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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 16, 2021 3:00pm-3:31pm BST

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i'm lukwesa burak. the latest headlines at 3. side by side in grief — the prime minister and leader of the opposition visit the scene where tory mp sir david amess was killed yesterday. police say they're treating the killing as a �*terrorist incident�* — as tributes are paid from across politics. he was a man of the people, he was absolutely there for everyone. he was a much loved parliamentarian. to me he was a dear and loyalfriend. the killing has resurfaced the dilemma facing mps over security at their surgeries — and whether it would be safer to hold them virtually. we don't want to become like other countries, other mps when they visit us are aghast that we meet our
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constituents face—to—face. are aghast that we meet our i are aghast that we meet our think we want to carry that i think we want to carry on doing that and i think we can but we have to do it in a way that is safer. this is the scene, live above southend, where a minute's silence is taking place to remember sir david amess. later this evening, the residents of leigh—on—sea will also be holding a candlelit vigil, in memory of their mp. also this hour - questions are asked about how a covid pcr testing lab, that recorded thousands of inaccurate results, won a multi—million also this hour - questions are asked about how a covid pcr testing lab, that recorded thousands of inaccurate results, won a multi—million pound government contract. uncovering the secrets of the solar system — a new nasa mission aims to learn more about how the planets were created. and coming up at 3.30pm — click investigates whether wikipedia entries about hong kong are being edited in favour of china.
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good afternoon. the prime minister, borisjohnson, and the leader of the opposition, sir keir starmer, have laid flowers together at the site of the fatal stabbing of the mp, sir david amess, in essex. sir david was killed during a constituency surgery in leigh—on—sea yesterday. the police are treating the attack as a terrorist incident which is potentially "linked to islamist extremism". a 25—year—old man who was arrested at the scene remains in custody — and searches have been carried out at two addresses in london. our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani reports. a moment of unity across the political divide. two leaders representing
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a shocked nation. this morning, borisjohnson and the labour leader keir starmer stood together on a quiet road in leigh—on—sea, where sir david amess lost his life. the committed constituency mp who, at the age of 69, showed no sign of giving up his work or his community. campaigning on every issue that mattered — climate change, cycling, veterans and even local dogs. less than 24—hours ago, david was in his own constituency doing a local advice surgery, which is somthing all mps do, week in, week out. of course david, as i knew him and we all knew him, was a passionate advocate and champion for southend, this wonderful town, and with that, of course, he was a man of the people. the community has been hit sideways by this, it is notjust a member of parliament, notjust the local member of parliament,
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but he did really touch people's lives, in a way that most mps don't manage to do. today the belfairs methodist church remains behind a cordon, detectives still at the scene where the suspected attacker was arrested and a knife recovered. overnight, scotland yard said sir david's death was being investigated as an act of terrorism motivated by islamist extremism. the 25—year—old man arrested at the scene remains in custody and security officials have told the bbc that he wasn't on mi5�*s main database of suspects, but there have been two searches overnight at addresses in london. signs of the huge operation now under way to understand what happened and more about this man's life. and nearby, shock at sir david's constituency office, the flag at half—mast. i don't think it's completely sunk in yet, but you only have to look at the floral tributes that are outside the constituency office here.
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a man of the people being mourned by the people, and a community and nation asking why. a review has begun into the security of mps when they meet their constituents — something seen as central to their role. one senior mp — tobias ellwood — has suggested that face—to—face meetings should no longer take place. our political correspondent peter saul reports. hello there. nice to meet you. scenes like this have long been a feature of our politics. it might not look as exciting as the fierce debates we sometimes see in parliament, but it is just as important. a chance for mps to meet the very people they are elected to represent. sir david amess was far from alone in holding a constituency surgery yesterday, and his death has raised questions about whether something so fundamental in our democracy can still be safe.
