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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  September 22, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, this is outside source. a pledge of vaccines to help other countries type coronavirus. we should countries type coronavirus. , should unite around the world to a few principles. that we commit to donating, not selling, donating, not selling, doses to lower income countries. selling, doses to lower income countries-_ countries. but despite the president's _ countries. but despite the president's vaccine - countries. but despite the l president's vaccine pledge, campaigners say that most countries are still not getting enough. we will speak to the who official coordinating the fight against covid—19 in africa. more talks over the submarine deal that has left france succeeding on the sidelines.
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brycejohnson had beat waits france succeeding on the sidelines. bryce johnson had beat waits for brycejohnson had beat waits for him. bryce johnson had beat waits for him. �* , ., ,., bryce johnson had beat waits for him. �* , ., ., bryce johnson had beat waits for him. �*, ., ., ., him. the it's time for some of our dearest friends _ him. the it's time for some of our dearest friends around _ him. the it's time for some of our dearest friends around the - him. the it's time for some of our dearest friends around the world | him. the it's time for some of our. dearest friends around the world to get a grip about all of this. the canary islands _ get a grip about all of this. the canary islands volcano continues to speu canary islands volcano continues to spell live, destroying hundreds of homes and forcing residents to flee. hello, a warm welcome. joe biden has told a special summit tackling vaccine inequity that the covid—i9 pandemic can't be solved with half measures. over 56% of the world's population are still waiting for theirfirst dose. and the us president had this pledge. we've already shipped nearly 160 million doses to 100 countries, more than every other country has donated combined. america's donations of half a billion pfizer vaccines
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through covax that i've announced before the g7 summit injune have already begun to ship. today, i'm announcing another historic commitment. the united states is buying another half—billion doses of pfizer to donate to low and middle income countries around the world. this is another half a billion doses that will all be shipped by this time next year. it brings our total commitment to donated vaccines to over 1.1 billion vaccines to be donated. we can't overstate how big the task is. experts say 11 billion doses are required to vaccinate at least 70% of the global population. and while many high income countries have now given one shot to over half of their populations — only 2% of people in low—income countries have had their first dose and joe biden�*s message is this.
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we should unite around the world on a few principles, that we commit to donating, not selling, donating, not selling, doses to low and lower income countries, and that the donations, they come with political strings attached. we support covax as the main distributor for sharing who approved vaccines. and that we fight vaccine disinformation and exercise transparency to build vital public trust in these life—saving tools. vaccine supply is imbalanced — in a big way. according to human rights watch, 75% of covid vaccines have gone to 10 countries. and the economist tells us the world's richest countries are administering 100 times as many shots as the poorest. here's the bbc�*s population correspondent stephanie hegarty on whetherjoe biden�*s target is realistic. it's possible, because we will have the vaccine supply, so if we have 11 billion
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vaccines that have been produced by the end of the year, that's almost enough to vaccinate the adult population of the whole world, and the study found that the supply will be there for this to be possible by may of next year, which is a long time in advance of biden's targets. so we will have enough vaccines, but will they be distributed fairly? and when we look at what has been pledged so far and what's been donated, there isn't a lot of room for optimism there, but it is certainly possible, it just means that these rich countries are really going to have to get on board. there have been big promises made by world leaders before. back injune, g7 members of the world's richest countries — vowed to donate a billion doses to poorer countries over the next year. the uk hosted world leaders — it promised 100m of that pledge. so far it has donated just under nine million. president biden pledged 580m. 140m have been delivered so far. the eu has donated about 20 million
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doses of a promised 250 million. bear in mind, that some of these countries will begin offering a third booster shot. the who says high—income countries have given their citizens 61 times more doses per inhabitant than low—income nations. some countries are relying on vaccines through the covax scheme — an inititiative aimed at equitable access to covid—19 vaccines. but it's faced problems. here's stephanie hegarty again. they relied on this facility in india, and in may when india experienced a huge wave it issued an export ban, so now covax is relying on donations, and that is where we have a problem, because there have been really ambitious pledges by a lot of rich countries to donate to covax,
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and as we can see from this graph, the donations and pledges haven't really, there's huge shortfalls there, it's not a problem with supply, there are a lot of vaccines being produced, and recent research by the science analytic company found that we produce 1.5 billion vaccines a month now, those production issues earlier in the year, they really ironed themselves out, but by the end of the year, there could be 11 billion doses. africa is affected by this. it's vaccinations are lagging. less than 4% of its population has been fully vaccinated. compare that to 54% in the us. dr ann fortin is the incident manager for covid—19 for the who africa. she's in geneva. we are hearing these huge, huge pledges. but when it comes to getting the vaccine itself, where is the problem area? what is the understanding of where the weakness is? ~ ., ~ . ., ,
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is? well, that evening. actually, what happened _ is? well, that evening. actually, what happened when _ is? well, that evening. actually, what happened when the - is? well, that evening. actually, what happened when the vaccine is? well, that evening. actually, - what happened when the vaccine came to the markets, the country back up so many bioassays that it left a note covax a little short of bioassays, and as you are saying previously, like when india had its devastating resurgence, basically, the indian supplier, which where the main supplierfor the the indian supplier, which where the main supplier for the kovacs facility really divert the doses domestically, so from currently the promise of 120 million, of those that arrive, we only delivered 67 doses, really, 67 million doses, currently. of course, we are happy about countries sharing their dialysis and we welcome now the united states announcing today about donating half a million doses.
