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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 15, 2021 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — i'm ben boulos. the headlines: there has been a stabbing at the constituency surgery of conservative mp sir david amess — a man has been arrested and officers are not looking for anyone else. more than 40,000 people may have been incorrectly given negative pcr covid test results in south—west england and south—east wales. it is a worry because i was out socialising, seeing people as normal, and possibly spreading the virus without even realising it. an investigation has singled out a lab in wolverhampton, and some scientists have questioned how this happened. i cannot fathom the failings that would lead to the level of a false
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negative result. rules for overseas lorry drivers are due to be relaxed to try to ease continuing problems in the supply chain. a bbc investigation finds nearly 13,000 domestic abuse cases have been dropped by police in england and wales in the last five years. from today, shoppers can spend up to £100 per transaction using their contactless card. 18 months ago i could have bought and paid for these on my contactless card, but from today, well, i can buy this much, up to £100, without putting in my pin. a man's been arrested
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after a stabbing at a constituency surgery of conservative mp sir david amess. let's get more from our political from our political correspondent, pete saull. what correspondent, pete saull. more do we know at th very what more do we know at this stage? very limited information at the nine learnt but we now according to his westminster office, a stabbing has had a dent in his constituency. sir david amess was having a regular constituency surgery in leigh—on—sea. essex police have confirmed they have arrested a man following reports of a stabbing there. again, those are the bits of information that we have at the moment. we are still trying to establish if it is indeed sir david amess that has been stabbed, what his condition might be. already, as you can imagine, tributes flooding
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in from all over the political spectrum. sir david amess quite a popularfigure in parliament, he has been an mp since 1983, most readily known for standing up in the commons and asking for his constituency of south end to be granted city status. the business minister, paul scully, dreadful to hear. 0thers describing sir david amess as one of the kind thatis, sir david amess as one of the kind that is, very supportive, most dedicated person. we don't know the full details here, but inevitably people will think about what happened in the run—up to the eu referendum in 2016, the tragic murder ofjoe cox and her constituency in west yorkshire. we are hoping that a similar thing has not happened here but we were off as they try and get more information on
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it. ., . ., , ., , it. you referenced a previous situation _ it. you referenced a previous situation where _ it. you referenced a previous situation where there - it. you referenced a previous situation where there was . it. you referenced a previous situation where there was a i it. you referenced a previous - situation where there was a stabbing in an np�*s constituency office, it has happened beforejo cox as well. backin has happened beforejo cox as well. back in 2010, a labour mp had a similar incident. at the time it raised questions about the access people need to head to their mp, but how you balance up with everyone safe. , ., , how you balance up with everyone safe. , . , ., how you balance up with everyone safe. ,. ., ., . safe. there is always a balancing act between _ safe. there is always a balancing act between access _ safe. there is always a balancing act between access to _ safe. there is always a balancing | act between access to democracy safe. there is always a balancing - act between access to democracy and security of these individuals. a lot of mps have complained in recent years about an increase in abuse, perhaps made worse by social media in recent years. 0bviously perhaps made worse by social media in recent years. obviously we had brexit, a hugely divisive issue. recently, a lot of mps have not been able to hold constituency surgeries in a non—away because of the pandemic, but clearly they have got back to doing that in recent months.
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—— a normal way. parliament is in recess, we have had a couple of weeks of party conferences. all mps are back in their constituencies, apart from the cabinet, who are currently meeting in the west country. i think a lot of them would have quite liked the idea to get back to having face—to—face meetings with their constituents. it is a very important part of our democracy in this country. inevitably there will be questions asked following this case if it is the case that sir david amess has been seriously injured here. i david amess has been seriously injured here-— david amess has been seriously injured here. david amess has been seriously in'ured here. , ., ., , ., injured here. i 'ust want to bring a tweet from — injured here. ijust want to bring a tweet from iain _ injured here. ijust want to bring a tweet from iain duncan _ injured here. ijust want to bring a tweet from iain duncan smith - injured here. ijust want to bring a tweet from iain duncan smith in i injured here. ijust want to bring a | tweet from iain duncan smith in on this. he says "my thoughts are with sir david amess and his family at this awful time, praying for a full recovery following the shocking news. this angry, violent behaviour cannot be tolerated in politics or any other walk of life.". that tweet
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from iain duncan smith, fellow conservative mp of sir david amess. the baking needs within the last half hour or so to recap, essex police have confirmed a man has been arrested after a stabbing at the constituency surgery of sir david amess, the conservative mp. this tweet on screen now, one of several reactions, this one coming from in duncan smith. let's bring an conservative councillor david gaston. he didn't witness what happened but now is sir david amess and worked alongside him. what more are you hearing? i and worked alongside him. what more are you hearing?— and worked alongside him. what more are you hearing? i know no more news about this than — are you hearing? i know no more news about this than you _ are you hearing? i know no more news about this than you do _ about this than you do unfortunately, but i can't tell you that sir— unfortunately, but i can't tell you that sir david amess is one of the best constituency mps in the land, there _ best constituency mps in the land, there is_ best constituency mps in the land, there is absolutely no doubt about that _ there is absolutely no doubt about that he _ there is absolutely no doubt about that. he lives in the constituency, he is _ that. he lives in the constituency, he is in _ that. he lives in the constituency, he is in regular touch, many people know_ he is in regular touch, many people know him _ he is in regular touch, many people know him and he is a very caring man _ know him and he is a very caring man. because of that and because of
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covid, _ man. because of that and because of covid. he _ man. because of that and because of covid, he doesn't have the comfort of his_ covid, he doesn't have the comfort of his constituency office for surgeries, he is taking them all over_ surgeries, he is taking them all over the — surgeries, he is taking them all over the constituencies. so people without _ over the constituencies. so people without cars or find it difficult to -et without cars or find it difficult to get to _ without cars or find it difficult to get to him — without cars or find it difficult to get to him can get to him. he has regular— get to him can get to him. he has regular meetings of the council there _ regular meetings of the council there is, — regular meetings of the council there is, he keeps well in touch with— there is, he keeps well in touch with the — there is, he keeps well in touch with the local scene. he has worked tirelessly— with the local scene. he has worked tirelessly to get southend—on—sea a city, which _ tirelessly to get southend—on—sea a city, which he believes passionately should _ city, which he believes passionately should happen. he isjust one of those _ should happen. he isjust one of those people are so many functions, he will— those people are so many functions, he will drop— those people are so many functions, he will drop things to get to something to stop the last time i saw him — something to stop the last time i saw him was at the centenary celebration of the british legion, where _ celebration of the british legion, where he — celebration of the british legion, where he is president of the local branch _ where he is president of the local branch he — where he is president of the local branch. he spoke passionately, people — branch. he spoke passionately, people knew him, they were talking to him _ people knew him, they were talking to him it _ people knew him, they were talking to him it is — people knew him, they were talking to him. it isjust a pleasure to be
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one of— to him. it isjust a pleasure to be one of his — to him. it isjust a pleasure to be one of his constituents, frankly, and i_ one of his constituents, frankly, and i am — one of his constituents, frankly, and i am absolutely horrified that a man like _ and i am absolutely horrified that a man like that, who has devoted his life to _ man like that, who has devoted his life to looking after the public, the people he represents, should have been— the people he represents, should have been stabbed in this way. i am 'ust have been stabbed in this way. i am just praying — have been stabbed in this way. i am just praying he is not hurt too badly — just praying he is not hurt too badly i— just praying he is not hurt too badly. i should also add he was meant — badly. ishould also add he was meant to— badly. i should also add he was meant to be at a dinner with us this evening, _ meant to be at a dinner with us this evening, which he would have done and that— evening, which he would have done and that have introduced the speaken _ and that have introduced the speaker. i and that have introduced the seaker. ., ., , ., speaker. i want to bring more reaction- _ speaker. i want to bring more reaction. the _ speaker. i want to bring more reaction. the 10 _ speaker. i want to bring more reaction. the 10 cox _ speaker. i want to bring more i reaction. the 10 cox foundation, speaker. i want to bring more - reaction. the 10 cox foundation, of reaction. thejo cox foundation, of course named after npjo cox who was shot and stabbed in 2016, has tweeted to say, "at the foundation is horrified to hear of the attack on sir david amess, we are thinking of him, his loved ones and family at this distressing time." it is important to reiterate the fact that these kinds of attacks are rare, but
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it is not unprecedented. there was the situation withjo cox and 2016, and before that an attack on stephen timms in 2010. how do you go about making sure people still have that vital access to their elected representatives, while keeping those representatives, while keeping those representatives and their staff safe? it representatives and their staff safe? , ., , representatives and their staff safe? , . , ., safe? it is a very tricky one. it does not _ safe? it is a very tricky one. it does not just _ safe? it is a very tricky one. it does notjust apply _ safe? it is a very tricky one. it does not just apply to - safe? it is a very tricky one. it i does notjust apply to members safe? it is a very tricky one. it - does notjust apply to members of parliament, and applies to people in the public— parliament, and applies to people in the public focus. when we go out door— the public focus. when we go out door knocking, in the ward i represent, we knock on doors right throughout— represent, we knock on doors right throughout the whole year, not just at election— throughout the whole year, not just at election time, and we never do it alone _ at election time, and we never do it alone we _ at election time, and we never do it alone. we go around various areas, making _ alone. we go around various areas, making sure — alone. we go around various areas, making sure people are all right, trying _ making sure people are all right, trying to— making sure people are all right, trying to take note of the things that need to be dealt with. it is very. _ that need to be dealt with. it is very. very— that need to be dealt with. it is very, very difficult, because you can't _ very, very difficult, because you can't have — very, very difficult, because you can't have an armed guard with you
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all the _ can't have an armed guard with you all the time — can't have an armed guard with you all the time. a little bit of safety in numbers. we do occasionally get some _ in numbers. we do occasionally get some very— in numbers. we do occasionally get some very difficult characters. they are out _ some very difficult characters. they are out to _ some very difficult characters. they are out to cause trouble unfortunately and you have to be extremely careful. 0n unfortunately and you have to be extremely careful. on one side of the coin. — extremely careful. on one side of the coin, people expect access to their— the coin, people expect access to their elected representatives, they expect— their elected representatives, they expect them to be accountable, but on the _ expect them to be accountable, but on the other hand you can't protect them _ on the other hand you can't protect them fully— on the other hand you can't protect them fully at all times, so it is terribly— them fully at all times, so it is terribly difficult. of course, sir david, — terribly difficult. of course, sir david, being so accessible, which is for the _ david, being so accessible, which is for the good of his electorate, has paid this _ for the good of his electorate, has paid this awful price, and ijust hope _ paid this awful price, and ijust hope it— paid this awful price, and ijust hope it is— paid this awful price, and ijust hope it is not too awful. we don't have _ hope it is not too awful. we don't have details of how badly he is aware — have details of how badly he is aware that he is in hospital at the moment — aware that he is in hospital at the moment. obviously, that will come out. moment. obviously, that will come out but— moment. obviously, that will come out but in— moment. obviously, that will come out. but in answer to your question, i out. but in answer to your question, i don't _ out. but in answer to your question, idon't think— out. but in answer to your question, i don't think you can ever be 100% secure _ i don't think you can ever be 100% secure. ~ ., i don't think you can ever be 10096 secure. ~ ., .. ., i don't think you can ever be 10096 secure. a, .. ., ~ secure. indeed. more reaction. a
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tweet from _ secure. indeed. more reaction. a tweet from sir— secure. indeed. more reaction. a tweet from sir keir— secure. indeed. more reaction. a tweet from sir keir starmer, - secure. indeed. more reaction. a tweet from sir keir starmer, the | tweet from sir keir starmer, the leader of the opposition, saying: councillor gus dunn, you mentioned the area, it is an area i know reasonably well having worked there, southend west is a busy area. shops, schools, plenty of people would have been around. part of the worrying thing is faultless to have happened, someone presumably carrying a knife and doing this in the of the day. absolutely. cell like all seaside resorts, — absolutely. cell like all seaside resorts, we expect a sort of thing on the _ resorts, we expect a sort of thing on the seafront, sadly, and the police — on the seafront, sadly, and the police have been wonderful in this particular— police have been wonderful in this particular area of the weight they have covid our seafront during the hot period — have covid our seafront during the hot period. —— southend—on—sea. of course, _ hot period. —— southend—on—sea. of course, you— hot period. —— southend—on—sea. of course, you don't expect this to happen— course, you don't expect this to happen in— course, you don't expect this to
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happen in the suburbs, southend west does not _ happen in the suburbs, southend west does not have the golden mile within the constituency, but sir david goes to all— the constituency, but sir david goes to all parts— the constituency, but sir david goes to all parts for his surgery. i don't — to all parts for his surgery. i don't know exactly were this surgery was this— don't know exactly were this surgery was this morning, but they are all areas _ was this morning, but they are all areas you — was this morning, but they are all areas you would not expect somebody with a _ areas you would not expect somebody with a knife _ areas you would not expect somebody with a knife. this was obviously planned — with a knife. this was obviously planned because the surgeries are well advertised, planned because the surgeries are welladvertised, so planned because the surgeries are well advertised, so whoever has the nurse _ well advertised, so whoever has the nurse was _ well advertised, so whoever has the nurse was obviously well aware sir david _ nurse was obviously well aware sir david was — nurse was obviously well aware sir david was keen to be there. and my mind, _ david was keen to be there. and my mind, this _ david was keen to be there. and my mind, this was planned. we don't want _ mind, this was planned. we don't want people walking around the constituency with knives. i'm sure more _ constituency with knives. i'm sure more will— constituency with knives. i'm sure more will come out in due course. but it— more will come out in due course. but it is— more will come out in due course. but it is awful and it wasn't predicted, quite frankly. thank you, counsellor. — predicted, quite frankly. thank you, counsellor, speaking _ predicted, quite frankly. thank you, counsellor, speaking to _ predicted, quite frankly. thank you, counsellor, speaking to us - predicted, quite frankly. thank you, counsellor, speaking to us from - counsellor, speaking to us from essex. thank you very much indeed. another update on this story. just to recap, a man has been arrested,
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this has been confirmed by essex police, after a stabbing at the constituency office of the conservative mp sir david amess. a british councillor at the scene of the stabbing has told the news agency, reuters, he is not sure how serious it is but it is not looking good. that line coming to us from the reuters news agency. we will bring you more updates as we get them to stop let spring and our political correspondent who is following developments. peter, it has been said there was a stabbing at the constituency office. hasn't yet been confirmed it was sir david amess himself or do we not know that for sure yet? we amess himself or do we not know that for sure yet?— for sure yet? we don't know that for sure, we for sure yet? we don't know that for sure. we know _ for sure yet? we don't know that for sure. we know a _ for sure yet? we don't know that for sure, we know a stabbing _ for sure yet? we don't know that for sure, we know a stabbing has - for sure yet? we don't know that for sure, we know a stabbing has taken | sure, we know a stabbing has taken place at his constituency surgery, we are told that was a church in leigh—on—sea. the policing a man has been arrested after reports of
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backstabbing. clearly there are a lot of people in politics reacting to this and fearing the worst. we are hearing from someone at the scene, suggesting it is not looking good. as yet, we do not have full confirmation that it is indeed sir david amess who has been stabbed here. just to remind you who he is. a very long serving mp, a very well respected across the house of commons to stop he has been there since the 1980s. for ten years he was a parliamentary aide to michael portillo stop people might remember in the 1992 general election he was contesting the seat of basildon, a billy totemic constituency in that general election. he won it for the conservatives, which was a pretty strong hint thatjohn major was going to go on and win the election. in recent years has reputation has been for a strong campaigning
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constituency mp, i suppose that is what he has been doing today, listening to the concerns of his constituents at regular surgeries. from what we are hearing it sounds like something pretty horrendous has happened there. like something pretty horrendous has happened there-— happened there. mercifully, it is a rari that happened there. mercifully, it is a rarity that we _ happened there. mercifully, it is a rarity that we report _ happened there. mercifully, it is a rarity that we report on _ happened there. mercifully, it is a j rarity that we report on something like this, but it is not unprecedented. there has been in situations like this before and have raise very real questions about the safety of elected representatives and the access that people inevitably need to have two of them. people will immediately think of because of what happened in 2016 to jo cox, who was tragically murdered in the run—up to the eu referendum outside her constituency surgery in west yorkshire. hopefully we are not seeing a repeat of that year. jo cox's sister has recently been elected to parliament in a by—election, and she has spoken, as
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have many mps, in recent years about the need of people to respect their elected representatives. they are to do with an awful lot of abuse online, you can agree or disagree with what their political views might be, but clearly there is no excuse for physical or verbal abuse. we saw a bit of an increase in these kind of incidents, certainly available abuse anyway, in the aftermath of the eu referendum, quite a toxic atmosphere at times here in westminster, with groups of rival protesters here around college green just opposite the houses of parliament. lots of incidents appearing on social media of mps having to deal with an awful lot, frankly. that appears to have come down in recent years. obviously, we have had the pandemic, meaning mps have had the pandemic, meaning mps have not be coming face—to—face with their constituents quite as much as they might have done beforehand, but those constituency surgeries are very much up and running and they
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are a very important part of our democracy, so that voters can go and see their elected representatives, raise concerns of them face—to—face and hope that they can do something about them. so they will be dozens of constituency surgery is happening up of constituency surgery is happening up and down the country today, friday is a very big day for that happening. as you can imagine, mps from all over the country reacting with horror at these reports we are hearing this afternoon. just with horror at these reports we are hearing this afternoon.— hearing this afternoon. just to be cut for anyone — hearing this afternoon. just to be cut for anyone who _ hearing this afternoon. just to be cut for anyone who is _ hearing this afternoon. just to be cut for anyone who is joining - hearing this afternoon. just to be cut for anyone who is joining us l hearing this afternoon. just to be cut for anyone who is joining us - cut for anyone who isjoining us — the news that there has been expanding at a constituency surgery of the conservative mp sir david amess, that is what we are talking about at the moment. i just wonder, with the timing of this, the police report said they were called shortly after 12 noon today, the area is a busy one, schools, shops, people around. that is obviously a big part of the concern around this. as you
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say, the surgery was being held in a church hall. it say, the surgery was being held in a church hall-— church hall. it raises all kinds of questions- _ church hall. it raises all kinds of questions. of— church hall. it raises all kinds of questions. of course, _ church hall. it raises all kinds of questions. of course, mps - church hall. it raises all kinds ofj questions. of course, mps need church hall. it raises all kinds of. questions. of course, mps need to church hall. it raises all kinds of- questions. of course, mps need to be accessible to their constituents. that is why they go to places, town centres, so that as many people as possible can go see them. that is this balancing act between protecting them and making them accessible to their constituents. the cabinet has been meeting afternoon in the west country, the second time since the last general election that they have done so outside of london. wait and see what kind of reaction we might get from there, whether the prime minister might make a statement, but that he needs to come back to westminster. we have already heard from the labour leader, said keir starmer, expressing his deep concern for events that appear to have unfolded in leigh—on—sea this afternoon first
