Skip to main content

tv   Outside Source  BBC News  September 29, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

7:00 pm
hello, i'm kasia madera. this is outside source. shocking details emerge of how a british police officer pretended to arrest sarah everard before kidnapping, raping and murdering her. her father and sister asked couzens, who had his head bowed, to face them. couzens started shaking. sarah's family told her killer that there can never be redemption for his horrendous act. he'll be sentenced on thursday. also ahead, america's top generals give more evidence about their advice tojoe biden before the us pulled its troops out of afghanistan. what they say they told the president doesn't tally with what his aides say he knew. can anyone come out of the row
7:01 pm
with their reputation intact? poland says a record number of migrants have tried to enter from belarus. we'll speak to the polish government about allegations it's breaking the law and pushing them back. hello and welcome. we are starting here in the uk, where new distressing details have emerged at the start of the two—day sentencing of the police officer who raped and murdered sarah everard in london. today, a court heard how wayne couzens, who was a serving metropolitan police officer, used covid rules to pretend to arrest the 33—year—old as she was walking home from a friend's house. her murder in march sparked an outcry against male violence towards women. our special correspondent lucy manning was in court. "she was my precious little girl,"
7:02 pm
said sarah everard's mother. "i can never talk to her, never hold her again. i am tormented at the thought of what she endured." that was at the hands of wayne couzens, in handcuffs when he was arrested at home, telling lie after lie. he'd already kidnapped, raped, murdered and burnt sarah. he's asked if he knows her. do you know sarah? i don't, no. 0k. do you know where sarah is? no. all right. i'm sat in handcuffs and... so you must have something to say that i know her. as sarah walked from her friend's house, couzens was hunting for a victim — this the moment of that deception. his car on the pavement, hazard lights on, he stops sarah. his arm outstretched, showing her his warrant card, using his handcuffs, he arrests her. he'd previously been on covid
7:03 pm
patrol, so knew what to say. witnesses see sarah with her arms behind her back, but they think it's an undercover police operation. it was kidnap. he used all the equipment and knowledge of being a police officer to do it. couzens sat in the dock, never lifting his head. sarah's family and friends listened to the devastating detail that is their daily reality. in the hours after kidnapping her, there was a mixture of the banal and the evil. after dumping sarah's body in woods in kent, he stops at costa coffee to get a hot chocolate. police think he's raped and murdered sarah by this time. he then throws sarah's phone into a stream, later recovered by a police diver. the next day, he goes to buy a green can and fills it up with petrol. he returns to the woods and burns sarah's body in a fridge. later, it's dumped in water. that same day, he calls the family vet as if nothing has happened.
7:04 pm
yeah, i was wondering if i could book my dog in for the vet, so i can have a discussion about her issues, please. he goes back again to the woods for a family trip with his wife and children, just days after he'd left sarah's remains there. sarah's family remained so dignified as they told the court about sarah and about what they had lost. her father and sister asked couzens, who had his head bowed, to face them. couzens started shaking. mr everard told him, "sarah was handcuffed and unable to defend herself. this preys on my mind all the time. i can never forgive you for taking sarah away from us. all my family want is sarah back. you have broken our hearts." her mother, susan, said...
7:05 pm
her sister told couzens. .. couzens has still never explained what exactly happened that night. a police officer betraying his uniform, a family left with no answers and without sarah, and a woman who had her life — her future — taken. lucy manning with that report. beyond the shock and anger, sarah everard's death raised serious concerns about whether the police can and are protecting women. back in may, the centre for women'sjustice released research showing that in the past two years, 129 women reported a serving police officer
7:06 pm
for domestic or sexual violence. it found "systemic problems" in police investigations into those cases, with "inadequate investigations, inadequate charging and misconduct decisions", and "in some cases accused officers and their colleagues of abusing their powers, harassing, punishing and victimising women." it calls this a "locker room" culture, where police officers allegedly abuse with impunity. well, before the sentencing, scotland yard released a statement saying... we are going to turn to the united states now. america's top military chiefs have been grilled for a second day on the us exit from afghanistan, this time in the house
7:07 pm
of representatives. yesterday, general mark milley and general kenneth mckenzie told the senate committee that they advised joe biden to keep 2,500 troops in afghanistan, which appeared to contradict president biden�*s own statements. well, here's defense secretary lloyd austin today on the advice he gave. in my view, there is no, was no, risk—free, status quo option. i think that the taliban had been clear that if we stayed there longer, they were going to recommence attacks on our forces. i think while it's conceivable that you could stay there, my view is that you would have had to deploy more forces in order to protect ourselves and accomplish any missions that we would've been assigned. it's also my view, mr chairman, that the best way to end this war was through a negotiated settlement. and, sadly, that did not happen. joe biden�*s top military adviser, the chairman of thejoint chiefs of staff, general mark milley,
7:08 pm
was also grilled by the committee. he gave this explanation for why the military and intelligence services overestimated the strength of the afghan military. i don't know the full answer yet, but i think the primary reason we missed it was because we essentially cannot, we have yet to develop a really effective technique to read people's hearts, theirwill, their mind, their leadership sort of skills. those are intangibles. the moral is to the physical as three is to one in the conduct of war. so, very difficult to measure. when we pull our advisers off of organisations at lower levels, you start missing that fingertip touch for that intangible of, "we can count the trucks and the guns and the units and all that, we can watch that from different techniques, but we can't measure a human heart from a machine." you got to be there to do that, and i think that was probably one of the most significant contributing factors to missing the deterioration in the morale of the afghan army. general milley was also questioned again on china.
