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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 15, 2021 6:30pm-7:01pm BST

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�*of �* of southend and indeed �* of seuthend and indeed for community of southend and indeed for the whole of greater essex. sir david has dedicated his life to serving the communities of essex and southend and today, he was simply dispensing his duties when his life was horrifically cut short. i know the residents of essex, southend west will stand with me today in remembering a member of our community. here at essex police, officers are right across our force and in particular south and have enjoyed a positive working relationship with sir david and today's events is hard to take. a specially trained family liaison officers are providing support to his family today. our officers will continue to work around the clock to ensure justice is delivered force a david and his family. i would like to thank the people of southend for their understanding as the
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investigation continues. i would urge anyone who has any information in relation to this terrible incident to call essex police on 101, online or indeed phone crimestoppers. finally, iask everybody to respect the privacy of sir david's family at this difficult time. and lastly, to save my personal thoughts having worked with sir david and all of those from essex police and our prayers are with sir david and his family during this difficult time. thank you. this is a shocking and utterly despicable attack against somebody who was an outstanding mp. find despicable attack against somebody who was an outstanding mp. and has worked tirelessly _ who was an outstanding mp. and has worked tirelessly for _ who was an outstanding mp. and has worked tirelessly for their _ worked tirelessly for their community for many, many years. my prayers _ community for many, many years. my prayers are _ community for many, many years. my prayers are with sir david and his family— prayers are with sir david and his family at— prayers are with sir david and his family at this incredibly difficult time _ family at this incredibly difficult time i— family at this incredibly difficult time. i know from personal experience the passion with which he
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stood _ experience the passion with which he stood up _ experience the passion with which he stood up for— experience the passion with which he stood up for and represented this community. he had a big heart, and i also want _ community. he had a big heart, and i also want to— community. he had a big heart, and i also want to acknowledge the officers — also want to acknowledge the officers who attended the event for their bravery and courage. it is vital— their bravery and courage. it is vital that— their bravery and courage. it is vital that we give the police all our support to ensure that they can do their— our support to ensure that they can do theiriob — our support to ensure that they can do theirjob at this time. for anybody— do theirjob at this time. for anybody who has information please do not _ anybody who has information please do not hesitate to contact the police — do not hesitate to contact the police. thank you. there we have had an update on the latest on the investigation into the killing of sir david amess, the conservative mp stabbed earlier today while he was conducting a constituencies surgery at a methodist church in leigh—on—sea. the police attended with the church
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where he was and said they attended and found a man injured. he was treated by emergency services but sadly died at the scene. 25—year—old man was quickly arrested we heard from the chief constable of essex police they are just now telling us a little more about what has been happening with that investigation, that also an insight into the fact that also an insight into the fact that police in essex had worked very closely with sir david as part of his role as an mp. you heard him say there to be very hard to take for everyone who knew him. and that is certainly a sentiment has been echoed across the political world this afternoon as well. there have been tributes pouring in for sir david amess from all and mp5. the political differences have been put in aside as they come together to remember somebody who was a colleague and friend. who has died in a most awful and there certainly
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are hundreds and hundreds of tributes we have seen this afternoon, far too many to read out in full. but there are some certain key things which really link them. things that come across about a man when he was described. one of the words that comes up time and time again in these tributes is kind. kindness. generosity. that comes up time and again. the prime minister described him as the nicest, kindest, most gentle, one of the most kindest, nicest, most gentle people in parliament. he said tonight our hearts are full of shock and sadness in that the uk had lost and sadness in that the uk had lost a fine public servant and a much loved friend and colleague. sir keir starmer come the labour leader has talked about this being a dark and shocking day. he paid tribute to her sir david and spoke about the positive impact he had and the people he represented. he was a very strong catholic and he took positions over the years that