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doctor we heard back injune at the g7 these countries pledging these huge amounts. so i'm just wondering where it comes down to on the ground, where it gets lost, because it's simply not getting to the people who need them on the african continent. , ., , ., ., continent. yes, what is also a challenging. _ continent. yes, what is also a challenging, covax, _ continent. yes, what is also a challenging, covax, they - continent. yes, what is also a| challenging, covax, they have continent. yes, what is also a - challenging, covax, they have just challenging, covax, they havejust announced a decrease in supplies of 25% of its telesis by the end of the year, so it's coming up with a lot less doses that were expected by the end of the year. currently, only 1a countries of the 5a countries have achieved the 10% target by the end of september. of course, it is challenging. of september. of course, it is challenging-— of september. of course, it is challenauin. ., ~ , ., challenging. talk us through. the com an challenging. talk us through. the company -- _ challenging. talk us through. the company -- continent _ challenging. talk us through. the company -- continent is - challenging. talk us through. the company -- continent is get - challenging. talk us through. the
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company -- continent is get up . challenging. talk us through. the | company -- continent is get up to company —— continent is get up to give vaccinations. we have seen it with ebola, so how ready are they when it comes to distributing the vaccines? £31 when it comes to distributing the vaccines? . ., , ., , vaccines? of course, what is happening. _ vaccines? of course, what is happening, consistent - vaccines? of course, what is| happening, consistent supply vaccines? of course, what is - happening, consistent supply that's been happening, it will make it quite difficult for the country to really absorb the vaccine in a certain way, basically, what we have seenin certain way, basically, what we have seen in august and september with the increased number of bioassays, which where coming to countries, many countries really could absorb those doses, for example, short of vaccines for two months, really could achieve the past week a 10% target, so if countries, we are confident that if countries get that doses, they will absorb the doses, and on top of that, the who israeli, if ever we see a difficulty, we sent an international expert to really make sure that every dallas gets in the arm of people all.—
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the arm of people all. when we hear that some areas, _ the arm of people all. when we hear that some areas, only _ the arm of people all. when we hear that some areas, only fewer- the arm of people all. when we hear that some areas, only fewer than - the arm of people all. when we hearj that some areas, only fewer than 296 that some areas, only fewer than 2% of the population in some countries have been vaccinated, what are the problem areas that you are very conscious of? we hear about a fourth wave across the african continent? of wave across the african continent? of course, a problem, basically, the same as everywhere else, we get vaccine hesitancy, we get operational inconsistency in countries to really plan their operation around vaccination, also, we had some countries that had to have expiring doses of vaccine because of the very short shelf life that comes when they are delivered, really. that comes when they are delivered, reall . ., ., ~ i. that comes when they are delivered, reall . ., ., ~ that comes when they are delivered, reall. ., ., . really. doctor, thank you so much for aaivin really. doctor, thank you so much for giving us _ really. doctor, thank you so much for giving us an — really. doctor, thank you so much for giving us an overview - really. doctor, thank you so much for giving us an overview about i really. doctor, thank you so much| for giving us an overview about the situation and protecting his threats. now, we will be picking up on this a little bit later in the programme, but i want to turn to a
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row that has been going on for the past week. france is angry with australia, the us and uk. it is after the three countries agreed a new defence pact which, as a result, and did a multibillion—dollar french submarine deal with australia. it angered president macron so much that he pulled his ambassadors from washington. well, joe biden and emanuel macron have now had a phone call and have issued a joint statement aimed at easing the tensions. they agreed that they would meet in person at the end of next month. but while the two presidents eased tensions, this is breastjohnson speaking today in washington. it’s speaking today in washington. it's time speaking today in washington. it�*s time for some of our dearest friends around the world to get a grip about all of this. because this is
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fundamentally a great step forward for our global security. it's three very like minded allies standing shoulder to shoulder, creating a new partnership for the sharing of technology. partnership for the sharing of technology-— partnership for the sharing of technology. let's get the very latest on this _ technology. let's get the very latest on this from _ technology. let's get the very latest on this from gary - technology. let's get the very - latest on this from gary o'donoghue. gary, before we talk about the uk's prime minister as attempts at french there, let's talk about this agreement now between emmanuel macron and president biden. bring us up—to—date. macron and president biden. bring us u-to-date. ~ macron and president biden. bring us up-to-date-— up-to-date. well, this call was initiated, _ up-to-date. well, this call was initiated, we _ up-to-date. well, this call was initiated, we are _ up-to-date. well, this call was initiated, we are told _ up-to-date. well, this call was initiated, we are told in - up-to-date. well, this call was initiated, we are told in the - initiated, we are told in the statement, byjoe biden this morning. in other words, the french will have probably insisted on that, we didn't call them, they called us. and they issued a joint statement, which is unusual in these circumstances. norma each side issues a readout of these because according to their own lights. and i think one of the key lines in it is
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the acknowledgement that the decision could've benefited from more open consultation, the decision of the submarines, and that is something that the french are very, very sore about, and that is quite a concession for the americans to make. the french felt they were stabbed in the back by this whole decision, notjust the $40 billion defence contract they last as a result, but also because they felt that scott added, and bear in mind from a friend sees itself as american's aldus ally going back to the war of independence here. so some important steps forward here. i think it's a start, as he said, they are returning to washington next week, but it will take more than an meeting in rome around the g20 meeting in rome around the g20 meeting in rome around the g20 meeting in october and the return of the ambassador to rebuild this confidence because europeans and certainly the french believe that while joe certainly the french believe that whilejoe biden may have been talking about america being back, he has failed to match that in his
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actions so far today. notjust on the submarines, but on things like consultation over the withdrawal from afghanistan. we consultation over the withdrawal from afghanistan.— consultation over the withdrawal from afghanistan. we had breast johnson committee _ from afghanistan. we had breast johnson committee uk _ from afghanistan. we had breast johnson committee uk prime - from afghanistan. we had breast - johnson committee uk prime minister johnson committee uk prime minister there, a little bit earlier, just talk us through how his comments had potentially helped or not but this whole discussion. i potentially helped or not but this whole discussion.— potentially helped or not but this whole discussion. i mean, the prime minister has — whole discussion. i mean, the prime minister has a _ whole discussion. i mean, the prime minister has a style, _ whole discussion. i mean, the prime minister has a style, we _ whole discussion. i mean, the prime minister has a style, we know that. l minister has a style, we know that. i was listening to french radio just before i came to speak you commander talked about having a particular kind of style and it really sort of sarcastic fashion. breast speaks proper french, let's be clear about that, he was a correspondent in brussels for a number of years for the daily telegraph. this is what the daily telegraph. this is what the french and english call mixing up the french and english call mixing up the french. it's a tweak of the tale, i think to the french. there is a serious message in there to get over it, but they are not going to get a rep that quickly if you bake them in that way can i don't think. so not really being able to resist
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that part of his character where he wants to actually start of thumb his nose slightly at those who are angry with him. , ., , ,., , nose slightly at those who are angry with him. , ., , , ., ~ i., with him. yes, absolutely. thank you so much for— with him. yes, absolutely. thank you so much for clarifying _ with him. yes, absolutely. thank you so much for clarifying that. _ with him. yes, absolutely. thank you so much for clarifying that. he - with him. yes, absolutely. thank you so much for clarifying that. he does l so much for clarifying that. he does speak brilliant french, but gary as always, thank you so much. gary o'donoghue speaking to us live. also being discussed a new york where the un general assembly is taking place is claimant. china's announcement that it will stop building new coal—fired power plants and other countries has been welcomed by climate campaigners. here's president xi making the announcement during his speech at the general assembly. translation: china will strive to peak carbon dioxide - emissions before 2030, and achieve carbon neutrality before 2060. this requires tremendous hard work, and we will make every effort to meet these goals. china will step up support for other developing countries in developing green and low carbon energy.