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up in leigh—on—sea this afternoon first up lots of conservative mps who are friends with sir david amess saying some on twitter. they find it utterly horrendous and are deeply shocked by it. you utterly horrendous and are deeply shocked by it— shocked by it. you work in parliament _ shocked by it. you work in parliament day _ shocked by it. you work in parliament day day - shocked by it. you work in parliament day day in, - shocked by it. you work in| parliament day day in, day shocked by it. you work in - parliament day day in, day out. the levels of security there, in order to keep mps safe when they are in their offices in westminster, is it at all feasible at that same level of security could be applied to constituency offices, or is that simply unworkable?— constituency offices, or is that simply unworkable? there is a huge security operation _ simply unworkable? there is a huge security operation around _ security operation around parliament. we have to go through quite a lengthy process to get a pass to be able to go to the palace of westminster. there are police officer stationed around it. there are airport style security gates at every single entrance into parliament. there is a huge amount of security. more widely in westminster too, there is downing street up the vote, there is a big cake they are, that all all those armed officers stationed at that
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date. it will not be possible to have that same level of security at constituency offices, arguably where mps are at their most vulnerable. we have been able to confirm that david amis has been stabbed while conducting a constituency surgery in leigh—on—sea in essex —— sir david amess. two local councillors have told us that he was the victim of an attack. just to welcome our viewers on bbc world news who are joining us, just to confirm the news that is breaking. the bbc has confirmed that sir david amess, a conservative mp, has been stabbed while conducting a constituency surgery in leigh—on—sea
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in itself east england. two local councillors have confirmed he is the victim of that attack. for a long time it was not entirely clear whether it was him, this of course creates another level of concern, that elected representative has been targeted in this way. there is now the third such attack within just over ten years. the third such attack within 'ust over ten yearsi the third such attack within 'ust over ten years. previously we had confirmation _ over ten years. previously we had confirmation that _ over ten years. previously we had confirmation that a _ over ten years. previously we had confirmation that a stabbing - over ten years. previously we had confirmation that a stabbing her l confirmation that a stabbing her taking place at the constituency surgery, that we do know it is sir david amess who has been stabbed. we don't know how critical his condition is. we have heard reports of an ambulance turning up, but we are yet to confirm any of those reports. inevitably people will think back to those other incidents,
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the most tragic one being the murder ofjo cox in 2016. obviously all our hopes and prayers are that we are not seeing a repeat of this in southend—on—sea. it does again raise questions about access to our elected representatives, what security should be around them when they are out and about in their constituency and here in westminster too. that is that balancing act. we want them to be as accessible as possible, it is very important to our democracy. sir david amess is known to be a hard constituency mp, in fact it is a bit of a running joke in westminster, how often he stands up in parliament to make the case for southend to be made a city. he has campaigned on all kinds of issues over the years. looking at social media, we are seeing a flood of tributes from all sides.—
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of tributes from all sides. plenty of tributes from all sides. plenty of well-wishers, _ of tributes from all sides. plenty of well-wishers, one _ of tributes from all sides. plenty of well-wishers, one of - of tributes from all sides. plenty of well-wishers, one of those i of tributes from all sides. plenty i of well-wishers, one of those joints of well—wishers, one of those joints is on the phone down, iain duncan smith, fellow conservative mp, a colleague of sir david amess. good to have ufos, albeit in these concerning circumstances. what more are you hearing? i’m concerning circumstances. what more are you hearing?— are you hearing? i'm not hearing very much _ are you hearing? i'm not hearing very much other _ are you hearing? i'm not hearing very much other than _ are you hearing? i'm not hearing very much other than the - are you hearing? i'm not hearing very much other than the news l are you hearing? i'm not hearing i very much other than the news that you are _ very much other than the news that you are putting out, which is concern _ you are putting out, which is concern that david was stabbed. i understand a number of times, not 'ust understand a number of times, not just once — understand a number of times, not just once, which makes me very worried — just once, which makes me very worried. obviously at the moment all i can worried. obviously at the moment all i can think— worried. obviously at the moment all i can think of as prayers for him and his— i can think of as prayers for him and his family, a safe recovery for him, _ and his family, a safe recovery for him. and — and his family, a safe recovery for him, and then for the most terrible emotions _ him, and then for the most terrible emotions that they must be going through — emotions that they must be going through. the reality for us as we see constituents all the time, knifing — see constituents all the time, knifing at _ see constituents all the time, knifing at their house and in a surgeries, _ knifing at their house and in a surgeries, we are out and about, always— surgeries, we are out and about, always available. it is the most
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critical— always available. it is the most critical bit _ always available. it is the most critical bit of what makes the british— critical bit of what makes the british parliamentary system of the most accessible in the world, because _ most accessible in the world, because we want it that way. we don't _ because we want it that way. we don't want — because we want it that way. we don't want to be frightened into doing _ don't want to be frightened into doing something different, and i certainly— doing something different, and i certainly won't and i know my colleagues will feel the same. i hope _ colleagues will feel the same. i hope this— colleagues will feel the same. i hope this as resolved very quickly. we will— hope this as resolved very quickly. we will certainly want to continue the way— we will certainly want to continue the way that we do things. of course — the way that we do things. of course, there may be some other elements— course, there may be some other elements that may be added to it. notwithstanding that, i want my constituents to have full access and i'm constituents to have full access and i'm sure _ constituents to have full access and i'm sure david would feel the same fillip it— i'm sure david would feel the same fillip it is— i'm sure david would feel the same fillip it is one thing to have full access— fillip it is one thing to have full access to — fillip it is one thing to have full access to mp5, but is there perhaps access to mp5, but is there perhaps a case _ access to mp5, but is there perhaps a case to— access to mp5, but is there perhaps a case to be — access to mp5, but is there perhaps a case to be made at improving security? — a case to be made at improving securi ? ., ., security? somehow not limiting access but _ security? somehow not limiting access but putting _ security? somehow not limiting access but putting checks i security? somehow not limiting access but putting checks in i security? somehow not limiting access but putting checks in at. security? somehow not limiting i access but putting checks in at the same way westminster constituency offices are protected. is that feasible? trio offices are protected. is that feasible? ., ., offices are protected. is that feasible?— offices are protected. is that feasible? ., ., . ., feasible? no sort of checks and
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alarm systems _ feasible? no sort of checks and alarm systems are _ feasible? no sort of checks and alarm systems are available i feasible? no sort of checks and i alarm systems are available already for constituency offices,, but those woman _ for constituency offices,, but those woman those offices are quite isolated — woman those offices are quite isolated in their offices. —— those sort _ isolated in their offices. —— those sort of— isolated in their offices. —— those sort of checks. the honest truth is, we often _ sort of checks. the honest truth is, we often end — sort of checks. the honest truth is, we often end up doing surgeries in church— we often end up doing surgeries in church halls, other places. it is simply— church halls, other places. it is simply impossible to have that sort of security— simply impossible to have that sort of security when you are doing surgeries— of security when you are doing surgeries in different locations. some _ surgeries in different locations. some people have rural constituencies will be doing surgeries in different villages of the time — surgeries in different villages of the time. it is really not practical to do— the time. it is really not practical to do that — the time. it is really not practical to do that. there may be a way in which _ to do that. there may be a way in which you — to do that. there may be a way in which you could have a police man outside _ which you could have a police man outside where you are doing the surgery. — outside where you are doing the surgery, that sometimes happens. genuinely, — surgery, that sometimes happens. genuinely, it is very difficult. we are what— genuinely, it is very difficult. we are what we are. in other words, we are what we are. in other words, we are members— are what we are. in other words, we are members of parliament, constituency members, we wander around _ constituency members, we wander around our— constituency members, we wander around our constituency, the greek people _ around our constituency, the greek people in_ around our constituency, the greek people in houses and shops in our
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surgeries — people in houses and shops in our surgeries. that is what i think makes — surgeries. that is what i think makes our— surgeries. that is what i think makes our system work. —— we greet people _ makes our system work. —— we greet people i_ makes our system work. —— we greet people ican— makes our system work. —— we greet people. i can remember when stephen timms. _ people. i can remember when stephen timms. the— people. i can remember when stephen timms, the labourmp, people. i can remember when stephen timms, the labour mp, was stabbed. we all— timms, the labour mp, was stabbed. we all felt _ timms, the labour mp, was stabbed. we all felt the same then, hopes and prayers _ we all felt the same then, hopes and prayers for— we all felt the same then, hopes and prayers for his safe recovery, which he did, _ prayers for his safe recovery, which he did, and — prayers for his safe recovery, which he did, and the same for david today~ — he did, and the same for david today it — he did, and the same for david today it is _ he did, and the same for david today. it is tragic when this happens _ today. it is tragic when this happens and we all feel for him. indeed. — happens and we all feel for him. indeed, and i think that is reflected in the number of tweets and messages wishing sir david amess well. when you look at the way things have been for the past year and a half, where people's only real way of accessing that mps has been by phone or through video meetings. how important was it to you and your colleagues and david amis as well to
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actually get there and start seeing people face—to—face again? how much of a difference does that make? it makes a huge difference was up there has been _ makes a huge difference was up there has been some early reluctance up from _ has been some early reluctance up from some — has been some early reluctance up from some worried about the contact, but that— from some worried about the contact, but that has— from some worried about the contact, but that has certainly improved. during _ but that has certainly improved. during the whole of covid, i know my colleagues _ during the whole of covid, i know my colleagues went to visit people at their houses, sometimes standing outside. _ their houses, sometimes standing outside, listening to them. they certainly— outside, listening to them. they certainly went and took the case to them, _ certainly went and took the case to them, as— certainly went and took the case to them, as it — certainly went and took the case to them, as it were, and did a lot of walking— them, as it were, and did a lot of walking around, talking to macro talking _ walking around, talking to macro talking to — walking around, talking to macro talking to people. we believe that is what _ talking to people. we believe that is what we were elected to do. since then, _ is what we were elected to do. since then, surgeries have come back. with a surgery— then, surgeries have come back. with a surgery that is a difference, which — a surgery that is a difference, which is — a surgery that is a difference, which is that you are in one
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location _ which is that you are in one location for a very specific period of time — location for a very specific period of time, and we all advertise that fact _ of time, and we all advertise that fact. everybody will know we are in that location for a set period of time _ that location for a set period of time so — that location for a set period of time so i _ that location for a set period of time, so i guess that makes you a little _ time, so i guess that makes you a little more — time, so i guess that makes you a little more vulnerable. but it is what _ little more vulnerable. but it is what we — little more vulnerable. but it is what we do, is how we manage the personal— what we do, is how we manage the personal affairs of those who need our help — inaudible. nonetheless, it does our with give them a sense that somebody is on their side. just explain to viewers who arejoining us now, they are hearing the voice of iain duncan smith, a conservative mp who is a colleague of sir david amess.
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breaking news that sir david amess has been stabbed while meeting constituents in essex. ijust wonder, you have been an mp for many years, do you detect that the nature of dialogue and debate has become more angry in recent years that perhaps fuels these sorts of violent attack? i appreciate it is still very early days and it would be wrong to speculate on motives. but the you for the nature of discourse and politics feeds more into this thing than perhaps when you started? —— but do you feel? that thing than perhaps when you started? -- but do you feel?— -- but do you feel? that has always been a rancorous _ -- but do you feel? that has always been a rancorous debate _ -- but do you feel? that has always been a rancorous debate in - been a rancorous debate in parliament going right back. i think the change in the last few years has been the _ the change in the last few years has been the arrival of social media. there _ been the arrival of social media. there is— been the arrival of social media. there is no— been the arrival of social media. there is no question when it comes to people _ there is no question when it comes to people withjamie problems, social— to people withjamie problems, social media gives than an echo
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chamber— social media gives than an echo chamber and often makes it worse. we have seen— chamber and often makes it worse. we have seen this in the threats made to mps. _ have seen this in the threats made to mp5, particularly female mps and women _ to mp5, particularly female mps and women in _ to mp5, particularly female mps and women in general. these seem to have been massively exacerbated by the nature _ been massively exacerbated by the nature of— been massively exacerbated by the nature of what they think is the anonymous nature of their commentary. for most of them they often _ commentary. for most of them they often find _ commentary. for most of them they often find the groups that they want to and _ often find the groups that they want to and they whip each other up into a sort _ to and they whip each other up into a sort of— to and they whip each other up into a sort of anger and frenzy over issues — a sort of anger and frenzy over issues which all logic is lost to. might — issues which all logic is lost to. might worry right now is the idea of what your— might worry right now is the idea of what your anger is about as often complemented by others through this internet— complemented by others through this internet chat. i think it has definitely made things worse. in my personal— definitely made things worse. in my personal view, the commentary is often _ personal view, the commentary is often very— personal view, the commentary is often very violent, very angry, and
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particularly — often very violent, very angry, and particularly bad for women, but it is threatening to anybody who disagrees with them. when you add to that, terrorism, that is another angle — that, terrorism, that is another angle the _ that, terrorism, that is another angle. the creation of a terrorist by the _ angle. the creation of a terrorist by the internet is a desperate affair~ — by the internet is a desperate affair. we have seen more of it. we have _ affair. we have seen more of it. we have seen— affair. we have seen more of it. we have seen no— affair. we have seen more of it. we have seen no idea who and the rationale — have seen no idea who and the rationale behind this dreadful attack~ — rationale behind this dreadful attack. we are all praying desperately for david's full recovery and for his family. thank you very much for speaking to us on a bbc news, so iain duncan smith. within the last hour the conservative mp sir david amess has been confirmed as being stabbed in an attack while meeting constituents at his office in essex in the south of england. police say they were called to an incident at the methodist church in the south end
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area. a man has been arrested and they are not looking for anyone else in connection with the attack. some reports say the mp for southend west was stabbed several times. at this stage there is no word on his condition but one councillor who was there at the time of the attack says he has been arrested and they are not looking for anyone else in connection with the attack. some reports say the mp for southend west was stabbed several times. at this stage there is no word on his condition but one counsellor who was there at the time of the attack says he is being treated at the scene and there are two ambulances outside the church. let's get more from our political correspondent. we spoke a few minutes ago but we are getting more details on this all the time, aren't you hearing any other information? we aren't you hearing any other information?— aren't you hearing any other information? ~ . ., �* , information? we are hearing there's an awful lot — information? we are hearing there's an awful lot of— information? we are hearing there's an awful lot of activity _ information? we are hearing there's an awful lot of activity at _ information? we are hearing there's an awful lot of activity at the - an awful lot of activity at the scene outside this church on leigh—on—sea were david ames was holding his constituency, something he regularly does on a friday afternoon. we know he's been stabbed, we don't know anything else about his condition but there are those close to him who have been saying things like it is not looking good. we will wait and see if we get
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anything more. essex police have confirmed they have arrested a man following reports of a stabbing, they are not looking for anyone else in connection with it. but meanwhile tributes and reaction flooding in from across the political spectrum. for example, robert halfon, another conservative mp in essex saying it is truly devastating news, sir david is truly devastating news, sir david is a very kind and dedicated mp and my thoughts and prayers are with him and his family and his team at this horrific time. the long serving labour mp barry sherman, just heard about the cowardly attack on david amis, david would not hurt a fly, why had this happen? lots of mps will be doing exactly the same today, speaking directly with the people they are elected to represent and already this is raising some pretty serious questions about the security for mps when they are out
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and about, this is not the first time an mp has been stabbed while carrying out the constituency surgery. most recently, the example ofjo cox, in the run—up to the eu referendum, before that we had a labour mp stephen timms, lib dem mp nigeljones, his colleague andrew pennington tragically died in that attack in trying to protect the mp. understandably, people are extremely shocked by what has happened this morning in essex. to underline that point, you mention jo cox, the mp who was murdered in 2016, and her widower brendan cox has said attacking i elected representatives is an attack on democracy, there is no excuse or justification, it is as cowardly as it gets. i think that reflects the
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feelings that many are expressing, of both concern but also anger, because if this leads to a limited access, situations like this when an mp can safely meet their constituents in a church hall —— with an mp cannot safely meet the constituents, the effect that has on everyone if that limit future access and is everyone poorer in democracy we can. ., .., and is everyone poorer in democracy we can. ., _, ., ., . we can. you could argue our elected representatives _ we can. you could argue our elected representatives have _ we can. you could argue our elected representatives have never- we can. you could argue our elected representatives have never been i we can. you could argue our elected l representatives have never been more accessible because they are all on social media now, and not have to take lots of abuse on social media, let's be honest about that, clearly that's ok too an extent unless it spills over and then you've got violent acts against mps in their own constituency, that's not the sign of a healthy democracy, but clearly someone like david amis, known, as we've heard from others today, as a hard—working constituency mp, would have wanted
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to put himself out there at every possible opportunity, to hear the concerns of his constituents and so he can act on their behalf. she has been an mp since the early 1980s, was elected, one of the early thatcherite conservative mps, never really made it to high levels ministerial anyway, really made it to high levels ministerialanyway, he really made it to high levels ministerial anyway, he was a parliamentary aide to michael portillo for ten years, perhaps his most famous moment in politics was when the then basildon constituency in 1992, considered a really totemic moment in that election because labour had targeted that's it quite hard, and it was a sign thatjohn major was on course to win the election in 1992. more recently he's been known for his ongoing campaign to make southend a city, that really speaks, i suppose, to make southend a city, that really speaks, isuppose, to to make southend a city, that really speaks, i suppose, to what he saw as his main role, to represent that local area rather than climb the
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political ladder and i think there is agreement across the political spectrum today sir david amess has certainly worked extremely hard for his constituents three decades. we should reiterate at this stage, for anyone just we should reiterate at this stage, for anyonejustjoining us, who is concerned about the safety in the area, police are saying they have arrested a man and they are not looking for anybody else and they do not believe there is any risk to the public. we are seeing some images from the helicopter of where this incident took place, we can see there is a police presence outside bell fares methodist church in leigh—on—sea in essex and its south of england, the area has been taped off. we were hearing there were two ambulances outside. i think we can see either an ambulance or police car behind one of the trees but the news that has been confirmed, sir david amess having been stabbed in
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an attack while meeting constituents at a methodist church in his constituency in essex. we can see what looks to be medical helicopter, air ambulance, what looks to be medical helicopter, airambulance, nearby. we what looks to be medical helicopter, air ambulance, nearby. we have no word on his condition at the moment, no word on the condition of sir david amess but one counsellor there at the time of the attack has said he is being treated at the scene. i want to speak now to a counsellor who was due to meet david amess later. aren't you hearing any more details? we are still waiting to hearjust how serious david is, we know it's very serious because we understand they have had to operate on site and why it's taken over 2.5 hours and he's not been moved to hospital yet so we know it is extremely serious,
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and literally he was meeting local constituents at the methodist church here in leigh—on—sea, he was doing his normal surgery. this was his way of going around to meet people and he used to hold surgeries in different locations. and someone has done this to him, which is unbelievable. he is a very hard—working member of parliament who serves southend and all the residents and constituents extremely well and works extremely hard for them. counsellor, one thing that strikes me as we look at these live pictures of the area, is just how residential the area is. it looks like it is a quiet neighbourhood, it looks like it would feel like a relatively safe neighbourhood, is that your understanding of the area that this happen in?