7:09 pm
earlier this month, it was reported that he'd held calls with chinese officials during the final days of the trump presidency — without the president's knowledge — to tell his chinese counterparts that there was no threat of war, and if there was, he would call to let them know. these claims have infuriated republicans. here is republican vicky hartzler questioning him on that. did you or did you not tell him that if we were going to attack, - you would let him know? as part of that conversation, i said, "general lee, there's not going to be a war, there's not going to be an attack between great powers. and if there was, the tensions would build up, there would be calls going back and forth from all kinds of senior officials." i said, "hell, general lee, i'll probably give you a call, but we're not going to attack you. trust me, we're not going to attack you." these are two great powers, and i'm doing my best to transmit the president's intent — president trump's intent — to ensure the american people are protected from an incident that could escalate. i understand your intent, - but i think you articulating that, that you would tell him -
7:10 pm
you would give him a call, i think is worthy of your resignation. let's unpick some of what we have been hearing. our correspondent gary o'donoghue has been listening to the day's hearing. we spoke yesterday, similar line of questioning. what stands out for you? in particular it is this aspect of who knew what about the event hundred force members, troops, that potentially were advised to stay in the us? in potentially were advised to stay in the us? .. ., ., , the us? in fact, the hearing was 'ust the us? in fact, the hearing was just wrapped _ the us? in fact, the hearing was just wrapped up. _ the us? in fact, the hearing was just wrapped up, so _ the us? in fact, the hearing was just wrapped up, so i _ the us? in fact, the hearing was just wrapped up, so i do not - the us? in fact, the hearing was. just wrapped up, so i do not know the us? in fact, the hearing was . just wrapped up, so i do not know if every member of the house committee got a chance, but quite a lot of them did. and, yeah, they have been focusing a lot on that, particular republicans focusing on that question of whetherjoe biden told the truth in an interview about the vice he had been given about the number of trips to glittery thought ought to be left behind. that is something that is been a persistent theme. that question of china has come up again and again and as you
7:11 pm
would expect, and general milley delete setting out today some of the ways in which he believed he was not acting rogora as a traitor as some republicans have called him —— really setting out ways. pointing out exactly who knew who was doing and how many people were in the loop, etc, but stilla and how many people were in the loop, etc, but still a lot of questions remain unanswered about the nature of the collapse of and the nature of the collapse of and the evacuation and the chaos, all that, and i think some of the big questions that remain unresolved, and there was not really a very upbeat message on this from the generals, was how is america going to keep an eye on what al-qaeda and other isys affiliates are doing in afghanistan? how are they going to prevent them rebuilding, reconstructing, reforming? and launching fresh attacks? they were not a whole lot positive about that. they did touch upon how the
7:12 pm
intelligence services had underestimated the strength of the afghan army, that's something that we did hear about today as well. yeah, the issues here seems to be there was a whole series of judgments compounded to end up in a miss calculation, so the effect... this is in their words, their view — the effect of the doha agreement on the effect of the doha agreement on the morale of the afghan army, the extent to which there was corruption in the upper reaches of the afghan army, the extent to which the taliban had worked very hard to get regional and rural commanders and provincial people on their side, a whole series of things like that, that seemed to come to a point where, certainly, the military and the administration were taken by surprise at the utter ii the administration were taken by surprise at the utter 11 day collapse of the afghan state and the
7:13 pm
afghan military. that is something i think they will be looking at. talking about these after action reviews. there will be looking into that in connection with the airport but also the wider strategic failure, as mark milley put it, over the entire afghan mission entirely. gary, thanks for keeping us up to date, informing us that second day of hearings has finished. terry o'donoghue, take you very much. —— gary o'donoghue. here in the uk, the leader of the opposition labour party, sir keir starmer, has made a stinging attack on the prime minister, calling him "a trickster" and "a showman with nothing left to show". in a keynote speech to his party's annual party conference, mr starmer accused borisjohnson of having no plan for tackling the country's problems. here's our political editor laura kuenssberg. a blast of fresh air? that's how keir starmer wants you to see him. labour's week's been bumpy.
7:14 pm
and he had to show today that he really is in charge, impatient for the chance. i've waited 17 months, 25 days and two hours to appear in front of you in this hall as leader of our great party. choosing first to confront the party's crushing defeat at the election, of the project he was part of, too. to those labour voters who said their grandparents would turn in their graves, but they couldn't trust us with high office, to those that reluctantly chose the tories, i say these simple but powerful words — we will never, under my leadership, go into an election with a manifesto that is not a serious plan for government. applause with his wife watching on, he explained how family has guided his beliefs.
7:15 pm
my dad was a toolmaker in a factory who worked on the shop floor all his life. he gave me a deep respect for the dignity of work. and when i tell you that good work and fair growth will be the priority for a labour government, i haven't learned this in some political seminar, i learned it around the kitchen table, from my dad. that is why i am so proud to lead a party whose name is labour! applause but all week, there has been noise here, angst that keir starmer�*s abandoning jeremy corbyn�*s principles. heckles were hurled at him from the floor. i have no regrets! he had lines ready. shouting slogans or changing lives, conference? then a new chant. go keir, go keir...!
7:16 pm
he had the hall. he spoke for nearly 90 minutes — sustenance required. with plans for mental health, insulating homes, education and technology, and a real departure from the man who used to stand on that platform — promises on crime, praise for the military, talk of creating wealth and national pride. in this conference hall, we are patriots. and while he didn't say his name, there was a tribute to tony blair... education is so important, i'm tempted to say it three times. ..and... hospital waits, down... ..what labour did in power. that's levelling up! power is his purpose now. this is a big moment that demands leadership, leadership founded on the principles
7:17 pm
that have informed my life — work, care, equality, security. these are the tools of my trade, and with them, i will go to work. thank you, conference. he didn't mention jeremy corbyn by name. he didn't have to, because it's obvious in this hall, in brighton this week, the power of the left has drained away, giving him a new sense of confidence in a changing party and a bolder voice that labour has been desperate to hear. it was a great speech. it showed that he cares about working, he cares about family. absolutely smashed it. i mean, this is the keir starmer that we all know. you wanted to hear more? that's what i was calling for, that genuine alternative. they were delighted. the vast majority of the crowd seemed pleased — relieved, maybe. doubts on the left, though, will linger. i didn't think that was his moment. i thought it was quite uninspiring. keir starmer leaves the stage
7:18 pm
not his party's darling, nor its hero, but perhaps having proven himself a leader, walking taller, with a conviction to win. the leader's team more than content tonight. but the party's problems remain profound, and he can't know if the country is ready to embrace him yet. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, brighton. we are going to return to our top story, the distressing details that have emerged at the start of the two day sentencing of the police officer who raped and murdered a young woman sarah everard, in london. we can speak to professor of criminology aisha k gill, from the university of roehampton. for the last decade, you've been involved in training but the police and also specialist prosecutors on violence against women. wayne couzens used his position, he used his police lawrence to trick sarah
7:19 pm
everard —— police warrant. how do you begin to build trust with the police force now? i you begin to build trust with the police force now?— police force now? i think it is really difficult. _ police force now? i think it is really difficult. here - police force now? i think it is really difficult. here was - police force now? i think it is really difficult. here was a i police force now? i think it is - really difficult. here was a police officer who in uniform, in the line officer who in uniform, in the line of duty, abused his position, a police officer is supposed to maintain law and order, in terms of protecting the public. he preached that sacred obligation —— he breached that. and what he did was unforgivable, unimaginable violence, and today we have heard at the old bailey, in terms of the prosecution, the unimaginable violence that sarah everard was objected to — kidnapped, raped, murdered 80 miles away from her home —— subjected to. if we want to look in and look at the issue of