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we will not build new coal—fired projects abroad. china is involved in many coal powered projects outside of its territory. here you can see where they have invested money abroad. however, half of the world's coal is burned in china itself and it is still adding numerous coal—burning plants at home. these dots show you where they are — but the number of plants at each location varies and at some sites there are more than 100. our correspondent in shanghai — robin brant — says china's announcement represents the "low hanging fruit", in phasing out coal. he says no new coal fired powered stations will be built abroad by china, and they were a key part of this country's belt road initiative, an awkward name,
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but that was china's foreign investment and infrastructure programme. there are questions, though, by the detail. when will it be implemented? it was the man at the top who announced it at the un, but will it immediate? will it apply to plants that are halfway through construction or those who have been approved? also, crucially, what about financing? the plants that it will no longer build, but what about the state owned banks? will they also stop their financing of coal—fired power stations abroad? the big issue here, though, as china's domestic demand for call. half of all the coal burned in the world is burnt here in this country and still makes up over half the fuel used to generate power in this country. china is adding coal—fired power stations here, some of them with a life span of 50 years, and it expects to continue to increase its demand for coal for the next five years up until 2026. so that is the key issue here, china's domestic demand for coal. that is what has to decrease in terms of significant steps in dealing with climate change.
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there's no way to combat climate change without china. it's responsible for 30% of the world's co2 emissions from fossil fuels. and china's total emissions are growing, not falling. but some experts say there's still room for optimism. mark maslin is professor of earth system sciences at university college london. china has really taken on the climate change challenge. they are clearly the biggest polluter, they produce the most c02 of any country in the world, but that's also because they are the biggest. and so what they are tackling is a huge, massive economy which is growing at 10% every single year, and they are trying to actually lift all of their population out of extreme poverty, which was their central goal. now, they have almost done that, then they can actually focus on how do we produce our energy?
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how do we actually influence the rest of the world? and the belt initiative is really interesting because they are now saying, we are going to influence other countries around us to be more green and sustainable because this is the direction of travel we are taking, and other countries the satellite countries they are influencing, they are going to go with them. china isn't alone in facing this problem. another country grapping with how to transition away from coal is india. our south asia correspondent, rajini vaidyanathan reports from india's eastern state of orissa. india's coal belt helps power this vast nation. more than two—thirds of the country's energy production still depends on it. such is the demand that the country is planning on building, or expanding, dozens of mines in the coming years and also continues to import coal.
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there is pressure on india to reduce its emissions. but cutting coal use is a tricky balance. a major pollutant in the country, the dirtiest fuels, coal is also a major source ofjobs in these communities, which are some of india's poorest. india cannot live without coal. our country is a developing country. coal is one of the major resources for indians. if we stop the coal production under the pressure of the world community, then how can we maintain our livelihoods? and how can india meet the energy needs of the population of more than 1.3 billion? a growing middle class is driving that demand. although the average indian still uses far less energy than the average brit or american. india is already shifting to cleaner sources, like solar.
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experts say the country needs more investment to make the switch to renewables. india has already set out some of the most aggressive renewable energy targets in the world. the more rapidly we can get more investment, more capital, more money into solar, wind, bioenergy and so forth, the quicker we can keep shifting away from the older energy infrastructure. but making that shift means reaching communities like these. where the oldest and most basic forms of energy are the only option. jhuna is one of the tens of millions of indians who still don't have access to power. "there is no electricity, there is no water. "if we don't have coal, we can't cook. "if it's harmful, what can we do about it?" she tells me. "we have no other option.
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"at night, we burn coal and keep it in the house "so we also have some light." what people here want so badly is what so many in the west have long taken for granted. in india, progress comes at a price. it means cutting the cord with coal could take time. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news, odissa. lots more on our website. now we turn to the ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky has promised a strong response after one of his top aides survived an apparent assassination attempt. this is the car of serhir shefir, police said it was hit by at least ten bullets as he left home near the village of lisnyky. he emerged unscathed but his driver was hit and is in hospital. president zelenski is currently in new york for the un general meeting, he recorded this video.