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strongly represented his fate so sir keir starmer paid tribute to him that way. that idea of him having a positive impact for people he represented, again that is also an idea that we have heard a lot this afternoon coming through in these tributes. that he was absolutely committed to the area that he represented. that it was his absolute priority and we have heard that time and time again this afternoon about his commitment to that. and the tributes have come in from politicians notjust from all parties but from all stages of experience. from newly elected mps right up to former prime ministers, three former conservative prime ministers who sir david served under have paid tribute to him. david cameron described it as the most devastating, horrific and tragic news. he said that sir david amess was a kind and thoroughly decent man. the most committed mp you could
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ever hope to meet. sirjohn major described as truly heartbreaking news of the good and decent man who for over 30 years was a dedicated public servant. he set his heart went out his family. in theresa may also saying it's heartbreaking to hear of the death of sir david amess. a decent man from a respected parliamentarian killed in his own community while carrying out his public duties. i think that's where the sense of shock is this evening. it's that again here we have another mp in the space of five years who has been out doing what mps do accommodate meet their constituents, fa ce—to —fa ce accommodate meet their constituents, face—to—face together problems that take up their issues and here he was going out and doing thatjust as part of hisjob going out and doing thatjust as part of his job and has obviously died in this most horrendous way. you are watching bbc news reviewers in the uk and around the world. i'm with you over the next few hours reporting on our leading story from
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the conservative mp sir david amess who represent a constituency on the east coast of england has died after being stabbed multiple times in a knife attack in essex. the mp was attacked this lunchtime when he was holding a constituencies surgery at the belfairs methodist church in the town of leigh—on—sea. reports say he was stabbed on more than one occasion. the 25 rolled man has been arrested and police are not looking for anyone else in connexion with the attack. the past few minutes essex police chief, benjamin harrington has now said the investigation is being led by counterterrorism command and investigating whether or not the killing was a terrorist incident. that means it is now in the hands of scotland yard. the home secretary priti patel is saying that she will provide updates in due course. boris johnson gave his reaction to today's tragic news. i johnson gave his reaction to today's tragic news— tragic news. i think all of our hearts are — tragic news. i think all of our hearts are full _ tragic news. i think all of our hearts are full of _ tragic news. i think all of our hearts are full of shock - tragic news. i think all of our hearts are full of shock and l tragic news. i think all of our - hearts are full of shock and sadness today to the loss of sir david
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amess, an mp killed in his constituencies surgery in a church after almost a0 years of continuous service to the people of essex and the whole of the united kingdom. the reason i think people are so shocked and saddened is, above all, he's one of the kindest, nicest most gentle in politics. but he also had an outstanding record of passing laws to help the most vulnerable who are suffering from endometriosis, passing laws to and cruelty to animals or doing a huge amount to reduce the fuel poverty suffered by people up and down the country. david was a man who believed passionately in this country and in its future. and we have lost, today, a fine public servant and a much
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loved friend and colleague. and our thoughts are very much to date with his wife, his children and his family. his wife, his children and his famil . �* his wife, his children and his famil. �* ., his wife, his children and his famil.�* ., ,., his wife, his children and his famil.�* , ., , family. always a sense of shock when our family. always a sense of shock when your cabinet — family. always a sense of shock when your cabinet colleagues _ family. always a sense of shock when your cabinet colleagues heard - family. always a sense of shock when your cabinet colleagues heard about | your cabinet colleagues heard about this, not news anyone was expecting to hear on friday, much less at eight surgery and a conservative mp for a very long time, nearly a0 years. what was the reaction of you and your colleagues when that news filtered through? i and your colleagues when that news filtered through?— filtered through? i think everybody was dee -l filtered through? i think everybody was deeply shocked _ filtered through? i think everybody was deeply shocked and _ filtered through? i think everybody was deeply shocked and heart - was deeply shocked and heart stricken. ourthoughts, was deeply shocked and heart stricken. our thoughts, as i say are very much with his family, his wife and his children. and for the rest we must really leave the police to get on with their investigation. thank you very much someplace the speaker of the house of, to said today he is shocked, saddened and distressed but says it also raises theissue distressed but says it also raises the issue of mp public safety. we've had to mps killed in the space of
