Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 18, 2021 2:00pm-4:59pm BST

2:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines... the former us secretary of state, colin powell, has died. us media say the cause of death was covid complications. we'll be hearing from the former british foreign secretary jack straw. the family of sir david amess visit the scene of his killing in essex. they say they're shattered by his death. other mps have been speaking out, about the abuse and threats they routinely endure. i've had three threats to life and limb over the last two years so of course i take it very seriously. and we need to respond to it, we need to make sure we're doing everything we can, you need to make sure we do that due diligence on everything.
2:01 pm
in the next half hour the house of commons speaker, sir lindsay hoyle, will hold a minute's silence in the house of commons. sorry, that is the wrong picture, clearly. that is a 25—year—old man who was arrested at the scene and is being questioned by police. are social media companies doing enough to tackle online hate, especially towards women? we have a special report. good news for hundreds of ford workers on merseyside, with a multi million pound investment, to make components for electric cars. and cameron norrie becomes the first british player, to win the prestigious indian wells tournament, in california. it's an amazing couple of weeks and i'm so happy with how i treated all the occasions, all the big moments,
2:02 pm
all the matches. yeah, i'm so happy, so pleased to win my biggest title. the former us secretary of state colin powell has died at the age of 8a. us media say he died of covid—19 complications. in a statement, colin powell's family say they have lost "a remarkable and loving husband, father, grandfather and a great american". colin powell was raised in the bronx and rose to become a four—star general in the us army. later, he became the first african—american secretary of state. before barack obama, he was the highest ranking african—american politician in the history of the us government. our defence correspondent jonathan beale explained the significance of his career.
2:03 pm
us secretary of state under george w bush but also us secretary of state under george w bush but also the us secretary of state under george w bush but also the 1st us secretary of state under george w bush but also the 1st black chamberlain joined bush but also the 1st black chamberlainjoined chief bush but also the 1st black chamberlain joined chief of staff which is the most senior us military position after a 35 year career in the military, the son ofjamaican immigrants, brought up in harlem, who made his mark on us politics. we will remember probably most of all him as us secretary of state if you remember him getting up at the united nations in giving that speech about the justifications for going to war with iraq, the invasion in 2003, presenting a think to his regret what was essentially faulty intelligence about iraq's so—called weapons of mass destruction. that, as i say, a point of regret but a big little figure and important because of who he was, his background and he was, as you say, the 1st black chairman of thejoint chiefs of staff and the 1st black us secretary of state. your is
2:04 pm
critical, of course, president trump later on, did not like his politics and made that very clear but he is somebody who has broken through many barriers for black americans. let's get an assessment of colin powell's life now. we can speak now to the former foreign secretary jack straw. he was the 1st african—american chief of staff, the most important soldier in america but also the most important diplomat in america, an extraordinary life, extraordinary achievement.— extraordinary life, extraordinary achievement. , ., , ., achievement. yes, he was and its to ronald reagan's _ achievement. yes, he was and its to ronald reagan's great _ achievement. yes, he was and its to ronald reagan's great credit - achievement. yes, he was and its to ronald reagan's great credit that i achievement. yes, he was and its to j ronald reagan's great credit that he was spotted when he was a low ranking officer in the military and taken into the white house to work there adding to a middle ranking position and in british terms, his career was nurtured by republicans, not by democrat but that goes back
2:05 pm
to the fact that, at the time that he was a young man, the southern democrats were the people in control in the southern states of the us. despite the fact that he was a republican, he had extraordinary link across the island was a brilliant diplomat because he always had time for people and in diplomacy, yes, of course if you are a secretary of state, you are buying break backed by far and away the most powerful military machine in the world but you still have to try to get people on site and he had good relationships notjust within the uk but also for example with a very long serving foreign minister in russia and many others who were potential adversaries. he put in a
2:06 pm
great amount of work. my wife nicknamed him the other man in her life because he used to phone at a convenient time for him which was 6 o'clock in washington just as his office was winding down before he had evening engagements where it was 11 o'clock in the uk and then i would phone him back on a sick line we had but direct so people in the state department elsewhere could not listen and we ended up having this kind of conversation particularly during the very active period of iraq and other issues 4 or 5 times a week normally at that time and i would go back to the close relationship that my wife and his wife had. they kept in touch and my last exchange of email with him was just a month ago. he was a good man
2:07 pm
and he was a great man, and leaving aside his colour, he wasi and he was a great man, and leaving aside his colour, he was i of the greatest military and diplomatic figures in american history in my view, absolutely brilliant. you mentioned — view, absolutely brilliant. you mentioned iraq _ view, absolutely brilliant. you mentioned iraq and _ view, absolutely brilliant. you mentioned iraq and it was because he was so respected as a diplomat and a soldier that when he went to the united nations in 2003 to present the case for war against iraq and against saddam hussein, he had enormous credibility and it is said later on that he regretted the way he had presented that case. he did regret it. figs he had presented that case. he did recret it. �* , �* regret it. as indeed did i. but the background _ regret it. as indeed did i. but the background to — regret it. as indeed did i. but the background to that, _ regret it. as indeed did i. but the background to that, because - regret it. as indeed did i. but the background to that, because he l regret it. as indeed did i. but the i background to that, because he was calling me while he was preparing for it was that he had been offered a script i think by vice president dick cheney's staff which he said to me with the usual soldier's lexicon was ridiculous so he then went and
2:08 pm
spent at least 2 days solidly at langley, the cia headquarters, going through all the intelligence and satisfying himself that what he was going to stand up and say in the security council turned out to be on the 5th of february 2003 was accurate and he was satisfied that it was, i happen to sit alongside him in security council for that meeting as for others, which was a matter of alphabet rather than anything else but it was later on where it emerged that our belief shared let me say across the security council, notjust by the protagonist but including by russia, china, germany, france that iraq did possess this arsenal of weapons of mass destruction which was wrong, colin obviously had great regret about that and he felt rather
2:09 pm
personally that this had been a blight on an otherwise impeccable reputation but it's my belief that people will see his career in the balance and put that against all his other extraordinary achievement. and other extraordinary achievement. and so many achievements, as you said, top format, top soldier and many people said he could have been president, actually, but he was not quite ideological enough. he was not fervent enough in his political views, do you agree with that? well. views, do you agree with that? well, he could have _ views, do you agree with that? well, he could have been _ views, do you agree with that? -ii he could have been president. we talked about this a number of times that he decided not to run because of his wife. he had a very close relationship with his wife and their children and grandchildren, and he judged that his wife would not be...
