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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 16, 2021 11:00am-11:31am BST

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i'm ben boulous, live in leigh—on—sea, where the killing of the mp david amess is being treated as a terrorist incident. police say there is a potential link to islamist extremism, and counter—terrorism officers are searching two addresses in the london area. side by side in grief — the prime minister and leader of the opposition visit the scene as tributes are paid from across politics. he was a man of the people. he was absolutely— he was a man of the people. he was absolutely there for everyone. he was a _ absolutely there for everyone. he was a much loved parliamentarian. to me, was a much loved parliamentarian. to me. he _ was a much loved parliamentarian. to me. he was_ was a much loved parliamentarian. to me. he was a — was a much loved parliamentarian. to me, he was a dear and loyal friend. the killing has resurfaced the dilemma facing mps over security at their surgeries and whether it would be safer
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to hold them virtually. i was based in westminster. you get very. _ i was based in westminster. you get very. very— i was based in westminster. you get very, very comfortable very quickly in very, very comfortable very quickly ih thet— very, very comfortable very quickly in that environment, which is essentially like a fortress. constituency offices are very much more _ constituency offices are very much more exposed. i'm ben thompson. also this hour... questions asked about how a covid pcr testing lab, that recorded thousands of inaccurate results, won a multi—million pound government contract. uncovering the secrets of the solar system — a new nasa mission aims to learn more about how the planets were created. hello and welcome to leigh—on—sea in
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essex where the prime minister boris johnson and the labour leader sir keir starmer have both visited the scene where the mp, sir david ms, was killed during his constituency surgery yesterday. —— sir police are treating his death as a terror incident. the metropolitan police said there was a potential link to islamist extremism. a 25—year—old man was arrested on suspicion of murder yesterday, and two properies in london are being searched. the home secretary, priti patel, has also laid flowers at belfairs methodist church in leigh—on—sea this morning. she said she was working with the police and security services to make sure all measures are being put in place for the security of mps. we are all struggling to come to terms with the fact that david amess has been so cruelly taken away from all of us. less than 2a hours ago,
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david was on his own constituency, doing a local advice surgery, which is something that all mps do week in, week out. and of course david, as i knew him and as we all knew him, was just a passionate advocate and champion for southend, this wonderful, wonderful town. and with that, of course, he was a man of the people. he was absolutely there for everyone. he was a much loved parliamentarian. to me, he was a dear and loyalfriend, but also he was a devoted husband and father. we think ofjulia and their children at this release sad time. —— we think ofjulia and their children at this really sad time. they are in our thoughts and in our prayers. and of course you have seen some of the tributes that have been laid today for david, and i think that absolutely reflects the warmth, love and affection that people locally had for him. and the prime minister and i today have come here to pay our own respects and our tributes to david,
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while also paying respects to the emergency services, and the police in particular, who responded yesterday with both great speed, but also with selfless professionalism, as ever putting themselves in harm's way to protect the rest of us. now, clearly there is a live police investigation taking place right now. there are obviously discussions around mp security, too. and when we think of david, david himself, man of the people, he was killed doing a job that he loved, serving his own constituents as an elected democratic member. and of course acts of this are absolutely wrong and we cannot let that get in the way of a functioning democracy. so that is why there are measures under way right now, i have convened meetings yesterday, i have been with the speaker of the house and with the police and our security services, to make sure that all measures are being put in place for the security of mps so that they can carry