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translation: who is behind this? frankly speaking, i don't know for now. what sort of power? it could be internal, it may be external, but i don't see it as a power, because to send me greetings with shots from the forest aimed at my friend's car is a weakness, and the response will be strong. the bbc�*sjonah fisher is in the capital kiev. hejoins us now. he joins us now. jonah, hejoins us now. jonah, incredibly dramatic. in terms of the driver who has hit and continued to drive, how is he doing? he has hit and continued to drive, how is he doing?— is he doing? he seems to be doing 0k, actually. _ is he doing? he seems to be doing 0k, actually. he — is he doing? he seems to be doing 0k, actually. he was _ is he doing? he seems to be doing 0k, actually. he was struck- is he doing? he seems to be doing | 0k, actually. he was struck several ok, actually. he was struck several times this morning when the car he was driving with him in the back came underfire as was driving with him in the back came under fire as it was going through a forestjets outside yet. i think if that car had stopped at that point, it is likely that both the driver and the other would be
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dead at this point. but he managed to keep the car going for several kilometres and pull over into a parking area where they called for help. that action from that heroism may have prevented both of them from dying. and as he said in your introduction there, the attention has really turned to who might have been behind us. at the moment, that we have had this talk of a strong response from the president, people are simply speculating as to possible motives behind it because these conmen appear to have been hiding in the forest. there is no cctv in that area. so at the moment, no firm leads which the authorities could go on. no firm leads which the authorities could go on-_ no firm leads which the authorities could no on. ., ~ ., ., could go on. now, we know that there is no love lost — could go on. now, we know that there is no love lost between _ could go on. now, we know that there is no love lost between russia and - is no love lost between russia and ukraine. we don't know, as you are saying, who is behind us, but the kremlin has denied this. whenever somethin: kremlin has denied this. whenever something bad _ kremlin has denied this. whenever something bad happens— kremlin has denied this. whenever something bad happens here, - kremlin has denied this. whenever something bad happens here, the l something bad happens here, the first suspicion people have is there might be some sort of role in moscow and russia in what has happened here. today was a little bit different. i think many people, particularly around the presidents
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who are still here and didn't go with him to the united states, they were talking about more of an internal threat. they were talking about legislation that the president is trying to get their parliament to tackle the power of oligarchs, the super rich class of ukrainians who control so much of the economy and political might hear, and perhaps there might be some sort of message that these oligarchs are perhaps trying to send to the president, that they don't like these reforms that they don't like these reforms that he is planning, and that perhaps he should back off. just briefl , perhaps he should back off. just briefly. this _ perhaps he should back off. just briefly, this aide, who is he? how important is he to the president could say i think the important thing is that is very close to the president. he is an aid to the president. he is an aid to the president within the government, and adviser, and a —— he is an old friend before he was the president from his entertainment career, so someone really close to the president, that is why people are almost looking and saying if he was attacked, the deliberately and must
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have been linked to the president. 0k, have been linked to the president. ok, jonah, thank you so much. don't go away, i will be back very shortly with lots more news. hello. it's been a day of contrasting fortunes across the british isles, southern and eastern parts dry, fine and sunny for the most part. further north and west, nothing like it. a real absence of sunshine there in the western side of scotland. the reason for that, well, a weather front has crept its way in from the atlantic, and it's produced a wee bit of rain across northern and western parts of scotland. the cloud filtering its way through the day, down towards northern ireland, probably robbing the far north of england of sunshine as well. during the course of the evening and overnight, so, the remnants of that weather front drag the prospect of a little bit of rain into the north of england, north wales, eventually a real rattle of showers, if not longer spells of rain,
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getting in across central, northern and western parts of scotland — where it will be decidedly chilly, and that's because it will be very windy indeed. these are the gusts, and we are looking at gusts around about 65 mph through the shetland isles, and even further south, that gustiness just tending to keep the temperatures above single figures for most. so, the new day dawns with that low pressure pulling away towards scandinavia. the winds, as a consequence, beginning to ease. we bring in a new set of weather fronts back into western scotland with time during the course of the afternoon with bits of rain here. rather cloudy too down into the north of england, perhaps northern ireland. further south, with a bit of brightness, you could see 22—23 celsius. the old weather frontjust clouding things up for a time in the first part of the day across wales and the southwest of england, but even here, i think the sun will break out eventually for many. come friday, we have got another set of fronts close by to the north of scotland, another weak affair there. just thickening up the cloud and pushing a bit of rain into the western side of scotland, maybe northern ireland too. but it heralds the arrival of mild airs across all parts of the british isles. it comes at a price.
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the air coming in off the atlantic, moisture laden, so quite a bit of cloud, say, for the eastern side of scotland, and generally speaking, the further south and east you are, again, the brighter your skies will be, and the temperatures really responding to this, 22—23 celsius at the very best. and then on into the weekend, it is a similar sort of pattern, where we are looking away towards the south and southwest to bring up mild airs from way down towards the azores. not completely dry, not wall—to—wall sunshine, but for the end of september, not bad at all.