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understanding of the area that this ha en in? , understanding of the area that this hauenin? , , �*., happen in? yes, absolutely. around here in belfairs _ happen in? yes, absolutely. around here in belfairs it's _ happen in? yes, absolutely. around here in belfairs it's a _ happen in? yes, absolutely. around here in belfairs it's a very _ here in belfairs it's a very residential, some houses, a few flats, mostly houses. the local residents know david very well. one older lady who he often visits because she is an older lady and has a cup of tea with her in her house, never had any problems, not that sort of problem at all going on, and then this has happened, which everyone is astounded how this has happened and in such a way and for such a hard—working mp, who not only looks after his residence but fights for refugees and everyone to make sure they are safe. he's got a very good name in a number of countries because how he tries to help the refugees that are in trouble in those countries. you yourself are an elected representative, as a counsellor do incidents like this make you ever
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question, or doubt whether you would continue meeting the people you represent face—to—face, perhaps to make yourself accessible by phone or video call instead? no, literally part of ourjob, i was leader of the council as well as deputy leader in the last two years i've been the mayor, i've only come out of being the mayor. meeting people as part of your role and you cannot do all that on the video, you how to meet them and be be prepared to meet them. you need to onlyjust take the best precautions you can to make sure to get you and your people safe, that is what david does all the time but he did like to go out. at one time his surgeries was always at our head office but he wanted to
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go and meet new people, he went around the constituency meeting in different places, like the belfairs methodist church. when you look at the fact that this is not the first such incident of its kind, we have seen this twice within just over the last ten years, 2016, jo cox being stabbed in the tragedy of that, our fatal stabbing. before that, stephen timms, labour mp in 2010 being stabbed at his constituency office as well. is there any obvious answer to how you keep notjust the elected representatives, but those who work around them because presumably those staff, administrative and support staff, administrative and support staff, arejust staff, administrative and support staff, are just as staff, administrative and support staff, arejust as much staff, administrative and support staff, are just as much at risk as mps themselves.— mps themselves. absolutely. especially _ mps themselves. absolutely. especially if _ mps themselves. absolutely. especially if they _ mps themselves. absolutely. especially if they try - mps themselves. absolutely. especially if they try and i mps themselves. absolutely. especially if they try and get l especially if they try and get involved to help the person being
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attacked. and that is why you do look and see, look at the risk and what things you can put in place to try and prevent such things. the other thing ? we have got to be careful. the people that do this, the person that has done this today to david, they must not get the upper hand, we must keep in there and if we have to take harsher precautions to make people safe then we must do it because mps, councillors are there to help the residents and they are there to meet their residence and not do it all remotely. and it is a harsh thing but if need be we have to give them the protection they might need. i want to recap, don't go away, please, counsellor, iwant i want to recap, don't go away, please, counsellor, i want to recap for viewersjoining us, david amess, conservative mp, has been stabbed in
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an attack while meeting constituents at his office in essex, police were called to an incident at belfairs methodist church in leigh—on—sea within the constituency of south and west, a man has been arrested and police say they are not looking for anyone else in connection with the attack. some reports say the mp was stabbed several times, the bbc has been told by a local councillor that sir david is in an extremely serious condition and had to be operated on at the scene. that detailjust emerging in the last few minutes. heat remains at the church where he is being treated, where the stabbing happened, and an air ambulance is on hand. i want to speak out to ian gilbert, the leader of southend—on—sea borough council. ian, good of you to join us, what more are you hearing,
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have you any updates about the situation of the condition of sir david amess? i situation of the condition of sir david amess?— situation of the condition of sir david amess? i cannot add, i am afraid, to — david amess? i cannot add, i am afraid, to what _ david amess? i cannot add, i am afraid, to what you've _ david amess? i cannot add, i am afraid, to what you've been i david amess? i cannot add, i am afraid, to what you've been told. | afraid, to what you've been told. clearly it's very serious and it is a profoundly shocking incident. this area, we were remarking at how it looks very residential and very safe. it does not look like the kind of area where anyone would be going and have concerns about something like this potentially happening. trio. like this potentially happening. no, indeed. like this potentially happening. ijrr, indeed. obviously it is not something you expect should happen anywhere at any time but suddenly there would be no reason to suspect this was a remotely dangerous part of the world. if people watching this are concerned, if they are in the area, your message to them as the local
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council leader? well, i believe that everything that i am led to believe says the police have the situation under control, although i don't want to speculate any further on the circumstances but all i want to say is i am sure everyone's thoughts and southend will be with sir david and his family at this time. you yourself, you sit across the political divide, sir david amess a conservative politician, yourself, at labour politician, give us a sense of what he's like to deal with, do you find him someone who reaches out and works across political differences to make things happen for people in it constituency? certainly sir david and i have always had a very friendly and civil working relationship. obviously
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we've met and discussed issues of importance to the town, most recently of course southend's city status bid which is a huge passion of sir david's, but we've been working together on. so we are on different sides of the political debate but i've always found him an extremely warm, friendly and caring person to work with. when we raise the question about access notjust when we raise the question about access not just to when we raise the question about access notjust to mps but to councillors, where do we go from here, because this kind of thing cannot be allowed to happen but equally it cannot be allowed to limit people's access to those that represent them and make decisions on their behalf and vote on laws and policies that affect everyone, how do you square those two competing
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needs of access but also safety? absolutely. it is really difficult. i agree with what your previous speaker was saying, as politicians we cannot hide away, we have to be responsive, accountable and accessible to the public. but it's about seeing what precautions have to be taken to allow us to carry on working in that way. we are just seeing live pictures from the scene, to recap, the details of what happened, the reason we've got the live shot of belfairs methodist church in leigh—on—sea in essex, it is because police have confirmed the conservative mp who represents the constituency, southend west, sir david amess, has been stabbed in an attack while
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meeting constituents at his office, well, at that constituency surgery taking place in the belfairs methodist church, police were called at around 12 noon today, a man has been arrested and they are not looking for anyone else in connection with the attack. some reports say the mp for south and west was stabbed several times. there's no word on his condition. actually, we are have had an update on that. within the last few minutes. saying that he is in an extremely serious condition and elitist we are hearing as he had to be operated on at the scene so as far —— he is in at very serious condition and he had to be operated on at the scene. we saw an air ambulance landed nearby. there are two response cars parked outside a church hall. we are being told those
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ambulances, they may be police cars, clearly, there has been a rapid and big response to this. i want to bring in our political correspondent, who is following developments from westminster. pete, are we hearing anything from the prime minister, cabinet, government? they are outside london today, has there been any reaction from any of them? ., �* , there been any reaction from any of them? . �* , ., there been any reaction from any of them? . �*, ., ., , them? that's right, a cabinet meetin: them? that's right, a cabinet meeting has _ them? that's right, a cabinet meeting has been _ them? that's right, a cabinet meeting has been happening| them? that's right, a cabinet i meeting has been happening in that west country this afternoon. i think we can say now that has ended because the education secretary nadhim zahawi has tweeted in the past half an hour or so expressing his shop about what happened and he said sir david is a committed public servant and as well as a close colleague and friend —— expressing his shock. clearly we wait for updates on david amess's conditions,
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you would have thought the cabinet will now be heading back to london and certainly the prime minister would be anyway given key is based in westminster. to give you a flavour of some of the tributes we are getting from across the political spectrum, the health secretary at sajid javid, thinking of my friend and colleague sir david amess and his family. lots of mps referring to him notjust as a colleague but as a friend, he's been our own parliament for three decades, that well known and very well liked i think we can safely say, judging by the responses we are getting today. to talk to you about what david amess did fairly recently, at prime minister's questions in march he raised the case of a stabbing in his constituency of 18—year—olds in leigh—on—sea, which clearly given what we are hearing, is tragically ironic. as you have been saying, ben, looking at the area, it does
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not look like the kind of place you would expect violent crime to happen. an mp being stabbed at a constituency surgery at a church, one conservative mp lucy allen today said, what does this tell us about what she calls about toxic and hateful politics, sir david amess not the first mp recently to be attacked outside a constituency surgery. of attacked outside a constituency surgery. of course attacked outside a constituency surgery. of course lots of people reflecting on what happened withjo cox in 2016, before her labour mp stephen timms was stabbed, he came through, as did the lib dems mp nigeljones around a similar kind of time but from what we're hearing on the ground, an awful lot of concern now about sir david amess. pete, we will speak to you again a little later but for now, i want to bring in councillorjohn lan who was due to meet sir david amess later.
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if you don't mind me asking what were you due to meet on about? it was tonight, it was our annual conservative dinner which we were holding over at saxon hall, and we had a special guest that would have been coming and another mp mark fran ois was attending and hopefully a number of our supporters who would have been there and listening to sir david's and our guests talk to us about what we were doing and how we were moving forward but unfortunately i've had to cancel that now. understandably so. i wonder, some mps inevitably if they become cabinet members or if they become senior mps, lots of their focus cabinet members or if they become senior mps, lots of theirfocus is taken up with business in westminster, is said david's, is he
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someone who puts a lot of energy and focus on constituency work, how much se involved with you what you do as a constituency party? —— how much is see involved? he a constituency party? -- how much is see involved?— see involved? he is tremendously involved in _ see involved? he is tremendously involved in the _ see involved? he is tremendously involved in the whole _ see involved? he is tremendously involved in the whole area. i see involved? he is tremendously involved in the whole area. david | involved in the whole area. david often goes out not only for his surgeries but he is often out meeting people at different events, he joined meeting people at different events, hejoined in all the meeting people at different events, he joined in all the events meeting people at different events, hejoined in all the events he can attend, i know he was due to be going shortly to the halloween event parade taking place in the south end and he would have been on the open top bus with the mayor. he supports the scouts, all the youth groups, all the veteran groups. he is around there, getting involved in supporting and helping them where he can. there is nothing that he will not go to if he can help them and
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turn up to support them. so he is very much a constituency mp that does 101% over and above to make sure she is helping our local groups. sure she is helping our local urou s. , , sure she is helping our local urous_ , , ., sure she is helping our local u-rous. , , , sure she is helping our local u-rous. , , ., sure she is helping our local circus, , ,., , , ., ., ., groups. give us a sense of the area, from what we've _ groups. give us a sense of the area, from what we've seen _ groups. give us a sense of the area, from what we've seen of _ groups. give us a sense of the area, from what we've seen of it - groups. give us a sense of the area, from what we've seen of it this i groups. give us a sense of the area, from what we've seen of it this was| from what we've seen of it this was a church hall in a fairly safe and quiet residential looking neighbourhood. that's exactly right. and it is, it is a methodist church hall but he uses various church halls which he goes to of different faiths. he goes and visits all the different faiths. he is very welcome but a number of muslim and some of their places he will visit too and hold his surgeries and he's always been very well respected by those areas. he
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supports all of them, thejewish community around where he lives close by him in westcliff, they really do love him because of all the work he puts in for the constituents and for all of them, he does not differ one iota and if someone has got a problem he will get it sorted. 0ne get it sorted. one of the things we've been talking about is the tension, inevitable tension between people having access to mps and councillors, elected representatives, that is such a fundamental part of our democracy but it brings with it the risk of things like this happening. yes, absolutely. as you say, it's one of the basic needs of our democracy, to make sure people have access to their mps and their counsellors, and can meet them and talk to them. i've been to people's
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houses before and visited them there are, as has david and so on. it purely to make sure they actually have access to him so he can help them, he picks up their problems and he deals with them and i know because i've been very much involved in might face offices i've held as a counsellor, where he will come to me and say, john, this is a council matter, can you get it sorted, and give me all the details, or he will take it to his parliamentary colleagues and do exactly the same if it's a parliamentary matter. he is always involved. and he will always help whenever he can. 0k, councillorjohn lamb, thank you very much for the moment. we can speak to reverend steve tinning who has worked with sir david amess extensively and there him well. firstly, your reaction to what happened.
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firstly, your reaction to what happened-— firstly, your reaction to what hauened. , , , �*, happened. just complete shock. as soon as i happened. just complete shock. as soon as i got _ happened. just complete shock. as soon as i got a _ happened. just complete shock. as soon as i got a phone _ happened. just complete shock. as soon as i got a phone call - happened. just complete shock. as soon as i got a phone call from i happened. just complete shock. as soon as i got a phone call from a i soon as i got a phone call from a charity i work with to make me aware it was happening, i came straight to the scene to see if i could offer anything, my prayersjust the scene to see if i could offer anything, my prayers just go out to him and his family and friends and his team —based on it look constituency and in westminster. —— in the local constituency at westminster. give us a sense how big a present he is in the community in southend? this is in the community in southend? is your previous guest says, he is now in first and foremost as a constituency mp whether you believe in is politics or not, you cannot deny he gets around and he knows the people of the town and of south and west and whether you are in a political alignment with him are not most people respect that he loves his town and works hard and gets to know his town and deeply respected.
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the area at this happened, i think from your perspective, the fact it happen within a church hall must add to that shock and concern as well. yeah, we hosted his drop in at our church a few weeks ago, i went along to another church a couple of weeks ago with a refugee family that needed to speak to him, he is present in the church since lockdown came back, he's been getting out and about and having his drop—ins in various places around the town and being in a local church, standing next to a minister of the church year, i have, who has only been posted a couple of weeks —— i am standing here next to the minister of the church. i don't know how long you yourself have lived in southend, it's an area i am familiar with and it feels like
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a safe place to be, especially daytime, it is a busy area, full of schools and businesses and shops, it is quite striking in the middle of the afternoon, around lunchtime, something like this could happen there of all places. absolutely. i grew up in southend, i was a leigh—on—sea boy born and bred for 18 years and then moved away for 15 years and when i started my family i did not hesitate to return because it is a beautiful place to bring up a family. it is quite unusual and quite shocking for us. reverend stephen tinning, ijust want to pause for a moment because we have had an update from essex police. who say a man has died is at the scene of a stabbing in england.