7:20 pm
trust, this is a heinous crime, a critical offence in relation to the murder of women, and how many cases like this? the prosecutor today said, even though she was walking home, that does not do justice to the ordeal that she was subjected the ordeal that she was sub'ected to. �* ., , ., , ., . to. and to be honest, the violence auainst to. and to be honest, the violence against women — to. and to be honest, the violence against women sector _ to. and to be honest, the violence i against women sector and colleagues and myself, we are enraged, we want to ensure . , , . to ensure that the public can feel safe, to ensure that the public can feel safe. when _ to ensure that the public can feel safe, when they _ to ensure that the public can feel safe, when they reach _ to ensure that the public can feel safe, when they reach out - to ensure that the public can feel safe, when they reach out for - safe, when they reach out for protection from those who are supposed to walk the walk of law in order. i think there is need for a sense of urgency, in terms of greater accountability. we know from the center for women's justice in the center for women's justice in the last year that a super complaint has been launched. this is not the only case, tragically, there are
7:21 pm
other cases where police officers have used their powers to abuse, violate women in our communities. professor, the centre for women's justice, which you just quoted, it is describing this as a locker room culture, police officers abusing with impunity, so how do you come up with impunity, so how do you come up with the terms of the training you give, fix this? the with the terms of the training you give. fix this?— give, fix this? the system is broken. give, fix this? the system is broken- in — give, fix this? the system is broken. in terms _ give, fix this? the system is broken. in terms of - give, fix this? the system is broken. in terms of fixing i give, fix this? the system is i broken. in terms of fixing this, i think we have to recognise that public confidence will not grow if lessons are not learned. the police must accept culpability when they make mistakes. and actually enact real change, in terms of ensuring that these kind of cases do not happen again, but i am afraid
7:22 pm
that... i know your listeners will feel a sense of rage and anger as well, in terms of those who are in the line of duty, but we know in the united kingdom in particular, but when we look at black and racialized women's experience is a violence, they were also subjected to under capital behaviour —— on except it will behaviour by the police following their debts. we do need to make sure that those who commit these kinds of crimes are subjected to punitive measures, and i know the judge in this case has communicated that they are looking for a whole life tariff, and we will have to see what that looks like tomorrow, but at the end of the day, a woman died, at the end of the day, a woman died, a woman died, and how many more before there is real change? there
7:23 pm
has to be greater accountability, because too many women are dying. professor —— professor gill, professor of terminology at roehampton, thank you. let's turn to spain's canary islands. lava from a volcano on la palma has now reached the sea, ten days since it first began erupting. this was the moment the lava hit the atlantic ocean, afterflowing down the mountain, destroying everything in its path. this footage was taken by spanish police around iipm local time on tuesday, near the town of tazacorte. and this was the scene as day broke. clouds of steam filled the sky. there are fears that parts of the shoreline could now collapse, triggering explosions. everyone within three and a half kilometres of the volcano have been told to leave immediately and to use a wet cloth to protect their mouths and noses.
7:24 pm
let's speak live to volcanologist david pyle from the university of oxford. david, we talk about the toxic gases being released as we see the lava mixing with the ocean. just explain why they are toxic, why should we be worried about them? yes. why they are toxic, why should we be worried about them?— worried about them? yes, the gases escain: worried about them? yes, the gases escaping off — worried about them? yes, the gases escaping off the _ worried about them? yes, the gases escaping off the lava _ worried about them? yes, the gases escaping off the lava flow, _ worried about them? yes, the gases escaping off the lava flow, as - worried about them? yes, the gases escaping off the lava flow, as it i escaping off the lava flow, as it runs down towards dc, are rich in volcanic gases like sulphur. they are really nasty and uefa but when the model reaches the sea level it boils the sea water dry, it comes into contact with dilaver —— but when the model reaches. the second thing is the sea water shows the lava that comes into contact with it and i can produce tiny pieces of volcanic glass. you've got this horrible mixture of steam, boiling water with hydra cork acid and tiny articles of glass in it, and this is
7:25 pm
forming this dense plume that we see at the lava sea water contact. is a dense plume, as it is to breathe, would be very unpleasant, so the safest way is to let it disperse, be dispersed by wind, and hopefully the 2.5, to exclusionjump dispersed by wind, and hopefully the 2.5, to exclusion jump will keep most people out of harm's way. and most people out of harm's way. and david, we most people out of harm's way. and david. we have _ most people out of harm's way. and david, we have been watching these very dramatic pictures for the past ten days. we don't have too much time left, but can you tell if this irruption is calming down? that's ve hard irruption is calming down? that's very hard to _ irruption is calming down? that's very hard to tell. _ irruption is calming down? that's very hard to tell. we _ irruption is calming down? that's very hard to tell. we have - irruption is calming down? that's very hard to tell. we have got i irruption is calming down? that's| very hard to tell. we have got lots of people on the ground measuring all kinds of parameters, the heat, the amount of lava coming out, but we cannot count how much molten rock is left inside the earth. we know that previous our options on this talking a lesson three weeks, so
7:26 pm
thatis talking a lesson three weeks, so that is our best guess.— talking a lesson three weeks, so that is our best guess. thank you for our that is our best guess. thank you for your best _ that is our best guess. thank you for your best guess. _ that is our best guess. thank you for your best guess. great i that is our best guess. thank you for your best guess. great to i that is our best guess. thank you for your best guess. great to talk to you about what is happening, david pyle from the university of oxford. we will of course monitor 0xford. we will of course monitor the pictures coming from la palma —— previous eruptions. hello, good evening. today brought a scattering of showers across the uk, but actually on balance, it was a decent day with a lot of dry weather and some spells of sunshine. a beautiful scene there for a weather watcher in cornwall. this, though, really wasjust a drier, brighter interlude, because through the rest of the week, we see the return of spells of heavy rain and potentially some very strong winds. you can see we were in a gap between weather systems today. clear spells, just a few showers, but here comes another stripe of cloud. this is our next weather front, and that will be working in from the west as we head through this evening and tonight. rain spreading quite quickly eastwards, but ahead of that rain band, where we keep clear skies across eastern parts, temperatures will at least
7:27 pm
for a time dip away. and some spots in north east scotland could get all the way down to freezing, but it will be milder out west with the clouds, the rain and a strengthening wind, a very windy start to the day, particularly across northern ireland and western scotland. we could see winds gusts for a time close to 60 mph. tomorrow will bring cloud and outbreaks of showery rain quite radically southwards and eastwards. it will stay quite windy through the day. some brighter glimpses, some sunny spells, most especially i think across northern scotland and maybe parts of south east england for a time. temperatures, if anything, a little up on where they were today, but still only between 14—17 degrees. further spells of rain to move eastwards as we move through thursday night and into friday morning because low pressure will be firmly in charge. this weather front will bring some early rain across eastern and south—eastern parts of england. that will clear away, and actually we will see the return of some sunshine on friday, certainly across england and wales. northern ireland and scotland will see showers or longer spells of rain into the far north west. it's another windy day, quite widely wind gusts in excess of a0 mph. could be stronger than that, though, across parts of scotland,
7:28 pm
feeling particularly chilly in the north, just 11—12, 16—17 down towards the south. and low pressure dominates the scene into the weekend. this will little weather system running in from the west could potentially spin up into quite a deep area of low pressure as it moves northwards. we'll have to keep a close eye on that because it could potentially bring some very strong winds indeed. certainly the risk of gales through the weekend, some heavy rain at times. so, if you have outdoor plans, do stay tuned to the forecast. some sunny spells between the downpours and temperatures generally between 12—17 degrees.
