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tv   Afghanistan  BBC News  September 25, 2021 5:30pm-6:01pm BST

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end, there was post on here. at the end, there was a media scrum and i managed to ask about his future relationship. i always worked hard to have good relationships. i invited the former prime _ relationships. i invited the former prime minister cameron when i was the mayor— prime minister cameron when i was the mayor and chancellor to help the decision_ the mayor and chancellor to help the decision on_ the mayor and chancellor to help the decision on brexit. but this is truly— decision on brexit. but this is truly from _ decision on brexit. but this is truly from my heart because i think the uk _ truly from my heart because i think the uk is _ truly from my heart because i think the uk is important for the development in europe, and that we will have _ development in europe, and that we will have to — development in europe, and that we will have to work together as friends _ will have to work together as friends. 50 will have to work together as friends. , ., ., �* will have to work together as friends. ., �* , friends. so you don't see the uk as a rival? i friends. so you don't see the uk as a rival? i see _ friends. so you don't see the uk as a rival? i see that _ friends. so you don't see the uk as a rival? i see that we _ friends. so you don't see the uk as a rival? i see that we will _ friends. so you don't see the uk as a rival? i see that we will have - a rival? i see that we will have aood a rival? i see that we will have good relationships _ a rival? i see that we will have good relationships between i a rival? i see that we will have | good relationships between the european union and the uk, and i hope _ european union and the uk, and i hope that— european union and the uk, and i hope that the political representatives in the uk understand that the _ representatives in the uk understand that the process of former process and the _ that the process of former process and the european union will
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continue _ and the european union will continue-— and the european union will continue. �* . ., , , continue. and that was interesting because all— continue. and that was interesting because all the _ continue. and that was interesting because all the three _ continue. and that was interesting because all the three top - continue. and that was interesting l because all the three top candidates to replace angela merkel have emphasised their desire to see germany recommit to the eu and deepen the work it does with its other member states. as for when we'll find out, the polls close on sunday evening. we'll know the outcome and the coalition talks start, because it won't get done on sunday. the coalition talks will begin, and only when a coalition is settled will be no who will replace angela merkel. settled will be no who will replace angela merkel-— settled will be no who will replace anuela merkel. ., ~ i. , . angela merkel. thank you very much, ros atkins- — angela merkel. thank you very much, ros atkins. you're _ angela merkel. thank you very much, ros atkins. you're watching _ angela merkel. thank you very much, ros atkins. you're watching bbc - ros atkins. you're watching bbc news. queues at petrol stations as the government prepares to announce a temporary visa scheme to make it easierforforeign lorry drivers to work in the uk. keir starmer heads for a showdown with labour's left over changes to the way the party chooses its mps and leaders. a book of condolence is opened for people to pay respects to teacher sabina nessa, who was killed in south—east london. and it's the final day
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of campaigning in germany, where voters will elect a new chancellor. now it's time for afghanistan the pakistan view. just over a month ago, the taliban swept into afg hanistan's capital, kabul. their lightning advance lasted only a few weeks, and they eventually walked into the capital without a fight, as former president ashraf ghani and much of his cabinet fled. a panicked evacuation ensued. now, the world is watching as the taliban form their government. exactly how they intend to rule remains unclear. the ministry for the propagation of virtue and prevention of vice is back, and last week, the taliban barred girls from secondary schools, with only boys and male teachers allowed back.