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that is the wording, very specific wording from essex police as reported by the reuters news agency saying that a man has died at the scene of a stabbing in england. we have no more detail or confirmation beyond that. that one line emerging within the last few moments. essex police saying that a man has died at the scene of a stabbing in england. we will keep across any details, any more details that emerge. in the meantime let me recap the breaking news within the last hour or so. the conservative mp sir david amess has been stabbed in an attack while meeting constituents at his office in essex, police confirmed, they were called to an incident at the belfairs methodist church in leigh—on—sea in essex in the south of england and a man has been arrested and eight state they are
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not looking for anyone else in connection with the —— they are not looking for anyone else. we saw outside the church there was a police presence, there were a number of response cars, ambulances or police vehicles as well as an air ambulance. the updates we were being given suggested sir david was being treated at the scene, and that was an extremely serious condition. that have been plenty of tweets in response to what has happened. stephen timms, who survived a similar stabbing stephen timms, who survived a similarstabbing in stephen timms, who survived a similar stabbing in 2010 has tweeted to say she is appalled to hear of the attack. joining me now, the
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south essex reporter from the attack. joining me now, the south essex reporterfrom essex line. ellis, what more do you know at this stage? the line. ellis, what more do you know at this stage?— at this stage? the latest update is what ou at this stage? the latest update is what you have _ at this stage? the latest update is what you have just _ at this stage? the latest update is what you have just seed _ at this stage? the latest update is what you have just seed now, i at this stage? the latest update is what you have just seed now, it i what you havejust seed now, it hasn't really rocked me, it is a devastating update to hear. my thoughts and all the thoughts of the essex live team go out to david amess apostrophe back —— david amess' family now. emergency services were descending on the scene and closing of the road, everyone was in a great deal of shock. the reaction that came in to hear that sir david had been injured was just hear that sir david had been injured wasjust a hear that sir david had been injured was just a complete sense of disbelief and total shock from all
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edges of the political spectrum in southend and southend council. the leader of the cell phone conservatives, the opposition party in the council, said he was truly shocked and appalled. another said he had no words. we also heard that of well—wishers being sent from members of the labour party who are in administration now along with the liberal democrats. the leader iain gilbert also sent his well—wishers. it is a truly heard in this state of affairs, and i amjust it is a truly heard in this state of affairs, and i am just devastated i am having to talk about it with you now. i have been a reporter in essex for over five years now, now. i have been a reporter in essex for overfive years now, i have worked with sir david, i have worked with him on different stories, different news reports, he has always been extremely helpful, very forthcoming and providing statements and helping us out with the stories.
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it is truly devastating. i am just very, very sorry that we are having to talk about it now. i very, very sorry that we are having to talk about it now.— to talk about it now. i should 'ust reiterate, to talk about it now. i should 'ust reiterate. at fl to talk about it now. i should 'ust reiterate, at this i to talk about it now. i should 'ust reiterate, at this stage, i to talk about it now. i should 'ust reiterate, at this stage, the i to talk about it now. i should just reiterate, at this stage, the only| reiterate, at this stage, the only thing that essex police are saying is that a man has died at the scene of a stabbing in england. they have not given any name, they have not been any more specific than that. there is another line i want to bring our work bureaus, police saying that a man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after a stabbing in leigh—on—sea. at this stage, that is what we are hearing in terms of confirmation by essex police, via the reuters news agency. we have seen the air ambulance
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nearby there, certainly for the last half an hour, 45 minutes, since we have been able to look at the aerial images outside the church. there is certainly a police presence in the taped off area. just give us a sense of that area and how routine this sort of meeting of constituents would have been for an mp like sir david. it would have been for an mp like sir david. , ., , ., ., , david. it is a very routine. he was alwa s david. it is a very routine. he was always very _ david. it is a very routine. he was always very forthcoming - david. it is a very routine. he was always very forthcoming with i david. it is a very routine. he was always very forthcoming with his. always very forthcoming with his constituents, very public facing. he engaged lots, he would hold a lot of meetings at places, such as belfairs methodist church, on a regular occurrence. they would never be any sort of issue, disruption, any sort of violence of any kind. it was very much a normal day as far as this surgery was concerned. i think what
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police have said is that a man has been arrested and they are not looking for anyone else in connection with the incident, and they believe that there is no wider threat to the public. that is what we are getting. we are unsure of any kind of motive yet for this attack, what was going on, what was said in the surgery, how it started and played out. but police have said in a statement before that they do not believe there is any wider risk and they have detained this man and he remains in custody. as far as surgeries are concerned, they often held in the southend constituency. sir david always announces when he is holding them and invites anyone to come along. i imagine this whole thing has been a shock to everyone on that road, in that area, and those people that run the church and the surgery as well. {iii
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those people that run the church and the surgery as well.— the surgery as well. of course we don't want _ the surgery as well. of course we don't want to _ the surgery as well. of course we don't want to prematurely - the surgery as well. of course we don't want to prematurely speak| the surgery as well. of course we i don't want to prematurely speak of it on any sort of native or anything like that at this stage. —— any sort of motive. you covid politics, and i just wonder if you get a sense of the intensity and ferocity of political discourse today and how much that has ramped up and feels people's feelings of anger sometimes towards elected representatives. do you get a sense the climate of this course is getting more intense and more angry? —— climate of discourse. the conservatives and the labour party is of a cell phone for sure have their differences and they will not be averse to debating fiercely on twitter. it is clear at the
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opposing parties he had have opposing parties he had have opposing views to how southend should be run, what the future should be run, what the future should look like and how it should be achieved. what i have definitely seen after these reports of the stabbing is every councillor that i have seen who has been publicly commenting on this has been very much unified in sending best wishes to all involved, labour, conservative, and others as well. it is very clear that whilst public debates and politics in southend county heated, opinionated, sometimes that is justified, sometimes that is justified, sometimes it can spiral out of control. i think on this occasion when there is something so tragic as this playing out in real time, everyone across the political spectrum does come together and
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support each other. i think they do know at the end of the date they are all elected representatives, and they are all trying to do right by their own constituents and do what is best by then. 0n their own constituents and do what is best by then. on this occasion a man has lost his life, it has happened and a very public setting. from what i have seen and what we have reported so far, everyone has put their political differences aside and just really come together to support each other to mourn those who will have been lost, those affected by this and support them, and make sure as an area leigh—on—sea can get through this and the people can get through this. i think that is what southend council do very well, they do generally care very much about their town and the people. i'm sure
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following a tragic event like this, they are going to be more supportive. whether or not it will make the political divide more inflamed, that will remain to be seen. this is obviously a very tragic incident, and they will be discussions about it to come, but in the future there will be more discussions about the future of southend in terms of house—building, economic, those will continue. in something like this, i certainly believe it will be the case that councillors will be very supportive of each other no matter what party they sit on. of each other no matter what party they sit on-— they sit on. ellis, thank you very much indeed. _ they sit on. ellis, thank you very much indeed. just _ they sit on. ellis, thank you very much indeed. just to _ they sit on. ellis, thank you very much indeed. just to bring i they sit on. ellis, thank you very much indeed. just to bring you i they sit on. ellis, thank you very. much indeed. just to bring you an update to viewersjust much indeed. just to bring you an update to viewers justjoining us.
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it has been confirmed that sir david amess, the mp for southend west, has died after a stabbing happened whilst he was meeting constituents in a church hall in leigh—on—sea. essex police confirming that the conservative mp, sir david amess, has died following that stabbing that happened just a few hours ago. a25—year—old man has been arrested. police say they are not looking for anyone else in connection with the attack. let's bring an hour political correspondent who joins us from westminster. i suppose this is the news that we had feared and it has been concerned in the last few minutes. inevitably, there will be strong reaction and feeling from the whole political world about this. it is a desperately sad day for our democracy. by murdering one of our
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elected representatives, you are attacking our democracy was that i cannot be the case that our elected representatives live in fear of doing the most basic part of their job, meeting their constituents to hear their concerns, to take those concerns to the powers that be here in westminster. these are constituency surgery seems would have been happening up and down the country today. sir david amess will have beans speaking to some of those people he represents, and we are hearing he has been stabbed to death. it is a clearly horrific incident. what we have got today as political parties united in shock and in condemnation of what we have heard happening today in essex will stop the archbishop of canterbury, justin welby, saying he is shocked to hear of the attack, praying for
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him, his loved ones and his staff. our elected representatives must be 0ur elected representatives must be able to live and work without violence and the fear of intimidation if we are to maintain our democracy. sir david amess is a very popularfigure in parliament, lots of people from all political persuasions describing him as not only a colleague, but as a friend, so this loss will be keenly felt in the world of politics.— the world of politics. peter sol, thank you _ the world of politics. peter sol, thank you for— the world of politics. peter sol, thank you for following - the world of politics. peter sol, i thank you for following development in westminster. i want to speak to leigh milner, our corresponding at the scene now. this confirmation from police are so david amess has died after being stabbed, this will inevitably be without very sharply and very intensely in the community that he represented? i and very intensely in the community that he represented?— that he represented? i have been s-teakin that he represented? i have been speaking to _ that he represented? i have been speaking to a _ that he represented? i have been speaking to a few _ that he represented? i have been speaking to a few of _ that he represented? i have been speaking to a few of those - that he represented? i have been i speaking to a few of those residents here today, yes, shock as one of the
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many— here today, yes, shock as one of the many things— here today, yes, shock as one of the many things they are feeling. if i 'ust many things they are feeling. if i just pan— many things they are feeling. if i just pan the camera around, this is where _ just pan the camera around, this is where it— just pan the camera around, this is where it happened. police were called _ where it happened. police were called to— where it happened. police were called to reports of a stabbing here 'ust called to reports of a stabbing here just after— called to reports of a stabbing here just after 12 o'clock today. as you can see — just after 12 o'clock today. as you can see we — just after 12 o'clock today. as you can see, we have a police cordon in place _ can see, we have a police cordon in place we _ can see, we have a police cordon in place. we have lots of residents here _ place. we have lots of residents here who — place. we have lots of residents here who are deeply worried, shocked, _ here who are deeply worried, shocked, concerned. earliertoday, we also _ shocked, concerned. earliertoday, we also saw — shocked, concerned. earliertoday, we also saw the ambulance arrive at the scene _ we also saw the ambulance arrive at the scene. reports that the 69—year—old, the mp for southend west. _ 69—year—old, the mp for southend west. was— 69—year—old, the mp for southend west, was stabbed several times as he was _ west, was stabbed several times as he was simply meeting with constituents at a church. within the past few _ constituents at a church. within the past few minutes, as we have been hearihg. _ past few minutes, as we have been hearing, essex police have confirmed they have _ hearing, essex police have confirmed they have arrested a man on suspicion _ they have arrested a man on suspicion of murder. they say they have _ suspicion of murder. they say they have also— suspicion of murder. they say they have also recovered the knife. they are not— have also recovered the knife. they are not looking for anyone else in
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connection— are not looking for anyone else in connection to the incident and a man remains _ connection to the incident and a man remains in _ connection to the incident and a man remains in custody. over here, we have _ remains in custody. over here, we have councillorjohn lamb. when did you hear— have councillorjohn lamb. when did you hear about the news? | have councillorjohn lamb. when did you hear about the news? i got have councillorjohn lamb. when did you hear about the news?— you hear about the news? i got the thone you hear about the news? i got the hone call you hear about the news? i got the phone calljust _ you hear about the news? i got the phone calljust gone _ you hear about the news? i got the phone calljust gone 12 _ you hear about the news? i got the phone calljust gone 12 saying i you hear about the news? i got the phone calljust gone 12 saying that| phone calljust gone 12 saying that sir david had been stabbed multiple times during his surgery. literally, i came straight round to see. by that time, there was a police cordon already set up and they would not let us in. t, . already set up and they would not let us in. ., ., i. let us in. how are you feeling right now? i let us in. how are you feeling right now? i have _ let us in. how are you feeling right now? i have been _ let us in. how are you feeling right now? i have been speaking - let us in. how are you feeling right now? i have been speaking to i let us in. how are you feeling right now? i have been speaking to a i let us in. how are you feeling rightl now? i have been speaking to a few of the _ now? i have been speaking to a few of the residents, and they are shocked _ of the residents, and they are shocked. , , ,, ., of the residents, and they are shocked. , , ~ ., , of the residents, and they are shocked. , , ,, ., , ., shocked. very shocked and very down. david was a — shocked. very shocked and very down. david was a very _ shocked. very shocked and very down. david was a very hard-working - david was a very hard—working constituency mp. he used to always hold his surgeries and our head office, but he decided he wanted to come around the constituency and hold them in the different locations
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so he could meet the people. around here, in such a nice area, he used to go and see a elderly lady and have a cup of tea with her on numerous occasions, and then he would go on to do his surgery. for this to happen is absolutely dreadful. his family and his wife must really feel down at the moment, as we all do, because we have lost a very good, hard—working constituency mp, who worked for everyone. didn't matter who you are, it didn't matter about your religion or your culture, if you had a problem he would work for you. we if you had a problem he would work for ou. ~ ., if you had a problem he would work for ou. . . , , if you had a problem he would work for ou. t . , , ., if you had a problem he would work for ou. . . , , ., ., for you. we have been seeing a lot of compliments _ for you. we have been seeing a lot of compliments on _ for you. we have been seeing a lot of compliments on social— for you. we have been seeing a lot of compliments on social media, i for you. we have been seeing a lot i of compliments on social media, the former— of compliments on social media, the former party leader, sir iain duncan smith _ former party leader, sir iain duncan smith, saying "we are praying for a full recovery. " smith, saying "we are praying for a full recovery." this was before essex — full recovery." this was before essex police confirmed they arrested
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a man— essex police confirmed they arrested a man on— essex police confirmed they arrested a man on suspicion of murder. we have _ a man on suspicion of murder. we have also— a man on suspicion of murder. we have also heard from the jo cox foundation, the charity set up in memory— foundation, the charity set up in memory of— foundation, the charity set up in memory of the mp murdered in 2016. they say— memory of the mp murdered in 2016. they say they are horrified by reports — they say they are horrified by reports of a stabbing, and in a statement the foundation say they are thinking of him, his family and the loved — are thinking of him, his family and the loved ones at this distressing time _ the loved ones at this distressing time. ., ., the loved ones at this distressing time. t, ~' ,, ~ time. thank you, leigh milner in leigh-on-sea- _ time. thank you, leigh milner in leigh-on-sea. just _ time. thank you, leigh milner in leigh-on-sea. just to _ time. thank you, leigh milner in leigh-on-sea. just to recap i time. thank you, leigh milner in leigh-on-sea. just to recap the | leigh—on—sea. just to recap the breaking news this afternoon to those of you joining us. the conservative mp, sir david amess, has been killed in a knife attack in essex. the mp was attacked when he was meeting constituents at belfairs methodist church in leigh—on—sea. reports say he was stabbed multiple times. a 25—year—old man's has been arrested, police say they are not looking for anyone else in connection with the attack. there
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has been plenty of reaction to this. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, called it horrific and deeply shocking news. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon tweeted elected representatives across the spectrum will be saddened and shocked today. sir david, who was 69, and mp for southend west since 1997. let's go back to our political correspondent. clearly, the strength of feeling towards sir david suggest he was incredibly hard—working, incredibly popular, and people are just utterly shocked about what happened. he just utterly shocked about what hat tened. ., , just utterly shocked about what hat tened. . , ., ~ just utterly shocked about what hat tened. . , . ~ ., happened. he had been an mp for nearl 40 happened. he had been an mp for nearly 40 years. _ happened. he had been an mp for nearly 40 years, first _ happened. he had been an mp for nearly 40 years, first elected i happened. he had been an mp for nearly 40 years, first elected in i nearly 40 years, first elected in the early 1980s. i suppose he will be most remembered politically for winning the basildon seat in 1992,
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considered a really totemic moment in that election, a key battle ground, he went for the conservatives and john major went on to form a government. later on in life, known for his socially conservative views, he had campaigned against abortion, amongst other things. campaigned against abortion, amongst otherthings. recently, campaigned against abortion, amongst other things. recently, the kind of a running joke in parliament was that he can tirelessly for his constituency of south end to be made a city. i suppose thatjust goes to the heart of the way she will be remembered as an mp, he put his constituency first and foremost. he was doing thatjob just today, meeting his constituents at a church, where tragically he has been stabbed to death. just awful news. bernard jenkins, a fellow conservative mp and essex saying, "david was principled and are