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hello, i'm kasia madera, this is outside source. the us president pledges half a billion doses of vaccine to help other countries fight coronavirus. we should re—up to eight unite around the world on a few principles. that week commit to donating, not selling. donate, not selling to those lower income countries. but despite the president's vaccine pledge campaigners say most countries are still not getting enough. progress slows on uk—us trade talks. borisjohnson is told not to get his hopes up, at the white house. and the canary islands volcano continues to spill lava destroying
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hundreds of homes and forcing residents to flee. president biden has announced the united states will donate anotherfive hundred million coronavirus vaccines to countries in need. addressing a virtual meeting of world leaders, mr biden said washington had now pledged to give away more than a billion doses. the bbc�*s nada tawfik is in new york. the president also had a really clear message for other rich nations as well when it comes to what he was saying the us is pledging he wants other nations just about doesn't he? yes, that's exactly right. and it's unclear at the moment because most of the summit is closed. whether they have stepped up with those new pledges, we know that there is a no
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two new e us— eu partnership with us. we see in the us pledge additional does doses. certainly that has been the message here that there is not room for half measures 18 months into this pandemic that if they want to try to end this pandemic that they need to be like that beat the virus and other countries as well. i thought what else was interesting to part of what he was saying, first he was unapologetic about the fact that is an american president he has prioritised getting americans vaccines. and there is the swirling criticism about whether his administration will allow booster shots in the united states in the coming months if the cdc recommends that. even though a lower income countries are still waiting for their first dose. also just the fact that the has said that he is going to be donated $370 million to try to get through those logistical challenges to actually administer at those vaccines. because as we know,
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back from the g7 there was certainly a lot of pledges but only 15% of those doses were actually delivered. i think that is the key point here is the pledges are great but how soon will they actually get into the arms of people to make good on this big goal of getting 70% of the world vaccinated by the time of the next un general assembly? vaccinated by the time of the next un generalassembly?_ vaccinated by the time of the next un generalassembly? exactly. did we hear any assurances _ un generalassembly? exactly. did we hear any assurances as _ un generalassembly? exactly. did we hear any assurances as to _ un generalassembly? exactly. did we hear any assurances as to when - un generalassembly? exactly. did we hear any assurances as to when these l hear any assurances as to when these pledges will actually turn into the real thing intojobs in arms? president biden said he wants to stay on top of world leaders. —— jab. also the private sector to do more as well he said in the first few months of 2022 that he wants to hold another virtual summit to see where each country is on their pledges and delivering on those commitments. also the us secretary of state is going to be getting togetherjune 20 foreign ministers
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in the next few months as well to checkin in the next few months as well to check in on that. a lot of ideas being thrown out there by the us administration on how to make an international approach to fighting the pandemic. even the vice president kamala harris saying that they are donating more money to the world bank to get the world ready for vaccine preparedness.- world bank to get the world ready for vaccine preparedness. thanks so much for bringing _ for vaccine preparedness. thanks so much for bringing us _ for vaccine preparedness. thanks so much for bringing us up _ for vaccine preparedness. thanks so much for bringing us up to - for vaccine preparedness. thanks so much for bringing us up to date. - while climate and covid are taking centre stage in new york, as is often the case when major leaders meet in person — there have been discussions about trade. borisjohnson and joe biden met on tuesday night. only the prime minister's second time meeting the us president in person. he had hoped to further talks about a free trade deal between the two countries, but when asked about the prospects of a deal — presidentjoe biden played down the chances of a rapid agreement.
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we're going to talk a little bit about trade today and work and have to work that through. president biden also reaccentuated his belief that any trade deal between the us and the uk would depend on the uk not unwinding any aspects of the northern ireland protocol — that's the part of the brexit agreement that prevents a hard border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland — in a way of safeguarding the good friday peace agreement. here's the president on that. on the protocols, ifeel very strongly about those. we spent an enormous amount of time and effort in the united states it was a major bipartisan effort made and i would not at all like to see nor i might add, would many of my republican colleagues would like to see change in the irish accords in the end result having a closed border. so not a lot of interest from the us. but borisjohnson has long talked
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of his desire to secure a post—brexit free trade deal with the united states. in 2017 he said on a visit to washington that "we hear under donald trump that might�*ve been true the us president telling in 1992 in march last year boris johnson's then foreign trade secretary said that the uk's greatest opportunity to increase the uk's free—trade deal is with the united states. clearly it was a priority but not forjoe biden. but despite the reluctance from the us administration to sign a deal, the prime minister is still confident a deal can be done in the future. what we are wanting to do is make solid incremental steps on trade. the biden administration is not doing free trade deals around the
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world right now but i've got absolutely every confidence that a great deal is there to be done. and there are plenty of people in that building behind me who certainly want to do that. but how vital is a trade deal with the us for the uk? here's our global trade corresponden dharshini david to explain. £1 and every six of our trade is with the us. so it's only natural to want to deepen those economic ties but when you look at the trade deal they had been talking about it would add perhaps 0.2% to her income, our gdp. and that has stalled in recent months, that's been know about for a while. so are there any alternatives to a direct deal with the us? first there were reports that the uk might attempt to join the usmca. that's the trade pact between the us, canada and mexico — set up after former us president donald trump tore up its predecessor, nafta. it came into effect injuly last year and covers everything
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from motor vehicles and steel to agricultural produce and data transfers, but downing street has shot down the rumours. a spokesperson telling the bbc its not an approach we re currently taking. so what other options could the uk take to increase its trade with the us? heres the uk's former international trade secretary dr liam fox on that. as trade secretary i was very keen that we looked at service agreements with d4 big estates, with california, texas and florida and new york making up about half of us gdp. many of those states don't want the federal government to have the _ authority and that negotiation. so you really need a twin track approach. that could be really quite trailblazing. then you got the alternative altogether of the united states rejoining the transpacific partnership which of course president obama and president biden as vice president oversaw. that would actually be another route to improving uk, us trade.
