i shall be doing that. at the same token, they may not be through practical realities. i'm not sure you are asking this particular question, but as a scientist i will say it, that it is very much a matter for the future, but one day i guess it is possible that the developers will come up with vaccines by organism, in other words flu and covid in the same job.
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it is not beyond the bounds of scientific possibility when you considerjust how amazing a job it is being to get to where we have got to in such a short space of time. that is always a possibility for the future. , ~ ., ., ., ., ., future. emily morgan. from the data a hue future. emily morgan. from the data a huge showed _ future. emily morgan. from the data a huge showed it _ future. emily morgan. from the data a huge showed it looks _ future. emily morgan. from the data a huge showed it looks like - future. emily morgan. from the data a huge showed it looks like the - a huge showed it looks like the decrease — a huge showed it looks like the decrease in— a huge showed it looks like the decrease in vaccine _ a huge showed it looks like the l decrease in vaccine effectiveness over time — decrease in vaccine effectiveness over time is— decrease in vaccine effectiveness over time is really— decrease in vaccine effectiveness over time is really small, - decrease in vaccine effectiveness over time is really small, so - decrease in vaccine effectiveness| over time is really small, so what is it that — over time is really small, so what is it that really _ over time is really small, so what is it that really persuaded - over time is really small, so what is it that really persuaded you i over time is really small, so whati is it that really persuaded you that we needs— is it that really persuaded you that we needs are _ is it that really persuaded you that we needs are booster— is it that really persuaded you that we needs are boosterjab - is it that really persuaded you that we needs are boosterjab if- is it that really persuaded you that i we needs are boosterjab if immunity remains _ we needs are boosterjab if immunity remains really — we needs are boosterjab if immunity remains really high. _ we needs are boosterjab if immunity remains really high. that— we needs are booster 'ab if immunity remains really high._ remains really high. that is a very ood remains really high. that is a very good question _ remains really high. that is a very good question and _ remains really high. that is a very good question and very _ remains really high. that is a very good question and very relevant. | remains really high. that is a very| good question and very relevant. if we are _ good question and very relevant. if we are running at a vaccine effectiveness of let's say 90% and it drops _ effectiveness of let's say 90% and it drops to — effectiveness of let's say 90% and it drops to 80%, which is just a 10% drop _ it drops to 80%, which is just a 10% drop it _ it drops to 80%, which is just a 10% drop. it may— it drops to 80%, which is just a 10% drop. it may not seem like very much, — drop. it may not seem like very much, but _ drop. it may not seem like very much, but for a certain proportion of people — much, but for a certain proportion of people who are being admitted to hospital— of people who are being admitted to hospital when vaccine effectiveness is at 90%, — hospital when vaccine effectiveness is at 90%, then you double the drop.
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you might— is at 90%, then you double the drop. you might find you are doubling the number— you might find you are doubling the number of— you might find you are doubling the number of people admitted to hospital— number of people admitted to hospital because of that small absolute drop in vaccine effectiveness. so it does have a big impact _ effectiveness. so it does have a big impact because we are talking about the entire _ impact because we are talking about the entire population here, notjust a single _ the entire population here, notjust a single individual. therefore, we are looking — a single individual. therefore, we are looking at this both from an individual— are looking at this both from an individual perspective, but also this is— individual perspective, but also this is a — individual perspective, but also this is a mass vaccination programme we are _ this is a mass vaccination programme we are looking out from a population perspective. you will remember that last year— perspective. you will remember that last year in— perspective. you will remember that last year in december, one of the urges _ last year in december, one of the urges was — last year in december, one of the urges was to save or protect the nhs because — urges was to save or protect the nhs because by— urges was to save or protect the nhs because by doing so we save lives. that is— because by doing so we save lives. that is entirely true for this winter. _ that is entirely true for this winter. as— that is entirely true for this winter, as well. if we can protect the nhs, — winter, as well. if we can protect the nhs, we will save lives in the broader— the nhs, we will save lives in the broader sense, as well. the other thin i broader sense, as well. the other thing i would _ broader sense, as well. the other thing i would add _ broader sense, as well. the other thing i would add is _ broader sense, as well. the other thing i would add is the _ broader sense, as well. the other thing i would add is the data i broader sense, as well. the other thing i would add is the data that l thing i would add is the data that we showed is data centred at the december 2021 point. thejcvi has
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had quite a difficult decision and quite a difficultjudgment call to understand what that is going to look like by the time we get to december orjanuary. if you look at the trent and you follow the trend, and if you follow immunological principles, protection will have went further by those points. that is an important consideration. it is an unknown, but a consideration that they have to second guess where we might be if we don't act now in terms of the deep midwinter. the brief from ministers has been very clearly to do the maximum we can to prevent morbidity and mortality from covid until the spring, sojcvi have rightly responded to that question set by ministers in the advice they have given. i can say from a
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perfectly practical point of view, i don't know if many of you are used to crawling into small tents on mountainsides, but if you do so, and you know there is a storm blowing you know there is a storm blowing you are going to realise it is better to put extra guy ropes on there and then then wait until it is there and then then wait until it is the middle of the night, it is howling with wind and rain and then you have to get out your tents and nature tents secure, and by the time you call back in your soaking wet, so it is better to be pre—emptive and be prepared and plan for the worst possibilities. tiara and be prepared and plan for the worst possibilities. two questions. thank you. — worst possibilities. two questions. thank you. good — worst possibilities. two questions. thank you, good morning. - worst possibilities. two questions. i thank you, good morning. professor, are you _ thank you, good morning. professor, are you worried — thank you, good morning. professor, are you worried that _ thank you, good morning. professor, are you worried that the _ thank you, good morning. professor, are you worried that the vaccine i are you worried that the vaccine roll-out — are you worried that the vaccine roll—out programme _ are you worried that the vaccine roll—out programme for- are you worried that the vaccine roll—out programme for the i are you worried that the vaccine i roll—out programme for the booster might— roll—out programme for the booster might be _ roll—out programme for the booster might be perceived _ roll—out programme for the booster might be perceived as— roll—out programme for the booster might be perceived as a _ roll—out programme for the booster might be perceived as a teacher- might be perceived as a teacher booster— might be perceived as a teacher booster programme _ might be perceived as a teacher booster programme because i might be perceived as a teacher- booster programme because people don't really— booster programme because people don't really like _ booster programme because people don't really like alternatives. - booster programme because people don't really like alternatives. if- don't really like alternatives. if they— don't really like alternatives. if they don't—
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don't really like alternatives. if they don't get _ don't really like alternatives. if they don't get the _ don't really like alternatives. if they don't get the pfizer i don't really like alternatives. if they don't get the pfizer and i don't really like alternatives. if. they don't get the pfizer and they are given — they don't get the pfizer and they are given what _ they don't get the pfizer and they are given what you _ they don't get the pfizer and they are given what you call— they don't get the pfizer and they are given what you call the i they don't get the pfizer and theyl are given what you call the second choice. _ are given what you call the second choice, moderna, _ are given what you call the second choice, moderna, they— are given what you call the second choice, moderna, they may- are given what you call the second choice, moderna, they may feel. are given what you call the second . choice, moderna, they may feel that their health — choice, moderna, they may feel that their health choice _ choice, moderna, they may feel that their health choice has _ choice, moderna, they may feel that their health choice has been - their health choice has been compromised _ their health choice has been compromised a _ their health choice has been compromised a bit. - their health choice has been compromised a bit. what i their health choice has beenj compromised a bit. what do their health choice has been i compromised a bit. what do you their health choice has been - compromised a bit. what do you say to scientists — compromised a bit. what do you say to scientists and _ compromised a bit. what do you say to scientists and the _ compromised a bit. what do you say to scientists and the world - compromised a bit. what do you say to scientists and the world health i to scientists and the world health organization. _ to scientists and the world health organization, that _ to scientists and the world health organization, that this _ to scientists and the world health organization, that this poster- organization, that this poster campaign _ organization, that this poster campaign undermines- organization, that this poster campaign undermines the i organization, that this poster. campaign undermines the global vaccine — campaign undermines the global vaccine programme? _ campaign undermines the global vaccine programme? the - campaign undermines the global vaccine programme?— campaign undermines the global vaccine programme? the first thing to note is that _ vaccine programme? the first thing to note is that we _ vaccine programme? the first thing to note is that we are _ vaccine programme? the first thing to note is that we are advising i vaccine programme? the first thing to note is that we are advising a i to note is that we are advising a preference _ to note is that we are advising a preference for mrna vaccines overall. — preference for mrna vaccines overall, so if somebody comes to a vaccination — overall, so if somebody comes to a vaccination centre and you are offered — vaccination centre and you are offered that vaccine, that is our preferred — offered that vaccine, that is our preferred choice. the alternative between — preferred choice. the alternative between pfizer and moderna is more a question. _ between pfizer and moderna is more a question. or— between pfizer and moderna is more a question, or more an option for vaccination _ question, or more an option for vaccination centres and deployment teams _ vaccination centres and deployment teams so _ vaccination centres and deployment teams so that they can organise themselves rather than suggesting that an _ themselves rather than suggesting that an individual should be trying
