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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 17, 2021 10:00am-10:31am BST

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this is bbc world news. i'm ben thompson. our top stories... the man arrested by police following the killing of the uk mp sir david amess has been named as ali harbi ali and is being held under the terrorism act. officers have until friday to question him. a candlelit vigil was held last night in tribute to sir david, who was stabbed multiple times during a constituency surgery on friday. i don't know where we go from here. as a nation, i don't know where we go from here. i really feel sad. priti patel said there were "immediate" security changes being offered to mps in the wake of the killing of southend west mp
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will have to be self—aware about how we conduct business and put safety front and centre of this. one of the closest associates of the venezuelan president, nicolas maduro, has arrived in the united states to face money laundering charges. hollywood producers and the technicians union strike an eleventh—hour deal — avoiding industrial action that threatened to stop the cameras. a princely prize — the duke of cambridge prepares to reveal the winners of a new environmental award. a trial using pigs to scare away birds from one of europe's busiest airports is showing early signs of success. hello and welcome to bbc news. the home secretary, priti patel, says she is looking at a "whole spectrum" of measures to better protect mps following the death of sir david amess.
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she said mps had been contacted by the police to share details of their whereabouts and that her department was looking at whether officers should be on duty at constituency surgeries. detectives now have until next friday to question a man arrested in connection with the death of sir david. he was attacked while holding a constituency surgery in leigh—on—sea in essex. it's understood that the 25—year—old suspect — ali harbi ali — was referred to the government's counter—terrorism programme, prevent several years ago but was never an official "subject of interest" to mi5. frances read has this report. lighting candles so he will be remembered. hundreds gathered to pay their respects to david amess, all faiths, young and older. not everyone may have agreed with his politics, but in this community they respected and loved him. he touched everybody�*s lives, and i don't know anybody who had that kind of reach. a truly dedicated soul.
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he was a genuine, caring and compassionate man, and it's absolutely tragic what has happened to him, and our hearts go out to his loved ones. i feel so sad. i don't know where we go from here. as a nation, i don't know where we go from here. i i really feel sad. in the light of day, this now formally declared a terrorist incident, with early inquiries suggesting a motive linked to islamist extremism. whitehall officials confirmed the suspect is ali harbi ali, a british national of somali heritage who is being held at a london police station under the terrorism act. he was referred to the government's prevent scheme a few years ago, the programme designed to stop people being radicalised. but he's not thought to have been considered a subject of interest by mi5. now, urgent calls to keep mps safe. this weekend, already, changes, such as in south wales,
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with a police guard for an mp's coffee morning. some say this needs to be the norm. there has not been, to my knowledge, a discreet police presence there has not been, to my knowledge, a police presence at most of those events, and i realise that that's an issue that will increase levels of resource for the police, but surely it is something which ought to be on the table. but neither do those in politics want it to impact the way they represent the people they serve. even when you canvass, you get various people that are for you and others that are against you, but you take it, you have debates. democracy is action. that's what this is happening. that's the sad thing about what happened on friday. meanwhile, tributes have continued this morning, remembering who sir david amess was. he was so very, very funny.
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he was wonderful company. he was the life and soul of a party. he literally lit up a room. but, for now, this small seaside town stands together, united by a tragedy that has deeper questions to the safety of those questions for the safety of those trying to uphold democracy. francis read, bbc news. our correspondent, greg mckenzie, is in leigh—on—sea with the latest. in terms of the investigation, a 25—year—old suspect was further detained late last night — that is ali harbi ali. he has been taken to a police station in london. having been at a police station in essex. properties are being searched in the capital, three in total. the police will have until friday to question this suspect.