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acts of this are absolutely wrong and we cannot let that get in the way of our functioning democracy. so that is why there are measures under way right now, i have convened meetings yesterday, i have been with the speaker of the house and with the police and our security services, to make sure all measures are being put in place for the security of mps so they can carry on with their duties as elected democratic members. the home secretary has started a review of mps' security. police forces across the uk have been contacting mps, to see what support they might be able to provide. there is always a big police presence in westminster, particularly after the terror attack of 2018, but it is impossible to provide this level of security for mps, when they are in their constituencies. now the mp who had to perform cpr after a police officer was fatally stabbed here says it is time to pause face to face constituency surgeries. i would recommend that no mp has a direct surgery until, you know,
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you can move to zoom, there's other ways. you can achieve a lot over the telephone, you can get things moving faster rather having to wait for the surgery date as well. the issue of protection for mps, and those around them has been on the agenda for years, and some long serving figures believe now is the time for the parties to come together and take serious action. it is not a question of carrying on with business as usual and just regarding this as an occupational hazard of being an mp, nor of having close security such as the home secretary has or the prime minister or the foreign secretary needs to have. we need to have a discussion about how we strike the balance. many mps want to be as accessible as possible, especially after the pandemic, but yesterday's tragedy in essex could force them to think twice about the way they work. peter saul, bbc news. earlier my colleague ben boulos spoke to james duddridge, mp for the neighbouring constituency
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of rochford and southend east... the community has been hit sideways by this. it is notjust a local member of parliament, but he really did touch people's lives in a way that most mps do not manage to do. david had been a member of parliament for nearly 40 years and we all expected him to go on to be father of the house. there is a part of me that still thinks that will happen because i have not come to terms with him passing. he could talk to anybody and pick—up, my phone is full of messages from colleagues and people who have known him expressing sympathy but also sharing stories. i have been an mp for 16 years and the number of new colleagues that would come up to me and say you are sir david amess's neighbour. and i'd brace myself
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for what would come. there would always be a comical story. something judy beyond appropriate but not inappropriate that broke the ice. a joyful occasion. he was a catalyst in a meeting, not in the background and not the person charging from the front but the person that pulls everything together and makes it work. it is shocking that he is no longer here in this community. we have been talking a moment ago with harriet harman and a security expert about whether there is a need to rethink the access that constituents have to their mps or how you keep that access but keep mps and their staff and families safe, how much do you think it would damage the democracy we have in this country if that access were limited or hindered or stopped
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altogether and become virtual? this will not happen. we will carry on as members of parliament meeting our constituents and being open and accessible. there are basic security things we should do and we are reminded of that but we will carry on. lindsay hoyle — the speaker — did a surgery last night and i think that was important and symbolic that we carry on. immediately after, i made a point of going down to my office and getting on with life. we are part of the community and that is what works. so yes, we need to dust off a few security arrangements but there is no ability to wrap us in cotton wool nor would would our electorate want it, nor would we want it. sir david worked alongside the charity �*dogs trust�* with its �*puppy smuggling taskforce.
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he supported the campaign to end the cruel puppy smuggling trade. claire calder, is their head of public affairs and shejoins me now. thank you forjoining us. i�*d like to get your reaction to this tragedy. i to get your reaction to this tra . ed . ~ ., to get your reaction to this traced. ~ ., , tragedy. i think we are absolutely heartbroken. _ tragedy. i think we are absolutely heartbroken. it _ tragedy. i think we are absolutely heartbroken. it is _ tragedy. i think we are absolutely heartbroken. it is an _ tragedy. i think we are absolutely heartbroken. it is an absolutely i heartbroken. it is an absolutely tragic situation. he was such a huge animal lovers, one of the biggest champions from around the world in parliament and for the dogs trust. he will be a huge loss. he really cared and really wanted to make a difference for dogs. he will be very sadly missed and of course it is awful for his sadly missed and of course it is awfulfor his family sadly missed and of course it is awful for his family at this time. how did you come to work for your charity and what did the poppy smuggling task force mean to him? sir david has worked with dogs for
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many years, he has been an mp for a0 years and worked with dogs for a lot of that time. he was a real constituency mp, he liked to visit his local rehoming centre in basildon. he went to the opening in 201a. we always had a good relationship with him. in terms of p°ppy relationship with him. in terms of mm smuggling. relationship with him. in terms of poppy smuggling, that is an issue we have been working on for six years to try and tackle the cruel trade. “ p°ppy to try and tackle the cruel trade. —— poppy smuggling. he isa he is a member of our leigh—on—sea parliamentary task force. he came to hand over our... he spoke on the issue in parliament for us. he is a big supporter of our work in that area. he