7:29 pm
7:30 pm
hello, i'm kasia madera, this is 0utside source. shocking details emerge of how a british police officer pretended to arrest sarah everard before kidnapping, raping and murdering her. her father and sister asked couzens, who had his head bowed, to face them. couzens started shaking. sarah's family told her killer there can never be redemption for his horrendous act he'll be sentenced on thursday. also ahead, the european union accuses belarus of trying to use migrants to create instablity. poland says a record number of migrants have tried to enter from belarus. we'll speak to the polish government about allegations it's breaking the law and pushing them back.
7:31 pm
also ahead, china is spending billions of dollars more than any other country on secret development funds, but why? we're going to spend the next few minutes talking about migrants caught up at the border between poland and belarus. the eu is accusing belarus of trying to destabilise the region by pushing thousands of people over the border. while poland is allegedly pushing them back to belarus breaking international law. let's start with the eu's home affairs commissioner. what we see now in belarus is lukashenko is desperate. he's really hurt by the economic sanctions and the sanctions the europeans have put on him. he is really desperate, and he's trying to destabilise the european union by bringing in migrants and facilitating
7:32 pm
them and pushing them into the european union. the problem lies at this border between poland, which is in the eu, and belarus, which isn't. there's been a huge spike in the number of migrants trying to cross over. many have come from afghanistan. we know five people have died in freezing conditions there. 9000 attempts have been made to cross into poland since august. compare that to 122 people who were detained after crossing the border illegally in the whole of 2020. belarus is accused of flying in migrants and pushing them over the border as retaliation against sanctions for its brutal political crackdown. but president lukashenko puts the blame on poland. translation: it is wrong that people are suffering. - yes, we dressed them, we brought them some firewood and some shawls. but they would freeze in winter.
7:33 pm
these are people who walked thousands of kilometres from the south. to put it short — it's a humanitarian catastrophe on the border. our neighbour has introduced an emergency and doesn't let anyone in so that no—one knows that people are dying. poland is accused of being heavy handed in its response. it's introduced a state of emergency which keeps journalists and ngos away from the area. and a message on the interior ministry's website says... our europe correspondent nick beake recently travelled to the area last week and sent this report. we meet men who fear they will be
7:34 pm
the next to die here. overwhelmed by the cold. they'd flown to belarus from far and wide, each with the promise they could then reach an eu country, but they're stranded. if the belarussians could send my back to my country, fine. i would be ok. better i die in my country. this 21—year—old from cameron tells us how belarussian troops took them to the polish border. they monitored the polish police across the border, they tell us this way, there's no polish police, so they tell us we must cross those wires. we can see a lot people here are not in a good state. apparently a doctor's on the way, but also the border force are on the way, so it's not clear what's going to happen to these men. they are playing us like a football.
7:35 pm
belarus would beat us, push us to poland, then the polish would catch us and beat us and push us back to belarus. we put this to the local commander, who's just arrived. have your border force been pushing migrants back into belarus? he won't answer that one. so that was the situation on friday. today, nick beake tweeted... he says the polish government plans to send text messages urging migrants to "go back to minsk". trouble is, he says, most he met last week said belarussians had stolen their phones. in a moment, we'll speak to poland's deputy minister of foreign affairs, marcin przydacz. but first we're going to talk to kalina czwarnog, who's from the ngo fundacja ocalenie, the salvation foundation. kalina, you and your team have been visiting the border over the past
7:36 pm
few months since the number of migrants trying to cross has increased. what migrants been saying to you? about half of august, we found a group _ about half of august, we found a group of— about half of august, we found a group of 32 — about half of august, we found a group of 32 people _ about half of august, we found a group of 32 people from - about half of august, we found a i group of 32 people from afghanistan who were _ group of 32 people from afghanistan who were stuck _ group of 32 people from afghanistan who were stuck on _ group of 32 people from afghanistan who were stuck on the _ group of 32 people from afghanistan who were stuck on the border - group of 32 people from afghanistan i who were stuck on the border between the border— who were stuck on the border between the border guards _ who were stuck on the border between the border guards are _ who were stuck on the border between the border guards are belarus- who were stuck on the border between the border guards are belarus and i the border guards are belarus and the border guards are belarus and the border— the border guards are belarus and the border guards _ the border guards are belarus and the border guards of— the border guards are belarus and the border guards of poland. i the border guards are belarus and the border guards of poland. andl the border guards are belarus and i the border guards of poland. and now they are _ the border guards of poland. and now they are stitt— the border guards of poland. and now they are still there. _ the border guards of poland. and now they are still there. it's _ the border guards of poland. and now they are still there. it's been - the border guards of poland. and now they are still there. it's been 50 - they are still there. it's been 50 days. they— they are still there. it's been 50 days. they were _ they are still there. it's been 50 days. they were saying - they are still there. it's been 50 days. they were saying that i they are still there. it's been 50 days. they were saying that the j days. they were saying that the belarussians _ days. they were saying that the belarussians are _ days. they were saying that the belarussians are not _ days. they were saying that the belarussians are not letting i days. they were saying that the i belarussians are not letting them out. belarussians are not letting them out they — belarussians are not letting them out they are _ belarussians are not letting them out. they are not _ belarussians are not letting them out. they are not letting - belarussians are not letting them out. they are not letting them i belarussians are not letting them out. they are not letting them go back to _ out. they are not letting them go back to belarus _ out. they are not letting them go back to belarus or— out. they are not letting them go back to belarus or further. - out. they are not letting them go back to belarus or further. and i out. they are not letting them go i back to belarus or further. and also the polish _ back to belarus or further. and also the polish forces _ back to belarus or further. and also the polish forces are _ back to belarus or further. and also the polish forces are not _ back to belarus or further. and also the polish forces are not letting i the polish forces are not letting them _ the polish forces are not letting them in — the polish forces are not letting them in even _ the polish forces are not letting them in even when _ the polish forces are not letting them in even when they- the polish forces are not letting them in even when they ask i the polish forces are not letting them in even when they ask forj them in even when they ask for asylum, — them in even when they ask for asylum, even_ them in even when they ask for asylum, even if— them in even when they ask for asylum, even if they _ them in even when they ask for asylum, even if they ask- them in even when they ask for asylum, even if they ask for- asylum, even if they ask for international— asylum, even if they ask for international protection i asylum, even if they ask forl
7:37 pm