2:10 pm
so he said thanks but no thanks. but he could have stood as a republican candidate, he would have been selected and he would have won, and he used to write to me from time to time saying, had i seen his numbers? and if i had not, i had to look them up and if i had not, i had to look them up and of course what he was saying was my numbers are better than anyone else is. and they were because people trusted him and they had really good reason to trust him as well. �* , ., , , had really good reason to trust him aswell. �* , ., , , as well. and 'ust to sum up, jack straw, as well. and just to sum up, jack straw, looking _ as well. and just to sum up, jack straw, looking back _ as well. and just to sum up, jack straw, looking back on _ as well. and just to sum up, jack straw, looking back on his - as well. and just to sum up, jack straw, looking back on his wife, | as well. and just to sum up, jack l straw, looking back on his wife, so many achievements but also so many barriers broken, clearly barack 0bama broke barriers but colin powell really broke so many barriers in terms of colour in the united states. , ., ., states. yes, colin powell led the wa in states. yes, colin powell led the way in breaking _ states. yes, colin powell led the way in breaking this _ states. yes, colin powell led the way in breaking this awful- states. yes, colin powell led the way in breaking this awful ceiling above african americans and broke through itjust by a combination of
2:11 pm
determination and his own brilliance and potential goodness and greatness as well. he succeeded. it's quite remarkable career given where he came from and given the fact that he is an african—american with the wrong coloured skin and grew up at a time of the most intense racial prejudice in the united states. jack straw, prejudice in the united states. jack straw. thank _ prejudice in the united states. jack straw, thank you so much forjoining us. jack straw there, former british foreign secretary, remembering colin powell has died. let's talk to our state department correspondent barbara plett usher. barbara, tells a little bit more about what we know about the circumstances of colin powell's death. ~ ., �* ., ., ., circumstances of colin powell's death. ., ., ., ., ., death. we don't have a lot of detail but we understand _ death. we don't have a lot of detail but we understand that _ death. we don't have a lot of detail but we understand that he - death. we don't have a lot of detail but we understand that he died - death. we don't have a lot of detail but we understand that he died of i but we understand that he died of complications that came from covid 19 complications that came from covid i9 and as you've probably already heard, he was vaccinated so this was a breakthrough case and an unusuali at that because breakthrough cases usually are not as severe, they are
2:12 pm
more mild than regular cases and most often do not the lead to death. we also understand his wife had covid i9, we also understand his wife had covid 19, also vaccinated, but she responded to treatment and has recovered but he did not. you did have some underlying conditions, including parkinson's and perhaps that was i of the reasons why. and that was 1 of the reasons why. and ou've that was 1 of the reasons why. and you've covered _ that was 1 of the reasons why. and you've covered american politics and american diplomacy for many years. what is your assessment of colin powell the man? we were running through some of his extraordinary achievements there with jack straw. yeah, i rememberwell achievements there with jack straw. yeah, i remember well his speech to the security council in 2003. i was in the middle east at the time and watched it with a certain amount of scepticism even then but as mister straw was saying, he later on acknowledge that that was a blot on his career, that she regretted it and that it was in full for him and i think that was kind of the measure of the man. he was seen as someone
2:13 pm
who had great integrity, who is honest, who was a good man, notjust a good politician and who cared about people. just this week, colin powell's name came up informal discussions with the state department and he was remembered as a secretary of state who is very focused on the institution himself which is unusual as most are very interested in foreign policy and counterparts and crafting the institution and how it really needed to be brought into the 20th century and they were updating the way people did things because he had been surprised when he got there or how blind everyone was with that regard and this is how he focused what has personal focus was at the state department and that is how he is remembered has in his name comes up. is remembered has in his name comes u . _ ., ~' is remembered has in his name comes un. ., " , ., is remembered has in his name comes the widow of sir david amess
2:14 pm
has visited the church where he was stabbed and killed during a constituency surgery on friday. mps are returning to westminster for a special parliamentary session this afternoon to pay their own official tributes, and there'll be a special service at st margaret's church, in the grounds of westminster abbey. since sir david's death, a number of mps have been speaking out about the abuse and threats they receive regularly, while the home secretary has called for a review of mps security arrangements. 0ur political correspondent chris mason reports. parliament reopening this morning. mps returning here, remembering sir david amess. he was just a really nice, decent, honourable gentlemen. and for him to be taken in such a horrible and evil way isjust, frankly, hard to believe.