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with any deal or the us one—off but about and he deals a post—brexit uk was able to make other major trade powers? was able to make other ma'or trade owers? ., ., ., . ., , powers? china free-trade actually can be difficult _ powers? china free-trade actually can be difficult for— powers? china free-trade actually can be difficult for all— powers? china free-trade actually can be difficult for all kinds - powers? china free-trade actually can be difficult for all kinds of- can be difficult for all kinds of reasons. the united states, president biden is now re—effect size what we can and you that there is no free—trade deal coming soon. and with the european union we have less then we used to have. the big brexiteer promise of bucket nearing trade deals around the world, part of that was talking about focusing on the longer term, on fast—growing markets in asia. but in the next few years because of that deficit with the european union it is hardly likely that we will be doing less trade with the rest of the world rather than more. here in the uk to more energy suppliers have gone out of business as rising gas prices put pressure on the market. the firm screen and avro
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energy announced late this afternoon that they seized trading between them they supplied more than 800,000 customers. six companies have collapse in recent days but the boss of the energy regulator is warning that more firms could go with the number of customers will eventually need new suppliers running into millions. at the very latest here's our consumer affairs coletta smith. two more energy firms have collapsed. that clogs up a total of six energy companies folding within the last fortnight. the industry called for help at the government says they won't bail out suppliers in trouble. in government says they won't bail out suppliers in trouble.— suppliers in trouble. in the first instance the _ suppliers in trouble. in the first instance the industry _ suppliers in trouble. in the first instance the industry has - suppliers in trouble. in the first instance the industry has a - suppliers in trouble. in the firstj instance the industry has a look suppliers in trouble. in the first i instance the industry has a look to itself and as you said at the beginning of your question, i am, where i stand in these issues i do not believe that is within support government to put taxpayers money to companies... so that means that i
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don't think we should be a rewarding failure. we don't think we should be a rewarding failure. ~ ., ., , failure. we are now seeing the result of that _ failure. we are now seeing the result of that decision - failure. we are now seeing the result of that decision with - failure. we are now seeing the result of that decision with a i result of that decision with a number of other providers teetering on the brink. more than 1 number of other providers teetering on the brink. more than1 million customers are now being switched to a new provider. facing the prospect of being charged more. robert was with a supplier who went bust a few months ago so he was automatically transferred. ., ., , ., transferred. fortunately for me i froze for two _ transferred. fortunately for me i froze for two years _ transferred. fortunately for me i froze for two years the _ transferred. fortunately for me i froze for two years the price - transferred. fortunately for me i froze for two years the price i . froze for two years the price i paid — froze for two years the price i paid i— froze for two years the price i paid hust— froze for two years the price i paid. ijust think it shocking that a lot— paid. ijust think it shocking that a lot of— paid. ijust think it shocking that a lot of people on probably relatively low incomes, it can be such— relatively low incomes, it can be such a _ relatively low incomes, it can be such a big — relatively low incomes, it can be such a big factor over the winter. those _ such a big factor over the winter. those being moved to a new supplier may be charged at a higher rate which sarah doesn't think it's fair. it'd be better if they did alternative plans or caps. nobody wants energy prices going up, do they? so i don't trying think about it much it'll probably stress me out. , ., _, ., it much it'll probably stress me out. , ., ., ., out. there is no comfort for customers _ out. there is no comfort for customers for— out. there is no comfort for customers for the _ out. there is no comfort for| customers for the regulator. out. there is no comfort for- customers for the regulator. they think it likely that more firms could collapse in the coming weeks. we are in unprecedented territory.
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afraid _ we are in unprecedented territory. afraid there are many factors that contribute — afraid there are many factors that contribute to that including an increase — contribute to that including an increase in international demand for the potentially some restrictions around _ the potentially some restrictions around supply was observed very hard to predict— around supply was observed very hard to predict how long that will last. in to predict how long that will last. in the _ to predict how long that will last. in the last — to predict how long that will last. in the last 24 hours the government has agreed to pay tens of millions of pounds to fix one quarter of this crisis. after panic from meat and drinks producers a deal was reached to get carbon dioxide production going again after major plants in tea sides. even though phases back on top for the next couple of weeks anyway the underlying issue that because those carbon dioxide plants to be turned off is the thing that that energy is so expensive and that problem hasn't been fixed yet. we are all facing a more expensive winter. energy bosses say the situation is out of their hands. the real worry is _ situation is out of their hands. tue: real worry is that situation is out of their hands. tte: real worry is that the situation is out of their hands. "tt9: real worry is that the sector situation is out of their hands. tt9 real worry is that the sector is so fragile as a whole that buyers that might be expected to pick up customers are worried about doing so because of the cost of doing it. there's no cash down the back of the
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sofa anywhere. this there's no cash down the back of the sofa anywhere-— sofa anywhere. as the gas price sike sofa anywhere. as the gas price spike claims — sofa anywhere. as the gas price spike claims more _ sofa anywhere. as the gas price spike claims more companies . sofa anywhere. as the gas price. spike claims more companies it's sofa anywhere. as the gas price - spike claims more companies it's the customers that can afford a police who will be hit the hardest as the bills rack up this winter. there are no reports of death or serious injuries despite judge there are no reports of death or serious injuries despitejudge is saying it was the biggest in the region since the 1800s. the earthquake hit the city of mansfield which as you can see is not far from melbourne. is it on wednesday morning with tremors felt across sydney and actually even all the way to tasmania, australia's largest island. this is the gate will not gateway to victoria ski fields and some skiers caught out on the slopes as you can see when the earthquake hit. let's have a look at melbourne,
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the capital of victoria state. it see for yourselves the damage of some of the buildings. actually, some of the buildings. actually, some of the buildings. actually, some of these cities residents getting bit of a startle along with the people of course was have a look at this. my my goodness, the studios worst nightmare. that clip was shared by the australian broadcasting company which show the presenters of x x x show reacting to the trailer. tt show reacting to the trailer. it was very tense — show reacting to the trailer. it was very tense 20 _ show reacting to the trailer. it was very tense 20 seconds _ show reacting to the trailer. it was very tense 20 seconds there. - show reacting to the trailer. it was very tense 20 seconds there. they very tense 20 seconds there. they very similar studio undoubtedly to
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the one you are sitting in now. lots of equipment, lots of heavy lights that were shaking above us, so it was pretty tense as that earthquake rocked notjust melbourne, but also large parts of southeast australia. tense of the studio tense in a radio studio. listen to this. our phonological mental, and hopefully were so on—air. tell me if you're listening or maybe you experience at his office up a ticketed earthquake was up it was crazy. i'mjust losing ticketed earthquake was up it was crazy. i'm just losing my mind a little bit. you hear about small earthquakes but that was something else. that was a presenter of abc. she says the experience was unsettling. t she says the experience was unsettling-— she says the experience was unsettling. i think around 30 seconds there _ unsettling. i think around 30 seconds there was _ unsettling. i think around 30 seconds there was around i unsettling. i think around 30 | seconds there was around 20 unsettling. i think around 30 - seconds there was around 20 seconds but between that time frame. it felt