international protection from poland. _ international protection from poland. and _ international protection from poland, and that's _ international protection from poland, and that's actually . international protection from poland, and that's actually a | poland, and that's actually a violation _ poland, and that's actually a violation of— poland, and that's actually a violation of international- poland, and that's actually a violation of international law poland, and that's actually a i violation of international law of the geneva _ violation of international law of the geneva convention. - violation of international law of i the geneva convention. according to the geneva convention. according to the law, _ the geneva convention. according to the law, the — the geneva convention. according to the law, the polish— the geneva convention. according to the law, the polish border— the geneva convention. according to the law, the polish border guards. the law, the polish border guards should _ the law, the polish border guards should arrest— the law, the polish border guards should arrest the _ the law, the polish border guards should arrest the person - the law, the polish border guards should arrest the person who i the law, the polish border guards- should arrest the person who crossed the border— should arrest the person who crossed the border illegally _ should arrest the person who crossed the border illegally and _ should arrest the person who crossed the border illegally and then - should arrest the person who crossed the border illegally and then in- the border illegally and then in detention— the border illegally and then in detention centre, _ the border illegally and then in detention centre, this- the border illegally and then in detention centre, this person i the border illegally and then in- detention centre, this person should be granted _ detention centre, this person should he granted an— detention centre, this person should be granted an option _ detention centre, this person should be granted an option for— detention centre, this person should be granted an option for applying i be granted an option for applying for asylum — be granted an option for applying for asylum-— for asylum. since a state of emergency _ for asylum. since a state of emergency was _ for asylum. since a state ofj emergency was pronounced for asylum. since a state of i emergency was pronounced by for asylum. since a state of - emergency was pronounced by the polish government, that means that ngo groups like yourselves and journalists cannot get to the area to verify this for themselves. how are you dealing with trying to get help to the migrants with this situation they are now in on the border? haste situation they are now in on the border? ~ . , .., _ border? we are being contacted by famil , border? we are being contacted by family, relatives _ border? we are being contacted by family, relatives and _ border? we are being contacted by family, relatives and friends i border? we are being contacted by| family, relatives and friends people who are _ family, relatives and friends people who are crossing _ family, relatives and friends people who are crossing the _ family, relatives and friends people who are crossing the border- family, relatives and friends people who are crossing the border at i family, relatives and friends people who are crossing the border at the i who are crossing the border at the moment, — who are crossing the border at the moment, and _ who are crossing the border at the moment, and also— who are crossing the border at the moment, and also by— who are crossing the border at the moment, and also by those - who are crossing the border at the | moment, and also by those people who are crossing the border at the i moment, and also by those people who have their— moment, and also by those people who have their phones _ moment, and also by those people who have their phones still. _
7:38 pm
moment, and also by those people who have their phones still. if _ moment, and also by those people who have their phones still. if they- have their phones still. if they will send _ have their phones still. if they will send us _ have their phones still. if they will send us a _ have their phones still. if they will send us a pen— have their phones still. if they will send us a pen that - have their phones still. if they will send us a pen that showsi have their phones still. if they. will send us a pen that shows that they are _ will send us a pen that shows that they are not — will send us a pen that shows that theyare not in— will send us a pen that shows that they are not in the _ will send us a pen that shows that they are not in the zone, - will send us a pen that shows that they are not in the zone, that i will send us a pen that shows that| they are not in the zone, that they crossed _ they are not in the zone, that they crossed this — they are not in the zone, that they crossed this area _ they are not in the zone, that they crossed this area of— they are not in the zone, that they crossed this area of emergency. crossed this area of emergency state. — crossed this area of emergency state. we — crossed this area of emergency state. we are _ crossed this area of emergency state, we are able _ crossed this area of emergency state, we are able to _ crossed this area of emergency state, we are able to reach i crossed this area of emergency. state, we are able to reach them, crossed this area of emergency- state, we are able to reach them, to find them _ state, we are able to reach them, to find them and — state, we are able to reach them, to find them and to— state, we are able to reach them, to find them and to help _ state, we are able to reach them, to find them and to help them - state, we are able to reach them, to find them and to help them with- find them and to help them with food, some _ find them and to help them with food, some medical— find them and to help them with food, some medicalaid, - find them and to help them with food, some medicalaid, give i find them and to help them with. food, some medicalaid, give them some warm — food, some medicalaid, give them some warm clothes. _ food, some medicalaid, give them some warm clothes. so, _ food, some medicalaid, give them some warm clothes. so, that's i food, some medicalaid, give them i some warm clothes. so, that's really a humanitarian — some warm clothes. so, that's really a humanitarian aid. _ some warm clothes. so, that's really a humanitarian aid. unfortunately, i a humanitarian aid. unfortunately, most _ a humanitarian aid. unfortunately, most of— a humanitarian aid. unfortunately, most of the — a humanitarian aid. unfortunately, most of the groups _ a humanitarian aid. unfortunately, most of the groups are _ a humanitarian aid. unfortunately, most of the groups are still - a humanitarian aid. unfortunately, most of the groups are still in i a humanitarian aid. unfortunately, most of the groups are still in the i most of the groups are still in the zone: _ most of the groups are still in the zone. which— most of the groups are still in the zone, which makes— most of the groups are still in the zone, which makes it _ most of the groups are still in the zone, which makes it impossiblel most of the groups are still in the i zone, which makes it impossible for us to— zone, which makes it impossible for us to reach— zone, which makes it impossible for us to reach them. _ zone, which makes it impossible for us to reach them. so, _ zone, which makes it impossible for us to reach them.— us to reach them. so, do you know what is happening _ us to reach them. so, do you know what is happening with _ us to reach them. so, do you know what is happening with them? i us to reach them. so, do you know what is happening with them? are| us to reach them. so, do you know i what is happening with them? are you saying that they are being pushed back by polish border patrols? yes. back by polish border patrols? yes, and actually — back by polish border patrols? yes, and actually i _ back by polish border patrols? yes, and actually i wanted _ back by polish border patrols? yes, and actually i wanted to _ back by polish border patrols? yes, and actually i wanted to add to what you said _ and actually i wanted to add to what you said before _ and actually i wanted to add to what you said before because _ and actually i wanted to add to what you said before because we - and actually i wanted to add to what you said before because we know. and actually i wanted to add to what i you said before because we know that the polish _ you said before because we know that the polish border— you said before because we know that the polish border guards _ you said before because we know that the polish border guards are - you said before because we know that the polish border guards are showingi the polish border guards are showing the polish border guards are showing the numbers— the polish border guards are showing