2:15 pm
i think a lot of people in there are numb today. a crime and a tragedy, but an attack on democracy, too. yet again, many here feel frightened and vulnerable. are some mps considering walking away from politics? yes, i do question whether... because it's notjust about me, it's about my staff and about my family as well. but i'm passionate about wanting to change the world and... and nobody is going to stop me. chris bryant received a death threat over the weekend, a man has since been arrested. every mp you speak to is asking themselves questions about their safety, particularly when they are away from the security at westminster. when the news came through about david amess, just after i had finished my surgery, i was just in profound shock thinking he had been carrying out his duties as a public servant, like all of us, and this is how his life ended. it's scary because you just don't know, even if you have security
2:16 pm
guards at surgeries, if you are walking about the town just going shopping even, even if you are not out doing yourjob as an mp this could happen because people can follow you and target you. this morning, sir david amess�* family came to see the many flowers left in his memory in essex. as his colleagues in westminster ask what can, what should change, given how much mps value face—to—face conversation with voters. we need to respond to it, we need to make sure we're doing everything we can and we need to make sure we are doing that due diligence on everything. at the end of the day, my feeling is, it is a personal one, we mustn't allow those who attack on democracy, who want to threaten us and stop us from talking to our constituents and serving our communities, we cannot allow them to win. it's just five years since flowers were last left at parliament when the labour mp
2:17 pm
jo cox was murdered. and here we are again. i am shocked it happened, but in some way to not surprised. in some ways our political discourse has got better, if you go back to 2016 and the brexit campaign if you go back to that period in the aftermath of that, while it was still up in the air, our political debate then was more toxic than it is now. but it's still pretty bad. this lunchtime, preparations for this afternoon's commemorations. as westminster reflects. a 25 year old man — ali harbi ali — is still being questioned over the killing of sir david amess. 0ur security correspondent frank gardner gave us this update on what we know about him. he is british born and raised, 25 years old, born in 96, from croydon. his parents came from somalia in the
2:18 pm
19905 his parents came from somalia in the 1990s and his father was an adviser to somalia's prime minister and that because some people to look at a possible somali connection but so far, from talking to people at whitehall, there doesn't appear to be any connection. we are told there is no connection to a prescribed somali terrorist group. detectives have him until friday, he has been rearrested under section 41 of the terrorism act 2,000 and they are going through every possible line of inquiry, looking particularly at the forensic evidence on his phone. police also recovered the weapon that was used to murder sir david amess, that was recovered from the scene, and the suspect made no attempt to flee the scene at all. witnesses at the time said that he did not utter what is known as the
2:19 pm
takbir, which is the phrase that is often mentioned in these kinds of terrorist attacks, and that his phone has been... and the police are not saying very much, there is a dearth of information. from politicians to reality tv stars, for many in the public eye, having to deal with abuse, is a fact of life and its particularly bad for women. social media is a big problem, with tech firms saying they re doing all they can to tackle online hate. but a panorama investigation, has revealed that facebook and instagram are continuing to promote content hostile to women on their platforms. here's our disinformation reporter, marianna spring. kaz was a contestant on what ireland earlier this year, she now has 450,000 followers on instagram.
2:20 pm
although she has loads of love on social media, she also gets out of hate. —— on love island. trio social media, she also gets out of hate. -- on love island.— hate. -- on love island. no one walks into _ hate. -- on love island. no one walks into an — hate. -- on love island. no one walks into an office _ hate. -- on love island. no one walks into an office and - hate. -- on love island. no one walks into an office and gets - hate. -- on love island. no one - walks into an office and gets people yelling _ walks into an office and gets people yelling abuse at them so why should it do the _ yelling abuse at them so why should it do the same thing on my instagram? a it do the same thing on my instagram?_ it do the same thing on my instagram? it do the same thing on my instauram? �* ~ ., ,, .,, instagram? a think tank has looked at abuse received _ instagram? a think tank has looked at abuse received by _ instagram? a think tank has looked at abuse received by both _ instagram? a think tank has looked at abuse received by both male - instagram? a think tank has looked at abuse received by both male and j at abuse received by both male and female contestants on love island and another reality tv show, studying over 90,000 posts and comments on finding women got more abuse than men. people were using explicitly gendered slurs, women being manipulative, sneaky, being sexual and evil or stupid. politicians are also targeted with some female mps saying they constantly receive a violent and sexualised abuse online. before socialmedia _ sexualised abuse online. before socialmedia existed, _ sexualised abuse online. before socialmedia existed, somebody| sexualised abuse online. before - socialmedia existed, somebody could get done for being threatening, in the street or in real life, for some of the things they said at the hate speech they had, the fact that they are talking directly to someone
2:21 pm
online, the fact it is through the medium of their phone, doesn't stop that being threatening. figs medium of their phone, doesn't stop that being threatening.— that being threatening. as the bbc secialist that being threatening. as the bbc specialist this _ that being threatening. as the bbc specialist this information - specialist this information reporter, i also get a lot of abuse. i'm recording this because last night i got some of the worst abuse that i've received during this job. i'm quite used to getting it now. all the main social media companies say they do not promote hate on their platforms and take action to stop it. to check this, panorama set “p stop it. to check this, panorama set up a fake profile of a man who had already set up some abuse to women on his profile and saw that facebook and instagram recommended to him some similar posts. this and instagram recommended to him some similar posts.— some similar posts. this is full of misogynistic _ some similar posts. this is full of misogynistic content _ some similar posts. this is full of misogynistic content very - some similar posts. this is full of misogynistic content very quickly | misogynistic content very quickly within two weeks.— misogynistic content very quickly within two weeks. facebook which owns instagram _ within two weeks. facebook which owns instagram says _ within two weeks. facebook which owns instagram says it _ within two weeks. facebook which owns instagram says it tries - within two weeks. facebook which owns instagram says it tries not . within two weeks. facebook which | owns instagram says it tries not to recommend content which breaks its rules and is improving its technology to find and remove abuse
2:22 pm