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devoted to his country, constituency and the fence, and gave his life in service will stop i am in a state of disbelief and shock and cannot imagine what to say to comfort his family.". that is typical of the many tributes we have had from across the political spectrum this afternoon. $5 across the political spectrum this afternoon. �* , across the political spectrum this afternoon. a ., , across the political spectrum this afternoon. ., , , , afternoon. as you say, many tributes have been made, _ afternoon. as you say, many tributes have been made, among _ afternoon. as you say, many tributes have been made, among them i afternoon. as you say, many tributes have been made, among them carrie johnson, the prime minister's wife, tweeting to say, "absolutely devastating news about sir david amess. he was hugely kind and good, an enormous animal lover and a two gen. this is so completely unjust. thoughts are with his wife and their children." you are now seeing the scene where the fatal stabbing took place, where david amess, the mp for southend west, was stabbed, and then died short time afterwards, at a church hall in leigh—on—sea in
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essex. in the constituency that he has represented since 1997. the inevitable question that will advise, especially given that the tragic outcome of this is whether people can still have the access they have been used to having to their mps if that results in situations like this. there is inherently a tension there between access and safety. it inherently a tension there between access and safety.— access and safety. it raises profound — access and safety. it raises profound questions. - access and safety. it raises profound questions. this . access and safety. it raises - profound questions. this sadly is not the first such stabbing we have seenin not the first such stabbing we have seen in recent years. people will be reminded of what happened in 2016 withjo cox, a fairly similar scenario, sadly, and it is surgery, tragically murdered. there have been other stabbings involving mps, in 2010 two. a lot of people are asking what this tells us about the state
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of our democracy, the toxicity of debate. it is all well and good at sharing your views, debating, disagree profoundly with your elected representative. we have a democracy in which you can go to the ballot box and vote them out. clearly this is someone who has taken pretty clearly this is someone who has ta ken pretty extreme clearly this is someone who has taken pretty extreme measures here and it is a pretty shocking thing for all of us to reflect on. one individual has lost their life year, but it is a massive attack on our democracy. that is what a lot of mps and commentators are saying this afternoon. what to say about the level of security that might be required for mps as they go about doing their daily duties. clearly we want them to be as accessible as possible can be to hear the views of their constituents. that is what a democracy is all about. but if they are fearing for their safety, that is a very dangerous thing indeed. clearly a lot of mps will carry on going about their daily duties, as
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they have been ever sincejo cox was murdered. there is an awful lot of security around westminster, but the same level of security does not exist around these constituencies. this was in a church, you would imagine there was little or no security at their protecting sir david amess. yes, lots of people would definitely pose these questions will stop- would definitely pose these questions will stop pete, you mention that _ questions will stop pete, you mention that jo _ questions will stop pete, you mention that jo cox. - questions will stop pete, you mention that jo cox. i - questions will stop pete, you mention that jo cox. i just i questions will stop pete, you i mention that jo cox. i just want questions will stop pete, you - mention that jo cox. i just want to mention thatjo cox. i just want to mention thatjo cox. i just want to mention a tweet from brendan cox, the husband ofjo cox. he has been reacting to the news of sir david amess's death, saying my thoughts are with sir david's family. they are with sir david's family. they are all that matters now. this brings everything back, the pain, the loss, but also how much love the public gave us following the loss of
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jo. i hope we can do the same for sir david now. the transport secretary, grant shapps, has described sir david amess as "a true parliamentarian. this is awful, tragic news about sir david. he was a dedicated and thoughtful man, who lost his life while serving the constituents who he worked relentlessly for throughout his career. my thoughts are with his family and his friends at this time." lets go back to peter saul, our correspondent at westminster. more tributes that highlights just the strength of feeling towards sir david, as a man, but also as a politician and how he worked in that role, how seriously he took his duty and responsibility to those he
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represented. he and responsibility to those he represented.— represented. he was a typical hard-working _ represented. he was a typical hard-working constituent - represented. he was a typical| hard-working constituent mp, represented. he was a typical- hard-working constituent mp, he has hard—working constituent mp, he has been at parliament and of a lot of time. he has made a lot of friends, notjust on the conservative benches, but across the house of commons judging benches, but across the house of commonsjudging by benches, but across the house of commons judging by the outpouring benches, but across the house of commonsjudging by the outpouring of tributes we have had this afternoon. he was doing thatjob we all expect of our constituency mps, he was hearing people's concerns. a lot of mps might feel that doing that is perhaps not as important as standing up perhaps not as important as standing up in the house of commons and making an impassioned speech, but thatis making an impassioned speech, but that is fundamentally part of our democracy, that they do that and that they are accessible. it is worth bearing in mind here that david amess, who was 69, was a family man— he had five children. as you heard there from brendan cox at the heart of this there is a family grieving and a community in shock for someone who has been the mp for
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many decades. it will send shock waves throughout the pluto establishment here in the uk and no doubt around the world as well and all western democracies. == all western democracies. -- olitical all western democracies. —— political establishment. just to recap the news that has been confirmed— essex police have confirmed— essex police have confirmed that conservative mp, sir david amess, has been killed in a knife attack in essex in the south of england. the mp for southend west was attacked while he was meeting constituents at belfairs methodist church. let's speak now to kevin burke, a councillor in southend, and also get pursued chair of the southend west conservative association within sir david amess' constituency. firstly, kevin, your reaction to what happened. absolutely devastated. david was just such a remarkable mp, a remarkable constituency mp and just
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a remarkable man. we are absolutely devastated by this news.— devastated by this news. people have been -a in: devastated by this news. people have been paying tribute _ devastated by this news. people have been paying tribute to _ devastated by this news. people have been paying tribute to him, _ devastated by this news. people have been paying tribute to him, members of your party, his colleagues in at the conservative party, others from other parties as well. just explain how he will be missed and the impact that he had in all those decades serving southend west since 1997. $5 serving southend west since 1997. is you mentioned, david was not a political person in that respect, in other words he helped many people from across the spectrum, there is no one that he wouldn't talk to, no one that he wouldn't help. he was heavily involved in many charities. it is just going to leave a big gap in many people's lives. does it isjust going to leave a big gap in many people's lives.— in many people's lives. does it raise for you — in many people's lives. does it raise for you concerns - in many people's lives. does it raise for you concerns about i in many people's lives. does it. raise for you concerns about the openness and the access that is such
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a cornerstone of our democracy, that people have this ready access to their mps, the councillors, their elected representatives in those constituency meetings in a way that just doesn't happen at westminster, where there is such tight security. and yet when they are in those constituency, they are more accessible, more open, and there are more vulnerable as we have seen from this tragic incident today. i more vulnerable as we have seen from this tragic incident today.— this tragic incident today. i think it does raise _ this tragic incident today. i think it does raise concerns _ this tragic incident today. i think it does raise concerns for- this tragic incident today. i think it does raise concerns for all- this tragic incident today. i think it does raise concerns for all of l it does raise concerns for all of us. i'm a counsellor, and there are concerns just around the general safety for all of us following incidents like this and previous incidents. in recent times, our offices and southend west have had security upgraded for this very reason. but david had chosen, had wanted to take his surgery to the people. that is what he did. i guess if there is any positive we can take
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out of this as he died doing what he wanted to be doing, which is meeting the people. wanted to be doing, which is meeting the --eole. ~ ., ., the people. when you look back on a career that has _ the people. when you look back on a career that has spanned _ the people. when you look back on a career that has spanned so _ the people. when you look back on a career that has spanned so long, - career that has spanned so long, before he became an mp for southend west, he had he mp for basildon back in 1983. how do you sum up the contribution that someone like him, who has focuses political career being a constituency mp, the impact that he has made in that time for the people that live and work and visit that constituencies today? i don't think i can sum it up, but i think what you will find is with all the people that you will inevitably speak to over the coming days and weeks is that everyone will have a different story to tell about their
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interaction with sir david and how he was able to help and support them and itjust be a decent human being. thank you very much for that moment, councillor. we will leave at that. i want to return to our correspondent in westminster because there has been more reaction, there has been a tribute from the communities secretary michael gove saying david amess's passing is heartbreakingly sad, terrible news, he was a good and gentle man, he showed charity and gentle man, he showed charity and compassion to all, his every word and act were marked by kindness. my heart goes out to his family. we crossed to westminster in a moment but before that we can speak to leejorgensen, who works for local butchers near the church and arrived shortly after the stabbing.
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it must have been quite a shocking scene, talk us through what you saw and what heard. yes, terrible. literallyjust heard about his passing, shocking. i don't know what to say, really. is it an air that you would feel safe in, it looks a very residential and quiet and the place where no one would have any hesitation to go to and feel safe in? yeah, it is a very nice area, there has not been any problems at all, it is quite a family area, nice parade of shops, church. something like this does not happen, not in all the years i've been round this way. i assume when you arrive there are people who had heard before you had what had happened must have been nr
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state of shock as yeah, obviously the details were sketchy over the last couple of hours but there was lots of hearsay and i think everybody is in shock and they still are. like i said, it is a big parade of shops up this way and we have met him a few times and i always found him a few times and i always found him such a nice guy so it is quite a shock to the whole area, i can only say that. everyone is in shock. you met him yourself, give us a sense of what he was like. i mean, take away your political beliefs, ifound them quite i mean, take away your political beliefs, i found them quite a i mean, take away your political beliefs, ifound them quite a nice guy, he always popped in at christmas time, you visited all the local shops. christmas time, you visited all the localshops. ifound christmas time, you visited all the local shops. ifound them quite a friendly guy on a personal level. it is so sad what has happened.
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what sort of things are people saying in light of all this? ijust think everyone saying in light of all this? i just think everyone is saying in light of all this? ijust think everyone is in shock, probably like i am in shock now, trying to put it into words, what is happening, it isjust trying to put it into words, what is happening, it is just shock, trying to put it into words, what is happening, it isjust shock, it is upsetting, mainly. this is happening here as well, it is quite a nice area, it's a quiet area, not something you would hear or see every day. it is so sad. and i think everyone feels the same around our local area. inevitably this kind of raises questions at it has in the past where mps have been attacked, mercifully, it has not been a frequent occurrence but it has happened before and it raises questions about how much access people should have, how safe it is for constituents to be able to readily access these mps and councillors. foryou
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readily access these mps and councillors. for you as someone who lives in that area, how important is it to you that if you had a concern or they were something you are worried about, you could go and speak face—to—face directly with your mp rather than e—mailing or writing or tweeting or so on? i always think that is a good thing, to raise a concern directly rather than talking to them over social media. and it is a shame that something like this has happened when the man is obviously good enough to listen to your issues. and this is probably going to change a lot of things, i guess, because a lot of things, i guess, because a lot of things, i guess, because a lot of mps won't feel safe to do this. it is not something you would expect to happen and it is not fair. indeed. i mean, we are seeing images of the scene now, police tape still
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up of the scene now, police tape still up around the church hall where the stabbing happened, police cars outside as short time ago there was an airambulance nearby, outside as short time ago there was an air ambulance nearby, for people in the area going about their daily lives, seems like this, what goes through your head? i appreciate you must all still be great amount of shock. what impact will this have on the community? do you think people will feel safe in leigh—on—sea, in southend west? obviously it's a shock and in the coming days i think that will be the big question, how everyone is going to feel. healing the guy has been arrested will put people's minds at ease, that's for sure. like i said, it is quite a nice place, especially at this area. but obviously it won't make people a bitjittery, i think.
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it is not something you would expect to hear or see every day. leejorgensen, speaking to us from the area, take it very much indeed. these are live pictures from the scene where the fatal stabbing of a sir david amess mp, the conservative mp, happened earlier today. sir david amess mp, the conservative mp, happened earliertoday. i sir david amess mp, the conservative mp, happened earlier today. iam looking at sir david amess's own twitter account, poignantly the last tweets on that account was highlighting the constituency surgery taking place on friday the 15th of october at belfairs methodist church and inviting people to book an appointment to go and see him to raise their concerns, and we have heard how much he campaigned for the constituency that he represents, and just looking within the last couple of days he was speaking to the local bbc radio station, bbc essex, about his campaign for southend to become a
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city, his mansion and virtual every week in parliamentjust this week he told our colleagues on bbc essex his plan was to wear them down until they say yes. that highlights, i suppose, how proud he was of the constituency that he served for all those years, becoming an mp for southend west in 1997 and before that for basildon, in 1983. a long—standing and long serving member of parliament, a member of the conservative party, and from all we've heard, are very dedicated constituency mp and our correspondent in westminster has been gauging the reaction to this. has there been any more said since we last spoke? the has there been any more said since we last spoke?— we last spoke? the flags are flying at half mast _ we last spoke? the flags are flying at half mast over _ we last spoke? the flags are flying at half mast over downing - we last spoke? the flags are flying at half mast over downing street, | at half mast over downing street, the cabinet met earlier on this afternoon in bristol, the second time limit outside the capital,
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cabinet ministers making their way back to london. we've heard from the deputy prime minister on twitter at dominic rab, who said, "we are heartbroken we've lost sir david amess, a great common sense politician and a formidable campaigner with a big heart and tremendous generosity of spirit. excellent toward those he disagreed with. rip, my friend." that description of him being a friend as well as a colleague is all over social media, from politicians of all stripes this afternoon. he was a very well—known and very well loved in parliament, even among those who might disagree with him profoundly politically and recognition of the work he did as a constituency mp. that most fitting tribute to him would be if southend was finally to be granted that city status he long campaign for. we heard how he was very much
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focused on the constituency. and an inevitable part of that is taking on casework from constituents and we had a moment ago from one of those he represented. about how important it was for people having that access and if there were things that were upsetting them concerning them or angling them, they felt they could go and speak face—to—face with the man who represented them at westminster. it’s man who represented them at westminster.— man who represented them at westminster. �*, ., ., , ., westminster. it's a really important art of the westminster. it's a really important part of the way _ westminster. it's a really important part of the way our— westminster. it's a really important part of the way our democracy - westminster. it's a really important i part of the way our democracy works, if you've got a concern, even if it smells like fry to you, you can still take it to mp and they will listen —— if it seems like small fry to you. david amess was holding this constituency surgery to date like many other mps, dozens of mps will have been doing the same and hearing all kinds of different issues, some of which might not make it to downing street, so to speak, but
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it's a really important function. inevitably people will talk about the security of mps out and about doing theirjobs, they are on recess at the moment, parliament isn't sitting because we've had party conferences, the conservative party conferences, the conservative party conference last week and the labour conference last week and the labour conference in the week before that, there might be a perception that mps take a holiday when parliament is not sitting but that is not the case as david amess has shown, he was arguably doing the most important part of a job of an mp and even if you rise to the lofty heights of cabinet you are still expected to your those concerns, whether it's about the bins being put out or whatever, these are the thing that matters to voters and it is so tragic in his life has ended doing that fundamentaljob as an mp. i want to share a tweet from brendan cox, the husband of murdered mpjoe cox, the husband of murdered mpjoe cox who died after being shot and stabbed in her constituency in 2016.
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he has been reacting to the news ? there is also been a tribute from sadiq khan, the labour mayor of london. he says ? the former conservative prime minister david cameron has also paid tribute saying... this is the most devastating,
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horrific and tragic news and he goes onto to say sir david amess was a kind and thoroughly decent man and the most committed mp you could ever hope to meet. words cannot adequately express the horror of what has happened today, right now my heart goes out to david's family. this is the scene live in leigh—on—sea in essex in the south of england, where the conservative mp, member of the conservative party sir david amess stabbed and died this afternoon, that news being confirmed by essex police and also confirming a man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. our correspondent is in westminster and following developments on this. mercifully, we do not report on the sort of thing happening very frequently but this is now definitely not without precedent.