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to find _ that an individual should be trying to find out— that an individual should be trying to find out where they can go to get the pfizer— to find out where they can go to get the pfizer vaccine compared to where they can _ the pfizer vaccine compared to where they can get the moderna vaccine. the advice — they can get the moderna vaccine. the advice is given for different levels. — the advice is given for different levels, and for different audiences in order— levels, and for different audiences in order to — levels, and for different audiences in orderto make levels, and for different audiences in order to make sure that everybody iets in order to make sure that everybody gets the _ in order to make sure that everybody gets the best choice possible. i will gets the best choice possible. will never gets the best choice possible. i will never pin on that question, if that's all right. i sit in on all thejcvi that's all right. i sit in on all the jcvi meetings that's all right. i sit in on all thejcvi meetings as an observer. i have seen the data they examined. i would be perfectly content as a 57—year—olds and is a health care to be boosted with either a half dose of moderna or a full dose of pfizer/biontech. i really couldn't care which. that is just the truth. on the point about global vaccine equity and boosters, of course as public health people we take a very strong view that it is important
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that the whole world has access to vaccines, and that until everyone has access to them, none of us are safe, none of us are truly safe. we get that. by the same token, the job given to us is to define what is best for the uk, and that is what jcvi has done. i would finally add is that based on the information my colleagues have givenjamie, nine countries, and this data comes from the end of august, nine countries have already announced that they are actively starting some form of booster campaign and there is firm intelligence that 18 others are already considering it. from that perspective, the uk is not alone in thinking that it will need to do this to give maximum protection to its population this winter. flan
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this to give maximum protection to its population this winter. can i follow u- its population this winter. can i follow up on — its population this winter. can i follow up on that _ its population this winter. can i follow up on that question i its population this winter. can i follow up on that question in i its population this winter. can i follow up on that question in terms of why— follow up on that question in terms of why you — follow up on that question in terms of why you need _ follow up on that question in terms of why you need to _ follow up on that question in terms of why you need to do _ follow up on that question in terms of why you need to do this. - follow up on that question in terms of why you need to do this. is i follow up on that question in terms of why you need to do this. is it i of why you need to do this. is it 'ust of why you need to do this. is it just the — of why you need to do this. is it just the data _ of why you need to do this. is it just the data on _ of why you need to do this. is it just the data on whaling - of why you need to do this. is it i just the data on whaling community in this— just the data on whaling community in this country— just the data on whaling community in this country or _ just the data on whaling community in this country or are _ just the data on whaling community in this country or are you _ just the data on whaling community in this country or are you looking i in this country or are you looking at other— in this country or are you looking at other country's— in this country or are you looking at other country's experience, i in this country or are you looking i at other country's experience, such as israel? — at other country's experience, such as israel? what— at other country's experience, such as israel? what evidence _ at other country's experience, such as israel? what evidence have - at other country's experience, such as israel? what evidence have you| as israel? what evidence have you seen _ as israel? what evidence have you seen that— as israel? what evidence have you seen that will_ as israel? what evidence have you seen that will show— as israel? what evidence have you seen that will show the _ as israel? what evidence have you seen that will show the impact - as israel? what evidence have you| seen that will show the impact this will happen— seen that will show the impact this will happen how— seen that will show the impact this will happen how effective - seen that will show the impact this will happen how effective it - seen that will show the impact this will happen how effective it will - will happen how effective it will be? for— will happen how effective it will be? for those _ will happen how effective it will be? for those who _ will happen how effective it will be? for those who have - will happen how effective it will be? for those who have had . be? for those who have had astrazeneca _ be? for those who have had astrazeneca last _ be? for those who have had astrazeneca last time, - be? for those who have had astrazeneca last time, whyi be? for those who have had . astrazeneca last time, why do be? for those who have had - astrazeneca last time, why do you think_ astrazeneca last time, why do you think that — astrazeneca last time, why do you think that is — astrazeneca last time, why do you think that is not _ astrazeneca last time, why do you think that is not the _ astrazeneca last time, why do you think that is not the right - astrazeneca last time, why do you think that is not the right option i think that is not the right option this time, — think that is not the right option this time, because _ think that is not the right option this time, because people - think that is not the right option| this time, because people might think— this time, because people might think it _ this time, because people might think it adds _ this time, because people might think it adds to _ this time, because people might think it adds to the _ this time, because people might think it adds to the general - think it adds to the general concerns— think it adds to the general concerns about _ think it adds to the general concerns about that - think it adds to the general. concerns about that vaccine. think it adds to the general - concerns about that vaccine. what impact _ concerns about that vaccine. what impact do — concerns about that vaccine. what impact do you _ concerns about that vaccine. what impact do you think _ concerns about that vaccine. what impact do you think this _ concerns about that vaccine. what impact do you think this campaigni impact do you think this campaign will have — impact do you think this campaign will have on— impact do you think this campaign will have on the _ impact do you think this campaign will have on the trajectory- impact do you think this campaign will have on the trajectory of- impact do you think this campaign will have on the trajectory of thisi will have on the trajectory of this epidemic— will have on the trajectory of this epidemic over— will have on the trajectory of this epidemic over the _ will have on the trajectory of this epidemic over the next _ will have on the trajectory of this epidemic over the next six - will have on the trajectory of this i epidemic over the next six months a-o. epidemic over the next six months auo. ~ ., epidemic over the next six months a'°.~ ., epidemic over the next six months auo.~ ., . epidemic over the next six months ago. we do look at information cominu ago. we do look at information coming from — ago. we do look at information coming from other— ago. we do look at information coming from other countries. l ago. we do look at information i coming from other countries. the information— coming from other countries. the information from israel is obviously very interesting and important. an important — very interesting and important. an important distinction, though, is
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that israel— important distinction, though, is that israel predominantly use the pfizer— that israel predominantly use the pfizer vaccine and used are three or four week— pfizer vaccine and used are three or four week dose interval schedule for the first— four week dose interval schedule for the first and second doses. that means— the first and second doses. that means that they are, if you will longer— means that they are, if you will longer from their second dose to now, _ longer from their second dose to how. more — longer from their second dose to now, more time has passed, and also window— now, more time has passed, and also window that— now, more time has passed, and also window that there is likely at difference in the peak immune protection that you get with the second — protection that you get with the second dose if it is time that a different— second dose if it is time that a different point. whilst that data is important, they are not quite as relevant — important, they are not quite as relevant to— important, they are not quite as relevant to the uk population as a room data, so we are looking to our data as _ room data, so we are looking to our data as the — room data, so we are looking to our data as the main source that is relevant — data as the main source that is relevant to— data as the main source that is relevant to the uk population. in terms _ relevant to the uk population. in terms of— relevant to the uk population. in terms of the impacts of the third booster— terms of the impacts of the third booster dose, this is probably where we can— booster dose, this is probably where we can look— booster dose, this is probably where we can look to israel where they have _ we can look to israel where they have published data on how their third _ have published data on how their third booster dose has helped them to reduce _ third booster dose has helped them to reduce hospitalisations. there are various — to reduce hospitalisations. there are various other reasons why that
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might— are various other reasons why that might be, — are various other reasons why that might be, it — are various other reasons why that might be, it might not simply because —— be because it is the trooster— because —— be because it is the booster dose, there might be questions around the variants and so on, questions around the variants and so on. but _ questions around the variants and so on. but it— questions around the variants and so on, but it does give some indication that a _ on, but it does give some indication that a third — on, but it does give some indication that a third booster dose can be helpful— that a third booster dose can be helpful irr— that a third booster dose can be helpful in the overall protection of the population. certainly from the clinical— the population. certainly from the clinical trials, what we see is that the immune response, measurable immuhe _ the immune response, measurable immune response, is very good after the trooster— immune response, is very good after the booster dose. in many cases it is higher— the booster dose. in many cases it is higher than the measured immune response _ is higher than the measured immune response after the first and second doses~ _ response after the first and second doses. therefore, if we get good protectioh — doses. therefore, if we get good protection against hospitalisation from the — protection against hospitalisation from the first and second doses anyway. — from the first and second doses anyway, one would expect that with the third _ anyway, one would expect that with the third dose, where they measured immuhe _ the third dose, where they measured immune responses even higher, you would _ immune responses even higher, you would get _ immune responses even higher, you would get outs good or even better protection — would get outs good or even better protection against hospitalisation and mortality. although the clinical trials _ and mortality. although the clinical trials at _ and mortality. although the clinical trials at the third booster dose obviously _ trials at the third booster dose obviously haven't gone and measured