more quickly. they've just announced new measures to tackle sexualised hate targeting journalists, politicians and celebrities. it comes at a time when women are increasingly standing up against hate and violence both online and in the real world. i hate and violence both online and in the real world.— the realworld. i am 'ust as human and ou the realworld. i am 'ust as human and you -- _ the realworld. i am 'ust as human and you -- as h the realworld. i am 'ust as human and you -- as you — the realworld. i amjust as human and you -- as you and _ the realworld. i amjust as human and you -- as you and it _ the realworld. i amjust as human and you -- as you and it hurts - the realworld. i amjust as human and you -- as you and it hurts me | and you —— as you and it hurts me the same way it would hurt you, and i would never wish for anyone to experience it, i would never wish that at all. and you can see more on all of this on panorama, tonight, at 7.30, on bbc one. the first five recipients of the earthshot prize — founded by prince william — have been announced at a star—studded ceremony in london. the prize aims to recognise innovative solutions to climate change — the winners have been awarded one—million pounds. one of the recipients was the entire nation of costa rica. it was a country that once cleared
2:23 pm
most of its forests, but it has now doubled the number of trees and is seen as a role model for others to follow, especially in latin america. the winning project is a scheme paying local citizens to restore natural ecosystems that has led to a revival of the rainforest we hope to speak to costa rica's minister for environment and energy — andrea meza—murillo a little later. as we've been hearing, parliament will be paying tribute to sir david amess this afternoon, who was fatally stabbed in his constituency on friday. let's talk to our political correspondentjonathan blake. to bea to be a sombre afternoon in the commons and a chance for sir david's friends and family to pay tribute. it will, the first time they have come together in person since the
2:24 pm
news of sir david amess's death came on friday afternoon and they are returning from their autumn break for the party conferences by doing so in very sad circumstances and normal business has been largely suspended today here at westminster, both in the house of lords and in the house of commons, there will be presently house of commons, shortly and then in about an hour or so's time, the prime minister will stand up time, the prime minister will stand up and pay tribute to sir david amess and he will lead a full session in the commons this afternoon where members not only on the conservative side where sir david sat as a backbencher but across the house will pay tribute to him in their own words and i'm sure we will hear as we have seen online that elsewhere in the last few days, many, many heartfelt tributes to a many, many heartfelt tributes to a man who was well liked and well—respected on all sides here at westminster. well-respected on all sides here at westminster-—
2:25 pm
well-respected on all sides here at westminster. , , , ,, westminster. there must be in shock amonost westminster. there must be in shock amongst mps — westminster. there must be in shock amongst mps because _ westminster. there must be in shock amongst mps because everyone - westminster. there must be in shock amongst mps because everyone had l westminster. there must be in shock i amongst mps because everyone had set the respective politics how sir david was such a popular mp and a popular colleague in the chamber but they sense amongst mps that this could have been hit them and they are vulnerable when they go to their constituencies and wondering now what the future holds in terms of security. the owner any mp you speak to will tell you about the threats they face, the abuse they face, the intimidation they face on a daily basis for many of them and those experiences have come to the fore in the wake of sir david amess's there. it something they don't talk about in public. it shouldn't be but it is part and parcel sadly of doing the job so while sir david's death has been shocking for many of his colleagues and friends here at westminster, sadly it will not have come as too much of a surprise because we had the death ofjo cox
2:26 pm
in similar circumstances a few years ago and now this and that is why we are seeing a new conversation, renewed focus on the problem that mps face of making themselves accessible and they go about representing people who voted for them and their constituents but in doing that, putting themselves in harm's way. downing street have said today it will be a matter for individual mps and police force in the area to have the surgeries and meetings, and how to manage that, but i think there will be increased pressure to do more centrally to increase the provision that mps have for security in their constituency as they go about theirjobs as we may well hear some of that reflected in the contributions for this afternoon's session from mps in the house. and parliament will be
2:27 pm
remembering a man who was a supreme parliamentarian, he was an mp who was not particularly interested in currying favour with the government, the prime minister, did not even take the phone call sometimes of the prime minister when it was david cameron. he did not seek ministerial office, it was enough for him to be a member of parliament representing his constituents and working with mps towards because he really believed in. he mps towards because he really believed in.— mps towards because he really believed in. he was not a career oolitician believed in. he was not a career politician in _ believed in. he was not a career politician in coming _ believed in. he was not a career politician in coming to _ believed in. he was not a career. politician in coming to parliament and seeking to climb the ladder, working their way up from the very junior ranks, and the front bench position and he was in it purely to be a constituency mp and he was devoted to thatjob in thatjob alone and any opportunity who had to stand up for his area and his
2:28 pm
constituency, time and time again, calling for them to be an opportunity for their to be an achievement of city status to the amusement of a lot of its colleagues what he did that relentlessly and as you suggest, had other causes he was very committed to like animal welfare and also children with learning difficulties as well. those were the causes which he was committed to and raise that any opportunity but he represent the vast majority of mps. we don't hear from them that much, certainly not in national media but they are there day in and day out doing artwork on behalf of their constituents whether they voted for them or not. find behalf of their constituents whether they voted for them or not.- they voted for them or not. and he was the beginning _ they voted for them or not. and he was the beginning of— they voted for them or not. and he was the beginning of so _ they voted for them or not. and he was the beginning of so they's - was the beginning of so they's proceedings and here is the house of commons sir lindsay hoyle. always
2:29 pm
very sombre these parliamentary traditions but particularly today. this is something that happens every time parliament opens a session, the speaker of the house of commons as you've just seen their lindsay hoyle reading other official stewards into the house of commons, the sergeant arms carrying the maze and as you say, taking on a particularly poignant impact and a particularly sombre note to the start of proceedings in the houses of parliament today, particularly where mps will be gathered at the house of commons in some numbers, i'm sure, to take opportunity to pay their respects in person, to put into their own words the... in great respect and admiration but also out of concern for the risk that mps
2:30 pm
take on a daily basis. just of concern for the risk that mps take on a daily basis.— of concern for the risk that mps take on a daily basis. just to say after those _ take on a daily basis. just to say after those tributes _ take on a daily basis. just to say after those tributes in _ take on a daily basis. just to say after those tributes in the - after those tributes in the commons from mps, there will be a service of sir david amess at st margaret's church next to westminster abbey. yes, that service will include an address by the archbishop of canterbury, sirjustin welby, and tell that st margaret's church which is just close to the houses of parliament and many mps will make their way across to that church as soon as the session in the house of commons has finished today and that will round off what has really been a day of reflection and a day where politics is normal has been suspended and paused to allow people to pay tribute to sir david amess who has been an mp for nearly 40 years. and you're just talking there about what happens now in of security for