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big supporter of our work in that area. , . , ., ., . area. he must have been a fantastic collaborator — area. he must have been a fantastic collaborator and _ area. he must have been a fantastic collaborator and colleague - area. he must have been a fantastic collaborator and colleague to - area. he must have been a fantastic collaborator and colleague to get. collaborator and colleague to get your argument and cause across. tells about those characteristics and how he took the arguments to parliament. he and how he took the arguments to parliament-— parliament. he was passionate, i think the biggest _ parliament. he was passionate, i think the biggest thing _ parliament. he was passionate, i think the biggest thing in - parliament. he was passionate, i think the biggest thing in terms | parliament. he was passionate, i | think the biggest thing in terms of our work wasjust how think the biggest thing in terms of our work was just how much he cared about dogs. hejudged our work was just how much he cared about dogs. he judged the dog our work was just how much he cared about dogs. hejudged the dog of our work was just how much he cared about dogs. he judged the dog of the year competition several times. he was due to enter the competition again this week with his favourite dogs. that is an important fact, he really cared, he loved dogs. interacting with dogs was just a jov- interacting with dogs was just a joy. he also got issues and he would understand what the problems were, example puppy smuggling. he was speaking about the issue. he would table questions for us. yes, he was
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just an accident animal welfare campaigner. i just an accident animal welfare campaigner-— just an accident animal welfare campaigner. just an accident animal welfare cam aianer. , . , ., campaigner. i understand there is an oane campaigner. i understand there is an online campaign _ campaigner. i understand there is an online campaign for— campaigner. i understand there is an online campaign for his _ campaigner. i understand there is an online campaign for his dog - campaigner. i understand there is an online campaign for his dog vivian, l online campaign for his dog vivian, a french bulldog to be crowned westminster dog of the year. that must be fantastic for him, he would be smiling at that thought because he spoke very fondly of vivian and what dogs may terminate a hard day. he did. anytime you spoke to him about his dogs, it was just so as well. there is an online campaign at the moment, you can vote for vivian and david as well. we hold that every year but david came along for many years for the westminster dog of the year, always with a huge sense of humour and a huge heart. it wasjust a sense of humour and a huge heart. it was just a pleasure to see him
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interacting around dogs, it was so obvious how much he cared and wanted to make a difference. for obvious how much he cared and wanted to make a difference.— to make a difference. for the ublic, to make a difference. for the public. as _ to make a difference. for the public. as we _ to make a difference. for the public, as we learn _ to make a difference. for the public, as we learn more - to make a difference. for the i public, as we learn more about to make a difference. for the - public, as we learn more about sir david, it is a surprise to find out how involved he was with so many organisations and issues and the level of his involvement, he was not just around the edges, he was deep within and he understood the salient points of whatever that concern was, have you been struck by how many issues he has been involved with? absolutely. i think it has been clear from the media absolutely. i think it has been clearfrom the media coverage. even from our work, he had an interest in anyissue from our work, he had an interest in any issue we took them. puppy smuggling was one of our biggest issues but i was just checking back before this interview about all the things we had worked on over the years. he worked with us on greyhounds, fireworks, electric
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shock collars, try to get them banned. there was a huge range of issues he worked on. looking at social media over the last 2a—hour is, it isjust social media over the last 2a—hour is, it is just so apparent how many animal charities he worked with and also how many other issues as well. what comes across as how passionate he was about each and every one of those issues. he was about each and every one of those issues-_ those issues. thank you very much for our those issues. thank you very much for your time _ those issues. thank you very much for your time today _ those issues. thank you very much for your time today in _ those issues. thank you very much for your time today in paying - for your time today in paying tribute for sir david amess. thank you. you are watching bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... side by side in grief — the prime minister and leader of the opposition visit the scene where tory mp sir david amess was killed yesterday. police say they�*re treating the killing as a �*terrorist incident�* — as tributes are paid from across politics. )the killing has resurfaced the dilemma facing mps over security at their surgeries — and whether it would be safer
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to hold them virtually. sport and now for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. claudio ranieri�*s first match in charge of watford turned into one he�*ll want to forget, his side was thrashed 5—0 by liverpool. sadio mane opened the scoring afterjust eight minutes at vicarage road. this was his hundredth premier league goal — making him the third african to achieve that feat. mo salah showed his spectacular goal in liverpool�*s previous game against manchester city wasn�*t a fluke as he reproduced that magic. and roberto firmino completed the rout with a hat—trick to move liverpool to the top of the table for at least a couple of hours. he went 5— nil and the people are really happy. it is incredible. it was not the easiest game, it was a great space. didn�*t play for a
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while, we are all human beings. that you can score these kind of goals and you�*re there is important. need to be in a good shape and that is why am hopeful and really happy. it why am hopeful and really happy. it is a big job but if my players understand me quickly, the big job is a little _ understand me quickly, the big job is a little less back. fire understand me quickly, the big “0b is a little less back.�* is a little less back. are you confident — is a little less back. are you confident you _ is a little less back. are you confident you will _ is a little less back. are you confident you will be - is a little less back. are you confident you will be okay? j is a little less back. are you - confident you will be okay? always i am confident- _ confident you will be okay? always i am confident. it _ confident you will be okay? always i am confident. it is _ confident you will be okay? always i am confident. it is the _ confident you will be okay? always i am confident. it is the first - confident you will be okay? always i am confident. it is the first match, l am confident. it is the first match, i am confident. it is the first match, iwas _ am confident. it is the first match, i was waiting for some battling today — i was waiting for some battling today. now we are ready, we are ready— today. now we are ready, we are ready to — today. now we are ready, we are ready to work hard. it�*s a busy afternoon in the premier league, with five other games currently underway. aston villa v wolves. leicester v man utd. man city 1—0 burnley. bernardo silva scored. and later, chelsea have the chance to move back to the top, above liverpool, if they win at in—form brentford.