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on with their duties as elected democratic members. but all our thoughts right now are absolutely with david and david's dear, dearfamily. this is an absolutely tragic time. we hold them close, we absolutely hold them close in our thoughts and our prayers. and we know this is a town that is grieving, as well, because david... david was there advocate, he was their champion. and i also see this as an essex mp, he was a neighbour of mine, —— and i also say this as an essex mp, he was a neighbour of mine, he was deeply loved and warmly regarded and respected. thank you. the police have talked about a potential link with islamist extremism. you have been in a police briefing this morning. what more can you say about that aspect to this investigation? well, first of all, this is a live police investigation. it is not for me to discuss or comment on any aspects of important policing work. that is absolutely integral to this investigation. we had a cabinet minister today
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talking, saying that no mp is safe. you are an mp, you carry out surgeries, how safe do you feel? well, i think it is important for all members of parliament, and i have been a member of parliament myself for ten years, look at david, you know, decades as an elected representative, man of the people, going out, doing his duties, we carry on doing our duties. we live in an open society, a democracy where we are accessible to the people. that is right and proper. we have measures in place to safeguard our mps. there have been a lot of lessons that have been learnt over recent years following the appalling murder of ourformer dear colleague, jo cox. and other parliamentarians, too. those measures are always under review. there is a review that is under way, has been under way in the last 2a hours. there is direct communication is taking place right now, took place yesterday, as well, with mps. all 600 plus mps as to their whereabouts, what they are doing
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in their constituencies to make sure that they are protected so that they can go around serving their constituencies in that open way, but in a safe way. it is important that that continues. but how do you balance safety with the democratic process of allowing voters to meet their mps? it can be balanced. it can absolutely be balanced, and it has been balanced, as well, through all the policing measures that have been put in place. there are measures in terms of policing, there are also measures that we have to undertake, as well, we take upon ourselves to protect ourselves in terms of surgeries, going around your constituency with those that know where you are going within policing, for example. so there are good measures in place. there will be further guidance that will go to mps, clearly, which is led by the speaker of the house, who i am working with, i constantly work with the speaker to ensure that the engagement is there, the support is there, the guidance is there.
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but importantly, those connections with local policing in local constituencies for local mps to make sure that mps can go around doing what they are elected to do, while also protecting our communities and the citizens across our communities. but will this be the end to face—to—face meetings with mps? we are open to surgeries, doing ourjob. we will continue to do that. and let's not forget, let's think about david right now, as well, i have already described david, he was a dearfriend of mine, and a loyalfriend and colleague, a man of the people, he was killed serving his own constituents and constituency members. we will carry on, we absolutely... we live in an open society, a democracy. we cannot be cowed by any individual or any motivation, people with motives to stop us functioning to serve our elected democracy. so, on that basis,
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we have measures in base. —— so, on that basis, we have measures in place. we will continue to review and strengthen measures, and rightly so. the speaker and i will continue to support mps. policing will continue to support mps. that work is under way. and, you know, we will continue to absolutely stand by the principles that we are elected by, to serve our constituents. in the open way in which we have been doing so. but also recognising that there are safety and protection measures that we are... we have to undertake, too. of course, this morning people here in the constituency were waking up to the reality that the man they have known, admired, respected as their mp for so long was taken from them in such a brutal and shocking and horrific way. sir david amess was the mp for southend west since 1997. he was an mp in essex for even
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longer than that, first elected to parliament in 1983. and as a result, he built many relationships across political divides, but he was never someone who achieved high office. he sought no cabinet position, for example, instead choosing to focus as a backbencher on matters that were important to him. and championing the constituency that he represented since 1997. often raising the issue of southend west in parliament in his speeches. and it was something that was acknowledged in many of the tributes that have been paid throughout the day. as each our passes, the number of tributes, flowers, messages that have been left for him has been growing. people coming all the time wanting to express their sadness and pay tribute to him. ordinary constituents, but also those who hold the highest office in the land.