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we have now discovered the suspect�*s father, newspaper, says he is traumatised at learning about the arrest of his son. the father of the suspect was a former adviser to the prime minister in somalia. in terms of today, the town is still in mourning. many coming here to lay flowersjust behind me. an active crime scene still here, further down, the church where sir david was killed on friday. as for today, there will be a church service at lipm. a candlelit vigil last night. many hundreds coming out in support of sir david, to remember him. many of those at that vigil last night knew him personally. they said he loved hisjob, he was a people person, and they are trying to come to terms with what has happened here. meanwhile, the home secretary priti patel has said there are "immediate"
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security changes being offered to protect mps. political correspondent peter saull is here. the home secretary speaking this morning saying mps have been contacted about their own security. she launched a review yesterday asking police forces to contact mps in the country. there have been already measures introduced following the murder ofjo cox, the labour mp in batley and spen, in 2016, introducing things like panic alarms, shutters on offices. i think there is a consensus that does not go far enough and is patchy in the country particularly when you have mps holding surgeries in different buildings, a difficult thing to do. the home secretary was on the andrew marr programme this morning and this is what she said.— is what she said. there are ways in which we can _ is what she said. there are ways in which we can do _ is what she said. there are ways in which we can do things _ is what she said. there are ways in which we can do things differently | which we can do things differently clearly— which we can do things differently clearly around surgeries. you mentioned publicising them. moving
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from publicising appointments to pre—booking appointments, making sure appointments are checked thoroughly and backgrounds on individuals are checked. if i may say a _ individuals are checked. if i may say a lot— individuals are checked. if i may say a lot of— individuals are checked. if i may say a lot of those measures are already— say a lot of those measures are already in— say a lot of those measures are already in place. they are being looked — already in place. they are being looked at — already in place. they are being looked at again. the speaker and i are working — looked at again. the speaker and i are working through, we are doing a lot of— are working through, we are doing a lot of practical things right now, in terms — lot of practical things right now, in terms of— lot of practical things right now, in terms of advice for mps. i think it is fair— in terms of advice for mps. i think it is fair to — in terms of advice for mps. i think it is fair to say we will have to be self-aware. _ it is fair to say we will have to be self—aware, conscientious as to how we conduct — self—aware, conscientious as to how we conduct business and put safety front and _ we conduct business and put safety front and centre of this. that we conduct business and put safety front and centre of this.— front and centre of this. that was the home — front and centre of this. that was the home secretary _ front and centre of this. that was the home secretary earlier. - front and centre of this. that was| the home secretary earlier. what this underlines is the changing nature of political discourse in this country, whether we are so polarised that these things are bubbling to the surface with devastating effects. interesting to hear re devastating effects. interesting to hehr pretty -- _ devastating effects. interesting to hehr pretty -- the _ devastating effects. interesting to hear pretty -- the home - devastating effects. interesting to| hear pretty -- the home secretary hear pretty —— the home secretary saying we have to be self—aware. mps have spoken about abuse they get online and sometimes it spills into
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death threats. she was asked whether the government was looking at introducing enforcing not having anonymity on social media. she said today that is being actively looked at, although she said it needs to be proportionate because there are lots of people, whistle—blowers for example, who use anonymous accounts and that is a important part of the democratic process. i imagine that will be a feature of the debate on this in the coming days, as politics comes to terms with the tragedy on friday. comes to terms with the tragedy on frida . . ~' , ., comes to terms with the tragedy on frida . ., ,, i. ., . comes to terms with the tragedy on frida . ., ,, ., . ., ., friday. thank you. police now have until next friday _ friday. thank you. police now have until next friday to _ friday. thank you. police now have until next friday to question - friday. thank you. police now have until next friday to question a - until next friday to question a suspect in relation to the killing of sir david amess. security correspondent frank gardner has more details about the suspect. quite a few more details have emerged. in the past 2a hours, he has been rearrested under what is called section 41 of the terrorism act 2000 and transferred to a london police
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station where detectives now have until next friday to question him. he has not been charged yet. they are gathering as much evidence as they can. it is fair to assume they will be going forensically through all his data communications, his phone, laptop, his browsing history. the most important thing they will have wanted to establish early on is whether there was anyone else involved in the actions on friday. so far, there do not seem to be. in other words, he was a lone actor. we know his name is ali harbi ali. he is a 25—year—old british man of somali heritage. that is relevant because his father has been visited in london by counterterrorism police. his father, also named as harbi ali kullane, has been absolutely traumatised by this. his father was an adviser to the somali government, a senior member of that, or participant in that government,
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an upstanding member of the community, and is totally horrified and shocked at what his son is alleged to have done. we also know that the suspect was referred some years ago to a counter—radicalisation programme in the uk called prevent. it is one of the strands of the government counterterrorism strategy that aims to steer people away from a path of radicalisation and extremism. it is not always successful. he did not spend long on it and, as of last week, i am told, he was not on any of the security service mi5�*s watch lists. he was not on a list of subjects of interest. he was not a clean skin, exactly, but there is a suspicion he would have been self—radicalised, potentially, by what he saw during lockdown. but there is no evidence on this and we have to keep an open mind and not say anything that could be