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in an exclusive interview, i speak to pakistan's prime minister, imran khan, about events in neighbouring afghanistan. i ask him how he intends to hold the new taliban government to account on human rights, and if they'll recognise afg hanistan's new rulers. prime minister, i suppose you're quite glad about what's happened in afghanistan. it suits pakistan very nicely, doesn't it? john, i'm glad because we were anticipating the sort of bloodbath that took place after the soviets withdrew from afghanistan in 1989. almost 200,000 afghans died in that 5—6 year period, so we were petrified here that when the us left, there would be a bloodbath, a similar bloodbath. and for pakistan, there
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were consequences — most of all, refugees. we already have 3 million refugees and we have no capacity to take any more. and secondly, if there was a protracted civil war in afghanistan, that too would have had implications for pakistan. so, from that point of view, no bloodshed. relatively, it has been a peaceful take over. a peaceful takeover. up to now, yes. but what happens from now on is a lot of concern to us. but the taliban are really a pakistani creation, aren't they? absolutely not. taliban were creation of the environment. after the soviets left, the warlords started fighting each other, and in that chaos emerged taliban. and why did taliban emerge? because they gave people a semblance of rule of law
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which did not exist before. previously — this is before taliban took over — every 50 miles, there was a checkpoint, there was a warlord who would then take money, and so it was a fractured afghanistan after the soviets left. so, taliban gave people a semblance of rule of law, and that's why they prevailed in afghanistan. but taliban came out of nowhere at that time — i'm talking about 96. but now, they also came out of nowhere, and many of the educated people, the more advanced people of afghanistan are leaving in their thousands because they're terrified of the organisation which you actually seem to approve of. john,
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that's not true. _ actually seem to approve of. john, that's not true. first _ actually seem to approve of. john, that's not true. first of _ actually seem to approve of. john, that's not true. first of all, - actually seem to approve of. john, that's not true. first of all, you - that's not true. first of all, you must understand that afghanistan is a history. afghanistan has resisted invaders throughout their history, and from people like us from 2008 onwards, i went specifically to the think tanks, i metjoe biden, i met john kerry, the senator at the time, and i explained to them there would not be a military solution. and at that time, they could have had some political solution — in other words, an inclusive government — but the us kept going for a military solution, which there wasn't one. so, pakistan was not responsible for what this current situation. it was actually the could coalition trying to find a
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military solution which didn't exist. we never knew what the us, what their ideal victory was in afghanistan. if it was al-qaeda and 0sama bin laden, al-qaeda was decimated in the first two years. it was finished. so, what did us hope to achieve? nation—building, democracy, liberating the women — whatever the aims were, they would not be military action.— not be military action. when the taliban took _ not be military action. when the taliban took over, _ not be military action. when the taliban took over, you _ not be military action. when the taliban took over, you were - not be military action. when the i taliban took over, you were quoted as saying that afghanistan had thrown off the shackles of slavery. you must be really embarrassed by that. ., ., ~' you must be really embarrassed by that. , ., ., .,, that. look, first of all, i was making a — that. look, first of all, i was making a speech. _ that. look, first of all, i was making a speech. the - that. look, first of all, i was l making a speech. the speech that. look, first of all, i was - making a speech. the speech was about, we were in inaugurating for the first time one government for the first time one government for the whole country. until pakistan
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inherited this colonial system which was for a tiny elite, it was the english medium, education system. so, we had this two tier system in place, and my exact words were that mental slavery is far more difficult to straight off than physical slavery, and i mentioned afghanistan. it was in that context. it was just translated into english and came out not as i intended. i and came out not as i intended. i understand that. but this is a really good opportunity for you now to say you condemn the excesses of the tallow —— the taliban and you feel by preventing women from getting a decent education once again, they're taking the wrong direction. would you like to say that to us now?—
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direction. would you like to say that to us now? john, absolutely. if an one that to us now? john, absolutely. if anyone has — that to us now? john, absolutely. if anyone has any _ that to us now? john, absolutely. if anyone has any idea _ that to us now? john, absolutely. if anyone has any idea of _ that to us now? john, absolutely. if anyone has any idea of what - that to us now? john, absolutely. if anyone has any idea of what this . anyone has any idea of what this was, it was a liberation of women. 0ur prophet, peace be upon him, we regard him as someone who gives right to women. who frees s slaves and gives equal rights to minorities. he ended racism. so, we look upon him with enlightenment. so, the idea that women should not get educated, is not islamic. it might have been some rural culture in afghanistan, but it has nothing to do with religion. can i say what the taliban did instead was, i mean,