7:39 pm
the numbers of— the polish border guards are showing the numbers of attempts _ the polish border guards are showing the numbers of attempts of - the polish border guards are showing the numbers of attempts of crossing | the numbers of attempts of crossing the numbers of attempts of crossing the horder~ — the numbers of attempts of crossing the border. these _ the numbers of attempts of crossing the border. these are _ the numbers of attempts of crossing the border. these are not _ the numbers of attempts of crossing the border. these are not the - the numbers of attempts of crossing the border. these are not the samei the border. these are not the same as humans — the border. these are not the same as humans i— the border. these are not the same as humans. i mean, _ the border. these are not the same as humans. i mean, one— the border. these are not the same as humans. i mean, one person- the border. these are not the same i as humans. i mean, one person might attempt _ as humans. i mean, one person might attempt a _ as humans. i mean, one person might attempt a few— as humans. i mean, one person might attempt a few times _ as humans. i mean, one person might attempt a few times to _ as humans. i mean, one person might attempt a few times to cross - as humans. i mean, one person might attempt a few times to cross the i attempt a few times to cross the border. — attempt a few times to cross the border. so — attempt a few times to cross the border. so it's— attempt a few times to cross the border, so it's not— attempt a few times to cross the border, so it's not necessary- attempt a few times to cross the i border, so it's not necessary 10,000 people _ border, so it's not necessary 10,000 people who — border, so it's not necessary 10,000 people who tried _ border, so it's not necessary 10,000 people who tried to _ border, so it's not necessary 10,000 people who tried to cross _ border, so it's not necessary 10,000 people who tried to cross the - people who tried to cross the polish- — people who tried to cross the polish— belarussian - people who tried to cross the polish— belarussian border. i people who tried to cross the| polish— belarussian border. it people who tried to cross the i polish— belarussian border. it may be three _ polish— belarussian border. it may be three times _ polish— belarussian border. it may be three times less _ polish— belarussian border. it may be three times less because - polish— belarussian border. it may be three times less because we i polish— belarussian border. it may. be three times less because we know from people — be three times less because we know from people we — be three times less because we know from people we meet— be three times less because we know from people we meet that _ be three times less because we know from people we meet that they- be three times less because we know from people we meet that they have i from people we meet that they have tried to _ from people we meet that they have tried to cross — from people we meet that they have tried to cross five _ from people we meet that they have tried to cross five times, _ from people we meet that they have tried to cross five times, even - tried to cross five times, even more — tried to cross five times, even more so. _ tried to cross five times, even more so. what— tried to cross five times, even more. so, what they - tried to cross five times, even more. so, what they say i tried to cross five times, even more. so, what they say is i tried to cross five times, even. more. so, what they say is that indeed — more. so, what they say is that indeed the _ more. so, what they say is that indeed the polish _ more. so, what they say is that indeed the polish guards - more. so, what they say is that indeed the polish guards are i more. so, what they say is that i indeed the polish guards are pushing them out _ indeed the polish guards are pushing them out through _ indeed the polish guards are pushing them out through the _ indeed the polish guards are pushing them out through the wires - indeed the polish guards are pushing them out through the wires of- indeed the polish guards are pushing them out through the wires of the i them out through the wires of the polish- _ them out through the wires of the polish— belarussian _ them out through the wires of the polish— belarussian fence - them out through the wires of the polish— belarussian fence on i them out through the wires of the polish— belarussian fence on the i polish— belarussian fence on the horder~ — polish— belarussian fence on the horder~ and _ polish— belarussian fence on the border. and they— polish— belarussian fence on the border. and they are _ polish— belarussian fence on the border. and they are using - polish— belarussian fence on the | border. and they are using dogs. polish— belarussian fence on the i border. and they are using dogs. we heard _ border. and they are using dogs. we heard the _ border. and they are using dogs. we heard the stories _ border. and they are using dogs. we heard the stories about _ border. and they are using dogs. we heard the stories about using - border. and they are using dogs. we heard the stories about using the i heard the stories about using the back of— heard the stories about using the back of the — heard the stories about using the back of the guns _ heard the stories about using the back of the guns and _ heard the stories about using the back of the guns and hitting i heard the stories about using the l back of the guns and hitting people in the _ back of the guns and hitting people in the back— back of the guns and hitting people in the back of— back of the guns and hitting people in the back of the _ back of the guns and hitting people in the back of the guns, _ back of the guns and hitting people in the back of the guns, so - back of the guns and hitting people in the back of the guns, so of- in the back of the guns, so of course — in the back of the guns, so of course we _ in the back of the guns, so of
7:40 pm
course we heard _ in the back of the guns, so of course we heard about - in the back of the guns, so of course we heard about first . in the back of the guns, so of- course we heard about first tests on the polish _ course we heard about first tests on the polish and — course we heard about first tests on the polish and the _ course we heard about first tests on the polish and the belarussian - course we heard about first tests on the polish and the belarussian side. 0k, the polish and the belarussian side. 0k. thank— the polish and the belarussian side. 0k. thank you — the polish and the belarussian side. 0k. thank you so— the polish and the belarussian side. 0k, thank you so much _ the polish and the belarussian side. 0k, thank you so much for- the polish and the belarussian side. 0k, thank you so much for the i the polish and the belarussian side. 0k, thank you so much for the timei 0k, thank you so much for the time being. a lot to discuss. we will put some of that to the deputy minister of foreign affairs. from krakow, we'rejoined by poland's deputy minister of foreign affairs, marcin przydacz. given the state of emergency declared by the polish government along the border prevents journslaists gettinn near the area, can you please confirm how many migrants have died along the polish—belarus border? well, thank you for having me. i think that we should certainly start firstly with the number of attempts. so there were thousands of attempts of illegally crossing the border, and we do have proof that there are even more than 10,000 people which
7:41 pm
were brought by president lukashenko to belarus in order to somehow send them to the european union illegally through our borders. those who have already crossed the border were accommodated by the polish state. the testimonies, they were given some kind of test in order to warm up, the belarussian guards told them, but unfortunately five out of those people died, most of the kind of drugs. 50 it is a very delicate issue. those people who already crossed the border and especially women and kids, if they are in a back condition, they are sent to the polish hospitals, but we cannot accept that kind of activity which is proposed by president lukashenko the people are being invited by the state of belarus, sent to the border to cross illegally the european
7:42 pm