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prejudicial to his trial. joining me now is the labour mp, diane abbott. welcome. i wonder how you will remember sir david amess. he welcome. i wonder how you will remember sir david amess. he was a ve kind remember sir david amess. he was a very kind man — remember sir david amess. he was a very kind man and — remember sir david amess. he was a very kind man and devoted _ remember sir david amess. he was a very kind man and devoted to - remember sir david amess. he was a very kind man and devoted to his - very kind man and devoted to his constituents. all our thoughts and prayers are with his family and friends today. we prayers are with his family and friends today.— prayers are with his family and friends toda . ~ ., ., ., friends today. we have heard from the home secretary, _ friends today. we have heard from the home secretary, speaking - friends today. we have heard from the home secretary, speaking to l friends today. we have heard from l the home secretary, speaking to the bbc about plans that might be put in place to provide more protection for mps. perhaps we may start with your experience. i know you have been subject to some horrific abuse either online or in person. talk me through what you may have to endure day to day doing the job you do. the day to day doing the 'ob you do. the last time day to day doing the job you do. tie: last time people examined day to day doing the job you do. tt2 last time people examined it, i have ten times more abuse online than any
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other member of parliament. it is horrible, very off—putting for staff and for young people who come as volunteers and there are regular death threats. 0ne volunteers and there are regular death threats. one of the things i would say about the online abuse, and also the online radicalisation. it is what the police call bedroom radicalisation, it is the social media companies could do more. they could take down some of these accounts. they could end what i call end—to—end anonymity. i was pleased to hear about this just now. of course you should be able to post on twitter and facebook anonymously, but, the social media company should hold your name and address. the name and address of everybody that uses their platform. because when i have had death threats, it has been hard
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for in the police to investigate because of this anonymity. also, people say things when they are anonymous that they would not say if they knew there was a way of finding out who they were. horse they knew there was a way of finding out who they were.— out who they were. how likely is it that will happen? _ out who they were. how likely is it that will happen? we _ out who they were. how likely is it that will happen? we have - out who they were. how likely is it that will happen? we have called i out who they were. how likely is it l that will happen? we have called for changes for so long, particularly when it comes to abuse on social media. yet social media giants are reluctant to make changes to how systems work. reluctant to make changes to how systems work-— reluctant to make changes to how systems work. they are reluctant, but it has to _ systems work. they are reluctant, but it has to happen. _ systems work. they are reluctant, but it has to happen. they - systems work. they are reluctant, but it has to happen. they cannot| but it has to happen. they cannot have a system that opens up people to racist, sexist abuse, threats of criminal action. they cannot continue with this system just because they believe they make more money if more people use their platform because they can be anonymous. tt platform because they can be anonymous-— platform because they can be anon mous. ., , ., . ., anonymous. it has to end. what im act anonymous. it has to end. what impact does _ anonymous. it has to end. what impact does that _ anonymous. it has to end. what impact does that sort _ anonymous. it has to end. what impact does that sort of- anonymous. it has to end. what impact does that sort of abuse, | impact does that sort of abuse, online or in person, have on your work, and how you go about your day—to—dayjob? tt
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work, and how you go about your day-to-dayjob?_ work, and how you go about your day-to-day job? day-to-day “ob? it does not impact m work. day-to-day “ob? it does not impact my work. it— day-to-day job? it does not impact my work. it impacts _ day-to-day job? it does not impact my work. it impacts on _ day-to-day job? it does not impact my work. it impacts on my - day-to-day job? it does not impact my work. it impacts on my mental| my work. it impacts on my mental wellbeing. it can be very traumatic. in terms of going about my day—to—dayjob and advice surgeries, i would not want to see as some have said a police officer outside my advice session. 0ne said a police officer outside my advice session. one of my colleagues in north london tried that and the numbers of people coming to the advice session dropped. i think there is more to be done by parliament working with the venues where we hold advice sessions. to make us more physically safe. for instance with screens, as you have now for covid. how do you make mps more physically safe, but allow constituents to come and see them and meet them? figs constituents to come and see them and meet them?— constituents to come and see them and meet them? as we said, the home secreta is and meet them? as we said, the home secretary is saying _ and meet them? as we said, the home
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secretary is saying she _ and meet them? as we said, the home secretary is saying she is _ and meet them? as we said, the home secretary is saying she is looking - secretary is saying she is looking at a spectrum of measures to better protect mps. what would you like to see when you hold your surgery? what would it look like if i was to come to a surgery, how would you be protected? t to a surgery, how would you be protected?— protected? i have been doing face-to-face _ protected? i have been doing face-to-face sessions - protected? i have been doing face-to-face sessions over i protected? i have been doing| face-to-face sessions over 30 protected? i have been doing - face-to-face sessions over 30 years. face—to—face sessions over 30 years. if you come to one, i am on the other side of the table from you. nowadays i have a member of staff taking notes. there is nothing to stop you leaning over the table and stabbing me to death. that is quite an unnerving thought. that is the thought, what has happened to sir david amess, brings to the mind of a lot of us. that is why parliament should cooperate with the venues where we held sessions to make sure as i say, screens are provided or otherwise to be physically secure. but i would stop short of wanting a policeman outside my advice surgery.