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it's very encouraging. they say they have an inclusive government, they say they will have work, get an education. they will give... these are encouraging statements. 50 are encouraging statements. so you're approving the way the taliban are operating? h0. you're approving the way the taliban are operating?— are operating? no, i'm approving of what they have _ are operating? no, i'm approving of what they have said. _ are operating? no, i'm approving of what they have said. what - are operating? no, i'm approving of what they have said. what happens| what they have said. what happens now, john, i'm afraid i can't say. no one can tell where afghanistan goes from here, but what we hope and pray that after a0 years, the people of afghanistan will have peace and stability. of afghanistan will have peace and stabili . �* ., of afghanistan will have peace and stabili . �* . ., stability. annual give the taliban time to show _ stability. annual give the taliban time to show whether _ stability. annual give the taliban time to show whether they're - stability. annual give the taliban | time to show whether they're the kind of government you can approve
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of, orwill you kind of government you can approve of, or will you say to them they've got to shape up and behave properly? you know, ithink got to shape up and behave properly? you know, i think this is a great opportunity for the international community to actually incentivise taliban to walk the talk, what they said, to make sure they go in the direction. because as compared to last time, ifind direction. because as compared to last time, i find that the taliban are seeking international acceptability. i think they recognise that the situation in afghanistan, unless the international community helps them, this could really spiral out of control and it could really... there could be a huge humanitarian crisis. so i think they are reaching out to the international community, and that gives leverage to the international community to make sure the statements they've made actually
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implemented. i the statements they've made actually implemented-— the statements they've made actually imlemented. , ., , ., implemented. i must say from my own exerience implemented. i must say from my own exnerience in — implemented. i must say from my own experience in afghanistan, _ implemented. i must say from my own experience in afghanistan, what - experience in afghanistan, what tends to happen is the taliban leaders say one thing, but real day—to—day moment by moment power exists in the hands of the vigilantes that go around the streets. they're the ones that decide what the state of afghan society is. and it doesn't really matter what the top taliban leaders say, life is still going to be pretty terrible for ordinary afghans. pretty terrible for ordinary aft hans. , ., ., ., pretty terrible for ordinary afuhans. , ., ., ., ., pretty terrible for ordinary afhans. ., ., ., afghans. john, again, i cannot say which way afghanistan _ afghans. john, again, i cannot say which way afghanistan will - afghans. john, again, i cannot say| which way afghanistan will go from here. as i said, we are quite tense that if... and my biggest worry right now is the looming humanitarian crisis. clearly, there are factions within the taliban.
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they're are factions within the taliban. they�* re clearly are factions within the taliban. they're clearly the taliban who are at the helm, trying to get international acceptability. but then, there are those who have been in the field for 20 years, who would claim they've given a lot of sacrifices. i would claim they've given a lot of sacrifices. iwould imagine claim they've given a lot of sacrifices. i would imagine there would be many problems within the taliban. so, where's this goes, i'm afraid i'm not in a position to say what will happen. but i know what we want to happen. if they can stick to the statements they have made, it could be a new beginning. is the statements they have made, it could be a new beginning.- could be a new beginning. is that what the head _ could be a new beginning. is that what the head of _ could be a new beginning. is that what the head of your _ could be a new beginning. is that| what the head of your intelligence organisation told the taliban leadership when he went there the other day? the leadership when he went there the other da ? ., ., ,, other day? the head of isi when he went there. — other day? the head of isi when he went there, his _ other day? the head of isi when he went there, his main _ other day? the head of isi when he went there, his main concern - other day? the head of isi when he went there, his main concern was l
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went there, his main concern was there were three different terrorist groups that have been attacks in pakistan. 0ne groups that have been attacks in pakistan. one is isis. isis has conducted can tear terrorist attacks... the pakistani taliban who were in afghanistan who conducted attacks. thirdly, the separatists who use afghan soil to conduct attacks. so, our main concern is that afghan soil should not be used for terrorism in pakistan. i see for terrorism in pakistan. i see that, ijust _ for terrorism in pakistan. i see that, i just find _ for terrorism in pakistan. i see that, | just find it— for terrorism in pakistan. i see that, i just find it hard - for terrorism in pakistan. i see that, ijust find it hard to - that, ijust find it hard to understand how pakistan taliban could be terrorists in pakistan because my view, but not the taliban that they supports in afghanistan.