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like a lifetime. it was just bizarre and i was thinking, am i drunk? in my belted as out, it denied press the self—destruct button or something? i didn't know what was going on. that something? i didn't know what was atoin on. : something? i didn't know what was ttoin on. : :, something? i didn't know what was totin on. : :, going on. at the time of the earthquake _ going on. at the time of the earthquake the _ going on. at the time of the earthquake the australian i going on. at the time of the - earthquake the australian prime minister was in the united states where only a few hours earlier he'd met president biden. he gave this reaction. tote met president biden. he gave this reaction. ~ :, :, :, , :, reaction. we have had no reports of serious injuries _ reaction. we have had no reports of serious injuries or _ reaction. we have had no reports of serious injuries or worse. _ reaction. we have had no reports of serious injuries or worse. and - reaction. we have had no reports of serious injuries or worse. and that i serious injuries or worse. and that is very— serious injuries or worse. and that is very good — serious injuries or worse. and that is very good news we hope that that could _ is very good news we hope that that could news— is very good news we hope that that could news will continue but obviously would give reports as the night _ obviously would give reports as the night unfolds in the united states it can _ night unfolds in the united states it can he — night unfolds in the united states it can he a — night unfolds in the united states it can be a very disturbing event for an earthquake of this nature. they— for an earthquake of this nature. they are — for an earthquake of this nature. they are very rare event in australia _ they are very rare event in australia and as a result i'm sure people _ australia and as a result i'm sure people would've been quite distressed to distressed and disturbed by that. and the most of the immediate area affected. let�*s the immediate area affected. let's take a look — the immediate area affected. let's take a look at _ how rare it is this earthquake for
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australia. working here from an expert. this is the lartest working here from an expert. this is the largest earthquake _ working here from an expert. this is the largest earthquake we've - the largest earthquake we've recorded it new south wales without not the largest earthquake recorded but it's getting up there. maybe .8 26 that will be determined. northeast of melbourne a couple of hundred kilometres away. but the felt area is huge. right across victoria the house shook for a good five seconds, i could feel the first wave come through, as wave came through a few seconds later spilt up in camera i've heard reports of it in tasmania. so the cell theory was very large. as is appropriate and a magnitude six earthquake was up the
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fact that it occurred in a remote area means we don't expect much damage at all. area means we don't expect much damage at all-— damage at all. incredible 'ust how far it was felt. * incredible just how far stay with us on outside source — still to come... a covid therapy derived from an amusing system of a llama performs well in clinical trials. —— llama. the number of people having a baby with a surrogate mother in england and wales is almost quadrupled in the last decade according to do research. counting down the weeks until their baby boy is due. sam and guy turned to surrogacy after finding out sam couldn't carry a pregnancy herself.— pregnancy herself. after a particular— pregnancy herself. after a particular bad _ pregnancy herself. after a particular bad miscarriage j pregnancy herself. after a l particular bad miscarriage i pregnancy herself. after a - particular bad miscarriage i was diagnosed with breast cancer. we got to the treatment, prognosis all good but at the end of that we kind of do
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that that was the end of the jury for having a family. we that that was the end of the “my for having a familyi that that was the end of the “my for having a family. we were really fortunate that _ for having a family. we were really fortunate that the _ for having a family. we were really fortunate that the cancer _ for having a family. we were really fortunate that the cancer was - for having a family. we were really i fortunate that the cancer was caught early, _ fortunate that the cancer was caught early, it— fortunate that the cancer was caught early, it wasn't long after that we realise _ early, it wasn't long after that we realise that surrogacy could be an option _ realise that surrogacy could be an 0 ttion. :, :, realise that surrogacy could be an otion. ., ., :, , realise that surrogacy could be an o-tion. :, :, :, , :, :, option. had a horrible doing today? within a few — option. had a horrible doing today? within a few months _ option. had a horrible doing today? within a few months of _ option. had a horrible doing today? within a few months ofjoining - option. had a horrible doing today? within a few months ofjoining a - within a few months ofjoining a nonprofit organisation the couple were matched with a surrogate. the three of them have become close meeting up regularly and speaking most days. morata has two children of her own, she has wanted to be a surrogate since she was 18. tt of her own, she has wanted to be a surrogate since she was 18.- surrogate since she was 18. it feels amazint surrogate since she was 18. it feels amazing to — surrogate since she was 18. it feels amazing to finally _ surrogate since she was 18. it feels amazing to finally make _ surrogate since she was 18. it feels amazing to finally make my - surrogate since she was 18. it feels| amazing to finally make my dreams surrogate since she was 18. it feels l amazing to finally make my dreams a reality— amazing to finally make my dreams a reality and _ amazing to finally make my dreams a reality and something _ amazing to finally make my dreams a reality and something of _ reality and something of always wanted — reality and something of always wanted to — reality and something of always wanted to do _ reality and something of always wanted to do. it _ reality and something of always wanted to do. it really - reality and something of always wanted to do. it really makes . reality and something of always i wanted to do. it really makes me feel humbled _ wanted to do. it really makes me feel humbled and _ wanted to do. it really makes me feel humbled and to— wanted to do. it really makes me feel humbled and to be _ wanted to do. it really makes me feel humbled and to be around i wanted to do. it really makes me i feel humbled and to be around such amazing _ feel humbled and to be around such amazing people _ feel humbled and to be around such amazing people that _ feel humbled and to be around such amazing people that have _ feel humbled and to be around such amazing people that have made - feel humbled and to be around such amazing people that have made my| amazing people that have made my dream _ amazing people that have made my dream a _ amazing people that have made my dream a reality _ amazing people that have made my dream a reality.— dream a reality. when the baby is born to a surrogate _ dream a reality. when the baby is born to a surrogate they - dream a reality. when the baby is born to a surrogate they are - dream a reality. when the baby is i born to a surrogate they are deemed illegal mother under you law office of it's not until a parental order —— legal mother. it's also illegal to advertise for a surrogate meaning
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intended parents can struggle to find eight. experts say the law is outdated and it leaves both surrogates and intended parents vulnerable. as sam and for the arrival of the babel they hope the process will become more accessible for others. the government has asked the law commission of england and wales along with the scottish law commission to revere two review surrogacy legislation and prepare a draught bill which are passed will change the law. this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. our lead story is. president biden has pledged a supply of further half a billion doses of coronavirus vaccine to lower income countries. he says that the united states will become an arsenal of vaccines for the world. a covid therapy.