2:31 pm
mps and at this very much up for debate. the home secretary was talking about not wanting to necessarily lay down any specific law but looking at options and this is the second mp to die withinjust a options and this is the second mp to die within just a few years very violently and it is something that all mps must be thinking about very deeply and seriously. yes. all mps must be thinking about very deeply and seriously.— deeply and seriously. yes, and without several _ deeply and seriously. yes, and without several of _ deeply and seriously. yes, and without several of them - deeply and seriously. yes, and without several of them speak| deeply and seriously. yes, and . without several of them speak out today and be quite candid about the fact that they have fought long and —— fought long and hard about if it is a job they want to continue doing —— they have thought long and hard. not only the mps themselves but their staff and their families who would also perhaps be in harm's way and perhaps not want them to continue doing thejob and perhaps not want them to continue doing the job given the risks that they face. chris bryant, the labour mp for rhondda, has spoken out today about receiving a death threat, there has been
2:32 pm
arrested in connection with that, he said that it is the causes he believes in the passions that he has that keeps him going and others have talked in very similar terms about questioning whether they should continue to do the job i want to continue to do the job i want to continue doing thejob continue to do the job i want to continue doing the job under the current circumstances and it may be that some decide in the wake of what we saw on friday and want to sir david amess that they cannot serve any longer, whether that is in the coming weeks and months are in the next general election they decide to stand down but it is certainly a very active debate here at westminster and on the one hand, one side of that, you have people like the former conservative defence minister saying let's pause constituency surgeries, let's stop face—to—face meetings for now, there are other ways to do it online while are other ways to do it online while a review of the arrangements put in place but i think it's fair to say that viewers in the minority and most mps want to continue doing the job and want to be as accessible to their constituents as they possibly can while taking due precautions to
2:33 pm
ensure that they are trying to keep themselves safe.— ensure that they are trying to keep themselves safe. difficult dilemmas for mps. jonathan, _ themselves safe. difficult dilemmas for mps. jonathan, we _ themselves safe. difficult dilemmas for mps. jonathan, we will- themselves safe. difficult dilemmas for mps. jonathan, we will be - themselves safe. difficult dilemmas for mps. jonathan, we will be back. for mps. jonathan, we will be back with you shortly, for more tributes to sir david which will begin in the house of commons at half past 3. we are now going to talk more about the earthshot prize which aims to recognise innovative solutions to climate change. i of the winners was costa rica. joining me is costa rica's minister for environment and energy — andrea meza—murillo. thank you so much for being with us. tell us about what you are doing is a relatively small nation to try and fight climate change, especially in terms of forestation?—
2:34 pm
fight climate change, especially in terms of forestation? thank you. you have pronounced _ terms of forestation? thank you. you have pronounced my _ terms of forestation? thank you. you have pronounced my name _ terms of forestation? thank you. you have pronounced my name perfectly! | have pronounced my name perfectly! this is a small country that had a very high rate of deforestation, 20, 30 years ago, and made the right decisions at that moment. we implemented policy arrangements, some legal arrangements, and we understood that it was very important to protect nature. that nature is an asset. and that we also needed to value nature and we created this incentive, for environmental services, and with the creation of the protected areas. minister, sorry, we have got to go back to parliament. the ceremonies to remember david amess. made the bri . ht to remember david amess. made the bright memory _ to remember david amess. made the bright memory of _ to remember david amess. made the bright memory of his _ to remember david amess. made the bright memory of his bright _ to remember david amess. made the bright memory of his bright and - to remember david amess. made the bright memory of his bright and rich i bright memory of his bright and rich life ever outshine the tragic manner of his death. let us keep silence.
2:35 pm
2:36 pm
thank you. i'm sorry the house is returning — thank you. i'm sorry the house is returning in — thank you. i'm sorry the house is returning in such _ thank you. i'm sorry the house is returning in such tragic— returning in such tragic circumstances. - returning in such tragic circumstances. since . returning in such tragic. circumstances. since we returning in such tragic- circumstances. since we last returning in such tragic— circumstances. since we last met we have lost _ circumstances. since we last met we have lost two — circumstances. since we last met we have lost two outstanding _ circumstances. since we last met we have lost two outstanding friends - have lost two outstanding friends and colleagues. _ have lost two outstanding friends and colleagues. james _ have lost two outstanding friends i and colleagues. james brokenshire and colleagues. james brokenshire and of— and colleagues. james brokenshire and of course — and colleagues. james brokenshire and of course david _ and colleagues. james brokenshire and of course david amess. - and colleagues. james brokenshire and of course david amess. i- and colleagues. james brokenshire and of course david amess. i knowj and of course david amess. i know honourable — and of course david amess. i know honourable and _ and of course david amess. i know honourable and right _ and of course david amess. i know honourable and right honourable . honourable and right honourable members — honourable and right honourable members in _ honourable and right honourable members in all— honourable and right honourable members in all parts _ honourable and right honourable members in all parts of- honourable and right honourable members in all parts of this - honourable and right honourable l members in all parts of this house will share — members in all parts of this house will share my— members in all parts of this house will share my deep _ members in all parts of this house will share my deep sadness - members in all parts of this house will share my deep sadness at - members in all parts of this housei will share my deep sadness at their loss and _ will share my deep sadness at their loss and will— will share my deep sadness at their loss and will want _ will share my deep sadness at their loss and will want to _ will share my deep sadness at their loss and will want to join _ will share my deep sadness at their loss and will want to join me - will share my deep sadness at their loss and will want to join me in - loss and will want tojoin me in sending — loss and will want tojoin me in sending out— loss and will want tojoin me in sending out heartfelt— loss and will want to join me in i sending out heartfelt condolences loss and will want to join me in - sending out heartfelt condolences to their families — sending out heartfelt condolences to their families. the _ sending out heartfelt condolences to their families. the circumstances- sending out heartfelt condolences to their families. the circumstances ofl their families. the circumstances of sir david's — their