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effectiveness against hospitalisation, we have every reason — hospitalisation, we have every reason to— hospitalisation, we have every reason to expect from what we can see it _ reason to expect from what we can see it will — reason to expect from what we can see it will provide very good protection in that sense. why are you not using a z, and people — why are you not using a z, and people who _ why are you not using a z, and people who have _ why are you not using a z, and people who have a _ why are you not using a z, and people who have a z— why are you not using a z, and people who have a 2 might - why are you not using a z, and j people who have a 2 might get why are you not using a z, and - people who have a 2 might get the sense _ people who have a 2 might get the sense it _ people who have a 2 might get the sense it is — people who have a 2 might get the sense it is hot _ people who have a 2 might get the sense it is not perhaps— people who have a 2 might get the sense it is not perhaps quite - people who have a 2 might get the sense it is not perhaps quite as - sense it is not perhaps quite as good _ sense it is not perhaps quite as good as— sense it is not perhaps quite as good as the _ sense it is not perhaps quite as good as the other— sense it is not perhaps quite as good as the other vaccines, - sense it is not perhaps quite as good as the other vaccines, sol sense it is not perhaps quite as - good as the other vaccines, so what would _ good as the other vaccines, so what would you _ good as the other vaccines, so what would you say? _ good as the other vaccines, so what would you say? the _ good as the other vaccines, so what would you say?— would you say? the astrazeneca vaccine is a _ would you say? the astrazeneca vaccine is a very _ would you say? the astrazeneca vaccine is a very good _ would you say? the astrazeneca vaccine is a very good vaccine i would you say? the astrazeneca| vaccine is a very good vaccine for its primary— vaccine is a very good vaccine for its primary cause. we have seen data that suggest the mrna vaccine given, whatever— that suggest the mrna vaccine given, whatever the primary cause vaccination is, gives a very good boost, _ vaccination is, gives a very good boost. and — vaccination is, gives a very good boost, and for a range of reasons, including _ boost, and for a range of reasons, including simplicity and delivery of the programme, we felt that, overall. — the programme, we felt that, overall, there was a preference for mrna— overall, there was a preference for mrna vaccines for the third booster dose~ _ mrna vaccines for the third booster dose~ 50_ mrna vaccines for the third booster dose. ,, ., ,, mrna vaccines for the third booster dose. ,, i. . . ,, mrna vaccines for the third booster dose. ,, . . ,, ., dose. so i think you had a kind of aeneral dose. so i think you had a kind of general question _ dose. so i think you had a kind of general question that _ dose. so i think you had a kind of general question that the - dose. so i think you had a kind of general question that the are - dose. so i think you had a kind of. general question that the are there. june, would you want to say anything on that one? i june, would you want to say anything on that one?— on that one? i 'ust want to follow
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u . on that one? i 'ust want to follow u- on a on that one? i 'ust want to follow up on a z. — on that one? i 'ust want to follow up on a z. and— on that one? i just want to follow up on a z, and the _ on that one? i just want to follow up on a z, and the regulatory - up on a z, and the regulatory position. _ up on a z, and the regulatory position, having _ up on a z, and the regulatory position, having looked - up on a z, and the regulatory position, having looked at. up on a z, and the regulatory position, having looked at all up on a z, and the regulatory- position, having looked at all the data, _ position, having looked at all the data. it _ position, having looked at all the data. it is — position, having looked at all the data. it is a — position, having looked at all the data, it is a very— position, having looked at all the data, it is a very safe _ position, having looked at all the data, it is a very safe and - data, it is a very safe and effective _ data, it is a very safe and effective vaccine, - data, it is a very safe and effective vaccine, so - data, it is a very safe and effective vaccine, so no l data, it is a very safe and . effective vaccine, so no one data, it is a very safe and - effective vaccine, so no one needs to hesitate, — effective vaccine, so no one needs to hesitate, and _ effective vaccine, so no one needs to hesitate, and if— effective vaccine, so no one needs to hesitate, and if the _ effective vaccine, so no one needs to hesitate, and if the decision- effective vaccine, so no one needs to hesitate, and if the decision as| to hesitate, and if the decision as you would — to hesitate, and if the decision as you would have _ to hesitate, and if the decision as you would have it _ to hesitate, and if the decision as you would have it for— to hesitate, and if the decision as you would have it for your - to hesitate, and if the decision as. you would have it for your booster, then no _ you would have it for your booster, then no worry— you would have it for your booster, then no worry at _ you would have it for your booster, then no worry at all, _ you would have it for your booster, then no worry at all, be _ you would have it for your booster, then no worry at all, be reassured i then no worry at all, be reassured that it _ then no worry at all, be reassured that it will— then no worry at all, be reassured that it will be _ then no worry at all, be reassured that it will be effective. _ then no worry at all, be reassured that it will be effective. so - then no worry at all, be reassured that it will be effective. so i - then no worry at all, be reassured that it will be effective. so i hope| that it will be effective. so i hope that it will be effective. so i hope that clears — that it will be effective. so i hope that clears that _ that it will be effective. so i hope that clears that up. _ that it will be effective. so i hope that clears that up. in _ that it will be effective. so i hope that clears that up. in terms - that it will be effective. so i hope that clears that up. in terms of. that clears that up. in terms of longer-term _ that clears that up. in terms of longer—term impact, _ that clears that up. in terms of longer—term impact, we, - that clears that up. in terms of longer—term impact, we, as. that clears that up. in terms of. longer—term impact, we, asjcvi, will be _ longer—term impact, we, asjcvi, will be following _ longer—term impact, we, asjcvi, will be following public _ longer—term impact, we, asjcvi, will be following public health - will be following public health england's _ will be following public health england's really— will be following public health england's really helpful - will be following public health england's really helpful and l england's really helpful and impressive _ england's really helpful and impressive and _ england's really helpful and impressive and timely- england's really helpful and impressive and timely work| england's really helpful and . impressive and timely work to england's really helpful and - impressive and timely work to make judgments — impressive and timely work to make judgments thank— impressive and timely work to make judgments. thank you. _ impressive and timely work to make judgments. thank you. [— impressive and timely work to make judgments. thank you. infill- impressive and timely work to make judgments. thank you.— judgments. thank you. i will try and answer your— judgments. thank you. i will try and answer your question _ judgments. thank you. i will try and answer your question a _ judgments. thank you. i will try and answer your question a little - judgments. thank you. i will try and answer your question a little bit. - judgments. thank you. i will try and answer your question a little bit. i i answer your question a little bit. i think if there is good uptake of the booster dose, and i have absolutely no reason to doubt that at all, you know, the uptake in this country, particularly in people over the age of 50, has been nothing short of astonishing. so if there is good uptake, ithink astonishing. so if there is good uptake, i think the booster programme will make a very substantial impact on keeping the lid on things, covid wise, in terms of hospitalisations and deaths, and keeping pressure off the nhs this
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winter. we want to live our lives as normally as possible from now on, and we want a normal winter life, too, and a high uptake of the booster programme is going to give us a much increased chance of doing that, in my view. hugo guy, i new�*s. thank you. obviously the delivery of this poster— thank you. obviously the delivery of this poster campaign— thank you. obviously the delivery of this poster campaign will— thank you. obviously the delivery of this poster campaign will be - thank you. obviously the delivery of this poster campaign will be done i thank you. obviously the delivery ofj this poster campaign will be done by the nhs, _ this poster campaign will be done by the nhs, but — this poster campaign will be done by the nhs, but professor— this poster campaign will be done by the nhs, but professor van - this poster campaign will be done by the nhs, but professor van tam, i this poster campaign will be done byl the nhs, but professorvan tam, can you just _ the nhs, but professorvan tam, can you just say— the nhs, but professorvan tam, can you just say something _ the nhs, but professorvan tam, can you just say something about - the nhs, but professorvan tam, can you just say something about how- you just say something about how soon _ you just say something about how soon you — you just say something about how soon you expect _ you just say something about how soon you expect this _ you just say something about how soon you expect this to _ you just say something about how soon you expect this to start, - you just say something about how| soon you expect this to start, how lon- soon you expect this to start, how long you _ soon you expect this to start, how long you expect— soon you expect this to start, how long you expect the _ soon you expect this to start, how long you expect the booster - soon you expect this to start, how - long you expect the booster campaign to -o long you expect the booster campaign to go on. _ long you expect the booster campaign to go on. and — long you expect the booster campaign to go on. and also— long you expect the booster campaign to go on, and also can _ long you expect the booster campaign to go on, and also can you _ long you expect the booster campaign to go on, and also can you say- to go on, and also can you say anything — to go on, and also can you say anything at _ to go on, and also can you say anything at all _ to go on, and also can you say anything at all about - to go on, and also can you say anything at all about where i to go on, and also can you say. anything at all about where these are going — anything at all about where these are going to— anything at all about where these are going to tre— anything at all about where these are going to be delivered, - anything at all about where these are going to be delivered, is - anything at all about where these are going to be delivered, is it. are going to be delivered, is it going — are going to be delivered, is it going to — are going to be delivered, is it going to be _ are going to be delivered, is it going to be necessary- are going to be delivered, is it going to be necessary to - are going to be delivered, is it going to be necessary to set . are going to be delivered, is itl going to be necessary to set up are going to be delivered, is it- going to be necessary to set up mass vaccination _ going to be necessary to set up mass vaccination hubs _ going to be necessary to set up mass vaccination hubs or— going to be necessary to set up mass vaccination hubs or can _ going to be necessary to set up mass vaccination hubs or can it— going to be necessary to set up mass vaccination hubs or can it be - going to be necessary to set up mass vaccination hubs or can it be done - vaccination hubs or can it be done within— vaccination hubs or can it be done within permanent _ vaccination hubs or can it be done within permanent infrastructure . vaccination hubs or can it be done| within permanent infrastructure at vaccination hubs or can it be done . within permanent infrastructure at a time when _ within permanent infrastructure at a time when the — within permanent infrastructure at a time when the nhs _ within permanent infrastructure at a time when the nhs is _ within permanent infrastructure at a time when the nhs is under- within permanent infrastructure at a time when the nhs is under a - within permanent infrastructure at a time when the nhs is under a lot. within permanent infrastructure at a time when the nhs is under a lot of| time when the nhs is under a lot of pressure _ time when the nhs is under a lot of pressure anyway? _ time when the nhs is under a lot of pressure anyway? i’m _ time when the nhs is under a lot of pressure anyway?— time when the nhs is under a lot of pressure anyway? i'm glad to answer that question- _ pressure anyway? i'm glad to answer that question. my _ pressure anyway? i'm glad to answer that question. my personal _ pressure anyway? i'm glad to answer that question. my personal view - pressure anyway? i'm glad to answer that question. my personal view is i that question. my personal view is this needs to start very quickly.