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it's something that has happened in similar situations twice within just over ten years. inevitably questions will be asked about how this kind of thing, this kind of tragedy can be avoided but can it? it's a difficult question. the last time we saw something like this was in 2016, days before the eu referendum when a labour mp, joe cox, was murdered outside her constituency surgery. lots of people are saying today this sends a pretty awful message about the toxicity, the level of debate in our politics, does it raise questions about the language at senior public figures use. or does it remind us asjo cox once said there is more that unites us than divides us, and certainly at the political reaction to this,
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david ames was a social conservative, and many people in parliament will have politically disagreed with him but today they are united in their condemnation of what has been described as a cowardly attack. in 2010 there was a stabbing and robbing a labour mp stephen timms, he survived. another involving nigel dons, liberal democrat mp, an assistant to him died protecting him —— nigeljones. this is not, tragically, without precedent. and lots of people now will be talking about levels of security for mps. there are lots of security for mps. there are lots of security and at westminster, that is easier to do because it's a contained environment, the house of westminster and parliament and downing street up the road and that government buildings that are around this part of central london. when mps are in their constituencies, they probably cannot afford
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security, it is highly unlikely there would have been a police officer on the door of a methodist church while david amess was listening to concerns from his constituents. it raises an awful of questions. stay with us, ijust questions. stay with us, i just want to break away for a moment to bring you some reaction from carriejohnson, the prime minister's wife. in a tweet she said... what speak now to father geoff walmart, he knew sir david and is the parish priest of saint peter's catholic church, very close to the scene. i suppose at times like this at the community look to people like yourselves for comfort and reassurance and hope but that must be very difficult to give when you
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yourself are working through the loss of someone who you must have been close to and will remember fondly. ijust fondly. i just would like to say first of all, the family, such a shock to all of us, sir david amess, no matter which political leanings you may have, has been a true friend to everybody in the constituency he serves, nothing has ever been too much trouble, he is a roman catholic and i am the local roman catholic priest here and all the christian community and people from all faiths will be saying the same thing, why has this happened? and i am shaking talking to you at the moment because i cannot even begin to understand why this has happened but the church is open and this evening at six o'clock we'll be saying mass immediately for his soul and that will be a difficult thing but there will be a difficult thing but there will be a difficult thing but there
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will be silence as we try and listen to the voice of god to give us comfort. i am to the voice of god to give us comfort. iam not to the voice of god to give us comfort. i am not sure i am capable of doing that at the moment, i have to say. i have got to give myself a lot of internal courage and strength to do, and ask for that from above. david was a great, great man, a good catholic and a friend to all, i cannot really say any more. i appreciate it is incredibly difficult time for you. this is not just someone you knew as a colleague in your public capacity, the sense that someone who was a good friend to you as well. that someone who was a good friend to you as well-— to you as well. absolutely. i supported — to you as well. absolutely. i supported all— to you as well. absolutely. i supported all of _ to you as well. absolutely. i supported all of the - to you as well. absolutely. i supported all of the catholicj to you as well. absolutely. i - supported all of the catholic clergy in the area and all of the church, notjust in the area and all of the church, not just the catholic in the area and all of the church, notjust the catholic church. all of the faiths in southend had a friend in sir david amess, itjust happened
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as a roman catholic, he has been at the most marvellous support to meet pasalic, weat said mass in the house of commons chapel, i've enjoyed his company and he was a wonderful man. just in terms of all of that, what he brought to this area is our friendship to everyone that wants his year, and he's died doing that, that's the remarkable thing, he has died serving the people. you mention you are opening your church doors to the community, people who want to come and gather and two reflects an comfort each other and share memories. reiterate the arrangements for that and how people can... i’ue the arrangements for that and how people can- - -_ people can... i've only 'ust put it u . people can... i've only 'ust put it u- on a people can... i've only 'ust put it up on a math people can... i've only 'ust put it up on a social media _ people can... i've onlyjust put it up on a social media page, - people can... i've onlyjust put it up on a social media page, we i people can... i've onlyjust put it. up on a social media page, we are going to see a mass at six o'clock tonight at saint peter's catholic
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church, just minutes walk from where this terrible thing happened. david's parish is another parish in southend and i am sure all of the catholic church is in this area but want to do something very similar if not this evening, over sometime tomorrow on saturday before the sunday masses begin. i suppose there are similarities in the work that someone in your position as a member of the clergy does, and they work a politician does, and they work a politician does, in the sense you have to have access, people have to be able to come and see you because you cannot do yourjob effectively without that. inevitably that raises concerns. does it give you cause for concerns. does it give you cause for concern about how readily you can serve people when things like this happen? of course it does. we have to be very sensible and grounded and we have to have a certain amount of street cred, to use that term,
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because all of us in public life are vulnerable. to those that would want to do something that has happened today and we have just got to be able to discern a little bit when strangers come in our midst, what they are actually going to be doing. i know that might be easy to say but when you are faced with something like this you've got to act very quickly and it sounds to meet per sir david had no time at all to defend himself. we are all vulnerable all of us. i suppose the shop will be most keenly felt by those with an at the time and who perhaps saw what happened —— i suppose the shock. that horror is just unimaginable. it that horror isjust unimaginable. it is indeed. and that is why it's so important for the community to gather around the altar this evening
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and prayed together and just reflect in silence. we do not need any words this evening, everybody is going to be really hurting, and incredibly upset. we feel like we have lost a member of our family, upset. we feel like we have lost a member of ourfamily, for upset. we feel like we have lost a member of our family, for what he's done for southend west over the years. i am done for southend west over the years. iam not done for southend west over the years. i am not doing very well, i cannot articulate because i am so shocked. you are giving us a heartfelt sense of demand that you knew and demand that you will miss and amount are now grieving for and you need make now grieving for and you need make no apology at all for that. thank you very much indeed, father. god bless you all. goodbye. that really gives you a sense of how intensely the community is feeling the loss of sir david amess, who has been the mp for southend west since 1997, a member
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of parliament in total for almost four decades, representing the seat of basildon before that from 1983. that really underlines why there has been such a swell of tributes to him, they have been pouring in from government, the deputy prime minister dominic rab tweeting, "heart broken lost sir david amess mp, a great common sense politician and formidable campaigner with a big heart and tremendous generosity of spirit." and the chancellor rishi sunak has just tweeted to say... let's return to our political
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correspondent. peter, the response in westminster are very clear, flight already flying at half mast as a mark of respect. absolutely ri . ht. a as a mark of respect. absolutely right- a much — as a mark of respect. absolutely right. a much loved _ as a mark of respect. absolutely right. a much loved politician i right. a much loved politician across all sides of the house of commons, really. the cabinet met this afternoon not in westminster but in bristol, those ministers you've been hearing from on twitter all making their own tributes, liz truss the secretary saying she is devastated to hear the terrible news about sir david amess, he was a lovely, lovely man and superb parliamentarian, my thoughts are with all his family and friends. it's notjust conservative politicians, labour, snp, liberal democrats are all stressing how much they admired him as a friend and a colleague and i suppose it comes at moments like this which tragically we've experienced in the past in our politics when we kind of come
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together and appreciate the for all the differences that different sides might have politically we are all united in wanting to foster a healthy democracy and the murder of an elected representative is an attack on our democracy which is why there is so much a shot across the political spectrum here, across the uk and no doubt around the world —— so much shock. we've heard about his work on international matters and he will be familiar to our view is notjust in the uk but some viewers elsewhere around the world as a result.- around the world as a result. that's ri . ht, around the world as a result. that's riaht, he around the world as a result. that's right, he campaigned _ around the world as a result. that's right, he campaigned on _ around the world as a result. that's right, he campaigned on refugee i right, he campaigned on refugee rights, on anti—semitism, he was a member of the all—party parliamentary group on anti—semitism. is what on animal welfare, social issues, such as abortion, he's been involved in lots of things over a long parliamentary career, was first elected the mp for
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basildon in 1983 and perhaps his most famous moment as a politician was winning that seat in 1992 during the general election, ultimately won ljy the general election, ultimately won byjohn major and the conservatives because that seat in basildon was considered the big swing constituency, key target voter in 1992 was known as a basildon man so sir david amess winning that seat for the tories was a clear sign they were going to hold off the challenge from labour. in recent years he's made a name as a campaigning local constituency mp and we need those local constituency mps just as much as politicians that might rise to the top positions in cabinet. the one thing he brought up almost weekly with a campaign for southend to be granted city status, no doubt those calls will only amplify following his tragic death.
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we have seen the tributes being paid on social media, is there any talk of the houses of parliament been recalled for tributes to be made official on the record? parliament is due to come back next week anyway so it's unlikely they would be recalled at the weekend. the last time parliament was recalled was during the afghanistan crisis and prior to that following the death of the duke of edinburgh. we expect to hear from the prime minister this afternoon. he's been sharing cabinet elsewhere in the country to date, lots of his colleagues as spoke. i imagine there are plenty of mps that would like to stand up in the house of commons and make it known how much they loved and admired sir david amess, how much he was respected on all sides of the house and there will know that the ample opportunity to do
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that the ample opportunity to do that when the house of commons returns from conference recess next week. the inevitable question that arises is whether people can continue to have the sort of access to their mps when this is not the first time, sadly, we are talking about an incident like this happening. that's right, five years agojo cox was murdered in her constituency, quite a few years have passed since then and mercifully these kinds of things are pretty rare in the history of our politics but inevitably people will talk about the quality of debate we have now and whether social media has exacerbated the problems. mps have onlyjust exacerbated the problems. mps have only just started exacerbated the problems. mps have onlyjust started having only just started having constituency onlyjust started having constituency surgeries in the normal way in recent months because of course during the covid pandemic that they've not been able to do that they've not been able to do that and they've held many of those meetings online but i know many mps have really enjoyed the fact that
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they've got back face—to—face, meeting the people they've been elected to represent and they see that as a really important part of theirjob, to get a sense of what ordinary people are thinking, westminster can seem like a bubble at the best of times and so they really value the opportunity to speak to the electorate. no doubt many will defend their right to do that even if there are those who say we should perhaps look again at the security there for our elected representatives when they are out and about because when they are in westminster there is plenty of security, airport style security at all the entrances to the houses of parliament. a lengthy process to get through a pass but less so in the constituency. ok, our correspondent at westminster. to recap, the conservative mp sir david amess has been killed in a knife attack in essex, the mp for south and west was
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attacked while he was meeting constituents at the methodist church hall in leigh—on—sea. tributes have been paid from across the political spectrum and our coverage continues here on bbc news. this is bbc news. the headlines: the conservative mp, sir david amess, has died after being stabbed during a constituency surgery in essex. a 25—year—old man has been arrested and remains in custody — a knife was recovered from nearby. fellow politicians have paid tribute to the 69—year—old mp for southend west — he'd been an essex mp since 1983. deputy prime minister dominic raab tweeted to say he was heartbroken, the labour leader, keir starmer, wrote that he was thinking of sir david's family and staff. his constituents, too, have been expressing their shock and upset. it's upsetting, mainly,
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this happening here as well, it's quite a nice area, it's a quiet area. it's not something you would hear or see every day. it's so sad. the conservative mp sir david amess has been killed in a knife attack in essex. the mp for southend west was attacked while he was holding a constituency surgery at belfairs methodist church in leigh—on—sea. reports say he was stabbed multiple times. a 25 year—old man's been arrested and police are not looking for anyone else in connection with the attack. deputy prime minister
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dominic raab tweeted that he was "heartbroken that we have lost sir david" whom he described as "a great common sense politician and a formidable campaigner with a big heart, and tremendous generosity of spirit." foreign secretary liz truss said she was "devastated" and called sir david "a lovely, lovely man and great parliamentarian." the labour leader, keir starmer, called the news "horrific and deeply shocking," while liberal democrat leader sir ed davey said it was a "truly terrible day for british politics." scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, tweeted, "elected representatives from across the political spectrum will be united in sadness and shock today." the welsh first minister, mark drakeford, called the attack a "truly despicable and horrifying act." flags outside parliament have been
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lowered to half mast. sir david, who was 69, had been mp for southend west since 1997. he had been an mp since the early 80s. our correspondent, leigh milner, is at the scene. if ijust pan the camera around, this is where it happened. police were called to reports of a stabbing here just after 12 o'clock today. as you can see, we have a police cordon in place. we have lots of residents here who are deeply worried, shocked, concerned. earlier today, we also saw the ambulance arrive at the scene. reports that the 69—year—old, the mp for southend west, was stabbed several times as he was simply meeting
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with constituents at a church. within the past few minutes, as we have been hearing, essex police have confirmed they have arrested a man on suspicion of murder. they say they have also recovered the knife. they are not looking for anyone else in connection to the incident and a man remains in custody. over here, we have councillorjohn lamb. when did you hear about the news? i got the phone calljust gone 12 saying that sir david had been stabbed multiple times during his surgery. literally, i came straight round to see. by that time, there was a police cordon already set up and they would not let us in. how are you feeling right now? i have been speaking to a few of the residents,
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and they are shocked. very shocked and very down. david was a very hard—working constituency mp. we used to always hold his surgeries at our head office, but he decided he wanted to come around the constituency and hold them in different locations so he could meet the people. around here, in such a nice area, he used to go and see a elderly lady and have a cup of tea with her on numerous occasions, and then he would go on to do his surgery. for this to happen is absolutely dreadful. his family and his wife must really feel down at the moment, as we all do, because we have lost a very good, hard—working constituency mp, who worked for everyone. didn't matter who you were, it didn't matter about your religion or your culture, if you had
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a problem he would work for you. we have been seeing a lot of compliments on social media, the former party leader, sir iain duncan smith, saying, "we are praying for a full recovery." this was before essex police confirmed they had arrested a man on suspicion of murder. we have also heard from the jo cox foundation, the charity set up in memory of the mp murdered in 2016. they say they are horrified by reports of a stabbing, and in a statement the foundation said they are thinking of him, his family and the loved ones at this distressing time. let's get more from our political correspondent, pete saull.
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no surprise, tributes from across the political spectrum because this is something that goes to the heart of all politicians. we talked about this five years ago with the murder ofjo cox, and it is almost unbelievable to all concerned that we are looking at something perhaps similar. ., , similar. there will have been hundreds _ similar. there will have been hundreds of _ similar. there will have been hundreds of mps _ similar. there will have been hundreds of mps doing - similar. there will have been hundreds of mps doing the i similar. there will have been - hundreds of mps doing the exact same thing as sir david amess was doing, holding a constituency surgery city, it is the bread and butter of their job, listening to the concerns of constituents. that is the ultimate job of an mp, to listen to what their electorate have to say, what their electorate have to say, what their concerns are, and then potentially bring it up in westminster and enact some change. i have just been handed an extract for sir david amess' book, which is incredibly poignant. he talks about when he was mp for basildon, before
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constituency boundaries changed and he became mp for southend west. with a young family, he writes of being informed of a death threat made against him apparently by the ira. he then goes on to talk about the attack on nigeljones, the liberal democrat mp, who is assistant died trying to protect the mp. david amess writes, it is appalling to think its next logical move was to stab mrjones. we all make ourselves readily available to our constituents and are often deal with members of the public you have mental health problems. it could happen to any of us. incredibly poignant, tragically ironic that david amess himself wrote that in this book. this will be a concern for many mps. inevitably, people are now talking about levels of security for mps as they go about doing their daily business in their constituencies was up because it
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cannot be right at in a functioning democracy that our elected representatives can be scared of just doing the job of meeting the people they are elected to represent. people they are elected to represent-— people they are elected to reresent. . ., ., , ., represent. we have had a statement from cert lindsay _ represent. we have had a statement from cert lindsay hoyle, _ represent. we have had a statement from cert lindsay hoyle, the - represent. we have had a statement| from cert lindsay hoyle, the speaker of the house, paying tribute to sir david. he was a lovely man, devoted to his family. but going on to make that point to say in the coming days we will need to discuss and examine mps' we will need to discuss and examine mps' security and any measures to be taken. tragically, we discuss all of this, this was talked about five and a half years ago whenjo cox died. sadly, we have been here before, in 2016 in the run—up to the eu referendum, a labour mp murdered outside her constituency surgery. before that, that was the attack on stephen timms in 2010. mercifully,
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these things do not happen all that often. i suppose this tells us what happens with the level of debate in our democracy at the moment? has social media maintains it worse? at times, there is a toxicity of debate, with mps having to take an awful lot of verbal abuse. today, we have seen that tragically sometimes becomes physical too. if you attack an mp verbally or physically, you are attacking our democracy, i think thatis are attacking our democracy, i think that is the message that we have to put across today. you can disagree with politicians, debate with them, choose to vote them out, that is how our democracy functions will stop and is not how our democracy works for mps to be in there as they go about doing the bread and butter of theirjobs. just about doing the bread and butter of their 'obs., , ., .~' about doing the bread and butter of their 'obs., , . a ., theirjobs. just a quick final thought- — theirjobs. just a quick final thought. there _ theirjobs. just a quick final thought. there are - theirjobs. just a quick final thought. there are so - theirjobs. just a quick final| thought. there are so much theirjobs. just a quick final - thought. there are so much we don't know about what happened here, we
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know about what happened here, we know police arrested someone and they are not looking for anyone else. explain to viewers how surgeries work. i'm assuming they have not been happening for a long time because of the pandemic to stop how could it work? if they are back up how could it work? if they are back up and running, people will ask how it works. are there any restrictions around you can get access to their mp and how they do it? or does it vary from constituency to constituency? it vary from constituency to constituency?— vary from constituency to constituency? vary from constituency to constituen ? ., , ., ~ constituency? it does vary from mp to mp, constituency? it does vary from mp to mp. but — constituency? it does vary from mp to mp, but most _ constituency? it does vary from mp to mp, but most will _ constituency? it does vary from mp to mp, but most will want - constituency? it does vary from mp to mp, but most will want to - constituency? it does vary from mp to mp, but most will want to make | to mp, but most will want to make themselves as accessible as they possibly can do to their constituents will stop during the pandemic, a lot of constituency certainties have been happening online, but as mps have been sent to parliament on mass, those i have been speaking to have been saying how great it has been to see their constituents again. they really value it because it gives them a
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good sense of what people are thinking about the key issues going on, it informs how they might vote on, it informs how they might vote on those key policies. it might also be the case that individuals raise serious concerns that might be newsworthy or something they feel as an mp they need to raise on their behalf in the house of commons chamber. that is how our democracy functions. i don't think you will find many mps think it is time to stop constituency surgeries, but with anyone been able to turn up without any level of security, it will be advertised in the local press and radio, that kind of thing. i think it is an important thing for our elected representatives to be seen to be accessible, but clearly also they need to be safe. they are clearly not as safe out and about in the country as they are here in westminster given the police presence at that already is around the house of parliament. just
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presence at that already is around the house of parliament.- the house of parliament. just to brina ou the house of parliament. just to bring you more _ the house of parliament. just to bring you more reaction - the house of parliament. just to bring you more reaction in - the house of parliament. just to bring you more reaction in such | bring you more reaction in such shock throughout the afternoon as entirely expected. we have just had reaction from the leader of the catholic church in england and whales, cardinal vincent nichols, saying i was shocked and saddened to learn of the killing of sir david amess mp. ican i can talk now to monsignor kevin hale is the vicar general of the diocese of brentwood and parish priest in leigh—on sea in david amess's constituency. thank you so much. a very difficult day for you personally, because i know you are new sir david well.