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earlier this morning, the prime minister borisjohnson, side—by—side minister boris johnson, side—by—side with minister borisjohnson, side—by—side with the leader of the opposition, the labour leader sir keir starmer, came to pay tribute themselves, to lay flowers here at the scene where that shocking incident took place just under 2a hours ago. the prime minister borisjohnson had said that sir david amess was one of the kindest, nicest and most gentle people in politics. labour's sir keir starmer held his profound sense of public duty. along with them, paying tribute and wear flowers, we had a moment ago from the home secretary pretty patel, she was with them here as well. she paid tribute and also raise those concerns about keeping other mps safe. with them, as well, so lindsay hoyle, the speaker of the house of commons, who described sir david is a much loved
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mp and a bright light of parliament. well, it has once again raised many questions about the safety of mps and about the inevitable access that their constituents have two them to raise matters of concern or matters that are important to them directly. for them to take that to westminster and reflect the views of the people around the country. but it raises the question of how much access can be maintained, but at the same time mps and their staff can be kept safe. it is something that harriet harman, the labour mp has raised, and she is calling for a speaker's conference. a nonparty political gathering to address the issue among mps. harriet harmanjoins us gathering to address the issue among mps. harriet harman joins us live now. firstly, your reaction to what has happened over the past 2a are worse. i, has happened over the past 24 are worse. ~' has happened over the past 24 are worse. ~ , ., , worse. i, like everyone else in parliament. — worse. i, like everyone else in parliament, is _ worse. i, like everyone else in parliament, is absolutely - worse. i, like everyone else in parliament, is absolutely in i worse. i, like everyone else in - parliament, is absolutely in shock about this. it is absolutely true what everyone is saying about david
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amess. he was one of the friendliest and affable mps in parliament. he was always prepared to work with you, whichever political party you are in, if it was a cause that he felt was important. and that is why everybody with their own experience of having worked in common cause with him is feeling shocked, and feeling a sense that this is an attack on democracy. and that is why we have to really think about how we enable us as mps to do our work, to engage with our constituents, but do so in a safe way. and this cannot be just left to the government are left to the police. we have to have that discussion as a parliament about what we need to change to make sure that we can keep that engagement with our constituents which are so precious and such a distinctive part of the uk's democracy, but not have a situation where this is the second murder of an a situation where this is the second murder ofan mp a situation where this is the second murder of an mp in five years. we cannot say that as a price worth paying for our democracy. obviously
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when something _ paying for our democracy. obviously when something as _ paying for our democracy. obviously when something as shocking - paying for our democracy. obviously when something as shocking and - when something as shocking and unexpected and tragic as this happens, it focuses people's attention on matters of security, personal safety, attention on matters of security, personalsafety, but attention on matters of security, personal safety, but i just attention on matters of security, personal safety, but ijust wonder in the years that you have been in parliament, as it always something that has been on your mind or is it only in recent years that it is something that has been in your consciousness?— something that has been in your consciousness? well, i think it was particularly — consciousness? well, i think it was particularly brought _ consciousness? well, i think it was particularly brought into _ consciousness? well, i think it was particularly brought into focus - consciousness? well, i think it was particularly brought into focus by i particularly brought into focus by the tragic murder ofjo cox. and the advent of social media, it enables us to tell our constituents where we are going to be so they can come and meet us, but it also puts it out there for everybody to know where we are going to be. and i do think we have to have a bit of a rethink. it is not a question of carrying on with business as usual and just regarding this as an occupational hazard of being an mp, nor of having close security such as the home secretary has or the prime minister
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or the foreign secretary needs to have. we need to have a discussion about how we strike a balance. nobody wants mps to be hidden away in armoured limousines and only seen, you know, behind police. but nor do we want mps to be unsafe. at the same time, as we have what i am arguing for, which is a speaker's conference, we need to discuss the culture of our politics. nobody wants mps to be put on a pedestal, but neither should the bird politician be a dirty word. we have all got a responsibility in that, not only to champion our own political parties, but to champion democracy as a whole. you political parties, but to champion democracy as a whole.— democracy as a whole. you have called for _ democracy as a whole. you have called for this _ democracy as a whole. you have called for this speaker's - democracy as a whole. you have i called for this speaker's conference to be convened. just explain for our viewers what that means and what that could achieve potentially. at, that could achieve potentially. speaker's conference is a very rare process. it only has happened about once every ten years in the recent