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the nhs has been planning for it for quite some time, months, and i would expect that, subject to ministerial go ahead, which at the moment i don't have, but the subject of that, i would expect them to be able to start in a short number of days, not a short number of weeks. i would expect the model, and again you should really ask the nhs for the proper details on this, but i fully expect the model to be a combination of mass vaccination centres and delivery through primary care. and of course the all—important domiciliary outreach to patients that can't reach normal health settings need to be visited in their own homes. in terms of how quickly can this proceed, there is a very clear understanding that it needs to proceed with good pace, and of course the advantage here, is that
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this time, patients only have to attend their vaccination location once, ratherthan attend their vaccination location once, rather than twice. attend their vaccination location once, ratherthan twice. so attend their vaccination location once, rather than twice. so the simple maths says that it's quite obvious that it should be possible to go faster, in the sense that there are not second doses to factor in, but really you need a qualified opinion from the nhs england, who have really been all over this for months. so i encourage you to reach out to them, and get some answers in detailfrom them. thank out to them, and get some answers in detail from them. thank you. out to them, and get some answers in detailfrom them. thank you. next question is sam from the sun. the ace question is sam from the sun. the age cut-off — question is sam from the sun. the age cut—off seems like quite a fine line, _ age cut—off seems like quite a fine line. can _ age cut—off seems like quite a fine line. can you— age cut—off seems like quite a fine line. can you say— age cut—off seems like quite a fine line, can you say what _ age cut—off seems like quite a fine line, can you say what data - age cut—off seems like quite a fine line, can you say what data you . age cut—off seems like quite a finei line, can you say what data you will be looking — line, can you say what data you will be looking at — line, can you say what data you will be looking at for— line, can you say what data you will be looking at for young _ line, can you say what data you will be looking at for young adults, - be looking at for young adults, considering _ be looking at for young adults, considering whether— be looking at for young adults, considering whether to- be looking at for young adults, considering whether to roll - be looking at for young adults, considering whether to roll out boosters — considering whether to roll out boosters for _ considering whether to roll out boosters for them, _ considering whether to roll out boosters for them, and - considering whether to roll outi boosters for them, and whether considering whether to roll out - boosters for them, and whether they can be _ boosters for them, and whether they can be assured — boosters for them, and whether they can be assured that _ boosters for them, and whether they can be assured that two _ boosters for them, and whether they can be assured that two doses - boosters for them, and whether they can be assured that two doses will i can be assured that two doses will be enough — can be assured that two doses will be enough to— can be assured that two doses will be enough to see _ can be assured that two doses will be enough to see them _ can be assured that two doses will be enough to see them through. can be assured that two doses will i be enough to see them through this winter? _ be enough to see them through this winter? and — be enough to see them through this winter? and also _ be enough to see them through this winter? and also early— be enough to see them through this winter? and also early in— be enough to see them through this winter? and also early in the - be enough to see them through this winter? and also early in the year, i winter? and also early in the year, there _ winter? and also early in the year, there was— winter? and also early in the year, there was some _ winter? and also early in the year, there was some talk _ winter? and also early in the year, there was some talk about - winter? and also early in the year, there was some talk about variant| there was some talk about variant specific— there was some talk about variant specific vaccines. _
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there was some talk about variant specific vaccines. how _ there was some talk about variant specific vaccines. how confident . there was some talk about variant i specific vaccines. how confident are you that _ specific vaccines. how confident are you that the — specific vaccines. how confident are you that the current _ specific vaccines. how confident are you that the current pfizer - specific vaccines. how confident are you that the current pfizerjab - specific vaccines. how confident are you that the current pfizerjab is - you that the current pfizerjab is future _ you that the current pfizerjab is future proofed _ you that the current pfizerjab is future proofed for _ you that the current pfizerjab is future proofed for the _ you that the current pfizerjab is future proofed for the next - you that the current pfizerjab is future proofed for the next six l future proofed for the next six months? _ future proofed for the next six months? . ~ future proofed for the next six months? . ,, , ., ~ , future proofed for the next six months? . ,, a future proofed for the next six months? . ,, ~ , . months? thank you. as you have robabl months? thank you. as you have probably worked _ months? thank you. as you have probably worked out _ months? thank you. as you have probably worked out from - months? thank you. as you have probably worked out from the - months? thank you. as you have i probably worked out from the slide that was shown earlier, people who are 50 years and below without underlying health conditions would have been offered a vaccine, a primary cause vaccine, much later, so they wouldn't have had their second dose until quite recently really. so even if they had immune responses that were similar to older adults, six months from their second dose would take them quite a long way into probably 2022 come into next year. so we have time to try and understand more, regarding how long the immune protection will last for, and when we have seen enough data, then we will be in a position
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to give further advice. what we don't want to do is for people to panic, and think that they need to have a booster dose straightaway because that may not be the case at all. regarding variant vaccines, there are variant vaccines in development. the clinical trials that looked at the third booster dose also were tested to see if they neutralised variance of concern. our on the immune response actually looked very, very good against variants of concern, so at the moment, at least, given the current generation of vaccines appears to still be very good against the known and major variants of concerns that we have now, clearly if there is a new variant that emerges, then we will have to understand what happens
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then. the next question is hannah at the express. in the next question is hannah at the exress. . , the next question is hannah at the exress. ., _, , ., express. in the last couple of weeks, seven _ express. in the last couple of weeks, seven gps _ express. in the last couple of weeks, seven gps were - express. in the last couple of i weeks, seven gps were affected express. in the last couple of - weeks, seven gps were affected by -- weeks, seven gps were affected by —— some _ weeks, seven gps were affected by —— some gps— weeks, seven gps were affected by —— some gps were — weeks, seven gps were affected by —— some gps were affected _ weeks, seven gps were affected by —— some gps were affected by— weeks, seven gps were affected by —— some gps were affected by delays - weeks, seven gps were affected by —— some gps were affected by delays to i some gps were affected by delays to the delivery— some gps were affected by delays to the delivery of— some gps were affected by delays to the delivery of the _ some gps were affected by delays to the delivery of the flu _ some gps were affected by delays to the delivery of the flu vaccine. - some gps were affected by delays to the delivery of the flu vaccine. are . the delivery of the flu vaccine. are you confident _ the delivery of the flu vaccine. are you confident that _ the delivery of the flu vaccine. are you confident that won't _ the delivery of the flu vaccine. are you confident that won't be - the delivery of the flu vaccine. are you confident that won't be a - the delivery of the flu vaccine. arel you confident that won't be a factor this winter. — you confident that won't be a factor this winter, and _ you confident that won't be a factor this winter, and secondly— you confident that won't be a factor this winter, and secondly recent. you confident that won't be a factor. this winter, and secondly recent nhs data suggests — this winter, and secondly recent nhs data suggests around _ this winter, and secondly recent nhs data suggests around 4% _ this winter, and secondly recent nhs data suggests around 4% of- this winter, and secondly recent nhs data suggests around 4% of people l data suggests around 4% of people might— data suggests around 4% of people might be _ data suggests around 4% of people might be vaccine _ data suggests around 4% of people might be vaccine hesitant. - data suggests around 4% of people might be vaccine hesitant. we - data suggests around 4% of people | might be vaccine hesitant. we have had really— might be vaccine hesitant. we have had really good _ might be vaccine hesitant. we have had really good up _ might be vaccine hesitant. we have had really good up lake _ might be vaccine hesitant. we have had really good up lake in- might be vaccine hesitant. we have had really good up lake in the - might be vaccine hesitant. we have had really good up lake in the uk. had really good up lake in the uk but do _ had really good up lake in the uk but do you — had really good up lake in the uk but do you have _ had really good up lake in the uk but do you have any _ had really good up lake in the uk but do you have any message - had really good up lake in the uk but do you have any message forj but do you have any message for people _ but do you have any message for people who — but do you have any message for people who still— but do you have any message for people who still haven't - but do you have any message for people who still haven't had - but do you have any message for people who still haven't had the| people who still haven't had the first or— people who still haven't had the first or second _ people who still haven't had the first or second dose? _ people who still haven't had the first or second dose? 0n- people who still haven't had the first or second dose?— first or second dose? on the flu vaccine delays, _ first or second dose? on the flu vaccine delays, that _ first or second dose? on the flu vaccine delays, that was - first or second dose? on the flu vaccine delays, that was from i first or second dose? on the flu i vaccine delays, that was from one manufacturer. my understanding is that delay is very short, one to two weeks. i have absolutely nothing to tell you that gives me any concern about the supply of the covid—i9 vaccine is required for the booster programme. in fact, vaccine is required for the booster programme. infact, i believe vaccine is required for the booster programme. in fact, i believe it to be extremely healthy and absolutely no constraints on that. and i have
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forgot the last bit of the question. for people who haven't had the first — for people who haven't had the first... . , . for people who haven't had the first... _ , . , first... yes yes. it remains the case that _ first... yes yes. it remains the case that going _ first... yes yes. it remains the case that going from _ first... yes yes. it remains the case that going from no - first... yes yes. it remains the - case that going from no protection at all against this virus to the protection given by those first two primary courses is always going to be more important in public health terms than boosting. it sounds crazy to say it at a briefing which is all about the booster programme, but it's actually true. and so from that perspective, the nhs has been very clear that the offer of a vaccination is evergreen for people who haven't yet taken advantage of it, and they can come forwards, and it, and they can come forwards, and it is still incredibly important. could i add to that, and thank you for raising that question, i am a clinician, and i see patients in hospital, as do a lot of my clinical colleagues, who have unfortunately been hospitalised because of
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covid—i9. a lot of them currently are people who have not been vaccinated at all, whether with one or two doses, and some of them, unfortunately, are very, very ill. i have spoken to patients who have survived an intensive care admission because of covid—i9, and during recovery we spent a long time chatting, and they ask me, when can i have my covid vaccine now? and of course we want them to wait until they have recovered from their illness before we offer them a covid vaccine, but the important thing is if only they had asked that question before they became seriously ill and ended up in intensive care, because we want people to be as well protected as possible. and it is always heartbreaking when you see somebody who is admitted to very, very unwell, and they didn't avail