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five matches underway in the scottish premiership — with rangers and celtic both in action. leaders rangers are against hearts at ibrox, who are second. it is currently goalless there. celtic, down in 6th place, taking on motherwell at fir park. goalless there as well. in the championship, fulham got the better of west london rivals queens park rangers — they thrashed their local rivals, in convincing fashion. it finished a—i at craven cottage — aleksandr mitrovic scoring twice for the home side. the win moves fulham up to third, two points behind the top two — at least for a couple of hours —as bournemouth can go top with a win at bristol city. it�*s one of the biggest days ahead in cameron norrie�*s tennis career, he faces gregor dimitrov, tonight in the semi—finals of the indian wells tournament. whatever happens he�*s already assured of being the new british number 0ne next week,
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and could even break into the world�*s top 20 for the first time. if he wins, norrie will face either unseeded georgian nikoloz basilashvili or american taylor fritz in the final. basilashvili produced a real surprise to beat the greek world number three stefanos tsitsipas in three sets. while home favourite fritz provided a shock of his own — beating the olympic champion alexander zverev. fritz saved two match points before winning in three sets. spain�*s paula badosa beat the in—form 0ns jabeur in straight sets. to set up a meeting with victoria azarenka in the women�*s final. azarenka came from a set and break down to beatjelena 0stapenko. azarenka will aim to become the first woman to win the tournament three times after victories in 2012 and 2016. at the women�*s big bash in australia, sydney thunder have started the defence of their title — with a humilating defeat — losing by 30 runs to the adelaide strikers. and the match will be remembered for this stunning catch by bridget patterson. with the ball heading for six — patterson was able to not only able to catch it one handed — but also able to make
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sure she didn�*t take it over the boundary rope. a stunning bit of fielding. great work. the melbourne renegades have started this season�*s tournament with a win. they beat the hobart hurricanes by six wickets. set 122 to win from their 20 overs, melbourne chased down their target with four balls to spare. that�*s all the sport for now. manchester united are a goal up at leicester. manchester united are a goal up at leicester. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. thank you very much. the united nations has withdrawn its invitation to matt hancock, to take up an unpaid role helping africa s economies recover from covid19. it�*s understood a decision was taken at senior levels within the un to rescind the offer — after questions were raised about the former health secretary�*s suitability for the role. 0ur correspondent, mark lobeljoins me now. you have been following this story
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very carefully, the news broke on the 12th of october so as happened since? , ., , . , since? this development which is embarrassing _ since? this development which is embarrassing for _ since? this development which is embarrassing for the _ since? this development which is embarrassing for the former - since? this development which is l embarrassing for the former health secretary who wanted to resuscitate his political career. it looked like the first step and come on tuesday when he had announced this news alongside the un economic commission for africa that he would be a special representative, an unpaid role to help africa�*s economy recover from covid. role to help africa�*s economy recoverfrom covid. he role to help africa�*s economy recover from covid. he tweeted that later, thejob did not come recover from covid. he tweeted that later, the job did not come from the uk government, it was internally from the un. he received praise from michael gove and justine doris. but there was anger it was announced on there was anger it was announced on the day a highly critical mp report came out criticising the government handling of the pandemic. also
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leaders in the african community pointed to his lack of experience in africa and his past mistakes. his friends pointed out these well—known variables when he was offered the appointment by the un. last night, the un secretary general confirmed that that appointment would not be taken forward. un sources told me it should never have been offered to him in the place. 0ne should never have been offered to him in the place. one reason given to matt hancock is a technical issue. if you are a sitting mp, you cannot become a special representative. gordon brown was a sitting mp and had become one but he had already announced a standing down from parliament whereas matt hancock has not expressed any intention to do that. the campaign group globaljustice has welcomed his withdrawal they hope he will now back pay to waivers on vaccines to boost the supply in africa of covid
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vaccines. . ~ boost the supply in africa of covid vaccines. ., ,, , ., , boost the supply in africa of covid vaccines. . ~' , ., , . vaccines. thank you very much indeed. questions are being raised around how a lab that recorded thousands of faulty covid pcr results, won a multi—million pound government contract. testing has now been suspended at the private lab in wolverhampton, and an investigation has been ordered into why it took a month to identify the failures. our health correspondent, dominic hughes has more. the wolverhampton lab at the centre of the faulty tests enquiry is run by a company called immensa health clinic limited. it was awarded a government contract worth £119 million to carry out pcr tests just a few months after being set up, one of a number of lucrative government contracts the company has won. but now thousands of people who received a false negative test are living with the knowledge they may have inadvertently infected someone. really cross with the system, and also, i wanted to do the right thing. i wanted not to go out into society and spread something, you know, make people poorly. but i was being told