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surely they're terrorist in those terms. �* g ., surely they're terrorist in those terms. �* .,~ , ., , terms. but john, pakistan sided with the international _ terms. but john, pakistan sided with the international coalition _ terms. but john, pakistan sided with the international coalition with - terms. but john, pakistan sided with the international coalition with the l the international coalition with the united states after 9/11. pakistan is the country that suffered more than any other coalition. in fact, although coalition partners put together, they not even suffer a fraction of the casualties what this country went through. 80,000 pakistanis died because we joined this war against the taliban. remember, we were the coalition. all the logistical support to fight the taliban or dislodge them went to pakistan. pakistan was an ally, and the only ally that almost... there was a point we thought we were going down because there were 50 different military groups attacking the state of pakistan, and there were
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different types of pakistani taliban. there were no militant taliban. there were no militant taliban in pakistan. so we were considered collaborators. the groups we had trained who were fighting the soviets, they called pakistan collaborators and targeted us. so, this country took the greatest amount of suffering by being part of the coalition. so, the reason why the coalition. so, the reason why the taliban are back in power is not because of pakistan. if you want to know the real reason why they're backin know the real reason why they're back in power, all you have to do is an analysis. why did 300,000 well—equipped afghan army give up without a fight to 65, 70,000 lightly armed militia? if you go into the details, which we have,
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thatis into the details, which we have, that is the reason why the taliban are back in power. it's not because of pakistan. are back in power. it's not because of pakistan-— are back in power. it's not because of pakistan. pakistan has one really im ortant of pakistan. pakistan has one really important lever _ of pakistan. pakistan has one really important lever that _ of pakistan. pakistan has one really important lever that it _ of pakistan. pakistan has one really important lever that it could - of pakistan. pakistan has one really important lever that it could lose i important lever that it could lose to get what it wants in afghanistan. and that is the question of recognising the taliban as the legitimate government. are you going to do that? just legitimate government. are you going to do that? , ., g ., to do that? just one thing, john, i want to make _ to do that? just one thing, john, i want to make clear. _ to do that? just one thing, john, i want to make clear. people - to do that? just one thing, john, i want to make clear. people don'tl want to make clear. people don't understand the afghan character. afghans are a country which do not accept outside interference. we were accept outside interference. we were a country in 2001 that recognised the taliban government. when after 9/11 the us asked us to help them flush out al-qaeda or asked the taliban to give up 0sama bin laden,
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pakistan tried its best. they flatly refused pakistan. so, this idea that afghanistan can be controlled from outside, it's never happened. the moment any head of afghanistan is perceived as a foreign public, he loses credibility. —— foreign partner. what you say is pakistan has recognition. i have spoken to a conference and i spoke to all the neighbors— iran, use pakistan, todd discussed man. —— use pakistan. i spoke to the president there. all of us decided we will collectively take a decision to recognise afghanistan. that decision would depend upon will they have an inclusive government?
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their assurance of human rights and that afghan soil should not be used for terrorism, and neighbours are the most worried about that. so, that's where it lies.— the most worried about that. so, that's where it lies. does not mean that's where it lies. does not mean that ou that's where it lies. does not mean that you will _ that's where it lies. does not mean that you will recognise _ that's where it lies. does not mean that you will recognise them - that's where it lies. does not mean that you will recognise them if - that's where it lies. does not mean j that you will recognise them if they agreed those three points? we that you will recognise them if they agreed those three points?- agreed those three points? we will collectively take _ agreed those three points? we will collectively take a _ agreed those three points? we will collectively take a decision. - collectively take a decision. pakistan itself will not decide on its own? ., .. , pakistan itself will not decide on its own? ., , . 4, pakistan itself will not decide on itsown? ., , . ~ ., its own? no. exactly. we think that all the neighbours _ its own? no. exactly. we think that all the neighbours will— its own? no. exactly. we think that all the neighbours will get - its own? no. exactly. we think that all the neighbours will get togetherj all the neighbours will get together and we will see how they progress, and we will see how they progress, and whether to recognise them or not will be a collective decision. find will be a collective decision. and the fact is _ will be a collective decision. and the fact is that _ will be a collective decision. and the fact is that taliban don't have an inclusive government. they haven't got the taliban people who've helped them into power. they've been excluded so far. 50 they've been excluded so far. so far, they've been excluded so far. gr far, they they've been excluded so far. sr far, they haven't got an inclusive
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government. as we hoped they would. but they say this is just a transition, this is not the final government. and we are trying. i am trying that we should speak to them and ensure that they do have an inclusive government because there will not be any long—term sustainable peace and stability in afghanistan. but sustainable peace and stability in afghanistan-— sustainable peace and stability in afuhanistan. �* �*, afghanistan. but there's something more important _ afghanistan. but there's something more important than _ afghanistan. but there's something more important than anything - afghanistan. but there's something more important than anything from j more important than anything from the taliban government, and that's the taliban government, and that's the kind of purity of their ideology, their religious ideology. they're never going to allow women to go to schools or anything like that because it cuts across their whole notion of what a society should be. i whole notion of what a society should be— should be. i think they will allow women to go _ should be. i think they will allow women to go to _ should be. i think they will allow women to go to schools. - should be. i think they will allow women to go to schools. they i should be. i think they will allow.