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themselves of something that would have protected themselves from such a severe disease. i’m have protected themselves from such a severe disease.— a severe disease. i'm going to take one more question _ a severe disease. i'm going to take one more question from _ a severe disease. i'm going to take one more question from the - a severe disease. i'm going to take - one more question from the gentleman at the back. could you introduce yourself? at the back. could you introduce ourself? �* . . at the back. could you introduce ourself? . . . ., , yourself? alice tai from reuters news agency- — yourself? alice tai from reuters news agency. you _ yourself? alice tai from reuters news agency. you have - yourself? alice tai from reuters news agency. you have been - yourself? alice tai from reuters. news agency. you have been very candid _ news agency. you have been very candid about _ news agency. you have been very candid about the _ news agency. you have been very candid about the fact _ news agency. you have been very candid about the fact it _ news agency. you have been very candid about the fact it is- candid about the fact it is uncertain— candid about the fact it is uncertain how— candid about the fact it is uncertain how long - candid about the fact it is- uncertain how long protection will last, uncertain how long protection will last. beyond _ uncertain how long protection will last. beyond six— uncertain how long protection will last, beyond six months, - uncertain how long protection will last, beyond six months, but- uncertain how long protection will last, beyond six months, but said you want— last, beyond six months, but said you want a — last, beyond six months, but said you want a precautionary - last, beyond six months, but said i you want a precautionary approach. this doesn't — you want a precautionary approach. this doesn't mean— you want a precautionary approach. this doesn't mean there _ you want a precautionary approach. this doesn't mean there is - this doesn't mean there is necessarily— this doesn't mean there is necessarily going - this doesn't mean there is necessarily going to - this doesn't mean there is necessarily going to be - this doesn't mean there is - necessarily going to be boosters in the years _ necessarily going to be boosters in the years going _ necessarily going to be boosters in the years going forward. _ necessarily going to be boosters in the years going forward. i'm - necessarily going to be boosters in the years going forward. i'm just. the years going forward. i'm just wondering — the years going forward. i'm just wondering how— the years going forward. i'm just wondering how we _ the years going forward. i'm just wondering how we are _ the years going forward. i'm just wondering how we are going - the years going forward. i'm just wondering how we are going to i the years going forward. i'm just- wondering how we are going to break out of— wondering how we are going to break out of the _ wondering how we are going to break out of the cycle — wondering how we are going to break out of the cycle of _ wondering how we are going to break out of the cycle of constantly- out of the cycle of constantly boosting. _ out of the cycle of constantly boosting. if— out of the cycle of constantly boosting, if this _ out of the cycle of constantly boosting, if this time - out of the cycle of constantly boosting, if this time next i out of the cycle of constantly. boosting, if this time next year out of the cycle of constantly- boosting, if this time next year we are still— boosting, if this time next year we are still taking _ boosting, if this time next year we are still taking a _ boosting, if this time next year we are still taking a precautionary- are still taking a precautionary approach _ are still taking a precautionary approach because _ are still taking a precautionary approach because we - are still taking a precautionary approach because we boosted| are still taking a precautionary- approach because we boosted everyone last year. _ approach because we boosted everyone last year. we _ approach because we boosted everyone last year. we don't— approach because we boosted everyone last year, we don't have _ approach because we boosted everyone last year, we don't have enough - last year, we don't have enough data, _ last year, we don't have enough data. and — last year, we don't have enough data, and then _ last year, we don't have enough data, and then more _ last year, we don't have enough data, and then more and - last year, we don't have enough data, and then more and more. last year, we don't have enough - data, and then more and more vaccine -ets data, and then more and more vaccine gets sucked _ data, and then more and more vaccine gets sucked into — data, and then more and more vaccine gets sucked into the _ data, and then more and more vaccine gets sucked into the developed - gets sucked into the developed world, — gets sucked into the developed world, doing _ gets sucked into the developed world, doing boosters - gets sucked into the developed world, doing boosters and - gets sucked into the developed world, doing boosters and noti gets sucked into the developed i world, doing boosters and not to people _ world, doing boosters and not to people who _ world, doing boosters and not to people who aren't _ world, doing boosters and not to people who aren't vaccinated? . world, doing boosters and not toi people who aren't vaccinated? so people who aren't vaccinated? fl: thatis people who aren't vaccinated? that is a very, very important question, and when we have been wrestling with for a long time, and still are. we certainly don't want
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to be in a situation where we are taking a precautionary stance every six months and wondering if we ever can break out of the cycle. that would not be a good position to be in. we want to understand just how long protection lasts for. there are major efforts being taken to understand how the measured immune response is, so things we can —— immune responses correlate with things against severe covid—i9, and if we have such correlate of protection, it becomes easier to measure immune responses to people, and then have some sort of protection —— projection as to whether further boosters are required. and how soon after. the other thing of interest is whether the third booster dose by giving such high levels of immune responses might last even longer than the
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second dose. 50 whilst the second dose, we have started to see some hints of some loss, although not very much, it may be that with the third dose, that is pushed out even further to many, many more months. that is certainly something to be encouraged about. the last thing i would say is we don't really know how natural infection will help in giving us mini boosts on their own. you can imagine a situation where somebody has had natural infection first, and then a vaccine, we find there measured immune response is very, very good. in the same is true the other way round.— the other way round. goodbye to viewers on _ the other way round. goodbye to viewers on bbc _ the other way round. goodbye to viewers on bbc two, _ the other way round. goodbye to viewers on bbc two, we - the other way round. goodbye to viewers on bbc two, we will - the other way round. goodbye to - viewers on bbc two, we will continue listening to this booster briefing here on the bbc news channel. 50 here on the bbc news channel. sr that they continually have a high level of immunity that protects them against severe disease, whilst they
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might get a milder illness. 50 against severe disease, whilst they might get a milder illness.- might get a milder illness. so that is a ve , might get a milder illness. so that is a very. very _ might get a milder illness. so that is a very, very comprehensive - might get a milder illness. so that i is a very, very comprehensive answer from wei shen, one which i agree with entirely, and, you know, the jcvi advice today is bespoke. it is for this winter only, and we will askjcvi to keep on coming back to this question until the whole world, indeed, has settled into some kind of normality, in terms of having to live with this virus. but now is not that time. the pandemic is still in its final, i hope final, active stage, and therefore we are under special measures, if you like, including asking jcvi to look at what we need to do this winter. but in time i suspect it will settle down exactly as wei shen has said. i don't know if i'm allowed to keep on taking questions, but go on. izzg
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taking questions, but go on. izzy roberts from _ taking questions, but go on. izzy roberts from the daily telegraph. if someone _ roberts from the daily telegraph. if someone in — roberts from the daily telegraph. if someone in this _ roberts from the daily telegraph. if someone in this group _ roberts from the daily telegraph. if someone in this group chooses i roberts from the daily telegraph. if someone in this group chooses noti roberts from the daily telegraph. if. someone in this group chooses not to take up— someone in this group chooses not to take up the _ someone in this group chooses not to take up the booster, _ someone in this group chooses not to take up the booster, would _ someone in this group chooses not to take up the booster, would you - take up the booster, would you consider— take up the booster, would you consider them _ take up the booster, would you consider them not _ take up the booster, would you consider them not fully- take up the booster, would you i consider them not fully vaccinated, and then— consider them not fully vaccinated, and then any— consider them not fully vaccinated, and then any covid _ consider them not fully vaccinated, and then any covid pass _ consider them not fully vaccinated, and then any covid pass they- and then any covid pass they currently _ and then any covid pass they currently have _ and then any covid pass they currently have would - and then any covid pass they| currently have would become and then any covid pass they- currently have would become invalid? there _ currently have would become invalid? there is _ currently have would become invalid? there is no _ currently have would become invalid? there is no current _ currently have would become invalid? there is no current consideration- currently have would become invalid? there is no current consideration of. there is no current consideration of covert certification, in terms of the booster dose.— covert certification, in terms of the booster dose. ~ ., , ., , the booster dose. would you consider that they wouldn't _ the booster dose. would you consider that they wouldn't be _ the booster dose. would you consider that they wouldn't be fully _ that they wouldn't be fully vaccinated _ that they wouldn't be fully vaccinated without? - that they wouldn't be fully vaccinated without? [- that they wouldn't be fully vaccinated without? ., . ., , vaccinated without? i would consider the don't vaccinated without? i would consider they don't have _ vaccinated without? i would consider they don't have the _ vaccinated without? i would consider they don't have the optional- vaccinated without? i would consider they don't have the optional -- i they don't have the optional —— optimal protection on board as a scientist. whether there will be a ministerial decision over what constitutes covert certification or not is something that boosters —— ministers need to decide on the future, but that is a long way off, because you can't put in those kind of rules until everyone has had the opportunity to be brought forward and offered the vaccine in the first place. so i am kicking the can down the road on that. can be very clear
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that i think that person was not optimally protected, if the jcvi that i think that person was not optimally protected, if thejcvi had advised they should be, but in terms of what the government, what ministers decide on, in terms of future covert passports is not a matter we can really go into today. the final question.— matter we can really go into today. the final question. tom harvard gb news. the final question. tom harvard gb news- there _ the final question. tom harvard gb news. there has _ the final question. tom harvard gb news. there has been _ the final question. tom harvard gb news. there has been a _ the final question. tom harvard gb news. there has been a lot - the final question. tom harvard gb news. there has been a lot of- news. there has been a lot of discussion— news. there has been a lot of discussion about _ news. there has been a lot of discussion about different i news. there has been a lot of- discussion about different vaccines having _ discussion about different vaccines having different _ discussion about different vaccines having different longevity, - discussion about different vaccines having different longevity, in i discussion about different vaccines| having different longevity, in terms of how _ having different longevity, in terms of how protective _ having different longevity, in terms of how protective they _ having different longevity, in terms of how protective they are, - having different longevity, in terms of how protective they are, and i having different longevity, in terms . of how protective they are, and some suggestions _ of how protective they are, and some suggestions that _ of how protective they are, and some suggestions that the _ of how protective they are, and some suggestions that the astrazeneca i suggestions that the astrazeneca vaccine _ suggestions that the astrazeneca vaccine might— suggestions that the astrazeneca vaccine might actually— suggestions that the astrazeneca vaccine might actually be - suggestions that the astrazeneca vaccine might actually be lastingi suggestions that the astrazeneca i vaccine might actually be lasting a bit longer— vaccine might actually be lasting a bit longer than _ vaccine might actually be lasting a bit longer than mrna— vaccine might actually be lasting a bit longer than mrna vaccines. i vaccine might actually be lasting a i bit longer than mrna vaccines. was this something _ bit longer than mrna vaccines. was this something that _ bit longer than mrna vaccines. was this something that had _ bit longer than mrna vaccines. was this something that had been- this something that had been considered _ this something that had been considered at _ this something that had been considered at all— this something that had been considered at all in _ this something that had been considered at all in your- considered at all in your deliberations? - considered at all in your deliberations? [- considered at all in your deliberations?— considered at all in your deliberations? i think that's actually quite _ deliberations? i think that's actually quite difficult i deliberations? i think that's actually quite difficult to i deliberations? i think that's i actually quite difficult to answer. we don't really know how long the duration of protection is for most vaccines. you have seen some data we have presented here, and it brings us back to the point that the primary aim of the covid—i9 vaccine