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that�*s what i should do. but also, over the course of the last week, i�*ve had five pcr tests. the expense and the waste of money, as well, that doesn�*t sit easily with me either. some campaigners say that this episode has exposed a lack of regulation of testing providers. they're outside of the health system and outside of any quality control by health professionals. we've seen this a lot with companies who don't really know what it is they're existing to do, but need some form of revenue while they're working it out, and that's what this company started as, and during the pandemic, because they could do some testing, they started doing covid testing as well and they scaled up very rapidly. immensa is a subsidiary of dante labs, which was also offering pcr tests of foreign travellers. but it�*s now under investigation by the competition and markets authority over concerns it has been treating customers unfairly, one of a number of covid testing terms facing similar investigations. dante labs says it�*s cooperating fully with the cma inquiry, but recognises a small number
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of customers face challenges. immensa health clinic says it�*s fully collaborating with health officials and added it has already analysed more than 2.5 million samples for nhs test and trace. but there will be questions over whether millions of taxpayers�* money has been wisely spent. dominic hughes, bbc news. new zealand has held a national day of action to encourage all remaining unvaccinated citizens to get a coronavirus shot. the "vaxathon" was streamed live on television for eight hours — while pop—up clinics opened up across the country, including in the cabin of a dreamliner plane. by late afternoon, more than 120,000 people had received an innoculation. before today, just over half of the population were fully vaccinated. the british—iranian aid—worker, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has lost an appeal against her second jail
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sentence in iran. her lawyer said he�*d been told the news in a telephone call from the judicial authorities. mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was given a second, one—year sentence followed by a one—year travel ban when her first five—year sentence ended in march. she has been on parole in her parents�* home in tehran but could now be returned to jail. nasa has successfully launched a landmark mission to study asteroids nearjupiter, which could provide vital information about the evolution of the solar system. the rocket carrying the lucy spaceprobe, which will travel more than four billion miles over the next 12 years, took off from cape canaveral in florida. aru na iyengar reports. three, two, one, zero. the lucy probe is on its way tojupiter. lift off.
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it is on a 12 year mission to study asteroids called trojans left over from the beginning of the universe. so what are the trojan asteroids? they are asteroids that orbit around the sun withjupiter that ultimately hold the clues to the formation of our solar system. the lucy probe will visit eight trojans, city—sized lumps of rock. we will really better understand all about the asteroid. if you only see one, maybe you got a funny one, by seeing eight you get to really understand what is going on in this population. the probe is named after the fossil lucy discovered in africa in 197a which taught us about where our species came from. this new mission takes inspiration from that name. scientists are hoping it will shows proof of a massive will show us proof of a massive reorganisation of matter, shortly after the solar system�*s formation. now it�*s time for a look
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at the weather with ben rich. hello, it has been decidedly mixed. some of us had played and train others or some sunshine. into this evening, the cloud will win out and producing some outbreaks are quite heavy rain, especially in the south of scotland, northern england and some coming further south—east. it will be mild at the end of the night for most bocelli and northern scotland. a few missed patches around as well. into tomorrow, expect a lot of cloud and outbreaks of rain. turning lighter and patchier is the day wears on. sunnier spots in the afternoon, the northern isles stairwell for sunshine and parts of southern england, south wales. sunshine in the south could lift temperatures to 19 degrees. this is a sign of things to come for the next week, things looked unsettled with outbreaks of rain and it will be mild, even warm
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with highs of 20 degrees. there a hello this is bbc news. the headlines... side by side in grief — the prime minister and leader of the opposition visit the scene where tory mp sir david amess was killed yesterday. police say they�*re treating the killing as a terrorist incident, as tributes are paid from across politics. he was a man of the people, he was absolutely there for everyone. he was a much loved parliamentarian. to me, he was a dear and loyalfriend. the killing has resurfaced the dilemma facing mps over security at their surgeries and whether it would be safer to hold them virtually. in southend, residents gathered outside the civic centre for a minutes silence to remember sir david. also this hour — questions are asked about how a covid pcr testing lab that recorded thousands
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of inaccurate results won a multi—million pound

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