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women to go to schools. they will allow that. they say they're doing it in phases, but that remains to be seen. what they do from now onwards, we can only hope to persuade them and encourage them and incentivise them in that direction. but sitting today, what happens, where they will 90, today, what happens, where they will go, i'm afraid i don't know. but you can influence _ go, i'm afraid i don't know. but you can influence it _ go, i'm afraid i don't know. but you can influence it by _ go, i'm afraid i don't know. but you can influence it by helping - go, i'm afraid i don't know. but you can influence it by helping the - can influence it by helping the other countries to decide to recognise them or not to? hide other countries to decide to recognise them or not to? we have already- -- — recognise them or not to? we have already--- i— recognise them or not to? we have already... i told _ recognise them or not to? we have already... i told you, _ recognise them or not to? we have already... i told you, i've _ recognise them or not to? we have already... i told you, i've already . already... i told you, i've already spoken to all the neighbours. i've spoken to all the neighbours. i've spoken to all the neighbours. i've spoken to the iranian president, they are the most relevant. and we have all decided that unless and until there is an inclusive
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government and as the respect for human rights, it would not be possible for us to recognise them. so, it really does depend on what they themselves do?— so, it really does depend on what they themselves do? absolutely. let me tell ou they themselves do? absolutely. let me tell you from _ they themselves do? absolutely. let me tell you from pakistan, _ they themselves do? absolutely. let me tell you from pakistan, our - me tell you from pakistan, our biggest worry. 0ur me tell you from pakistan, our biggest worry. our biggest worry is that this will be a huge humanitarian crisis, and that would immediately lead to a refugee problem. secondly, if they do not have an inclusive government and it gradually descends into a civil war, which if they do not include all the factions, sooner or later they will have again, a sort of civil war. that too will impact pakistan. it will be an unstable afghanistan.
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ideal placed first terrorist because there's no control, that is a worry. so, terrorism from afghan soil and secondly, if there is a humanitarian crisis or a civil war, a refugee issue for us. crisis or a civil war, a refugee issue for us— crisis or a civil war, a refugee issue for us. can i “ust ask you, “ust no issue for us. can i “ust ask you, just go back on _ issue for us. can i just ask you, just go back on something - issue for us. can i just ask you, just go back on something you | issue for us. can ijust ask you, - just go back on something you said - just go back on something you said — the taliban leadership has assured you or suggested that it will allow women's education again? how strong was the assurance?— was the assurance? public statements. _ was the assurance? public statements. their - was the assurance? public . statements. their spokesman was the assurance? public - statements. their spokesman came was the assurance? public _ statements. their spokesman came on television and said women will be allowed to work, they will be allowed to work, they will be allowed to study. he used it in the islamic context. so, i guess what he means by islamic context is they will have segregation.—
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means by islamic context is they will have segregation. before, of course, will have segregation. before, of course. they _ will have segregation. before, of course, they would _ will have segregation. before, of course, they would blow - will have segregation. before, of course, they would blow up - will have segregation. before, ofj course, they would blow up girls' schools and kill anyone in them. i schools and kill anyone in them. i know. this idea of not allowing girls to study, believe me, has nothing to do with religion. because we give special stipends to our girls, we give them extra money so they will put girls in school. ianthem they will put girls in school. when ou've they will put girls in school. when you've seen what _ they will put girls in school. when you've seen what happens - they will put girls in school. when you've seen what happens here i they will put girls in school. when you've seen what happens here in afghanistan, you must be pretty disgusted with the way the taliban are behaving. i disgusted with the way the taliban are behaving-— disgusted with the way the taliban are behavinu. ,, g ., ., are behaving. i think, john, what we should hope — are behaving. i think, john, what we should hope for— are behaving. i think, john, what we should hope for and _ are behaving. i think, john, what we should hope for and try _ are behaving. i think, john, what we should hope for and try for - are behaving. i think, john, what we should hope for and try for is - are behaving. i think, john, what we should hope for and try for is to - should hope for and try for is to make them go into that direction. and in the statements they've made, and secondly, afghans are very strong people. i mean, as a race,