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derived from a llama named fifi has shown "significant potential" in early trials. it is a treatment made of "nano—bodies, small versions of antibodies — which llamas produce naturally in response to infection. once the therapy has been tested in humans, it could be given as a nasal spray, to treat and even prevent early infection. this was thought to be just something of an evolutionary quirk when it was first discovered that llamas, camels, alpacas and strangely sharks have the special nano bodies, they produce antibodies that are slightly different from ours, much smaller and simpler molecules. ours are these quite cumbersome complicated molecules. that was discovered a few decades ago but with these researchers hope to have done is investigate theirs as a possible covid therapy, and immune therapy using these nano bodies because they're so simple they are interesting to molecular biologist to reengineer and
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potentially make therapies out of. so what the scientists have done is they have worked with eight llama named devey who lives in a facility at the university of reading. they've her a vaccine and come back later and taken a sample of her and saying in saints these nano batteries that are responded to this vaccine against covid—19. then date look at the example of the blood and they pick out the ones that match they pick out the ones that match the virus most closely, the ones that bind to the virus most tightly and therefore potent covid neutralising agent for that when they've given that as a therapy, they've given that as a therapy, they develop that into a therapy and when they've given that as a nasal spray to laboratory animals and the barbara terry road as they recovered from covid infection within a few days or actually prevented covid infection in the first place when they sprayed into their respiratory tract. this is very early days, it's early—stage animal trials but the hope is that this could actually enter the trials the first stage of human trials within six to 12
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months. and ultimately this could be an early stage treatment that you could use at home or even a preventative measure against covid—19. victoria's article is on our website. lava flowing from the volcano that erupted last weekend on the the spanish island of la palma — has now destroyed about 200 homes. there are fears that when the lava hits the sea, it will create toxic gases and explosions. let's just show you some of the latest pictures of the lava at night taken by a drone — you can see how far its spread. these next pictures are from today — taking during the day and showing the volcano in its explosive phase. these images show the destruction it has caused. the lava has reached these evacuated houses — and rescue teams are working round the clock in close proximity to it. our correspondent dan johnson is on the island. it's possible the wind
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direction has changed today because we are starting to see more ash falling in other places. this is la laguna, a villagejust outside the restricted zone. these are the roadblocks where police are keeping people back from the villages that have been evacuated. occasionally a few residents are allowed through to get the last of their belongings. but in the main there are more roadblocks and more roads that are disrupted because of where the lava is flowing. some roads have been completely smothered. others the police have closed to keep people back. and you can see how much ash has fallen here and it is coming down the whole time. sometimes really fine volcanic dust, sometimes thicker particles. if i hold out my hand you might be able to actually see it falling from the sky and landing. and that is happening continuously. that is why we've got the masks and we've also got eye protection as well. one other problem has been traffic jams because of the amount of roads that are closed.
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the traffic is building up with people trying to get through and there is a risk that this side of the island actually gets cut off by the lava flow. that will probably happen at some point. so we are starting to see how everyday life is being disrupted here and this eruption is causing problems notjust for the people whose homes are directly at risk. and the big question is how long will this last and what will the future impact be. we have seen banana plantations which are the main source of industry here, we've seen banana leaves covered in ash. will they be productive in future, that is one question. but for now the emphasis is still on the volcano that continues to erupt and the sky is looking a bit darker today. with that ash cloud continuing to spread particles right across the eastern and southern tip of la palma. incredible images. there is been posted on social media on dan
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johnson news on twitter. thanks very much for watching outside source. hello. it's been a day of contrasting fortunes across the british isles, southern and eastern parts dry, fine and sunny for the most part. further north and west, nothing like it. a real absence of sunshine there in the western side of scotland. the reason for that, well, a weather front has crept its way in from the atlantic, and it's produced a wee bit of rain across northern and western parts of scotland. the cloud filtering its way through the day, down towards northern ireland, probably robbing the far north of england of sunshine as well. during the course of the evening and overnight, so, the remnants of that weather front drag the prospect of a little bit of rain into the north of england, north wales, eventually a real rattle of showers, if not longer spells of rain,
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getting in across central, northern and western parts of scotland — where it will be decidedly chilly, and that's because it will be very windy indeed. these are the gusts, and we are looking at gusts around about 65 mph through the shetland isles, and even further south, that gustiness just tending to keep the temperatures above single figures for most. so, the new day dawns with that low pressure pulling away towards scandinavia. the winds, as a consequence, beginning to ease. we bring in a new set of weather fronts back into western scotland with time during the course of the afternoon with bits of rain here. rather cloudy too down into the north of england, perhaps northern ireland. further south, with a bit of brightness, you could see 22—23 celsius. the old weather frontjust clouding things up for a time in the first part of the day across wales and the southwest of england, but even here, i think the sun will break out eventually for many. come friday, we have got another set of fronts close by to the north of scotland, another weak affair there. just thickening up the cloud and pushing a bit of rain into the western side of scotland, maybe northern ireland too. but it heralds the arrival of mild airs across all parts
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of the british isles. it comes at a price. the air coming in off the atlantic, moisture laden, so quite a bit of cloud, say, for the eastern side of scotland, and generally speaking, the further south and east you are, again, the brighter your skies will be, and the temperatures really responding to this, 22—23 celsius at the very best. and then on into the weekend, it is a similar sort of pattern, where we are looking away towards the south and southwest to bring up mild airs from way down towards the azores. not completely dry, not wall—to—wall sunshine, but for the end of september, not bad at all.
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this is bbc news, i'm james reynolds. the headlines at 8pm — two more energy firms collapse because of the spike in wholesale gas prices. it comes just hours after the energy regulator ofgem warned that hundreds of thousands of customers will have to move suppliers and that the worst isn't over. we are in unpredecented cost territory, and i'm afraid, you know, there are many, many factors that have contributed to that. so, it's very, very hard to predict how long that will last. no trade deal in sight with the us, but the prime minister says america will lift its ban on british lamb for the first time in decades. a pledge of half a billion doses of covid vaccine by president biden to help other countries fight coronavirus. the family of a primary school teacher who was killed in a south—east london park say they are devastated by her death.
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her parents are absolutely shocked.

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