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your thoughts at this really shocking news? i your thoughts at this really shocking news?— your thoughts at this really shocking news? your thoughts at this really shockin: news? ~ , , ., ~ ., shocking news? i thinki speak for eve one shocking news? i thinki speak for everyone in _ shocking news? i thinki speak for everyone in the _ shocking news? i thinki speak for everyone in the area _ shocking news? i thinki speak for everyone in the area when - shocking news? i thinki speak for everyone in the area when we - shocking news? i thinki speak for everyone in the area when we are| everyone in the area when we are utterly appalled by what has happened. it is hard to believe it, really. there is a great sense of incredulity about the whole event. sir david was a neighbour of ours, he was a very good friend of the parish family here. a few can visitors, a familiar face parish family here. a few can visitors, a familiarface in parish family here. a few can visitors, a familiar face in the area. a great supporter of everything happening in the locality. —— a frequent visitor. he was often seen at mass, a great constituency man. utterly appalled. if i can speak on behalf of the catholic community in the area, our hearts and our prayers go out profoundly to his wife and to his children at this moment. ind profoundly to his wife and to his children at this moment. and your thouuhts children at this moment. and your thoughts about _ children at this moment. and your thoughts about him _ children at this moment. and your thoughts about him as _ children at this moment. and your thoughts about him as a _ children at this moment. and your
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thoughts about him as a person i children at this moment. and yourj thoughts about him as a person as well? you know him as a constituency mp, but your thoughts about him the individual? ., , ., ., individual? david was a great supporter — individual? david was a great supporter of _ individual? david was a great supporter of anything - individual? david was a great supporter of anything we - individual? david was a great supporter of anything we did | individual? david was a great i supporter of anything we did in individual? david was a great - supporter of anything we did in the area, he made himself very readily available to all the fifes in the area. if i was to highlight a few things, i would say david was such a great supporter of the pro—life activities of the church, a great supporter of marriage into family life too, and also a great supporter of our catholic education. i know whenever there were problems of our schools, he would make representations personally to the department of education. we had a great friend and a great supporter, and he would also support local activities. who is often to be seen at the various activities that we had in the southend area. i can barely find words to describe the
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shock that we all feel at this moment. —— i cannot barely find words. moment. -- i cannot barely find words. , , . moment. -- i cannot barely find words. , ., moment. -- i cannot barely find words. ., ,, words. this is a nonpartisan issue, isn't it? politicians _ words. this is a nonpartisan issue, isn't it? politicians don't _ isn't it? politicians don't necessarily always talk about their faith, why should they, not everyone is comfortable with that. but as i understand that, his faith was very important to him, he went to a catholic school, i believed he carried out through his life? david was a student _ carried out through his life? david was a student of... _ carried out through his life? david was a student of... he _ carried out through his life? david was a student of... he very - carried out through his life? david was a student of... he very much | was a student of... he very much loved his roots and at that part of east london. he was to be seen frequently at mass in the area here, he was a weekly mass goer. if familiar face at our catholic mass, our catholic worship. lode familiar face at our catholic mass, our catholic worship.— our catholic worship. we are crateful our catholic worship. we are grateful for _ our catholic worship. we are grateful for your— our catholic worship. we are grateful for your time, - our catholic worship. we are | grateful for your time, thank our catholic worship. we are - grateful for your time, thank you
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very gratefulfor your time, thank you very much on a very difficult day for your constituency area, for the parish that you represent, thank you for your time. talking about the importance of his faith as well. just to bring you a statement from sirjohn majors, the former conservative prime minister, saying this afternoon, "this is truly heartbreaking news. a good and decent man for more than 30 years with a dedicated public servant. my heart goes out to his family." sir john major with his tribute to sir david amess, the conservative mp who died today in a stabbing in his constituency. to mark this horrific event, we can see already that the flags are flying at half mast in downing street. he was a
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conservative mp, but to stress that the shock and the tributes are coming from a cross party politics. this is not a day for party politics that had been tributes from all the leaders of the main westminster parties, and from the scottish and welsh welsh first minister as well. this is something that affects public servants of all colours. let's talk again to our political correspondent, peter saull, who is getting reaction as it continues to pour in. i think we can't say often enough, it is that sense of shock. people will be following the news, saying has nothing changed since the merger ofjo cox five and have years ago? i stress we don't know exactly what has happened in the circumstance, but this is an mp, doesn't matter what party, trying to meet his constituents, that is part of their job, meet his constituents, that is part of theirjob, and at the end of the day he is no longer with us. it is
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trauic day he is no longer with us. it is tragic and _ day he is no longer with us. it s tragic and desperately sad for anyone who cares about our politics and our democracy. the flags flying at half mast across the parliamentary estate now, just a measure of how highly he was held in people's views. sir david amess had friends right across parliament. for all those individual mps who might have disagreed profoundly on a range of different subjects, they will all be feeling this pretty keenly today. friday is the usual day for constituency surgeries, for mps to their constituents face—to—face. a lot of them willjust go about it in a normal way. clearly, you don't expect someone to burst in and attack you physically. it's a shocking thing to happen. we are expecting to hear from the prime minister at some point this afternoon. he has been sharing a cabinet meeting in bristol this afternoon, the second time he has
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taken up the cabinet outside of london to do that. cabinet ministers all on their way back to london now. just some of the tributes we have had from the top of government this afternoon, the education secretary, nadhim zahawi, "rest in peace, so david could. you will be missed by many. the foreign secretary liz truss, "devastated to hear news about sir david amess was up he was about sir david amess was up he was a lovely, lovely man and a superb parliamentarian. my thoughts are with all his and friends." the levelling up secretary, "heartbreaking news, he was a good and gentle man who showed charity and gentle man who showed charity and compassion to all. his every word and act were marked by kindness was my thoughts go out to his family." i'm struck by what people have been saying about sir david amess in similarity withjo cox, one
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was labour and one was a conservative politician forced were in politics because they wanted to do good in the local areas they represented. fundamentally, that is what mps are supposed to do. you are reminded of those words jo what mps are supposed to do. you are reminded of those wordsjo cox famously said, that is more than unites us than what divides us. certainly the world of politics is united in shock and grief today by the murder of a long serving mp. flags are flying at half mast in downing street. we can hear a little from our reporter —— south essex reporter from from our reporter —— south essex reporterfrom essex live, ellis whitehouse, who has been explaining more. , . whitehouse, who has been explaining more, , . , whitehouse, who has been explaining more. , . , more. public debates in southend can be heated, more. public debates in southend can be heated. can _ more. public debates in southend can be heated, can be _ more. public debates in southend can
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be heated, can be opinionated, - be heated, can be opinionated, sometimes that is justified, sometimes that is justified, sometimes it can all spiral out of controb — sometimes it can all spiral out of controb i— sometimes it can all spiral out of control. i think on this occasion when _ control. i think on this occasion when there _ control. i think on this occasion when there is something so tragic as this, and _ when there is something so tragic as this, and it's — when there is something so tragic as this, and it's playing out in real time, _ this, and it's playing out in real time, everyone across the political spectrum — time, everyone across the political spectrum does come together and support— spectrum does come together and support each other. i think they do know_ support each other. i think they do know at— support each other. i think they do know at the — support each other. i think they do know at the end of the day they are all elected — know at the end of the day they are all elected representatives and they're — all elected representatives and they're all trying to do right by their— they're all trying to do right by their own _ they're all trying to do right by their own constituents and do what they believe is best for them. in this occasion, a man has very sadly lost his— this occasion, a man has very sadly lost his life — this occasion, a man has very sadly lost his life. it has happened in a very public— lost his life. it has happened in a very public setting, and mp's surgery _ very public setting, and mp's surgery. from what i have seen and what _ surgery. from what i have seen and what we _ surgery. from what i have seen and what we have reported from essex live, _ what we have reported from essex live, everyone has put their political— live, everyone has put their political differences aside and it 'ust political differences aside and it just really come together to support each other— just really come together to support each other to mourn those who will have been— each other to mourn those who will have been lost, those affected about this, and _ have been lost, those affected about this, and support them. and to make sure as _ this, and support them. and to make sure as an— this, and support them. and to make sure as an area, leigh—on—sea cannot
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-et sure as an area, leigh—on—sea cannot get through— sure as an area, leigh—on—sea cannot get through this and the people can -et get through this and the people can get through this and the people can get through this. i think that is what _ get through this. i think that is what i — get through this. i think that is what i have seen from south end councillors, they do genuinely care a lot about — councillors, they do genuinely care a lot about their town and their people — a lot about their town and their people. i'm sure following a tragic event _ people. i'm sure following a tragic event like — people. i'm sure following a tragic event like this, they are going to be more — event like this, they are going to be more supportive. whether or not it is going _ be more supportive. whether or not it is going to— be more supportive. whether or not it is going to make the political divide — it is going to make the political divide more inflamed, arguments are more _ divide more inflamed, arguments are more inclined, that remains to be seen _ more inclined, that remains to be seen this — more inclined, that remains to be seen this is _ more inclined, that remains to be seen. this is obviously a very tragic— seen. this is obviously a very tragic incident and a very much breaking — tragic incident and a very much breaking event right now. there will be discussions to come, in the future — be discussions to come, in the future there will be more discussions about the future of pottery. — discussions about the future of pottery, in terms of his house—building, tourism, its economics. those will continue. i think— economics. those will continue. i think in— economics. those will continue. i think in something like this, i certainiy— think in something like this, i certainly believe it will be the case — certainly believe it will be the case councillors will be very much supportive — case councillors will be very much supportive of each other no matter what party — supportive of each other no matter what party they sit on. we
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supportive of each other no matter what party they sit on.— supportive of each other no matter what party they sit on. we have been heanna what party they sit on. we have been hearing tributes _ what party they sit on. we have been hearing tributes from _ what party they sit on. we have been hearing tributes from politicians - what party they sit on. we have been hearing tributes from politicians of i hearing tributes from politicians of all parties. let's hear a little of the thoughts of iain duncan smith, he was a close friend of sir david amess. just in at the last hour or so, he was talking to my colleague. let's hear a little from iain duncan smith. ., , ., , .,, , smith. the reality for us as we see constituents _ smith. the reality for us as we see constituents all _ smith. the reality for us as we see constituents all the _ smith. the reality for us as we see constituents all the time, - smith. the reality for us as we see constituents all the time, they - constituents all the time, they think their houses and in the surgeries, we had out and about, we are always available, we must be available, it is the most critical bit of what makes the british parliamentary system i think one of the most accessible in the world, because we want it that way. we don't want to be felt in the into doing something different, and i certainly won't, and i know my colleagues will feel the same. so i hope this has resulted very quickly, but we will certainly want to continue that we do things. of
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course, there may be some other elements that may be added to it. notwithstanding that, i want my constituents to have full access, and i'm sure david would have felt the same. it and i'm sure david would have felt the same. , ., ., ., the same. it is one thing to have full access _ the same. it is one thing to have full access to _ the same. it is one thing to have full access to mps, _ the same. it is one thing to have full access to mps, but - the same. it is one thing to have full access to mps, but is - the same. it is one thing to have full access to mps, but is there l full access to mps, but is there perhaps a case to be made at improving security and somehow not limiting access but putting checks in the way westminster constituency offices are protected? is that feasible, to think about doing that in constituency offices? ikla feasible, to think about doing that in constituency offices?— in constituency offices? no sort of checks, in constituency offices? no sort of checks. alarm _ in constituency offices? no sort of checks, alarm systems _ in constituency offices? no sort of checks, alarm systems are - in constituency offices? no sort of l checks, alarm systems are available already for constituency offices. —— those sort of checks was up we forget those woman and are quite isolated in their offices, we have settled on the same in my constituency, put in security. we often end up doing surgeries in church halls, other places. it is simply impossible to have that sort
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of security when you don't surgeries in different locations, because some people who have rural constituencies will be doing surgeries in different villages all at the time. it is really not practical to do that. there may be a way in which you could have a police man outside where you are doing the surgery, that sometimes happens, but genuinely it is very difficult. we are what we are, in other words we are what we are, in other words we are members of parliament, see constituency members, we wander around our constituency, the greek people in the shops, their houses and our surgeries. people in the shops, their houses and oursurgeries. —— people in the shops, their houses and our surgeries. —— we greet people. that is what i think makes our system work and we mustn't be cowed by it. serene duncan smith, very striking that he said in that interview several times we should not be cowed. being an mp, the point is to
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talk to your constituents, meet them face—to—face. sadly, inevitably, this is something that will be discussed. when we reflect on the tributes paid by cert lindsay hoyle, the speaker of the commons, as well as paying tribute to sir david, he said, "we will need to discuss and examine mps' security and any measures we will need to take. inevitably, this will become part of the conversation and in light of the killing of sir david amess at lunchtime in essex. just the latest from the scene itself, just to reiterate that the police have said they have arrested a 25—year—old man, he is still in custody, a knife was recovered nearby. essex police saying this afternoon they are not looking for anyone else in connection with the incident. that is the view of the police, but we are expecting to hear a police news
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briefing in the next little while. as soon as that gets under way, we will be in essex this year an update from the force itself. the police over the last couple of hours say they have arrested a 25—year—old man and as things stand, as far as they are concerned, they are not looking for anyone else in connection with this incident. if you are just if you arejustjoining us here if you are justjoining us here at this afternoon on bbc news, let me bring you up—to—date with a truly grim development, because conservative mp sir david amess has been killed by a knife attack in essex was up he was the mp for southend west, he was attacked while holding a constituency surgery being held in a methodist church in leigh—on—sea. there have been reports this afternoon that she was stabbed multiple times. a25—year—old man was arrested, and essex police say they are not looking for anyone else in connection with this attack.