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five years. this is an urgent problem that we need to protect our democracy. we need to let the police get on with their investigation and i'm sure that all those issues will be considered in the proper time but i think this is a moment for us to think of sir david, his wife, his family and our thoughts are very much with them. thank you very much, thank you. much with them. thank you very much, thank ou. 1. , much with them. thank you very much, thank ou. 1, _., ,., much with them. thank you very much, thank ou. , thank you. boris johnson responding to the news — thank you. boris johnson responding to the news about _ thank you. boris johnson responding to the news about sir _ thank you. boris johnson responding to the news about sir david - thank you. boris johnson responding to the news about sir david amess l to the news about sir david amess would been a conservative mp since 1983. we have had this very brief statement actually from the chief, of essex police and the police and crime commissioner. you can clearly
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tell from their statements how shocked and devastated they are. we have not learned any more facts to be perfectly honest about the nature of the attack and the circumstances of the attack and the circumstances of actually what has happened at the methodist church where sir david was holding his constituencies surgery, his regular friday surgery. the most important thing is that we have now established it is been confirmed that scotland yard counterterrorism has basically taken primacy in this. effectively what that means is the counterterrorism network, all of its huge resources are being thrown at this investigation to establish exactly what the circumstances are. i go to caveat that i saying it does not mean that this was an act of terrorism because police are keeping an open mind as to what was behind and what was the motive for this attack on sir david. but what it means is an enormous amount of resources thrown at this now. things going in at the moment is that the
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man who is been taken into custody is 25—year—old man who was arrested at the scene which indicates that the suspect was not someone they apprehended, had not left the scene. his devices, as he has mobile phones or computers will be interrogated by specialist officers looking for clues as to his motive. if it's going to be terrorism there will be looking for mindset, evidence of mindset and ideology, always a critical part of these investigations in the early stages. second thing happening is this team of specialist officers will be going to his home, they will be conducting the most incredible search you can possibly imagine. i've known searches involving counterterrorism officers that have gone on for many, many days. literally tearing up floorboards and killing back wallpaper in some instances looking for evidence. this is the scale of what is going on. only if police find evidence of an ideological
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mindset at this attack was allegedly carried out for an ideological purpose will they call it an act of terrorism. in effect what they have got is all of these resources coming in to help them but we still no closer to understanding the motive. as for the individual himself he is in custody on suspicion of murder. if the police believe that there is a possibility that this is an act of terrorism they can rearrest him and hold him under the terrorism act which means they can hold him a lot longer. which means they can hold him a lot loner. ., ~' ,, , which means they can hold him a lot loner. ., , . . longer. thank you very much. dominic there referring — longer. thank you very much. dominic there referring to _ longer. thank you very much. dominic there referring to looking _ longer. thank you very much. dominic there referring to looking into - there referring to looking into whether there might be any way of political or extremist motive. much like the attack on stephen timms that was motivated on islamist ideology no connexion with this case but a similar situation where a serving mp was knifed in the abdomen and thankfully he survived. that was back i should say in may 2010. the leader of the labour party sir keir
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starmer of the tributes on behalf of the opposition. my heart goes out to sir david public— my heart goes out to sir david public wife, his children, his wider farnily. _ public wife, his children, his wider farnily. his — public wife, his children, his wider family, his staff in all of his friends _ family, his staff in all of his friends and colleagues. today is a dark and — friends and colleagues. today is a dark and a — friends and colleagues. today is a dark and a shocking day. the more so because _ dark and a shocking day. the more so because heartbreakingly we have been here before. informed by his faith, sir david _ here before. informed by his faith, sir david had a profound sense of public— sir david had a profound sense of public duty and he was highly respected and much liked across the houses— respected and much liked across the houses of— respected and much liked across the houses of parliament on all sides. and within — houses of parliament on all sides. and within the christian community. we now— and within the christian community. we now have to come together in response — we now have to come together in response to this horrendous act and to show— response to this horrendous act and to show that violence, intimidation and threats will never prevail over the tireless work of public servants like david — the tireless work of public servants like david simply doing hisjob. sir keir like david simply doing hisjob. 5 " keir starmer, leader of the opposition labour party.