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good to have you with us. thanks. the home secretary, priti patel, says she is looking at a "whole spectrum" of measures to better protect mps following the death of sir david amess. a candlelit vigil was held last night in tribute to sir david, who was stabbed multiple times during a constituency surgery on friday. a princely prize — the duke of cambridge prepares to reveal the winners of a new environmental award. one of the venezuelan president nicolas maduro's closest aides has arrived in the united states to face money laundering charges after being extradited from cape verde. the us treasury says alex saab worked as a frontman for mr maduro's regime, using his accounts in american banks to launder the proceeds of corruption. he was detained injune last year as his plane made a stopover in africa to refuel. lucy grey has more details.
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colombian—born businessman, fugitive — alex saab, one of the venezuelan president's closest aides, is now in the united states facing money—laundering charges. he was extradited from cape verde after the us treasury claimed he worked as a frontman for president nicolas maduro, using his accounts in american banks to launder the proceeds of corruption. mr saab was detained injune last year as his plane made a stopover in africa to refuel. he said he was travelling on an official mission to get medical supplies to deal with the coronavirus pandemic. venezuela has reacted angrily to the extradition, accusing the us of abducting diplomatic personnel. shortly after saab's extradition, mr maduro's government suspended talks with the us—backed opposition, ahead of next month's regional elections. negotiations were due to resume this weekend in mexico with the aim of resolving a political crisis that has led to the collapse of the economy and years of chronic shortages of food and medicine.
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mr saab denies the charges against him and says they are politically motivated. the first five recipients of the earthshot prize will be announced later, during a ceremony hosted by the awards founder — the duke of cambridge. it comes after senior royals expressed frustration this week, at world leaders' lack of action on climate change. the award recognises those who have come up with the most innovative solutions to solve the world's environmental problems. each finalist will receive £1 million to try to bring their idea to life. earthshot prize council member and environmental activist hindou ibrahim spoke to me earlier. she told me why the earthshot prize is so important i think the prize, it's really very important for the world, not only for the individual who are winning it, because we are in a time of crisis, when you see all the reports come out. but when you go to the communities
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you are seeing the climate changing every day affecting the life of the peoples. at the end of the day, we can't live with it, we want to have solutions. and those peoples, those finalists, they and those people, those finalists, they are all carrying solutions that can help recover nature and that is why the prize is really very important and it is right on time in order to help us all find the solution. so very proud of all them and more proud about the prize that is set up. and talk to me a little bit about what sort of entrants you would be looking for, because these will tackle projects both big and small, some very innovative solutions, but some may be relatively simple, but they just need the funding to be rolled out on a much bigger scale. so talk to me about some of the work that is being done. that's true. you know, many people are fighting just to find a solution. it could be around ocean
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restoration, forest restoration, or savannahs, or improving the livelihoods and lives of people, all those people looking how to enhance the work that they are doing. so, for example, you know there is one who is doing the activity that can tackle not only one region, but several regions around the world, like africa, asia. so how those solutions can be scaled up. but if they don't have funding, if they don't have support, or recognition, it cannot help them to scale it up and we have also to inspire others. this is the most important thing. if someone is doing a project, it is very important for people and planet, so other persons can look at it and say, "i can do this there, or i can do this for my community, for my country. so how i can do it, i can be inspired by those persons who are doing it." so it's possible, it works.