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shock and sadness being expressed across the political spectrum. let's start with the comments of the deputy prime minister dominic raab. he tweeted that he was heartbreaking that we have lost sir david, who he described as a great common sense politician and a formidable campaigner with a big heartand a big heart and tremendous generosity of spirit. foreign secretary liz truss said she was "devastated" and called sir david "a lovely, lovely man and great parliamentarian". the labour leader keir starmer called the news "horrific and deeply shocking", while liberal democrat leader sir ed davey said it was a "truly terrible day for british politics." scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, tweeted, "elected representatives from across the political spectrum will be united in sadness and shock today." tthe welsh first minister, mark drakeford, called
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the attack a "truly despicable and horrifying act." flags outside parliament have been lowered to half mast. sir david, who was 69, had been mp for southend west since 1997. he had previously represented basildon, he had been an essex mp for many decades. councillorjohn lamb, was due to meet sir david amess later today. he told my colleague ben bulous sir david was an extrmely hardworking mp. he was meeting the local constituents at the methodist church here in leigh, he was doing his normal surgery, here in leigh, he was doing his normalsurgery, he here in leigh, he was doing his normal surgery, he used to hold
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surgeries in different locations, and someone has done this to him, which is unbelievable. he is a very hard—working member of parliament, who served southend and all the residents and constituents extremely well and works extremely hard for them. one of the things that strikes me as we are looking at these life pictures is just how residential the area is, it looks like it is a quiet neighbourhood, it looks like it would feel like a relatively safe neighbourhood, is that your understanding of the area that this happen in? absolutely. around here in belfairs, it is a very residential, there are houses, if you flat spot mostly houses, if you flat spot mostly houses, the local residents know david very well, one older lady who he often visits because she is an older lady, and has a cup of tea
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with her in her house. never had any problems, not that sort of problem going on, and then this has happened which everyone is astounded how this has happened and for such a hard—working mp, who not only looks after his residence but fights for refugees and everyone to make sure they are safe. he's got a very good name in a number of countries because of how he tries to help the refugees that are in trouble in those countries. you yourself are an elected representative, as a counsellor, do incidents like this make you ever question or doubt whether you would continue at meeting the people you represent face—to—face, perhaps opting to make yourself accessible by phone or video call instead? ida. by phone or video call instead? no, literally part — by phone or video call instead? no, literally part of _ by phone or video call instead? iiif7, literally part of ourjob, and i was leader of the council as well as deputy leader in the last two years
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i have been mayor, i've onlyjust come out of being mayor, meeting people is part of your role, and you cannot do all that on the video and so on, facebook time and all the rest, you have to be prepared to meet people, you need to take the best precautions you can to keep you and your people safe and that is what david does all the time but he liked to go out, at one time his surgeries was always at our head office in the first set but he wanted to go and meet new people so he went around the constituency is —— our head office in leigh. so he went around the constituency, meeting in places like the belfairs methodist church. i am looking across a because we are
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just waiting for that essex police news briefing to begin and we are keeping an eye on that, expecting to hear more details from the police force that told us they were called to reports about stabbing just after midday today, we will be in southend for that update from police just as soon as that gets under way. let's hear a little from fatherjeff wollnough — he knew sir david and is the parish priest of st peter's catholic church eastwood road north, which is close to the scene. the first of all i would like to cite the family, julie and the children, it's such a shock to all of us and can ijust say sir david amess, no matter which political leaning you may have, has been a true friend to everyone in the constituency, nothing has ever been
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too much trouble, he is a roman catholic, i'm at the local roman catholic, i'm at the local roman catholic priest and all of the christian community and others that know him, from all different faiths, will all be saying the same thing, why has this happened, and i am shaking talking to you at the moment because i cannot even begin to understand why this has happened but the church is open now and this evening at six o'clock we will be saying mass immediately for his soul and that will be a difficult thing to do but there will be silence as we try and listen to the voice of god to give us comfort. i we try and listen to the voice of god to give us comfort.- we try and listen to the voice of god to give us comfort. i am not sure i god to give us comfort. i am not sure i am _ god to give us comfort. i am not sure i am capable _ god to give us comfort. i am not sure i am capable of _ god to give us comfort. i am not sure i am capable of doing - god to give us comfort. i am not sure i am capable of doing that i sure i am capable of doing that at the moment, it is something i've got to give myself a lot of internal courage and strength and ask for that from above. david is a great man, great, great man, a good catholic and a friend to all, all of
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the faiths in southend have had a friend in sir david amess, itjust happens as a roman catholic he has been the most marvellous support to me personally. we've said mass at the house of commons chapel under his invitation, been to his office and enjoyed his company and socially and enjoyed his company and socially a wonderful, wonderful man. just in terms of all of that, what he brought to this area is our friendship to everyone that wants his area. and he's died doing that, that the remarkable thing. —— wants his ear. let's get more from our political correspondent pete saull — we are waiting for an update on today's desperately events from essex police but inevitably, there is much to learn but inevitably talk
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about security and about what happened here, so lindsay hoyle, the speaker of the house of commons, among those who are saying today we think about sir david and his family but in days to come we have other matters to talk about. that's right. sir david amess sadly is not the first mp to be murdered outside his constituency surgery, five years ago we were talking about a labour mp injo cox being stabbed to death there. inevitably there will be an awful lot of people talking now about what level of security is required for mps as they go about doing the bread and butter of theirjob, speaking to the people they are elected to represent. very poignantly david amess actually wrote in his book about the attack on another mp, the liberal democrat nigeljones, who assistant was killed trying to protect the mp and he said of that in his book, david
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amess, that this could happen to any of us. like many other mps, he was well aware they are really quite vulnerable at times, you just don't know who is going to walk through the door that surgery. in recent years lots of mps have sadly had to get to torrents of abuse online and many of them in person, lots of people talking about the toxicity of debates in our politics, whether our leaders and senior public figures can do more to quell that level of toxicity in the debate, no doubt those are the kinds of things that will be discussed in the coming days and weeks. for now, the focus very much on sir david amess, who was a father of five, a lot of people saying their thoughts are immediately with his family, and of course the community he represented for many, many years, regardless of
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your political persuasion, i think a lot of people in southend and leigh—on—sea will be in mourning this afternoon. an mp for many decades in various essex constituencies. and when you look at the tributes, there are far too many to go through but is striking when you hear the tone both about him as a man and a committed parliamentarian but if you look, for example, seen recently what theresa may has said, saying, this is a bad day for democracy. because parliamentarians are by definition are elected by the people in the constituencies and are meant to go out and meet them and talk to them and understand their concerns. this goes to the heart of the veryjob they are there to do. yes, if they feel scared to do that fundamentaljob yes, if they feel scared to do that fundamental job that's yes, if they feel scared to do that fundamentaljob that's incredibly fundamental job that's incredibly bad fundamentaljob that's incredibly bad for our democracy because this is one of the most important thing
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they do. there are many things happening in the country but people are concerned about, the rising cost of living, the recent queues at petrol pumps, the end to the uplift in universal credit, potential of food shortages, things we've spoke a lot about on bbc news but these are concerns of ordinary people will be raise with their mps and that informs them as elected representatives when they come back to westminster, when they come back next week there will be a return to those debates and they can pressure the government to make decisions that ultimately will help the people they are elected to represent. we need these constituency surgeries to continue for our democracy to continue for our democracy to continue to function. many have not been happening in the normal way, during the pandemic many have been happening virtually and i've spoken to many mps who spoke of their
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delight be able to come face—to—face again with these people, their bosses, the electorate. as theresa may says, it's a pretty terrible day for our democracy. for —— for now, thank you very much. we still await that news briefing from essex police. the police force telling us over the afternoon they were called to the scene a little after midday today, they arrested a 25 an old man and they say they are not looking for anyone else in connection with this incident but perhaps we will get more details from them in the next little while. as soon as that briefing gets under way we will bring that to you, i am just keeping an eye on police headquarters in southend. let's talk now to someone else who knew sir
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david, the author and broadcaster and political commentator iain dale, works for lbc radio. thank you for joining us. explain to viewers your dealings with sir david, the extent to which you knew him. i should be at this very moment on my way to southend to speak to his local conservative association. it was an event organised for months, and i got an e—mailfrom the deputy chairman of the association about 12:30pm telling me what happened, they did not know the extent of his injuries at the time. i last saw david at the conservative party conference and he said how much he was looking forward to the event because he was going to interviewing me rather than me interviewing him, so it isjust ? it's difficult me rather than me interviewing him, so it is just ? it's difficult to explain the shock. the whole not just the body politic but those who
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work in politics, other mps, constituency caseworkers, everyone will feel that and everyone at snow david since he was first elected in 1983 will feel it as well —— everybody that has known david, he always had a smile, everyone liked him, he was a thatcherite tory, he had some quite right wing views on some things but labour mps knew if they wanted to get a campaign going he was a very good ally to have and he was a very good ally to have and he was a very good ally to have and he was like a cross parliament. and i know it when somebody dies in tragic circumstances like this people come out with trite clich s about how he was loved by everyone but it is absolutely true in his case. i cannot imagine what his wife and his five children must be going through. it is unimaginable. how anyone could even think of doing something like this, most people just cannot get through their heads.
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indeed. had he ever spoken to you about security or about meeting the public, was that something you discussed? i interviewed him for an hour on my podcast in may about his book which i'm sure you've discussed, there is a passage in that where he talks about the murder ofjo cox and how everyone was so shocked by that, he was not an mp who had any truck for social media, and that interview i've been watching an extract of it back and he says he does not do social media because he finds it a vile, awful place where awful people say horrible things and he can do without that. he admitted himself he wasn't the most up—to—date mp in many ways because he was 69 years old, he was a child of the 70s and 80s and just did not have much truck with modern social media and in await you look at some of the
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hateful things people have been —— you look at some of the hateful things people have been tweeting and you think it is just a sewer, how can people tweak nasty things about someone who has just been can people tweak nasty things about someone who hasjust been murdered. it is unbelievable people think of writing these things. tragically, that will be something we all debate in the coming days and weeks. the speaker, so lindsay hoyle, has been saying how in future days will have to have that conversation about security but it is a conversation everybody had five years ago when a labour mp was murdered. the problem is there is no solution to this. you cannot keep everybody safe all of the time. it is just impossible and if you want to have mps having close—up personal relationship with constituents, where constituents can come and see them without having some sort of bullet—proof screen in front of them, i am afraid it is a risk
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people will have to take, you cannot have a police man or policewoman on duty at every constituency surgeries, surgeries are where mps take the temperature of the constituencies and often now they have an aid with them and i'm sure there was someone with david today but you cannot stop somebody who is intent on doing something like this unless you have, i don't know, a secure zone. it'sjust unless you have, i don't know, a secure zone. it's just not possible. anybody can make an appointment to see their mps, some mps don't even have an appointment system i just allow people to turn up on the spot. that's something which i think is a really good thing but incidents like this obviously mean they will have to be some sort of review. unless you want to cancel all mp surgeries where they don't actually see their constituents. lots of mps also and nobody ever talks about this, if you get a letter from somebody in a
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particular situation the go and see them in their house, not on the door and go and see them, if you think about it, that's quite a dangerous thing to do but do we really want them not doing that in the future? i don't know what the solution is, and the problem is i don't think anybody does and the issue as there is no solution that will keep politicians or indeed anybody else 100% safe. we heard from mr iain duncan smith and he used the words i don't want mps to be cowed by this, he was talking about the very nature of the job. exactly as you have described. yet one wonders whether we will hear voices saying, our mps going to have to start doing the sort of thing online, for example?- to start doing the sort of thing online, for example? yes, they have been doing — online, for example? yes, they have been doing it — online, for example? yes, they have been doing it online _ online, for example? yes, they have been doing it online during _ online, for example? yes, they have been doing it online during covid - online, for example? yes, they have been doing it online during covid sol been doing it online during covid so it is perfectly possible but you can
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never get that same kind of conversation online. you and i would be having probably a different conversation if i was in the studio with you, looking each other in the eyes, it would be a different atmosphere, i would eyes, it would be a different atmosphere, iwould maybe eyes, it would be a different atmosphere, i would maybe he eyes, it would be a different atmosphere, i would maybe be saying different things, i don't know. i think that would be very difficult thing for mps to stomach and the other consequence of this, there will be lots of people around the country who have been thinking of political careers and their families will say to them, are you mad, this could happen to you? i know what would happen if my mother was still alive and i told her i was thinking of going into politics again, she would do everything she could to try and dissuade me, partly because of this sort of thing happening now and thatis this sort of thing happening now and that is where we are now, lots of good people are being deterred from going into politics because of the downsides, notjust things like this, there is much more we could talk about maybe on another occasion but there will be lots of very
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negative consequences from the events of today. that is a very striking point, and you are talking about the overall toxicity, notjust the tragic events of today. iain dale, good to speak to you, thank you very much. iain dale steeped in politics and reflecting the fact that this cuts across the political divide. comments, sadness and shock are being expressed by people across politics and public life, does matter whether you vote —— who you vote for or whether you vote for anyone, this cuts across all of that. but remind you with the time coming up to az50pm, to bring you up—to—date, with everything we know about the really grim news of today, we are sadly talking about the stabbing of another mp, five years after we brought you the news of the
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stabbing ofjo cox, labour mp, today we are talking about the death of a conservative mp, sir david amess, killed in a knife attack in essex, the mp for south and west, attacked while he was holding a constituency surgery, that was held at the methodist church in leigh—on—sea in essex, we've had reports this afternoon sir david was stabbed multiple times. essex police say they've arrested a 25 an old man and they've arrested a 25 an old man and they are not looking for anyone else in connection with this attack. but reflect on some of the tributes but have been paid and the shock being expressed, the deputy prime minister dominic rab tweeted he was heartbroken we've lost sir david who heartbroken we've lost sir david who he described as a great common sense politician and a formidable campaigner with a big heart, politician and a formidable campaignerwith a big heart, he politician and a formidable campaigner with a big heart, he said he had tremendous generosity of spirit. the foreign secretary liz truss said she was devastated and she called
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said they would a lovely man and a great parliamentarian. and labour leader sir keir starmer called the news horrific and deeply shocking. the liberal democrat leader sir ed davey said this is a truly terrible day for british politics. we've heard as well from scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon, she tweeted elected representatives across the political spectrum will be united and shock and sadness to date. mark drakeford called it a truly shocking and despicable act. flags are flying outside parliament at half mast now. sir david was 69, he had been mp for southend west since 1997, he had been an essex mp since the early 19805. been an essex mp since the early 1980s. he had previously represented the constituency of basildon. he
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represented various constituency mps for very many decades. we are hearing comments from the former prime minister tony blair, he says he is shocked and horrified by the murder of sir david, he makes the point, david and i came into parliament together in 1983, though an opposite political sides, i always found him courteous, decent and thoroughly likeable, he was respected across the house. an striking tony blair as saying, this is a terrible and sad date for our democracy. that is very similar language to language used by someone on the other side of politics, theresa may, former conservative prime minister who said today is a tragic day for our democracy and that again takes us to the heart of everything we've been discussing this afternoon, the democratic process and how sir david, just like jo cox before him 5.5 years ago, was
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simply doing what mps are elected to do, getting into the constituency their constituents and those people who put them into parliament to represent their views and to hear their complaints, views, anxieties about life in their area. many, many people from all parties saying again this is a dark day for democracy. with the flags flying at half—mast on ten downing st let's go back to westminster and join our political correspondent peter saull. we cannot say often enough just the sheer level of shock, does not matter which party represent, the shock as a justine greening has tweeted, former conservative cabinet minister effectively saying i cannot believe we are talking about something like this again. we are talking about something like this aaain. . v we are talking about something like this aaain. . �*, ., this again. that's right, an outpouring _ this again. that's right, an outpouring of _ this again. that's right, an outpouring of grief - this again. that's right, an
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outpouring of grief and - this again. that's right, an - outpouring of grief and devastation from across the political spectrum this afternoon, a lot of mps will be filling this incredibly personally, especially given what happened five years ago with the murder ofjo cox. we as politicaljournalist talk years ago with the murder ofjo cox. we as political journalist talk an awful lot about who is up and who is down, cabinet ministers, leaders of parties. david amess have been in parliament for almost four decades and the highest he got up the political treat was a parliamentary aide to michael portillo butjust as important are those constituency mps, important are those constituency mp5, 650 important are those constituency mps, 650 up and down the country who are elected to represent those areas and that first and foremost was what david amess was all about. he regularly stood up in the house of commons and talked about his desire for southend, the town he represented, to be made a city. no doubt those around him will continue
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to make that argument, in tribute to him. as you say, when we reflect on this, it's about what we expect of our elected representatives, can they continue to go out and be so accessible as they have been, when potential of their lives are under threat? mercifully, this does not happen all that often but they have to be able to speak to the people that put them into office, so they know what people think about all the issues going on in the world because without that fundamental cog in the democratic process is removed. parliament is in recess at the moment, is there any suggestion things might be different when mps return, perhaps it's on a difficult, desperate days, too early to talk about that but that there will be some whose responsibility is the
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security of that area and they will have to think about that now. that's absolutely right. _ have to think about that now. that's absolutely right. over— have to think about that now. that's absolutely right. over the _ have to think about that now. that's absolutely right. over the past - have to think about that now. that's absolutely right. over the past few. absolutely right. over the past few weeks parliament hasn't been sitting, the house of lords has not been sitting this week either, mps going to partick conferences which have been largely put it celebratory for the parties —— mps going to party conferences, a chance for activists and grassroots campaigners to get together and get to the basis of what they think on different policies, that is what conferences are about and they've done that in person for the first time in a couple of years and it might have been the case mps returning to westminster with a felt rejuvenated, i don't think that will be the case anymore, this will put a dark cloud over the palace of westminster, i don't think parliament will be recalled this weekend but no doubt tributes will be scheduled for monday, so lindsay hoyle, the
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speaker, has spoke this afternoon about the need for mps to feel safe not only in westminster but in their constituencies, too and i would imagine there will be lots of mps from all sides of the house who will want to stand up from the green benches and pay tribute to this much love politician in sir david amess, who sacrificed his life in public service, like all of the rest of them are doing every day. peter saull, for now, thank you. we will have much more from westminster and more tributes to sir david after five o'clock. now here on bbc news we are going to pause for a moment or two. we approach the we can sort we will take a moment to catch up with the latest weather prospects from ben rich. today brought a shock to the system for early risers in the uk with temperatures around or below freezing in places, compared with
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the value for the south, 15 celsius in bute, clear dividing line between the mild airand in bute, clear dividing line between the mild air and cold they are marked out by this band of cloud syncing southward with the odd spot of rain and with that colder air working in behind. for most this afternoon it stays fine and dry and fairly sunny but relatively chilly. some slightly milder air holding on in the far south—west but there could be the odd shower. this evening and tonight, cloud generally increasing, it could turn misty and murky in places, odd spot of patchy rain and drizzle, tonic milder again in western areas, eastern scotland and england, some places will see a touch of frost close up to the centre of this area of high pressure however the high slips away and this system works and from the west tomorrow so tomorrow many will see lots of cloud first thing, parts of
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england and wales should brighten up and staying largely dry, brightness for northern scotland, through much of scotland thicker cloud and rain arriving later in the day but it starts to turn just a little bit milder and that continues into the second half of the weekend. into sunday, some uncertainty about exactly where the wettest weather will be, we expect some areas of cloud, some patchy rain but there could be more rain for the far south—west that these graphic suggests. one thing we can see as the winds will come from the south that will feed much milder air in our direction so by this stage temperatures between 13 and maybe 18 celsius towards the south. to the start of next week we see further systems pushing in from the atlantic, outbreaks of rain and potentially some quite strong winds at times but for the first half of the week we have south or south—westerly winds pumping mild
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air in our direction and temperatures in the south could reach 28 for a time and then cooling off by the end of the week —— reach 20, for a time. today at five — the conservative mp sir david amess has died after being stabbed during a constituency surgery in essex. a 25—year—old man has been arrested and remains in custody, a knife was recovered from nearby. fellow politicians have paid tribute to the 69—year—old mp for southend west. he'd been an essex mp since 1983. deputy prime minister dominic raab tweeted to say he was heartbroken, the labour leader keir starmer wrote that he was thinking of sir david's family and staff. his constituents, too, have been expressing their shock and upset.
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jest, it's upsetting mainly.

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