families. the circumstances of sir david's death _ their families. the circumstances of sir david's death were _ their families. the circumstances of sir david's death were despicable . sir david's death were despicable and they— sir david's death were despicable and they raise _ sir david's death were despicable and they raise the _ sir david's death were despicable and they raise the most - sir david's death were despicable - and they raise the most fundamental issues _ and they raise the most fundamental issues about — and they raise the most fundamental issues about how _ and they raise the most fundamental issues about how members - and they raise the most fundamental issues about how members of - and they raise the most fundamental issues about how members of this i issues about how members of this house _ issues about how members of this house are — issues about how members of this house are able _ issues about how members of this house are able to _ issues about how members of this house are able to put _ issues about how members of this house are able to put on - issues about how members of this house are able to put on their- issues about how members of this| house are able to put on their vital democratic— house are able to put on their vital democratic responsibility— house are able to put on their vital democratic responsibility safely- house are able to put on their vitali democratic responsibility safely and securely _ democratic responsibility safely and securely in— democratic responsibility safely and securely. in light _ democratic responsibility safely and securely. in light of _ democratic responsibility safely and securely. in light of the _ democratic responsibility safely and securely. in light of the ongoing - securely. in light of the ongoing police _ securely. in light of the ongoing police investigation _ securely. in light of the ongoing police investigation i _ securely. in light of the ongoing police investigation i will- securely. in light of the ongoing police investigation i will not. securely. in light of the ongoingl police investigation i will not say more _ police investigation i will not say more about— police investigation i will not say more about the _ police investigation i will not say
2:37 pm
more about the events - police investigation i will not say more about the events but - police investigation i will not say more about the events but i - police investigation i will not sayj more about the events but i give police investigation i will not say - more about the events but i give the house _ more about the events but i give the house my— more about the events but i give the house my undertaking _ more about the events but i give the house my undertaking that - more about the events but i give the house my undertaking that i- more about the events but i give the house my undertaking that i will- more about the events but i give the house my undertaking that i will dol house my undertaking that i will do everything — house my undertaking that i will do everything within— house my undertaking that i will do everything within my _ house my undertaking that i will do everything within my power - house my undertaking that i will do everything within my power to - house my undertaking that i will doi everything within my power to make sure that _ everything within my power to make sure that these _ everything within my power to make sure that these issues _ everything within my power to make sure that these issues are _ everything within my power to make sure that these issues are treated i sure that these issues are treated with urgency _ sure that these issues are treated with urgency and _ sure that these issues are treated with urgency and with _ sure that these issues are treated with urgency and with the - sure that these issues are treated with urgency and with the sense l sure that these issues are treated i with urgency and with the sense of priority— with urgency and with the sense of priority that — with urgency and with the sense of priority that they _ with urgency and with the sense of priority that they deserve. - with urgency and with the sense of priority that they deserve. i - with urgency and with the sense of priority that they deserve. i know. priority that they deserve. i know that whatever _ priority that they deserve. i know that whatever political _ priority that they deserve. i knowl that whatever political differences there _ that whatever political differences there are — that whatever political differences there are in — that whatever political differences there are in the _ that whatever political differences there are in the house, _ that whatever political differences there are in the house, all- that whatever political differences i there are in the house, all members want to— there are in the house, all members want to make — there are in the house, all members want to make sure _ there are in the house, all members want to make sure that _ there are in the house, all members want to make sure that not - there are in the house, all members want to make sure that notjust- there are in the house, all members want to make sure that notjust that| want to make sure that notjust that we and _ want to make sure that notjust that we and our— want to make sure that notjust that we and our staff— want to make sure that notjust that we and our staff are _ want to make sure that notjust that we and our staff are able _ want to make sure that notjust that we and our staff are able to - want to make sure that notjust that we and our staff are able to work. we and our staff are able to work safely _ we and our staff are able to work safety but — we and our staff are able to work safely but that _ we and our staff are able to work safely but that our— we and our staff are able to work safely but that our democracy. we and our staff are able to work. safely but that our democracy itself with a _ safely but that our democracy itself with a local — safely but that our democracy itself with a local member— safely but that our democracy itself with a local member of— safely but that our democracy itself with a local member of parliamentl safely but that our democracy itself. with a local member of parliament at the heart _ with a local member of parliament at the heart of— with a local member of parliament at the heart of our— with a local member of parliament at the heart of our constituency - with a local member of parliament at the heart of our constituency is - the heart of our constituency is able _ the heart of our constituency is able to— the heart of our constituency is able to function _ the heart of our constituency is able to function securely. - the heart of our constituency is able to function securely. 0n . the heart of our constituency is . able to function securely. on that, i able to function securely. on that, i know— able to function securely. on that, i know the — able to function securely. on that, i know the house _ able to function securely. on that, i know the house is— able to function securely. on that, i know the house is united. - able to function securely. on that, i know the house is united. the i i know the house is united. the house — i know the house is united. the house will— i know the house is united. the house will want _ i know the house is united. the house will want to _ i know the house is united. the house will want to pay- i know the house is united. the house will want to pay tribute l i know the house is united. thel house will want to pay tribute to both sir— house will want to pay tribute to both sir david — house will want to pay tribute to both sir david and _ house will want to pay tribute to both sir david and james - house will want to pay tribute to both sir david and james and - house will want to pay tribute to both sir david and james and i. house will want to pay tribute to i both sir david and james and i hope it will— both sir david and james and i hope it will be _ both sir david and james and i hope it will be useful _ both sir david and james and i hope it will be useful if _ both sir david and james and i hope it will be useful if i _ both sir david and james and i hope it will be