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england's most senior catholic churchman, cardinal vincent nichols, has given his reaction to the death. in a statement, he said: "the tragic death of david amess creates a painful loss in so many lives. i pray for his family and friends, those reeling from shock at this time. i pray for his constituents all those who worked with him in his political career. david carried out his vocation as a catholic in public life with generosity and integrity. he served in parliament for four decades and was respected by all political parties across the house. his untimely death is a great loss. may he rest in peace." mervyn thomas is founder president of christian solidarity worldwide and campaigned together with david amess on religious liberty issues. hejoins me now from farnham, in surrey. he also knew him from a very young age. thank you very much for being with us. this must be a terrible shock to you. with us. this must be a terrible shock to yon-— with us. this must be a terrible shock to ou. ~ , , . , shock to you. absolutely. and first of all i would _ shock to you. absolutely. and first of all i would like _ shock to you. absolutely. and first of all i would like to _ shock to you. absolutely. and first of all i would like to obviously - of all i would like to obviously pass on my condolences to sir david's wife julia pass on my condolences to sir david's wifejulia and their five children. this is something totally
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unexpected but maybe we it should not be unexpected, it's happening with some regularity. david was a very special person and when you hear that a friend that you have known for decades, you know, we grew up known for decades, you know, we grew up in essex together, and were sort of around the young conservative scene in the 70s, and then subsequently when david became an mp we worked close together on religious liberty issues and a great man, and what a tragic, tragic loss of life. ., ., ~ man, and what a tragic, tragic loss of life. . ., ,, ., ,, of life. had he ever talked to you about the issue _ of life. had he ever talked to you about the issue of _ of life. had he ever talked to you about the issue of safety? - of life. had he ever talked to you l about the issue of safety? because no mp certainly after the death of jo cox five years ago now could not have had to ask themselves those questions about the risks they ran. that was the third attempt there had
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been on mp, i mentioned stephen timms and nigeljones at the beginning of the century which led to the death of one of his assistants. but the killing ofjo cox must have brought it home to david as it did two other mp5. he never talked about it and i was not with him day and night. david and i saw each other in later years reasonably infrequently. he saw each other in later years reasonably infrequently. he did not seak reasonably infrequently. he did not speak about _ reasonably infrequently. he did not speak about it _ reasonably infrequently. he did not speak about it but _ reasonably infrequently. he did not speak about it but this _ reasonably infrequently. he did not speak about it but this would - reasonably infrequently. he did not speak about it but this would not i speak about it but this would not have bothered david. david was a person that wanted to be with the people. you know, he loves the people. you know, he loves the people that he represented. he loves humanity. all that was sparked from his deep christian faith. and so david would not have given a second thought about going into a dangerous situation. if it was to help others. he will be there. and that was who he was. he he will be there. and that was who he was. ., .,
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he will be there. and that was who he was. . ., , , ., he will be there. and that was who he was. . . , , ., ., , ., he was. he had a upbeat quality to him. he was. he had a upbeat quality to him- always _ he was. he had a upbeat quality to him- always try — he was. he had a upbeat quality to him. always try to _ he was. he had a upbeat quality to him. always try to see _ he was. he had a upbeat quality to him. always try to see the - he was. he had a upbeat quality to him. always try to see the positive things. was he like the child that you grew up with? for things. was he like the child that you grew up with?— things. was he like the child that you grew up with? for somebody that cam aiuned you grew up with? for somebody that campaigned on _ you grew up with? for somebody that campaigned on such _ you grew up with? for somebody that campaigned on such serious - you grew up with? for somebody that campaigned on such serious issues i you grew up with? for somebody that j campaigned on such serious issues he did not really take life too seriously. he was fun to be with and i think that's why so many people across the parties in westminster really liked david. he was respected and he did not take life too seriously. but for those causes that he was passionate about, and one of them was of course religious liberty, freedom of religion or belief. we started our organisation i started in 1979 with another conservative mp and it was really difficult to find mps who were interested in the subject. one of them was a very young david ultan who had just got into parliament but
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david amess was one of the first and i remember taking him to russia in 1987 which was still communist russia, and he was a great travelling companion, but what he was also somebody who always spoke his mind. who always told eve the communist authorities what he thought about freedom and justice. and that was who he was. that heartfelt tribute _ and that was who he was. that heartfelt tribute your _ and that was who he was. that heartfelt tribute your old friend coming thank you very much for talking to us this evening. david bowles is head of public affairs at the rspca he worked closely with david amess on campaigning to improve animal welfare. thank you very much. how valuable was he to your cause? he thank you very much. how valuable was he to your cause?— thank you very much. how valuable was he to your cause? he was a truly valuable and — was he to your cause? he was a truly valuable and this _ was he to your cause? he was a truly valuable and this was _ was he to your cause? he was a truly valuable and this was something - was he to your cause? he was a truly valuable and this was something that he espoused from the time he got elected in 1983 up until he died tragically today. and he will have a number of legacies that he made, so