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past. it is where parliament meets to discuss and decide on something and report on it on an issue which affects the whole of parliament. and it would be the speaker bringing together all parties, and the like the police and security services, and social media, and actually having a deliberation which allows mps to discuss how we balance this democracy and then issue a report. after the killing ofjo cox, we have had more security in our homes and more security in the house of commons, but we did not fully address the issue of security in the constituency. i think that is what we need to do now. i constituency. i think that is what we need to do now.— we need to do now. i have heard several peeple — we need to do now. i have heard several people talk _ we need to do now. i have heard several people talk about - we need to do now. i have heard several people talk about this i we need to do now. i have heard l several people talk about this over the afternoon yesterday, into the evening and this morning, about things needing to change, the situation needing to be made safer, notjust situation needing to be made safer, not just for situation needing to be made safer, notjust for mps situation needing to be made safer, not just for mps but their families and the people who work with them
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and the people who work with them and those constituency offices. but it seems very hard for anyone to pick them up —— pinpoint any practical steps that can be taken immediately to achieve that. are there anything that comes to mind that you think can be done quite swiftly to keep them safe? yes. swiftly to keep them safe? yes, there are- _ swiftly to keep them safe? yes, there are- l— swiftly to keep them safe? yes, there are. i do _ swiftly to keep them safe? yes, there are. i do not— swiftly to keep them safe? yes, there are. i do not want - swiftly to keep them safe? yes, there are. i do not want to i swiftly to keep them safe? yes there are. i do not want to pre—empt what other mps would say, but i think that there is a balance between saying we do not need to meet our constituents at all except on zoom or on the other hand we carry on with business as usual. it is safer, for example, if you meet your constituents by appointment only. it is safer, for example, if you meet them by appointment only and in the town hall where there is security, but at low level which is unlikely to deter people. plus i think all of these things can be discussed. the thing is that mps come in all shapes and sizes now, and that is a strength of our democracy. we have got women mps, we have got pregnant mps, we have got mps with disabilities. we want a
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system of doing our work which enables all of them, all of them who represent all sorts of different people in this country, to do that engagement, but do it in a safe way. we do not want to become like other countries, other mps when the visitors, they are aghast that we actually meet our constituents face—to—face. i think we want to carry on doing that. but i think we can, but we are going to do it anyway which is safer. harriet harman. _ anyway which is safer. harriet harman, labour— anyway which is safer. harriet harman, labour mp, - anyway which is safer. harriet harman, labour mp, thank i anyway which is safer. harriet l harman, labour mp, thank you anyway which is safer. harriet i harman, labour mp, thank you very much for speaking to us here on bbc news. let's pick up on that security point. joining me now is anthony glees, a security expert from the university of buckingham. this really highlights a tension in our system, doesn't it question about the cornerstone of our democracy that the people who are like those mps have ready access to them. it is a tension with achieving that, and yet at the same time making sure those mps and the people alongside them are safe. i making sure those mps and the people alongside them are safe.— alongside them are safe. i agree with ou.
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alongside them are safe. i agree with yom the — alongside them are safe. i agree with you. the first _ alongside them are safe. i agree with you. the first thing - alongside them are safe. i agree with you. the first thing that i i with you. the first thing that i would say is this is an appalling attack on our parliamentary democratic way of life. the second thing i would say is that good security is not the enemy of our liberal democratic way of life. it has its servant. without good security, our parliamentary liberal democracy cannot function. when people say, we cannot have mps surrounded by cordons of policeman, as if the choice is between that and no security at all. i think they are completely wrong. i am an academic, nobody has voted for me. you hear from people who are elected, and i accept they superior position here, but in my view, mps need to get real. they need to get real about the sort of political culture that we now have in the united kingdom. 2019, there were a whole series of
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credible and serious threats made against mps, including, for example, sir ian duncan smith, a neighbouring essex mp. and it is, i think, mindless to say, we have to go on meeting our constituents as we have done for decades in the past. because britain has changed. we are no longer the same britain. and when harriet harman says we have got to be different, i do not think we are different. if you look at germany, for example, every member of parliament is entitled automatically to protection from the federal german criminal agency. ten mps are under permanent guard from them. most mps are not interested in it, but they are things that we can do right now and should do. and