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programme is to protect against severe disease. there are a lot of data regarding protection against symptomatic cases, but i don't think we can stop symptomatic cases completely, whereas we want a higher level of protection against hospitalisation and people dying, and that's really where we want to focus on. so asking that question of different vaccines, with regards to hospitalisation, is much more difficult. ~ . ~ hospitalisation, is much more difficult. ~ . ,, difficult. ok. well, thank you, june, difficult. ok. well, thank you, june. thank— difficult. ok. well, thank you, june, thank you _ difficult. ok. well, thank you, june, thank you wei _ difficult. ok. well, thank you, june, thank you wei shen, i difficult. ok. well, thank you, i june, thank you wei shen, thank you june, thank you wei shen, thank you for coming, nice to see some of you, and this briefing is now closed. studio: so the deputy chief medical officerfor england studio: so the deputy chief medical officer for england professor jonathan van tam bringing that to a close, saying this booster plan was bespoke for this winter only. right at the beginning of that briefing, he said that we are still in the active phase of the pandemic. it will be bumpy at times. so the mantra he said was to stay on top of
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things. let's get the view of our health correspondent anna collinson. just pick out if you would a lot of detail there, the key points. abs, lat detail there, the key points. a lot of detail. detail there, the key points. a lot of detail- so _ detail there, the key points. a lot of detail. so as _ detail there, the key points. a lot of detail. so as we _ detail there, the key points. a lot of detail. so as we already i detail there, the key points. lot of detail. so as we already knew, of detail. 50 as we already knew, the government wants the vaccines to do the heavy lifting this winter. we have only heard about the vaccination of 12 to is—year—olds, and now we're talking about the booster campaign. we first started hearing about that at the end of june, when we got interim advice from the uk's advisory panel on vaccines, and the nhs has been working on a booster programme since then. now, three months on, we've got more clarity, and so this includes around 30 million people in the uk. those aged over 50, those living and working in care homes, health workers, and over 165 with underlying health conditions, which puts them at risk of covid. now that might sound quite similar to when we went back to december, january time, phase one, and it is, it is similar to that group, and the reason these people are required to get this third booster vaccine is because it
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is feared their immunity may be waning slightly. the vaccine is still likely to work against serious illness but they want to boost that immunity. illness but they want to boost that immuni . �* . , illness but they want to boost that immuni . �* ., . illness but they want to boost that immuni . . ., . , . immunity. and there was a preference for as they are — immunity. and there was a preference for as they are known _ immunity. and there was a preference for as they are known mrna - immunity. and there was a preference for as they are known mrna vaccines, we are talking about the pfizer biontech or the moderna vaccines, and we were told that because? basically the rha said pfizer, madonna and astrazeneca were all used as boosterjabs but thejcvi said that based on new data, the mrna vaccines were preferable for a booster dose. it seems they give a particularly good immune response, and that is regardless of whether you previously had pfizer or astrazeneca. so as i said, that is preferable, but the message from the m rha is that the astrazeneca jab is still good, still safe and if you were required to have that as a booster it would still be ok. so no earlier after _ booster it would still be ok. so no earlier after the _ booster it would still be ok. so no earlier after the six _ booster it would still be ok. so no earlier after the six months i booster it would still be ok. so no earlier after the six months after i earlier after the six months after the second dose, so that is the time spanif the second dose, so that is the time span if you are eligible for a booster, and jonathan van tam briefly just saying booster, and jonathan van tam brieflyjust saying he would like this to happen within days, to start
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happening within days, rather than weeks. ~ , , happening within days, rather than weeks. ~ , happening within days, rather than weeks. , ,, weeks. absolutely, as i say, the nhs have been preparing _ weeks. absolutely, as i say, the nhs have been preparing for— weeks. absolutely, as i say, the nhs have been preparing for this - weeks. absolutely, as i say, the nhs have been preparing for this for i have been preparing for this for months, so asjonathan van tam said, he is really keen to get this going as soon as possible, as he put it, to keep the lid on covid, because there is a lot facing the nhs this winter. . ~' , ., , there is a lot facing the nhs this winter. . ,, , ., , . ~ . winter. thank you very much, anna. let me just — winter. thank you very much, anna. let me just tell _ winter. thank you very much, anna. let me just tell you, _ winter. thank you very much, anna. let me just tell you, having - winter. thank you very much, anna. let me just tell you, having seen i let me just tell you, having seen that briefing, that at around 12:30pm, the health secretary sajid javid will outline the government's plans to deal with coronavirus over the autumn and winter months, and we will bring you that live as well. but right now i am joined by kevin courtney. kevin courtney isjoint general secretary of the national education union. we are talking about the news that children aged 12 to 15 will be offered a single vaccine dose from next week, and broadly, are you happy about this plan, kevin? itrefoil. happy about this plan, kevin? well, we are not the _ happy about this plan, kevin? well, we are not the medical _ happy about this plan, kevin? in we are not the medical experts, but we are not the medical experts, but we try and follow the science. we have heard thejcvi said there was a
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net benefit, it is small. we have the chief medical officer saying this could really impact on reducing disruption in schools, and that's what we'd been calling for, is measures that can reduce disruption in schools, so i think a lot of teachers and school support staff will be pleased that this decision has been made. we will hope that parents agree for children to come forward and hope that it can impact on reducing disruption. yes. forward and hope that it can impact on reducing disruption.— on reducing disruption. yes, as you sa , it is on reducing disruption. yes, as you say. it is about _ on reducing disruption. yes, as you say, it is about reducing _ say, it is about reducing disruption, ratherthan say, it is about reducing disruption, rather than any hugely measurable health benefit for this age group, who are unlikely, as we know, to suffer any terrible effects from covid, the vast majority, thankfully. so what about the actual implementation of this vaccination programme, then? our school is ready to accommodate this? itrefoil. programme, then? our school is ready to accommodate this?— to accommodate this? well, school sites are used _ to accommodate this? well, school sites are used regularly _ to accommodate this? well, school sites are used regularly as - to accommodate this? well, school sites are used regularly as part i to accommodate this? well, school sites are used regularly as part of. sites are used regularly as part of this country's childhood vaccination programme, so there is some experience of it. obviously, it is a new vaccine, a new vaccination, but
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schools are being used to being used as sites. it is wise the nhs staff who do the jabbing, but schools can create a bit of the framework around it, and schools will be very willing to do that. i think they will want to do that. i think they will want to make sure that the government is taking the lead on the public health messaging, and taking the lead on any questions about consent, and i think parental consent we think is important, and it is for government to talk about that.— to talk about that. invariably, thou~h, to talk about that. invariably, though. a _ to talk about that. invariably, though. a lot _ to talk about that. invariably, though, a lot of _ to talk about that. invariably, though, a lot of questions i to talk about that. invariably, | though, a lot of questions will to talk about that. invariably, i though, a lot of questions will be directed from parents and carers towards teachers, and around that issue of consent, and for example if a child may want to have the vaccine, and the parent doesn't want them to have the vaccine, so do you foresee lots of difficult conversations that will take up teaching time around that particular issue? i teaching time around that particular issue? ~' ,., teaching time around that particular issue? ,, ,., ., , issue? i think some of this will disru -t issue? i think some of this will disrupt education _ issue? i think some of this will disrupt education in _ issue? i think some of this will disrupt education in its - issue? i think some of this will disrupt education in its own i issue? i think some of this will i disrupt education in its own way, the vaccination programme itself well, and those sorts of
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conversations may, but we really hope that will be a lot less than the disruption at the other end. we do think it is important that government doesn'tjust rely on vaccination, and chris whitty said yesterday this is a useful tool but not a panacea. he said it is not a silver bullet to stop all the disruption, so we want to carry on pressing the government on the co2 monitors, on having filtration. because as you said, children by and large are not badly affected by the disease, but they will still have to stay home if they test positive, disrupting their education, and that's notjust disrupting their time in the classroom, it is also meaning they lose time in the playground, they lose their swimming lessons, they lose their friendship development, and that does have a real impact on children. so we want to work to try and avoid that disruption. 50 to work to try and avoid that disruption-— to work to try and avoid that disruption. to work to try and avoid that disru tion. , ., . ,, ., disruption. so 'ust going back to that oint disruption. so 'ust going back to that point on — disruption. so just going back to that point on the _ disruption. so just going back to that point on the question i disruption. so just going back to that point on the question of. that point on the question of consent and conversations that parents and carers may be having
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with teachers, are you issuing any particular advice to teachers about how to handle that sort of scenario? do you know, we have sent that materials, addressing vaccine hesitancy, and urging our members to use that with children. that was for the general stage. we will pass on the general stage. we will pass on the government public health advice, you know, it is important that we don't put ourselves in place as the medical experts, so the public health advice has to come from government, orfrom those health advice has to come from government, or from those senior medical bodies. teachers are always willing to talk to children about these sorts of issues. as i understand it, the question of consent, it is a very small number of cases where a parent and child don't reach the same decision, and then, if there is a different decision, that is not something a teacher can be involved in resolving, or any other member of school staff, school support staff.
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it's only an issue that doctors, medically trained people, can be part of resolving, if there is a difference of view between the child and the parent. difference of view between the child and the parent-— let's just look and review what we have been hearing at that booster briefing on the last few minutes, medical experts are recommending about 30 million people in the uk should be offered a booster covid vaccine this autumn and winter. it comes ahead of a government announcement on its plan to manage the pandemic in england over the coming months. thejcvi, the uk's advisory body on vaccinations, recommends everyone over the age of 50, health care workers and other individuals with underlying health conditions be given anotherjab. it says the booster dose should be given no sooner than six months after the second dose. the moderna, pfizer, and astrazeneca vaccines can safely be used as booster doses, and can be given at the same time as a flu jab.
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we will be hearing from the health secretary sajid javid in the house of commons in a few minutes, also we are expecting the prime minister to give a briefing at 3:30pm to talk about the government's plan for the autumn and winter. russian president vladimir putin is self—isolating, after members of his entourage fell ill with covid—i9. he had been due to travel to tajikistan for high level security talks but the kremlin said he would now attend via video link instead. mr putin has been fully vaccinated with the russian sputnik vaccine. prince andrew's lawyers have told a pre—trial hearing that legal action accusing him of sexual assault is "baseless" and should be dismissed. virginia giuffre has launched a civil lawsuit over the alleged abuse, which she says happened two decades ago, when she was 17. the duke of york has consistently denied ms giuffre's claims.