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he piloted the tethering act through to get better protection for the course welfare in 1988 and he talks to me and that was one of his most proud things. very difficult to get a private members bill through particularly in those days but he managed it and he chose animal welfare. his principles were always heartfelt, but never wavered as your last guest said. when he got elected he was against fox hunting and forever conservative mp in the 19805 it was a very, very small club, only probably half a dozen mp5. but he saw it through, he did not mind, he stuck to his principles and that obviously eventually led to the hunting act in 2005. because he saw that everybody else caught up with what he wanted. he was still campaigning on animal welfare issues even now. two weeks ago i met up with them at the conservative party conference in manchester, he had a private members bill in the house of
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commons he was talking about cheaper imports coming through through the australian trade deal, and the sad fact is those things which i think will happen in the next year he won't be around to see. he really laid the foundations for those. what laid the foundations for those. what was it that made _ laid the foundations for those. what was it that made him _ laid the foundations for those. what was it that made him effective as a campaigner? he was a part partisan politician but always an mp to be relied upon to fly the flag that even when the party was having difficulties. doesn't always translate to someone is effective at getting cross party support and i wondered what it was about his character or the way you saw him operate you think made him so effective in that way? this operate you think made him so effective in that way?— operate you think made him so effective in that way? as many of our effective in that way? as many of your previous _ effective in that way? as many of your previous guests _ effective in that way? as many of your previous guests have - effective in that way? as many of your previous guests have said, l effective in that way? as many of. your previous guests have said, he was very open, he was very kind, never saw him turned out a meeting with anybody or refuse an interview, and i think he was well respected
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across the house and obviously on animal welfare at the cross party issue. it started off being a very labour issue in the 19905, but now the conservative government have got huge ideas on how to improve animal welfare. and i think that's what really drove him on. never afraid to stand up in the house of commons and say something that he really believed and whether it was on animal welfare or any other issue like her previous guests talked about. he was not afraid to stand up for his principles, just there with those principles work despite maybe the problems it would cause. i think people respected him for doing that. of what or what your area of expertise would be his lasting legacy? he expertise would be his lasting leia ? ., ., , expertise would be his lasting lea ? . ., ., expertise would be his lasting lea ? . legacy? he already has a legacy as i mentioned. he _ legacy? he already has a legacy as i mentioned, he posited _ legacy? he already has a legacy as i mentioned, he posited the - legacy? he already has a legacy as i mentioned, he posited the cruel- mentioned, he posited the cruel tethering of forces act, ? horses act. there's now half a dozen up
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piece of legislation in parliament i think it will come into effect pretty soon. in the next few years you will start to see moves to ban the battery cage for laying hands also ticketed ban south stalls, is still on the floor of the house of commons now. it will start to see the sentiments bill go through, they kept animals bill which will band live exports at another really important issue that was really at the heart of sir david's thinking. and i think that will be his legacy. he drove animal welfare in the conservative party at a time when it was not popular in the 19805 and now he has finally come to see that a government that's really intent on driving animal welfare progress through for the future and understand... we through for the future and understand. . ._ through for the future and understand... ~ ., ., ., ., understand... we are going to have to leave it there. _ understand... we are going to have to leave it there. thank _ understand... we are going to have to leave it there. thank you - understand... we are going to have to leave it there. thank you very . to leave it there. thank you very much for that tribute. let's hear from the former conservative leader iain duncan smith. the
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from the former conservative leader iain duncan smith.— iain duncan smith. the reality for us is that we _ iain duncan smith. the reality for us is that we see _ iain duncan smith. the reality for us is that we see constituents - iain duncan smith. the reality for us is that we see constituents all| us is that we see constituents all the time — us is that we see constituents all the time but in the houses and surgeries— the time but in the houses and surgeries who are out and about and we are _ surgeries who are out and about and we are always available, we must be available _ we are always available, we must be available. the most critical bit of what _ available. the most critical bit of what makes the british parliamentary system _ what makes the british parliamentary system of _ what makes the british parliamentary system of the most acceptable in the world _ system of the most acceptable in the world and _ system of the most acceptable in the world and as because we want it that way. world and as because we want it that way we _ world and as because we want it that way. we don't want to be cowed or frightened — way. we don't want to be cowed or frightened into doing some be different and i know my colleagues will feel— different and i know my colleagues will feel the same. different and i know my colleagues will feelthe same. i hope different and i know my colleagues will feel the same. i hope this is resolved — will feel the same. i hope this is resolved very quickly but we will certainly — resolved very quickly but we will certainly want to continue the way that we _ certainly want to continue the way that we do— certainly want to continue the way that we do things. of course leaving some _ that we do things. of course leaving some other— that we do things. of course leaving some other elements