union border. those who want to get asylum or international protection, they can get it in the embassy of poland or any other embassy or any other state was that if they get it, and they can get to poland or any other state. of course those people, they don't do that because of the just want to cross illegally the border and this is the breaking of the law. but border and this is the breaking of the law. �* u, , border and this is the breaking of the law. �* u, , ., the law. but can they get to embassies _ the law. but can they get to embassies as _ the law. but can they get to embassies as you _ the law. but can they get to embassies as you say? - the law. but can they get to - embassies as you say? because what we are hearing is that polish border patrols are pushing migrants back. and that is breaking international law. can you respond to that? welcome to the people who are already in the territory, of course, they can go to any embassy or to the consulate to apply for international protection or asylum. if they have all documents, then of course they
7:43 pm
can get this international protection for them if not, of course we also can take care of them but through the embassy. with regard to the pushback, i do not have any information of that kind of procedure has been done by the polish force but what they do is to protect the border. in the group you've been talking about with my polish colleague, they are still in the territory of belarus. they are still there, so there is no legal possibility for them to apply for asylum because they are not in poland. , ., asylum because they are not in poland. , . ., .y poland. the state of emergency there means that journalists _ poland. the state of emergency there means that journalists cannot - poland. the state of emergency there means that journalists cannot get - means thatjournalists cannot get there, ngos cannot get there. is the state of urgency potentially extended by another 60 days, it is necessary to stop journalists from getting there to see what is happening with my also a group of doctors who have been told that their services are not needed. while people be prevented from seeing witnessing what is happening on this
7:44 pm
border? the witnessing what is happening on this border? , ., witnessing what is happening on this border? , . ., . , . , border? the state of emergency was introduced during _ border? the state of emergency was introduced during the _ border? the state of emergency was introduced during the exercises. - introduced during the exercises. there were thousands and thousands of russian and belarussian troops exercising next to our borders, and they were possible near provocations at the border. the migration crisis is a kind of artificial crisis that was a decision of president lukashenko was we imposed sanctions on him on that very day, he said that there will be the answer. and the answer is the migration crisis so we were afraid of the possible provocation and there was some shooting into the air. 50 that was a reason why we introduced the state of emergency on a very narrow piece of emergency on a very narrow piece of land. 0nly of emergency on a very narrow piece of land. only three km of the border in poland. 50 it was not too stop journalists or to protect them and
7:45 pm
civilians down there next to the belarussian border and on and the site we do not have the friendly soldiers. they are quite aggressive as they start shooting and provoking our safeguards and the policeman and thatis our safeguards and the policeman and that is why for the protection of those people, they are not allowed to cross this area. qm. those people, they are not allowed to cross this area.— to cross this area. 0k, deputy minister of — to cross this area. 0k, deputy minister of foreign _ to cross this area. 0k, deputy minister of foreign affairs - to cross this area. 0k, deputy minister of foreign affairs for. minister of foreign affairs for poland, thank you so much for joining us here on outside source. thank you. stay with us on outside source. still to come, the latest chapter in britney spears' fight to get her own life back as a court considers granting a request for her father to give up his contro. the uk business secretary has stressed there is no fuel crisis and no need to panic, while admitting that the last
7:46 pm
few days have been difficult for the country. long queues are continuing at petrol stations as people rush to fill their tanks amid fears of shortages. but there are signs the situation is improving. our business editor simonjack has this report. the fuel industry and the government insist the situation is slowly improving, but the business secretary today said said the army will be on our streets soon. it takes a couple of days, sometimes a few days, to get troops on the ground. we have decided to do that, and i think in the next couple of days people will see some soldiers driving the tanker fleet. clearly, there are still major problems about the availability of fuel, but what about prices? as you can see here, they've been rising steadily since the beginning of the year and are now at an eight—year high. the effect of this crisis — comparatively small. the real reason they're
7:47 pm
rising is this. this is the global crude oil price, and the bad news is that this recent spike is yet to be reflected in pump prices, so they're expected to go even higher even after this current crisis ends. if you add that to this horror show — this is the wholesale gas price which has bankrupted lots of energy companies, seen millions of people facing higher bills — and we have the makings of a proper cost of living crunch this winter. just this afternoon, three more energy companies went bust. igloo, enstroga and symbio's combined quarter of a million customers face higher bills from the new providers taking them on. the petrol crisis will inevitably end. the financial pressure on household incomes is arguablyjust starting. simon jack, bbc news.
7:48 pm
this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. 0ur lead story is — a court in the uk has heard how a police officer pretended to arrest sarah everard in london before kidnapping, raping and murdering her in march. a court in los angeles will decide later whether to revoke an order which gives the father and lawyers of britney spears control over her affairs and finances. the 39—year—old singer has long fought to overturn the so—called conservatorship which has been in place for more than 13 years. sophie long has more. # with a taste of your lips, i want to ride # you're toxic...# she's an international superstar, but since britney spears refused to perform until she gets her life back, her millions of fans have only seen her moves on instagram. # we let the waters rise...#
7:49 pm
since her passionate plea for her conservatorship to end injune, there have been major developments. look at that! the star got engaged to fiance sam asghari. chanting: hey-ho, no, no, - the conservatorship has got to go! she was also granted the right to hire her own lawyer, and a flurry of petitions have been filed by both sides since. in a surprise move, jamie spears applied to end the conservatorship, stating all he wants is what's best for his daughter. i'm glad progress is being made, but we are going to keep the pressure on to make sure that he does follow through and step down. and not only that, that this conservatorship is terminated entirely. last week, britney spears' lawyer formally applied to do that, saying the star hopes it will be completely and inevitably terminated this autumn. thank you very much. thejudge's ruling could put the conservatorship en route to termination, which would free britney and could also help others who've
7:50 pm
suffered or fear suffering from abuse of the system. i'm autistic, and all of my friends who are... ..dealing with mental health issues, we fear every day that we are going to get locked up in a similar situation that britney is in. so many people i've talked to said she sounded just like me. it was that pain, it was that struggle, it was just that demand to be your own person. that individualism, it exists in all of us, and so she was speaking directly from the heart. and it was from all of our hearts. # oh, baby, baby, how was i supposed to know?# _ but there may be other things that weren't right. jamie spears has been accused of hiring a security firm to monitor his daughter's phone and bug her home. doing so without her consent is illegal in california. it's not known whether britney spears herself will attend virtually or in person or at all, but her fans and members of the free britney movement will be outside court in force. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles.