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0ur north america correspondent nada tawfik sent this report. well, this first hearing really centred more on procedure, rather than the allegations. those allegations, of course, virginia giuffre accusing prince andrew of sexually assaulting her in london, new york and the us virgin islands, when she was just 17 years old. now the duke of york has strenuously denied those allegations, even saying he has no recollection of ever meeting virginia giuffre. but in court, it really did focus on the steps ahead. prince andrew's attorney told the court he had two main arguments. first, that the papers were not properly served to the duke of york, that the uk high court had to weigh in on the legality of service. and secondly, he said they believed this lawsuit was potentially unlawful and baseless. and what they said they wanted was to see a 2009 settlement
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agreement between virginia giuffre and jeffrey epstein. now, they believe there is a release in that agreement, which would absolve the duke of york of any legal obligation. now, virginia giuffre's attorneys, in response, said they thought that was a mischaracterisation of that settlement. they also said if prince andrew does feel that he was not properly served, that he needs to put in a formal motion through the court, so that could be litigated. the judge will hear oral arguments in october, october 13, and that will be in person. the next chance these parties will have to once again debate whether this case can get under way. now it's time for a look
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at the weather, with helen willetts. a lot of us getting rather damp on the way to work. absolutely, quite a lot of rain falling, potentially half a month's worth in places, this is how the radar is looking, the rainfall at the moment. for wales and the south—west it is drier, for some parts of north—west scotland and northern ireland, but for parts of eastern england, central and eastern england, it will stay pretty wet for the rest of the afternoon. so that's why i've talked about perhaps as much as a0 millimetres of rain, if not more, in places. quite pleasant and quite warm and western areas but obviously quite cool where we have all that rain, which will continue into this evening before it clears out the way overnight. still some showers in the north—west of scotland actually, a weather front starts to creep in here, but i think the main thing overnight, some mist and fog around as we wake up tomorrow morning, which will need to clear, and some low cloud as well. the question over how much cloud will get over eastern areas tomorrow
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but much drier. instead, cloudy skies for parts of scotland, western scotland and northern ireland. more in half an hour, so you then. hello, this is bbc news with anita mcveigh. the headlines: everyone in the uk over the age of 50, as well as healthcare workers and other individuals with underlying health conditions, should be offered a boosterjab this winter, experts have recommended. since we began deploying these vaccines, they have probably averted in the region of 2a million cases of covid—i9 in the uk. and average at around 112,000 deaths, so incredibly successful. it's part of the government's autumn and winter plan for managing covid — measures to tackle covid in england over the coming months will be outlined later this afternoon. meanwhile, vaccinations for children aged 12 to 15 will go ahead in england and in wales,
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it's been confirmed. lawyers for prince andrew tell a court in new york that sexual assault allegations filed against him are "baseless and potentially unlawful". job vacancies have hit a record high, rising above a million for the first time since records began, according to officialfigures. the health secretary, sajid javid, is due to get to his feet in the house of commons shortly, where he will outline the government's plans to deal with coronavirus over the autumn and winter months. we can cross over to westminster now. let's speak to our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. it sounds very like what the prime minister is going to be doing this afternoon. , afternoon. yes, when the prime minister has _ afternoon. yes, when the prime minister has been _ afternoon. yes, when the prime minister has been doing - afternoon. yes, when the prime minister has been doing a - afternoon. yes, when the prime minister has been doing a press| minister has been doing a press
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conference, this speaker has said, hang on, could you tell mps beforehand or at so now the government has got into the habit of giving details the mp5 first. one of the first thing sajid javid will have to do is quite procedural, which is to say if he is accepting the advice on the booster campaign for the over—505. this morning, the scientist from the jcvi and for the over—505. this morning, the scientist from thejcvi and the deputy chief medical officer have put forward a recommendation for the booster programme, but they only advise, ministers decide, so we will have to hear from sajid javid that the government is accepting the recommendation, but it is safe to say they will. psi recommendation, but it is safe to say they will-— say they will. at this stage it is about the _ say they will. at this stage it is about the government - say they will. at this stage it is l about the government reminding say they will. at this stage it is - about the government reminding the public as much as anything that the pandemic isn't over and keeping measures in the public consciousness, so repeating them and getting those ideas in everyone's mines. it getting those ideas in everyone's mines. . , ,
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mines. it was interesting in the statement _ mines. it was interesting in the statement that _ mines. it was interesting in the statement that downing - mines. it was interesting in the statement that downing street| mines. it was interesting in the . statement that downing street put out overnight, saying that the pandemic is going to last for quite a long time yet, and if you compare that's at the start of this whole issue, he said that we could send covid packing injust i2 issue, he said that we could send covid packing injust 12 weeks. we have learnt over the last few months it is human behaviour that drives the virus just as much as it is the big structural things like what restrictions are in place and what the vaccine programme is doing. vaccines are very much plan a, and what the government is pinning their hopes on. what we will get from sajid javid in a few minutes and the prime minister in a few hours is plan b, what are the measures on potential restrictions and tactics and tools that are being left in the locker to deal with various scenarios.— locker to deal with various scenarios. ., ., ~ , ., ., scenarios. karen, thank you for that. ithink— scenarios. karen, thank you for that. i think as _ scenarios. karen, thank you for that. i think as we _ scenarios. karen, thank you for that. i think as we look - scenarios. karen, thank you for that. i think as we look at - scenarios. karen, thank you for that. i think as we look at the l that. i think as we look at the house of commons, that we are about to see the health secretary, sajid
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javid, get to his feet to give us a statement. i'm sure the whole house would wish to join with me to give our commiserations to the prime minister on the loss of his mother yesterday. mr speaker, with permission, i would like to make a statement on the pandemic and our autumn and winter plan to manage the risk of covid—i9. over the past few months we have been making progress down the road to recovery, carefully and cautiously moving closer to normal life. as we do this, we have been working hard to strengthen our defences against this deadly virus. we have been continuing to roll out of a vaccination programme with 81% of a vaccination programme with 81% of people over the age of 16 having had the protection of both doses. we have expanded our testing capacity yet further, opening a new mega— lab
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in leamington spa, and we have continued supporting research into long covid, taking the total investment to £15 billion. thanks to this determined effort, we have made some major steps forward. the link between cases, hospitalisations and deaths has weakened significantly since the start of the pandemic, and deaths from covid—19 have been mercifully low compared to previous waves. but we must be vigilant, as autumn and winter are favourable conditions for covid—19 and other seasonal viruses. children have returned to school, more and more people are returning to work. the changing weather means that there will be more people perhaps spending time indoors and there is likely to be a lot of non—covid command on the nhs, including flu and norovirus. today, keeping our commitment to this house, i would like to provide
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an update on our review of preparedness for autumn and winter. the plan shows how we will give this nation and the best possible chance of living with covid without the need for stringent social and economic restrictions. there are five pillars to this plan. first, further strengthening our pharmaceutical defences, like vaccines. the latest statistics from the ons show that almost 99% of covid—19 deaths in the first half of this year were people who had not received both doses of covid—19 vaccine. this shows the importance of our vaccination programme and by extending this programme further we can protect even more people. almost 6 million people over the age of 16 remain unvaccinated in the uk and the more people that are unvaccinated, the larger the holes in our collective defences, so we
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will renew our efforts to maximise uptake amongst those who are eligible but have not yet, for whatever reason, taken up the offer. next, we have been planning our booster doses, too. like with many other vaccines, there is evidence that the protection offered by covid—19 vaccine reduces over time, particularly in older people who are at greater risk. 50 booster doses are an important way of keeping the virus under control for the long term. this morning we published the jcvi's advice on a booster programme. they have recommended that people who were vaccinated in phase one, that is priority groups 1-9, phase one, that is priority groups 1—9, should be offered a booster vaccine, that this vaccine should be offered no earlier than six months after the completion of the primary vaccine course and that, as far as possible, the booster programme should be deployed in the same order
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as phase one. i can confirm that having accepted thejcvi's advice and that the nhs is preparing to offer booster doses from next week. the nhs will contact people at the right time and nobody needs to come forward at this point stop this booster programme will protect the most vulnerable through the winter months and strengthen our wall of defence even further. as well as this, we will be extending the offer of about covid—19 vaccines even more people as the minister for vaccine deployments announced yesterday and the house, and thank you, mr speaker, for allowing him to make that statement yesterday. all young people over 16 have been offered the vaccination to give them protection as they return to school. yesterday, the chief medical officers in the uk unanimously recommended offering a first dose of a vaccine for people
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between 12—15. the government has accepted this recommendation, too, and will move with urgency to put this into action. we are also seeing great advances in the use of antivirals and therapeutics. several covid—19 treatments are already available through the nhs and antiviral task force is leading the search for breakthroughs in antivirals which have so much more potential to offer. second, testing, tracing and self isolation have been another vital defence. over the autumn and winter, pcr testing for those with covid—19 symptoms and contacts of confirmed cases will continue to be available free of charge. regular asymptomatic testing, which identifies currently around a quarter of all reported cases, will also continue in the coming months. the focus on those who are not fully vaccinated,
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perhaps those in education or another higher risk settings. and contact tracing will continue through the nhs test and trace system. we don't want to face hardship as they carry out their duty to self—isolate, so for those who are still required to self—isolate, we will keep offering practical and financial support to people who are eligible and need assistance and we will review these regulations and the support by the end of march 2022. our third pillar is that we are supporting the nhs and social care. last week, i announced a £5.a billion injection for the nhs to support the covid—19 response over the next six months, including £1 billion extra to tackle the elective backlog caused by covid—19. we have also launched a consultation on protecting vulnerable patients by making covid—19 and flu vaccination is a condition of deployment for front
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line health care staff and wider social care workers in england. we are already making this a condition of deployment for people in cqc registered adult care homes and although we are keeping an open mind and we won't be making a final decision until he and we won't be making a final decision until be fully considered the results of the consultation, i believe that it is highly likely that front line nhs staff and those working in wider social care settings will also have to be vaccinated to protect those that are around them and that this will be an important step in protecting those at greatest risk. fourth, we will keep encouraging people to take steps to keep seasonal illnesses a day, including flu and covid—19. the best that we can all take is to get vaccinations for covid—19 and flu if eligible. so vaccinations for covid—19 and flu if eligible. 50 along with our covid—19 vaccination programme, the next few months will see the largest ever flu vaccination campaign this country has ever seen. our plan also sets
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out a number of changes we can all make to our daily routines, like meeting outdoors where possible, or if you need to be indoors, trying to let in fresh air. wearing a facemask in enclosed spaces, where you can come into contact with people that you don't normally meet. mr speaker, our fifth pillar is you don't normally meet. mr speaker, ourfifth pillar is how you don't normally meet. mr speaker, our fifth pillar is how we will look beyond our shores and pursue an international approach. last week i attended a g20 health ministers meeting and i met counterparts from across the world and i talked about the part that we will be planning to lead the global effort to accelerate vaccines and diagnostics. as we do this, we will maintain our strong defences at the border, allowing us to identify and respond to variants of concern. it is these defences and the progress of vaccination campaigns both here and abroad that have allowed us to manage the risks
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and to start carefully reopening international travel once again. we have already relaxed the rules for fully vaccinated travellers and i asked the cma to review the issue of exploitative behaviour in the private testing market. this review reported last week and i'm looking into what further action we can take. i can also update honourable members that on top of these measures we will be publishing a new framework for international travel and the transport secretary will be announcing more details ahead of the formal review on the 1st of october. thanks to the defences we have built, we have been able to remove many of the regulations that have governed our daily lives, rules that were unprecedented but necessary and our plan shows how we will be removing more of these powers while maintaining those that are essential for a response. this includes expiring more of the powers in the coronavirus act, so for example the