that may be added _ some other elements that may be added to— some other elements that may be added to it but notwithstanding that i added to it but notwithstanding that i want _ added to it but notwithstanding that i want my— added to it but notwithstanding that i want my constituents to have full access _ i want my constituents to have full access and — i want my constituents to have full access and i'm sure david would have felt the _ access and i'm sure david would have felt the same. it is access and i'm sure david would have felt the same-— felt the same. it is one thing to have full access _ felt the same. it is one thing to have full access to _ felt the same. it is one thing to have full access to mps - felt the same. it is one thing to have full access to mps but - felt the same. it is one thing to have full access to mps but is l felt the same. it is one thing to - have full access to mps but is there have full access to mp5 but is there perhaps a case to be made for looking at improving security and somehow not limiting access but
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putting checks in the way that westminster constituency offices are protected? is that feasible to think about doing that in constituency offices? .,, ,., about doing that in constituency offices? ., ., ., , offices? those sort of alarm systems are available — offices? those sort of alarm systems are available for— offices? those sort of alarm systems are available for constituency - are available for constituency offices — are available for constituency offices. those who make constituencies are often quite isolated — constituencies are often quite isolated in their offices, so we have _ isolated in their offices, so we have certainly done the same in my constituency but the honest truth is we often _ constituency but the honest truth is we often end up doing surgeries in church— we often end up doing surgeries in church halls and other places and it is simply— church halls and other places and it is simply impossible to have that sort of— is simply impossible to have that sort of security when you are doing surgeries— sort of security when you are doing surgeries in— sort of security when you are doing surgeries in different locations because — surgeries in different locations because some people have rural constituencies and will be doing constituencies and will be doing constituencies in villages all the time _ constituencies in villages all the time it's— constituencies in villages all the time. it's really not a practical thing — time. it's really not a practical thing to— time. it's really not a practical thing to do. it may be a way in which — thing to do. it may be a way in which you _ thing to do. it may be a way in which you could have a policeman outside _ which you could have a policeman outside where you are doing the surgery. — outside where you are doing the surgery, that sure is something in that sometimes happens. but
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genuinely it's very difficult. we are what— genuinely it's very difficult. we are what we are in other words members _ are what we are in other words members of parliament, constituency members _ members of parliament, constituency members. we wander around our constituencies to greet people in shops— constituencies to greet people in shops and houses and our surgeries. that's_ shops and houses and our surgeries. that's what— shops and houses and our surgeries. that's what makes our system work. that was the former conservative leader iain duncan smith. much more reaction to the death of sir david amess. now a look at the weather. most of us have had a fine and sunny day, felt a little cooler and fresher compared with recent dates but there has been lots of sunshine to go around and knows how things looked earlier in the day. now this cool down in the weather is only a brief one because as we go through the weekend milder atlanta care will be pushing its way back in from the west. with that will come a boost to temperatures. to date we have
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temperatures. to date we have temperatures in a range of more or less 1a celsius. the structure set to rise, money gets up to 17 degrees in glasgow going from about 11 to 15. turning increasingly mild. before we get there overnight tonight we were clear spells he or areas of england as well. with that temperatures will drop away, a cold night for these areas. cold enough are patches of rust in the countryside but the weather will start to turn a good deal more mild. temperatures lifting to 12 in parts of the southwest. tomorrow morning quite a cloudy start the day of the few mist and fog patches and the odds bit of rain from this area of cloud pushing northwards and eastwards across parts of northern england into southern scotland as well. later on in the day will see increasing amounts of sunshine and whales the midlands. so relatively cool air hanging on in scotland for a little longer. saturday night sees
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these weak fronts eastwards. the rain heaviest across northern ireland and england and patchy elsewhere. that ring will tend to ease away pretty quickly as they go through sunday. left with quite a bit of cloud around but some breaks in the cloud coming through as the day progresses and into the afternoon during a little bit drier and brighter as well. turning milder, temperatures reaching a high of 17 degrees in london and cardiff as well. 16 in belfast. low pressures from the in charge next week but look at those really long weather fronts just targeting the hills of wales. some flooding here with further large totals of rain building up of the other thing to notice is that it turns very mild indeed. temperatures can reach 20 for a time in london. that is your latest weather.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 7.00pm — the conservative mp sir david amess has been stabbed to death in essex he was attacked, with a knife multiple times, as he met his constituents at a local church in leigh—on—sea. he died at the scene. a 25—year—old man was arrested immediately at the scene on suspicion of murder. he remains in custody. a knife was also recovered at the scene. the prime minister borisjohnson has described sir david as one of the kindest people in politics. i think all our hearts are full of shock and sadness today at the loss of sir david amess mp who was killed in his constituency surgery, in a church, after almost 40 years of continuous service to the people
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of essex and the whole of the united kingdom.

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