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they're very strong. the women are very strong. i feel, they're very strong. the women are very strong. ifeel, give they're very strong. the women are very strong. i feel, give them time and they will assert their rights. how much time? years? ads, and they will assert their rights. how much time? years? a year, two ears, how much time? years? a year, two years. three — how much time? years? a year, two years, three years? _ how much time? years? a year, two years, three years? three _ how much time? years? a year, two years, three years? three years? - how much time? years? a year, two years, three years? three years? at| years, three years? three years? at the moment. _ years, three years? three years? at the moment, john, _ years, three years? three years? at the moment, john, it's— years, three years? three years? at the moment, john, it'sjust - years, three years? three years? at the moment, john, it'sjust too - the moment, john, it'sjust too early to say anything because it's barely been a month. after 20 years of civil war, they have come back into power. in a short period of time, we will know the direction they are going. i time, we will know the direction they are going-— they are going. i think we know it now. i they are going. i think we know it now- i don't _ they are going. i think we know it now. i don't know. _ they are going. i think we know it now. i don't know. i'm _ they are going. i think we know it now. i don't know. i'm an - they are going. i think we know it l now. i don't know. i'm an optimist. i think now. i don't know. i'm an optimist. i think there _ now. i don't know. i'm an optimist. i think there is _ now. i don't know. i'm an optimist. i think there is a _ now. i don't know. i'm an optimist. i think there is a chance _ now. i don't know. i'm an optimist. i think there is a chance that - now. i don't know. i'm an optimist. i think there is a chance that there | i think there is a chance that there will be peace in afghanistan after a0 years, and once there's peace and stability, the afghan people strong enough, they will reserve their rights. enough, they will reserve their riahts. �* ., enough, they will reserve their riahts. . . , enough, they will reserve their riahts.�* . , , ., , enough, they will reserve their riahts. . , .,,, ., rights. afghan history shows us that movements — rights. afghan history shows us that movements like _ rights. afghan history shows us that
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movements like the _ rights. afghan history shows us that movements like the taliban - rights. afghan history shows us that movements like the taliban leaders| movements like the taliban leaders don't really last very long. they lasted five years last time. this is not a permanent answer to afghanistan's problems, is it? i don't think so. i think this is just the beginning. as i said, where it goes from here, no one can predict. but what we hope is they will have peace. so, peace is the key, and we hope that once there's peace, afghanistan will move in the right direction. hello again. after a very cloudy start to the day, very gradually through the afternoon, most of us saw some brighter weather
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pushing in, some sunshine, the cloud has completely cleared in a sussex to give those blue skies. not like that everywhere. in devon, the cloud stuck and we had some mist and fog over higher ground, some drizzle in the air as well. there's the extent of today's cloud, but out in the atlantic, this bright stripe of cloud you can see just here, well, this is a cold front, and behind that cold front, the air is coming down from polar regions, so a much cooler air mass. that cooler air will surge its way eastwards across the uk into sunday night and into next week, it's going to be a lot cooler than the weather we've seen over recent times. temperatures this weekend into the low 20s, but towards the middle of next week, we'll be looking at temperatures struggling to make the mid—teens in places, so will certainly feel a lot cooler. overnight tonight, cloud will tend to rethicken, reform, the odd patch of drizzle just about anywhere, especially across the south and south—west, and mist and fog patches around our coasts and hills, particularly southern and western areas.
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particularly southern temperatures, just like last night, 13 to 15 celsius. 0n into sunday's forecast, brighter spells for a time in northern ireland, but this band of rain, this cold front, the air turns heavy through this afternoon and it the rain turns heavy through this afternoon and it will be followed by gusty winds, winds of a0 mph, wet and windy weather pushing into western scotland through the afternoon. east scotland, england and wales, with slightly stronger winds, a better chance at those winds will knock a few holes into the cloud sheet, and so should be a brighter day for late september. highs of 23. sunday night, our band of rain, our cold front continues to push eastwards across the uk, still there monday morning across east scotland from eastern england, but clearly out of the way. but clearing out of the way. the weather then brightens up with a mixture of sunshine and showers, maybe even an odd rumble of thunder, and the temperatures much closer to average —
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18 in london is our average, 13 or 1a in the north—west even a smidge below—average. and then, deeper into the week ahead, it stays very unsettled, heavy rain, strong winds, gales for some on tuesday and then we see further showers around later in the week. so, autumn arriving next week. a media scrum and i managed to ask
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about his future relationship. this is bbc news the headlines at six: queues at petrol stations as the government prepares to announce a temporary visa scheme to make it easierforforeign lorry drivers to work in the uk. the labour leader heads for a showdown with the party's left over changes to the way the it chooses its mps and leaders. a book of condolence is opened for people to pay respects to teacher sabina nessa, who was killed in south—east london. and it's the final day of campaigning in germany, where voters will elect a new chancellor.
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good afternoon.

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