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but they are things that we can do right now and should do.- right now and should do. and you raise that important _ right now and should do. and you raise that important point - right now and should do. and you raise that important point about | right now and should do. and you i raise that important point about the security that is offered and is available, but i suppose it comes down to the fact whether the mps themselves feel that that would put a barrier between them and the constituents they represent. anthony, forgive me, because i want to bring in an mp we have with us here in leigh—on—sea, james who is a conservative mp in a neighbouring constituency. i'm sure you want to share some thoughts about the tragic events of the past 24 of us. i am still and believing _ events of the past 24 of us. i am still and believing that _ events of the past 24 of us. i am still and believing that he - events of the past 24 of us. i am still and believing that he is i events of the past 24 of us. i am still and believing that he is dead. i still and believing that he is dead. i expect— still and believing that he is dead. i expect him to turn up. the community hasjust been hit sideways by this _ community hasjust been hit sideways by this it _ community hasjust been hit sideways bythis it is— community hasjust been hit sideways by this. it is notjust a member of parliament. — by this. it is notjust a member of parliament, notjust a local member of parliament, but he really did touch _ of parliament, but he really did touch people's lives in a way that most _ touch people's lives in a way that most mps — touch people's lives in a way that most mps do not manage to do. i am quite _ most mps do not manage to do. i am quite moved — most mps do not manage to do. i am quite moved by reading some of the messages _ quite moved by reading some of the
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messages and seeing not people dressed — messages and seeing not people dressed up, as i am, in summer attire. _ dressed up, as i am, in summer attire, peoplejust dressed up, as i am, in summer attire, people just wanting to lay flowers _ attire, people just wanting to lay flowers and get on with their normal lives _ flowers and get on with their normal lives and _ flowers and get on with their normal lives. and thank him for the little kihdhess— lives. and thank him for the little kindness that he shared with them. david _ kindness that he shared with them. david had _ kindness that he shared with them. david had been a member of parliament for nearly 40 years, we all expected him to going to be father— all expected him to going to be father of— all expected him to going to be father of the house. there is part of me _ father of the house. there is part of me that — father of the house. there is part of me that still that will happen because — of me that still that will happen because i— of me that still that will happen because i have not come to terms with him — because i have not come to terms with him passing. but it has been amazing — with him passing. but it has been amazing in— with him passing. but it has been amazing in southend today to see the mayor, _ amazing in southend today to see the mayor, prime minister, the leader of her majesty's opposition, the speaker— her majesty's opposition, the speaker of the house of commons coming _ speaker of the house of commons coming here just to pay respects to david's _ coming here just to pay respects to david's memory, and say he was important — david's memory, and say he was important and he will be missed. and ou bean important and he will be missed. you began by important and he will be missed. situc you began by talking about important and he will be missed. fific you began by talking about how people just going about their day—to—day lives have come to lay flowers, and you finish by talking about people holding the highest office in the land, who clearly
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thought very highly of him. what was it about him that meant he could appeal to those of all walks of life? ., appeal to those of all walks of life? . ., ., ., , , life? he had an enormous energy. he would always — life? he had an enormous energy. he would always do _ life? he had an enormous energy. he would always do double _ life? he had an enormous energy. he would always do double the _ life? he had an enormous energy. he would always do double the number l life? he had an enormous energy. he | would always do double the number of lengths— would always do double the number of lengths that i did. if i'd had a busy— lengths that i did. if i'd had a busy day, _ lengths that i did. if i'd had a busy day, he will look down at me slightly— busy day, he will look down at me slightly because i was going back home _ slightly because i was going back home to — slightly because i was going back home to eat or do something else. you mean. — home to eat or do something else. you mean, you're not going to the fifth eveht — you mean, you're not going to the fifth event today? he had a great energy _ fifth event today? he had a great energy. he knew everybody and put everybody— energy. he knew everybody and put everybody at ease, even if he did not know — everybody at ease, even if he did not know them. and he could talk to anybody _ not know them. and he could talk to anybody. my phone isjust full of messages from colleagues, people that have _ messages from colleagues, people that have known him expressing sympathy— that have known him expressing sympathy is, but also sharing stories — sympathy is, but also sharing stories i_ sympathy is, but also sharing stories. i have been an mp now for 16 years. _ stories. i have been an mp now for 16 years. the — stories. i have been an mp now for 16 years, the number of new colleagues it was sidle up to me and say, james. — colleagues it was sidle up to me and say, james, you're david amess's neighbour, — say, james, you're david amess's neighbour, aren't you? and i would say, yes _ neighbour, aren't you? and i would say. yes i— neighbour, aren't you? and i would say, yes. iwas neighbour, aren't you? and i would say, yes. i was bracing myself for what _ say, yes. i was bracing myself for what was — say, yes. i was bracing myself for what was going to come. but there would _ what was going to come. but there would always be a comical story of something — would always be a comical story of something just slightly beyond