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power is directing the temporary closure of educational institutions. the remaining provisions will be those that are critical to the government's response of the pandemic, for example, making sure that the nhs is properly resourced answer —— and supporting statutory soap —— sick pay for those who are self isolating. the plan before the house today is our plan a, a comprehensive plan to steer this country through the autumn and winter. but we see how quickly this virus can adapt and change, so we have prepared a plan b of contingency measures that we can call upon only if they are needed and supported by the data to prevent unsustainable pressure on the nhs. these measures would be communicating clearly and urgently to the public the need for caution. legally mandating face coverings in certain settings. and whilst we are not going ahead with mandatory vaccine only # certification now, we
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will hold a power in reserve. as well as these three steps, we will consider a further measure of asking people to work from home if they can for a limited time if that is supported by the data. any responsible government must prepare for all eventualities and although these measures are not an outcome that anyone wants, we need to be ready for it, just in case. mr speaker, eversince ready for it, just in case. mr speaker, ever since we published our road map to recovery seven months ago, we have been carefully but cautiously getting this nation closer to normal life. now we have come so far, we have achieved so much, we must stay vigilant as we approach this critical chapter so that we can protect the progress that we can protect the progress that we can protect the progress that we have all made together. i commend the statement to the house. shadow secretary of state, jonathan ashworth. i thank the secretary of state for advance out of his
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statement. i want to extend my condolences to the prime minister and the widerjohnson family at this difficult time. infection levels today are higher than they were at this time last year. so the test of his plan a and his plan b is whether we can push infections down, minimise sickness and save lives, keep schools open, protect care homes, maintain access to all care in the national health service and avoid a winter lockdown. he has talked about a plan b. can he tell us what level of infection and hospitalisations does he think would trigger plan d? yesterday, downing street briefed about a lockdown as last resort. what then is first resort in combating the virus to avoid a winter lockdown? will he rule out today local and regional
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lockdowns, like we saw in my city of leicester, or in bolton and parts of west yorkshire last year? on vaccination, last night we have confirmation of the vaccine programme for children. we welcome and support that. he has now confirmed a boosterjab, as well. we welcome that and support that. how will he boost vaccines in those areas of the country where a vaccine take—up remains relatively low? for example, bradford, the second doses are running at around 65%, burnley 69%, leicester 61%. what support will be made available for those areas and others so they can boost vaccine take—up? vaccinating children is often justified vaccine take—up? vaccinating children is oftenjustified in my view wrongly, in the view of its impact on adults. surely children would be helped by the vaccine ——
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vaccination rates being posted in adults. what is he going to do to vaccinate more younger adults? what campaign will he run to get those vaccination rates up? what is the plan for those who are immunosuppressed, who have shielded throughout this crisis. one example, there were 1 million cancer patients who can produce an immune response to vaccines. will they be offered prophylactic antibody treatment is not available, or will they be expected to shield further throughout the winter? he is right to raise flu and seasonal viruses, but he will know that the australian flu season has been minimal, but that impacts the ability to collect samples to make an appropriate vaccine for the strains that might hit us. is he confident of the effectiveness of the flu vaccine to match this year's strain? on test and trace, flu, we are likely to see
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more common colds and coughs. these are viruses with overlapping symptoms to temp —— jr covid. we look at multiplex testing, so as well as diagnosing whether you are covid positive, it also diagnosis flu and rsv? he said the pcr testing will continue free of charge through autumn and winter. i think that is the first time... will he be suggesting that we will move to a different system other than pcr testing for next spring and summer where people might be expected to pay for a test? could he clarify the government's testing for spring and summer? isolation rules have changed, understandably, but we still need tracing system so local authorities get the resources they
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need to do contact tracing, and for those people who need to isolate still, will local authorities have more money in their funds to pay isolation payments, because we know that people who are low paid it is a struggle for them to isolate themselves? he has talked about mask wearing and working from home, but not about ventilation so much. we knew the virus is airborne. we know that workplaces have legal standards about the quantity of fresh air and purified air that is appropriate, so what is he going to do to drive up ventilation in workplaces and support public buildings to install the relevant air purification kits so people are not breathing in contaminated air? he didn't mention social care. one of the most devastating consequences of failing to protect care homes, not putting that protective ring around them, was the tragic number of deaths in care homes. the infection—control fund currently ends on the 30th of
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september. will that fund for social care be extended? finally, the vaccine passports, can he clarify what exactly is the position of the government now and what the government now and what the government is actually proposing and what the government will ask the host to decide? he said he is not ruling it out on sky, on bibi said he said he was, he is now saying they will keep it in reserve yesterday downing street said vaccine passports are our first line of defence against the winter way. what exactly is the position? can we just get clarity and carat in the house make a final decision on whether we think vaccine passports are an appropriate intervention or not? ,, . ., , ., ,, ., not? secretary of state. the right honourable _ not? secretary of state. the right honourable gentleman's - not? secretary of state. the right honourable gentleman's numberl not? secretary of state. the right l honourable gentleman's number of questions, let me plough through them. on plan a comet that is absolutely our focus, the situation we are in. vaccines remain a critical part of it. testing and surveillance. can i thank the
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honourable gentleman for his support of our vaccine programme. he also asked me about plan b. he is right, the government has a contingency plan. the triggerfor the government has a contingency plan. the trigger for plan the government has a contingency plan. the triggerfor plan b the government has a contingency plan. the trigger for plan b would be to look carefully at the pressures on the nhs and if we deemed them to be unsustainable, if there was a significant rise of hospitalisation that we thought unsustainable, we would look carefully if we need to take any of those measures. they would be informed by the data and we would come to the house and make the appropriate response. it is really important, i think, appropriate response. it is really important, ithink, to appropriate response. it is really important, i think, to emphasise the importance of vaccines. we now know from the data just yesterday from the ons in the first half of this year 99% of those people that died from covid—19 sadly were not
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vaccinated. it highlights the importance of vaccination. there will be more details around that including treatments that are either currently available or treatments that may soon be available to stop i have mentioned the work of the antiviral task force, they are doing great work, and there are number of possible new treatments, it is something the uk is very engaged in. those immunosuppressed, it was just last week that we announced our third dose as part of the primary treatments. that's again as a reminder of the action we are taking that our advisers are constantly looking at to see what more we can do. he asked about the flu risk, and it is a significant risk this year, really significant risk not least
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because of reasons we are all familiar with there was not much flu last year there is a lot less natural immunity in our communities and the flu vaccine itself does have, notjust in the uk but it is being deployed across europe, has less efficacy than normal, but it is still effective, it is still a very worthwhile vaccine and that is why we will be trying to maximise optic with the biggest roll—out programme and communications programme this country has ever seen for the flu vaccine. on diagnosis, he made a good point. that is something we are looking at with covid and italy jointly. on testing arrangements, i think i set about clearly. we have no plans to change the current arrangements, but we constantly keep that under review as long as those tests are needed, available, free for the public, that will be the case, but we will keep in under
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review. in terms of infection—control and social care settings, there is a substantial amount of funding available. we have already made available for this year some £3a billion of funding in total for nhs and the care system for a lot of these extra measures, and thatis lot of these extra measures, and that is a huge amount of funding, much of it is going towards essential work like infection—control and we will make sure that what is needed is there. his last question arounds vaccine only certification, i think i have made the government's position clear, it is not something that we are implementing. we will not go ahead with any plans for that. i think for any government to do something like that would be such a big decision and it would have to be backed up by the evidence and the data, that evidence is not there and i hope that it will never need that situation, but to keep it in reserve is the right thing to do. ichair
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situation, but to keep it in reserve is the right thing to do.— is the right thing to do. chair of the committee, _ is the right thing to do. chair of the committee, jeremy - is the right thing to do. chair of the committee, jeremy hunt. l is the right thing to do. chair of the committee, jeremy hunt. i | the committee, jeremy hunt. welcome the committee, jeremy hunt. i welcome this announcement, particularly on boosters. i asked the best thing —— vaccines minister about boosters, just 15 hours later the secretary of state makes a statement. it is almost as if the government is listening! nowhere wants to get back to normal as quickly down the nhs itself. will he commit that the backlog in mental health treatment will be treated every bit as seriously as the backlog in physical health? in particular, that the nhs and government will continue to adhere to the mental health investment standard, that says that mental health spending will increase at the higher rate, particularly when it comes to the extra money coming from the levy, because parity of esteem is supported on both sides of the house, and there is a lot of worry in the mental health world that the money from the levy will not reflect the needs of mental health backlog.
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first of all, i always listen to the former health secretary, he always has good advice and i am pleased that he thinks that the government is moving quickly. on third mental health backlog, he is right to raise this issue. the government is committed to parity of esteem, it is in our manifesto. i want to reassure everyone who is particularly concerned, that commitment remains and this new funding that will go over the next three years to deal with the backlog absolutely includes mental health provision. thank with the backlog absolutely includes mental health provision.— mental health provision. thank you, mr speaker- — mental health provision. thank you, mr speaker- may — mental health provision. thank you, mr speaker. may i _ mental health provision. thank you, mr speaker. may i start _ mental health provision. thank you, mr speaker. may i start by - mental health provision. thank you, | mr speaker. may i start by extending my condolences and those of the party to the prime minister and his family bereavement. i am grateful to the secretary of state for advance out of his statement and i would echo his call for vigilance and the importance of getting vaccinated. with regards to covert dated, it shows how few deaths between january
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and july were amongst the fully vaccinated and it demonstrates the effects of vaccines and driving down deaths. now with winter approaching and the most favourable conditions for transmission to take place, it is welcome we are extending back things to younger citizens and also the news on booster vaccines. however, what more does the minister think more can be done to encourage people who have not yet been double vaccinated to become so? the winter will be a difficult time for many people in the uk, with the annual flu potentially coinciding with another first microwave, the destruction that this will entail after the end of furlough and the universal credit uplift, at a time of rising fuel bills. why is the uk government insisting on entering two of the key measures supporting through the pandemic shortly before a potentially difficult winter months for millions? it is essential
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that self isolation remains affordable. finally, the uk government has cancelled the contract with a vaccine company that was set to produce vaccines for the uk and scotland at its littleton facility. on these benches we would be very grateful if the secretary of state to provide an explanation as to why this deal was cancelled before the trials were even completed, and threatening jobs in scotland. first of all can i thank the honourable gentleman for raising and this has the importance of vaccines, i agree with him wholeheartedly about what he said about vaccines and he is right to think about what more can be done to encourage family gps, and also just taking the time that is done ;ary to allay family gps, and also just taking the time that is done to y to allay people, particularly older people family gps, and also just taking the time that is done to encourage more can be done to encourage people, particularly older people over 60, throughout the uk to take over 60, throughout the uk to take up over 60, throughout the uk to take up over 60, throughout the uk to take up this offerfor over 60, throughout the uk to take up this offer for vaccination. there up this offerfor over 60, throughout the uk to take up this offer for vaccination. there are a number of things being done. are a number of things being done. both here in england and in scotland both here in england and in scotland as well to focus on this, but as well to focus on this, but including making greater use of including making greater use of family gps, and alsojust family gps, and alsojust including making greater use of family gps, and also just taking the including making greater use of family gps, and also just taking the
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time that is necessary to allay time that is necessary to allay people's concerns where they are hesitant and to allow them to speak to the clinicians they want access to the clinicians they want access to to give them that comfort, and that work will continue, and we are constantly looking for new and perhaps even better ways to do that. on universal credit, when the government announced that increase it was made clear that it was temporary, and i think being temporary, and i think being temporary at some point it has to come to an end. i think the time for thatis come to an end. i think the time for that is now as our economy has thankfully started to reopen, the availabilities ofjobs is availabilities of jobs is increasing, availabilities ofjobs is increasing, economic growth has come back. i think this is the right time to do it but also to continue

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