7:51 pm
china is spending billions of dollars in secret development spending, twice as much as the us and other major powers combined. american researchers from aid data found that most of the lending is in the form of risky high—interest loans from chinese state banks. the figures are startling, there's been 13,500 infrastructure projects over the last 18 years. combined, the projects are worth more than $843 billion. and the lending is spread far and wide, with projects in 165 countries. and just look at the difference in international loans compared to the us over the last 20 years. while washington's loans have stayed relatively steady, beijing's investment has boomed. it's been quite a change for china, which only recently was a recipient of foreign aid, receiving more than $1 billion in 2003 from the us.
7:52 pm
here's our asia pacific editor celia hatton on that rapid transformation. back in the �*90s, china decided to start a going—out strategy, and that's because china had a lot of domestic problems it needed to address. it had too much for currency because it had imbalanced trade with lots of countries overseas. it had industrial overproduction, so it had too many factories making things that weren't being used, and so it decided to invest a lot of that currency overseas in big infrastructure projects because that's what chinese companies are really good at. they're good at building railways, they're good at building ports and dams, and so this spending started to snowball. many loans are being lent by chinese banks, and in some cases, the details are being kept secret from chinese officials. critics fear that secretive loans are saddling poorer nations in sky—high debt. celia has this example.
7:53 pm
a 400—kilometre railway stretching from southwest china across the border into neighbouring laos, down to its capital, vientiane. it's a complicated project requiring 75 tunnels and 62 bridges, and it's costing a lot. $5.9 billion. laos is one of the poorest countries in the region, and it's shouldering most of the risk. last year, laos had to sell off a $600 million chunk of its energy grid to pay its chinese creditors. all before the railway even starts operations. loans like the laos deal are often cloaked in confidentiality clauses, so researchers are concerned that the shaky financing behind such deals are often hidden from public view. even though ultimately it's the public that's going to be on the hook for repaying the mammoth debts to china owed by such mammoth projects. most of the projects are part of china's belt and road initiative, which you may have heard of already. but it's always worth
7:54 pm
getting a refresher. the intitiative started in 2013 and is xijinping's plan to build a vast network of trade routes across the globe, with high—speed with high—speed rail into europe and africa, and massive shipping ports throughout asia, the pacific, and key nations in africa. here you can see the vast spread of the belt and road initiative, with the most investment so far pumped into some of china's regional neighbours, like pakistan, khazakstan and indonesia. but there's concern that poorer countries like laos could fall into insurmountable debt. heres aid data's executive director dr brad parks to explain. the levels of debt accumulation over time are staggering. we've found 42 countries around the globe now have levels of public debt exposure to china in excess of 10% of gdp, and a lot of the public debt
7:55 pm
is hidden from public view. so, the belt and road initiative has really created major debt sustainability challenges for poor countries. beijing really has a buyers' remorse problem on its hands. many foreign leaders who were initially eager tojump on the belt and road bandwagon are now suspending or cancelling chinese investments or projects because of the debt sustainability concerns and because changes in public opinion are making it difficult for these leaders to maintain close relations with beijing. chinese banks have defended their loan system and the belt their loan system and the belt and road initaitve. a spokesperson for the china led asianinfrastructure investment bank, which is closely linked to the bri, said "the overarching principles of the belt and road initaitve are sound". and on the concerns about high risk loans the they said "we advocate for high international standards". quick reminder of our main story as a court in london has heard details
7:56 pm
about how a police officer pretended to be arresting sarah everard before he raped and murdered her. more details on her website is always and thank you for watching outside source. hello, good evening. today brought a scattering of showers across the uk, but actually on balance, it was a decent day with a lot of dry weather and some spells of sunshine. a beautiful scene there for a weather watcher in cornwall. this, though, really wasjust a drier, brighter interlude, because through the rest of the week, we see the return of spells of heavy rain and potentially some very strong winds. you can see we were in a gap between weather systems today. clear spells, just a few showers, but here comes another stripe of cloud. this is our next weather front, and that will be working in from the west as we head through this evening and overnight. rain spreading quite quickly eastwards, but ahead of that rain band, where we keep clear skies across eastern parts, temperatures will at least for a time dip away. and some spots in north east scotland could get all the way down to freezing, but it will be milder out west with the clouds,
7:57 pm
the rain and a strengthening wind, a very windy start to the day, particularly across northern ireland and western scotland. we could see winds gusts for a time close to 60 mph. tomorrow will bring cloud and outbreaks of showery rain quite radically southwards and eastwards. it will stay quite windy through the day. some brighter glimpses, some sunny spells, most especially i think across northern scotland and maybe parts of south east england for a time. temperatures, if anything, a little up on where they were today, but still only between 14—17 degrees. further spells of rain to move eastwards as we move through thursday night and into friday morning because low pressure will be firmly in charge. this weather front will bring some early rain across eastern and south—eastern parts of england. that will clear away, and actually we will see the return of some sunshine on friday, certainly across england and wales. northern ireland and scotland will see showers or longer spells of rain into the far north west. it's another windy day, quite widely wind gusts in excess of a0 mph. could be stronger than that, though, across parts of scotland, feeling particularly chilly in the north, just 11—12,
7:58 pm
16—17 down towards the south. and low pressure dominates the scene into the weekend. this will little weather system running in from the west could potentially spin up into quite a deep area of low pressure as it moves northwards. we'll have to keep a close eye on that because it could potentially bring some very strong winds indeed. certainly the risk of gales through the weekend, some heavy rain at times. so, if you have outdoor plans, do stay tuned to the forecast. some sunny spells between the downpours and temperatures generally between 12—17 degrees.
7:59 pm
8:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines at 8pm.... sarah everard's family have spoken of their torment over her kidnap, rape and murder by serving metropolitan police officer, wayne couzens, as further details emerge at his sentencing hearing. in his first in person party conference speech as labour leader, sir keir starmer set out his vision for the future and attacked the government's response to coronavirus and lorry driver shortages. the prime minister, either get a grab bar get out of the way and let us step up and clear up this mass. the fuel industry says there are signs of pressure at the petrol pumps easing, the aa believes �*the worst is over�* but drivers are still urged not to rush to fill up. tv personality katie price has been warned she could face jail,
8:01 pm
after she admitted drink driving, driving while disqualified

39 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on