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appropriate but not inept or inappropriate that he did that broke the ice _ inappropriate that he did that broke the ice and — inappropriate that he did that broke the ice and created a bit ofjoy. he was the _ the ice and created a bit ofjoy. he was the catalyst in a meeting. not in the _ was the catalyst in a meeting. not in the background and not the person charging _ in the background and not the person charging from the front, but the person— charging from the front, but the person that pulls everything together and makes it work. it is shocking — together and makes it work. it is shocking that he is no longer here in this— shocking that he is no longer here in this community. we shocking that he is no longer here in this community.— in this community. we have been talkin: in this community. we have been talking just _ in this community. we have been talking just a _ in this community. we have been talking just a moment _ in this community. we have been talking just a moment ago - in this community. we have been talking just a moment ago with l in this community. we have been talking just a moment ago with a | talking just a moment ago with a couple of guests, with harriet harman, with anthony, a security expert, talking about whether there is a need to rethink the access that constituents have to their mps or how you keep that access but keep mps and their staff and families safe. how much do you think it would damage the democracy we have in this country if that access where limited or hindered, even stopped altogether become virtual? this or hindered, even stopped altogether become virtual?— become virtual? this will not ha en. become virtual? this will not happen- we _ become virtual? this will not happen. we will _ become virtual? this will not happen. we will carry - become virtual? this will not happen. we will carry on i become virtual? this will not happen. we will carry on as i become virtual? this will not - happen. we will carry on as members of parliament, meeting our constituents and being open and
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accessible. there are a few basic security— accessible. there are a few basic security thinks we should do and will be _ security thinks we should do and will be reminded of that. but we will be reminded of that. but we will carry— will be reminded of that. but we will carry on. lindsay hoyle, the speaker— will carry on. lindsay hoyle, the speaker of— will carry on. lindsay hoyle, the speaker of the house, did a surgery last night, — speaker of the house, did a surgery last night, i— speaker of the house, did a surgery last night, i think that was important and symbolic that we carry on. immediately after, i made a point _ on. immediately after, i made a point of— on. immediately after, i made a point of on — on. immediately after, i made a point of on my own wandering down the street. — point of on my own wandering down the street, going to my office and getting _ the street, going to my office and getting on— the street, going to my office and getting on with life. we are part of the community and that is what works — the community and that is what works so. _ the community and that is what works. so, yes, we need to dust of the few— works. so, yes, we need to dust of the few security arrangements, but there _ the few security arrangements, but there is— the few security arrangements, but there is no— the few security arrangements, but there is no ability to wrap us in cotton— there is no ability to wrap us in cotton wool, nor would our electric want _ cotton wool, nor would our electric want that, — cotton wool, nor would our electric want that, nor would we want it. what _ want that, nor would we want it. what sort — want that, nor would we want it. what sort of —— electorate want that. what sort of advice have you been given in terms of your personal security? i been given in terms of your personal securi ? ., �* ~' been given in terms of your personal securi ? ., �* ~ ., security? i don't think there are any specific _ security? i don't think there are any specific and _ security? i don't think there are any specific and ongoing - security? i don't think there are | any specific and ongoing threats security? i don't think there are i any specific and ongoing threats to neighbouring members of parliament, essex _ neighbouring members of parliament, essex mps. _ neighbouring members of parliament, essex mps, are more broadly elected representatives. however, we should io representatives. however, we should go back— representatives. however, we should go back to _ representatives. however, we should go back to following the basic advice — go back to following the basic advice i_ go back to following the basic advice. i think the speaker will, to