useful if i set _ both sir david and james and i hope it will be useful if i set out - both sir david and james and i hope it will be useful if i set out how- both sir david and james and i hope it will be useful if i set out how i- it will be useful if i set out howl expect _ it will be useful if i set out howl expect us— it will be useful if i set out howl expect us to _ it will be useful if i set out howl expect us to be _ it will be useful if i set out howl expect us to be able _ it will be useful if i set out howl expect us to be able to - it will be useful if i set out howl expect us to be able to do - it will be useful if i set out howl expect us to be able to do so. . it will be useful if i set out how ii expect us to be able to do so. on wednesday— expect us to be able to do so. on wednesday after— expect us to be able to do so. on wednesday after prime _ expect us to be able to do so. on wednesday after prime ministers| wednesday after prime ministers questions — wednesday after prime ministers questions there _ wednesday after prime ministers questions there will— wednesday after prime ministers questions there will be _ wednesday after prime ministers questions there will be an - questions there will be an opportunity— questions there will be an opportunity for— questions there will be an opportunity for tributes. questions there will be anj opportunity for tributes to questions there will be an i opportunity for tributes to be questions there will be an - opportunity for tributes to be paid tojames— opportunity for tributes to be paid to james brokenshire. _ opportunity for tributes to be paid to james brokenshire. today's- to james brokenshire. today's planned — to james brokenshire. today's planned substantive _ to james brokenshire. today's planned substantive businessl to james brokenshire. today's. planned substantive business will not be _
2:38 pm
planned substantive business will not be proceeded _ planned substantive business will not be proceeded with _ planned substantive business will not be proceeded with and - planned substantive business willl not be proceeded with and instead planned substantive business will- not be proceeded with and instead we will have _ not be proceeded with and instead we will have home — not be proceeded with and instead we will have home office _ not be proceeded with and instead we will have home office questions - will have home office questions followed — will have home office questions followed by— will have home office questions followed by an— will have home office questions followed by an opportunity- will have home office questions followed by an opportunity to i will have home office questions. followed by an opportunity to pay tribute _ followed by an opportunity to pay tribute to — followed by an opportunity to pay tribute to sir— followed by an opportunity to pay tribute to sir david, _ followed by an opportunity to pay tribute to sir david, to _ followed by an opportunity to pay tribute to sir david, to be - followed by an opportunity to payj tribute to sir david, to be opened by the _ tribute to sir david, to be opened by the prime _ tribute to sir david, to be opened by the prime minister. _ tribute to sir david, to be opened by the prime minister. at - tribute to sir david, to be opened by the prime minister. at six - by the prime minister. at six o'clock— by the prime minister. at six o'clock there _ by the prime minister. at six o'clock there will— by the prime minister. at six o'clock there will be - by the prime minister. at six o'clock there will be a - by the prime minister. at six| o'clock there will be a service by the prime minister. at six i o'clock there will be a service of prayer— o'clock there will be a service of prayer and — o'clock there will be a service of prayer and remembrance - o'clock there will be a service of prayer and remembrance to- prayer and remembrance to commemorate _ prayer and remembrance to commemorate sir- prayer and remembrance to commemorate sir david - prayer and remembrance to commemorate sir david at. prayer and remembrance to. commemorate sir david at st margaret's_ commemorate sir david at st margaret's church _ commemorate sir david at st margaret's church and - commemorate sir david at st margaret's church and i - commemorate sir david at st i margaret's church and i expect commemorate sir david at st - margaret's church and i expect the house _ margaret's church and i expect the house to— margaret's church and i expect the house to adjourn _ margaret's church and i expect the house to adjourn approximately i margaret's church and i expect the house to adjourn approximately at j house to adjourn approximately at 530, for— house to adjourn approximately at 530, for those _ house to adjourn approximately at 530, for those members— house to adjourn approximately at 530, for those members who - house to adjourn approximately at 530, for those members who wish| house to adjourn approximately at l 530, for those members who wish to attend _ 530, for those members who wish to attend the _ 530, for those members who wish to attend the service, _ 530, for those members who wish to attend the service, and _ 530, for those members who wish to attend the service, and then- 530, for those members who wish to attend the service, and then to - attend the service, and then to proceed — attend the service, and then to proceed from _ attend the service, and then to proceed from this _ attend the service, and then to proceed from this chamber- attend the service, and then to proceed from this chamber to i attend the service, and then to. proceed from this chamber to st margaret's _ proceed from this chamber to st margaret's i_ proceed from this chamber to st margaret's. i note _ proceed from this chamber to st margaret's. i note many- proceed from this chamber to st l margaret's. i note many members proceed from this chamber to st - margaret's. i note many members want to speak— margaret's. i note many members want to speak and — margaret's. i note many members want to speakand if— margaret's. i note many members want to speakand if we — margaret's. i note many members want to speak and if we can _ margaret's. i note many members want to speak and if we can bear— margaret's. i note many members want to speak and if we can bear that - margaret's. i note many members want to speak and if we can bear that in - to speak and if we can bear that in mind, _ to speak and if we can bear that in mind, it— to speak and if we can bear that in mind, it will— to speak and if we can bear that in mind, it will help _ to speak and if we can bear that in mind, it will help us— to speak and if we can bear that in mind, it will help us all— to speak and if we can bear that in mind, it will help us all that - to speak and if we can bear that in mind, it will help us all that we i mind, it will help us all that we -et mind, it will help us all that we get it— mind, it will help us all that we get it on— mind, it will help us all that we get it on the _ mind, it will help us all that we get it on the record _ mind, it will help us all that we get it on the record and - mind, it will help us all that we get it on the record and just- mind, it will help us all that we i get it on the record and just say, there _ get it on the record and just say, there will— get it on the record and just say, there will be _ get it on the record and just say, there will be books _ get it on the record and just say, there will be books of— get it on the record and just say, i there will be books of condolence for members _ there will be books of condolence for members to _ there will be books of condolence for members to sign— there will be books of condolence for members to sign along - there will be books of condolence for members to sign along with l there will be books of condolence i for members to sign along with staff as welt _ for members to sign along with staff as welt so. — for members to sign along with staff as well. so, please, _ for members to sign along with staff as well. so, please, let— for members to sign along with staff as well. so, please, let us— for members to sign along with staff as well. so, please, let us now- for members to sign along with staffl as well. so, please, let us now move to a question — as well. so, please, let us now move to a question to— as well. so, please, let us now move to a question to the _ as well. so, please, let us now move to a question to the home _ as well. so, please, let us now move to a question to the home secretary. studio: _ to a question to the home secretary. studio: the — to a question to the home secretary. studio: the speak— to a question to the home secretary. studio: the speak in— to a question to the home secretary. studio: the speak in the _ to a question to the home secretary. studio: the speak in the house - to a question to the home secretary. studio: the speak in the house of. studio: the speak in the house of commons there remembering david