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so we want people for small and bigger projects. are all important and everyone can learn from what each other is doing. and what will a winning entrant look like? what will push it over the line to get that prize money at the they work very hard, that's for sure, because being in the council i saw there was a lot of project applications and all are so competitive. at the end of the day, it has become very hard to choose who is the finalist and to leave the others. so you know, it is not enough money always when you see a very nice project you want to give them support. but you have also to select. you have also to choose, unfortunately. but if it was like more money, i think personally i will go for more than 100, but no, it is not, but it has been a very
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hard time for all of us to choose those who are finists. those who are finalists. it's does not mean that the others are not important, so they must continue the work they are doing for sure. hollywood union has threatened to strike from monday. the shutdown from the covid—i9 pandemic had caused a backlog that cause cruised to work ia hours a day to ensure programming. pigs have been deployed by one of europe's busiest airports to keep geese away from the farmland in between the runways. but the team, drafted in by amsterdam's schiphol airport, won't be using scare tactics.
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the bbc s correspondent in the netherlands anna holligan has been to see them in action. are pigs the new scarecrows? i think pigs are the best scarecrows you can have. they are really big, large, moving, and they are a natural way of keeping the geese away. but their greatest attribute here is their appetite. they really like to eat everything. the idea is they will gobble up leftovers from the sugar beet harvest, removing the crop residue from this freshly turned soil that usually entices the winged trespassers. this is the sugar beet. when they harvest the crop, they take the sugar beet out. they sell the crop and they leave the top of the crop, the harvest residue, over here, and the birds really like it. but the pigs are here first, so they eat it and that is why the birds fly over and search for another place. this pig patrol is being used
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in combination with technological innovations like sound generators and green lasers that spook the geese. they are watching 2a/7. we have bird detection radar. birds learn pretty fast. so we have to keep innovating with the measures. when you look around, this land is below sea level. it is fertile farmland. it is very attractive for geese especially. you are battling against nature really here. and the pigs can play a role on this front line. they sure can, yeah. these are sensitive, intelligent creatures, so i am curious about how they feel being so close to the runways. here they have like four soccer fields. they have the same houses, the same water system and feed system.
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so it is really normal to keep them this way. these snuffling swine are part of a six—week pilot project and if they are successful in keeping the birds and geese away from the runway, then similar projects could be trotted out at airports all over the world. anna holligan, bbc news. the headlines are coming up. stay with us on bbc news. hello, southerly winds will bring mild or even warm weather across the uk over the next days but warm weather does not always mean sunny weather does not always mean sunny weather and we will see cloud and rain at times. a lot of cloud at the
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moment. some rain moving eastwards, although it will turn increasingly light through the rest of the day with drizzle really through the afternoon. some brighter spells, especially in the far north of scotland and in the south of england, parts of wales and the midlands. the sunshine in the south could live temperatures up to 18—19. tonight, expect a lot of cloud which will produce rain and drizzle. it could turn quite misty in places but not a cold night with minimum temperatures between 9—13. tomorrow, we have a southerly wind. a brisk wind in the west where we will see rain. some early brightness in north—east scotland and eastern england, it will cloud over during the day as the rain moves eastwards. temperatures still above where they should be at this time of year,
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1a-18, should be at this time of year, ia—18, may be 19. those temperatures have further to climb. as we move into tuesday, this system will bring heavy rain to the west. but the winds from the south will tap into this very mild, even warm air, sending that northwards across the uk. the highest temperatures will be seen where we get sunshine. many of us will have cloud, outbreaks of rain. brisk wind in the west. the weather cloud does break. north—east scotland, south—east england, we will see sunshine. temperatures in places up to 20, possibly 21. but we do not keep those values long. 0n do not keep those values long. on wednesday, cooler air and low pressure in charge in the middle of the week bringing showers or longer spells of rain and some of the rain will be heavy. for the end of the week, the winds go round to
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northerly winds which will bring a cooldown although it might turn drierfor a time.
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