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members — advice. i think the speaker will, to members of parliament, reissued that basic advice. _ members of parliament, reissued that basic advice, to make sure we can carry— basic advice, to make sure we can carry on. — basic advice, to make sure we can carry on. do— basic advice, to make sure we can carry on, do ourjobs, but do it safely — carry on, do our “obs, but do it safel . ~ ,, .,~ safely. we will continue speaking about it. ijust _ safely. we will continue speaking about it. i just want _ safely. we will continue speaking about it. i just want to _ safely. we will continue speaking about it. i just want to say i safely. we will continue speaking l about it. i just want to say goodbye to our viewers on bbc world news. thank you. are you forgive me if i move _ thank you. are you forgive me if i move on. — thank you. are you forgive me if i move on. as — thank you. are you forgive me if i move on, as well?— move on, as well? thank you for s-ueakin move on, as well? thank you for speaking to _ move on, as well? thank you for speaking to us- _ move on, as well? thank you for speaking to us. thank _ move on, as well? thank you for speaking to us. thank you i move on, as well? thank you for speaking to us. thank you very l move on, as well? thank you for- speaking to us. thank you very much indeed. james duddridge there, neighbouring mp from a constituency here in essex, who shared his thoughts and memories of sir david amess. a little earlier, we were speaking to who was a former adviser. this is a sad time for the immediate family of sir david amess, but we have to remember the people who worked with him who would have spent many hours with him, day in, day out, we can, we count. without the constituency office here in southend and also in
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the office in westminster, and how keenly they will be feeling his last. katie shared some of their thoughts. i actually once went for a _ of their thoughts. i actually once went for a job — of their thoughts. i actually once went for a job interview - of their thoughts. i actually once went for a job interview with i of their thoughts. i actually once i went for a job interview with david amess. needless to say, they found somebody better for the job. but he was extremely kind, he was clearly very passionate about the work you did. ithink it is a very passionate about the work you did. i think it is a point worth making that, despite some of the language that is used in public life and in social media and in our press media, the vast overwhelming majority of people who go into public life do so in good faith. and they are trying to do the best for their constituents, whether we agree with their politics or not, david amess was a kind and passionate human being who was clearly trying to serve his constituents as best he could. i5 to serve his constituents as best he could. , ,., ., .,
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to serve his constituents as best he could. , ., ., ., ., could. is someone who works in that arena, in could. is someone who works in that arena. in that— could. is someone who works in that arena, in that field _ could. is someone who works in that arena, in that field alongside - could. is someone who works in that arena, in that field alongside mps, l arena, in that field alongside mps, some you have experience of, how much of a concern is safety on a day—to—day basis for those who work in constituency offices and in westminster, and what sort of guidance, if any, westminster, and what sort of guidance, ifany, ortraining, are you given? guidance, if any, or training, are you given?— you given? that all increased specifically — you given? that all increased specifically after _ you given? that all increased specifically after the - you given? that all increased specifically after the murder | you given? that all increased i specifically after the murder of jo specifically after the murder ofjo cox in her constituency. that became very sharply in focus. but we were definitely aware. i was based in westminster. you get very, very comfortable very quickly in that environment, which is essentially like a fortress. you go through all of those security checks, you've got armed police patrolling around the building, you got police boats on the river stop if you're looking out windows, you can see the level of protection that is there. you get used to feeling that you are in that bubble, you're protected and your say. constituency offices are very much more exposed, but they are
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given a lot of security measures that obviously came into place, as i say, after the murder ofjo cox. we were talk to, we were given training in terms of what to do were somebody to breach the security at westminster. although i think in the time that i was working there, i am not entirely certain i ever thought that was a realistic possibility given the strength of the security presence that was outside. in constituency offices, you know, i cannot obviously comment on any kind of specific arrangements. it would not be right for me to do so. but there are measures in place to protect constituency staff. that being said, they are all very much a response to what happens if violence is already taking place. and how to protect yourself from an attack once it has begun. and i think we are starting to need to look now is way before that to understand where that violence and strength of feeling is coming from. notjust when it takes place in these unbelievably extreme
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cases, likejo cox and david amess, but also in terms of some of the mps who have been subject to horrific abuse online, subject to stalking and intimidation. this is not the only case of mp intimidation and abuse that we see. way to go back and look at where this violence is originating. and look at where this violence is originating-— originating. katie pruszynski, former adviser _ originating. katie pruszynski, former adviser to _ originating. katie pruszynski, former adviser to chloe i originating. katie pruszynski,. former adviser to chloe smith, speaking to me a short time ago. we are here in leigh—on—sea where people living bag have been coming to lay their own flowers, pay their own tributes. some of them stopping just to tell us how much they feel the loss of sir david amess as their mp, a man who represented them in parliament since 1997. a man who some say there was no bigger champion for southend than sir david, and his loss will be very keenly felt in the community, as much as at westminster. we will
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continue our coverage throughout the day here in

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