2:39 pm
amess and also james brokenshire iron who died recently of lung cancer. saying what a despicable killing it had been of sir david, and that he would do everything in his power to make sure that these issues of the security of mps is treated with urgency, and that the democracy as expressed by the local mp meeting their constituency has to be able to function securely, he said. the commons speaker outlining that this afternoon there will be a couple of hours for mps, friends and colleagues of sir david, to express their tributes and express their thanks to him and to talk about him as a politician and a parliamentarian who never sought ministerial office, and for him it was enough to be a member of parliament, representing his constituents. after those tributes they will be a service of prayer and remembrance for sir david at st margaret's church next to
2:40 pm
westminster abbey which will begin at six o'clock this evening. we will have full coverage here on bbc news of those events this afternoon, of those tributes from sir david's parliamentary colleagues, beginning at 330, we will bring you that live here. in the meantime, back to the discussion of the earthshot awards and the awarding of one of these prizes to costa rica. joining me is costa rica's minister for environment and energy — andrea meza—murillo. i'm sure you understand why we had to interrupt you for those tributes and the minute's silence, but you were telling us what your country has done in terms of fighting climate change. it is a lead that many countries will say that others should follow, especially a country like brazil, which has seen a lot of
2:41 pm
destruction of its rainforest. thank ou. our destruction of its rainforest. thank you. our condolences _ destruction of its rainforest. thank you. our condolences to _ destruction of its rainforest. thank you. our condolences to the - destruction of its rainforest. thank. you. our condolences to the country and his family. we understood that it was so critical to stop the deforestation and we implemented policies, legal arrangements and incentives, and we understood the nature that nature is an asset, and we need to give nature this value, which means nature can be the centre of our economic model. we created this method, the indigenous communities are doing conservation, and the land owners, we also continuing work on the protection of our protected areas. there are two elements, to understand the public park but also that we need to work with private landowners and with this vision we managed to stop
2:42 pm
deforestation at that moment and right now, what we are seeing is how can we take this model and do the conservation of our ocean which is our next frontier. you conservation of our ocean which is our next frontier.— conservation of our ocean which is our next frontier. you have done so much work — our next frontier. you have done so much work on _ our next frontier. you have done so much work on trees _ our next frontier. you have done so much work on trees and _ our next frontier. you have done so l much work on trees and reforestation but now you are turning your attention elsewhere. is this you and your government or the people of your government or the people of your country who are behind this fight against climate change? do you all see this as something important? this is something that we have understood as a whole, as a society. this is something that it is in our values and it is so important to understand that this is not about one government or the other, it is about long—term policies, and that we really need to implement them with this long—term vision and right now, what we are seeing is decarbonisation, protection of oceans, and it is where we need to
2:43 pm
improve the model, these are the new challenges. improve the model, these are the new challenoes. ~ ., ., , improve the model, these are the new challenoes. . ., ., , ., ., challenges. what does it mean to get this award from _ challenges. what does it mean to get this award from prince _ challenges. what does it mean to get this award from prince william's - this award from prince william's earthshot scheme? it shines a spotlight on what you have been doing, and if we had not had that, we might not have heard about what you are doing, and the role that it is playing in fighting climate change. is playing in fighting climate chance. ~ ., is playing in fighting climate chance. . ., is playing in fighting climate chance. ~ ., ., ., . change. we are so honoured. we were so ha . change. we are so honoured. we were so happy and — change. we are so honoured. we were so happy and excited, _ change. we are so honoured. we were so happy and excited, the _ change. we are so honoured. we were so happy and excited, the president i so happy and excited, the president was there, and the whole country, it is a bit, what we felt, when we have the soccer team and we have our national team, and it was a success, it is the direction we had as a country. so proud and grateful to the prince and the royal foundation because it is great what they are doing. it is a recognition because there is a lot of good innovations over the decades and we know that we
2:44 pm
are going to win this fight. shall over the decades and we know that we are going to win this fight. gill of are going to win this fight. all of this 'ust are going to win this fight. all of this just before _ are going to win this fight. all of thisjust before the _ are going to win this fight. all of thisjust before the cop26 - are going to win this fight. all of thisjust before the cop26 summit in this just before the cop26 summit in glasgow and we have heard that some countries are not even bothering to send their leaders to that summit. do you think what you are doing there and all the publicity it has had could play an important role in persuading other countries to take more action? i persuading other countries to take more action?— persuading other countries to take more action? i absolutely think so. this is the whole _ more action? i absolutely think so. this is the whole of _ more action? i absolutely think so. this is the whole of society - this is the whole of society approaching this and i know when you have all the young people with these demands and you have the engagement of local governments, then some of the leaders will pay attention. glasgow needs to be a success. it is a very critical meeting. we will be working to address and have that success as well.— working to address and have that success as well. congratulations to ou and success as well. congratulations to you and your _ success as well. congratulations to you and your country. _ success as well. congratulations to you and your country. that - success as well. congratulations to you and your country. that is - success as well. congratulations to you and your country. that is the i you and your country. that is the costa rican ministerfor you and your country. that is the costa rican minister for environment and energy. thanks forjoining us.
2:45 pm
let's return to the breaking news this afternoon that the former us secretary of state colin powell has died at the age of 84. in a statement, his family say they have lost "a remarkable and loving husband, father, grandfather and a great american". we can talk now to david manning, a former british ambassador to the us. thanks forjoining us. he was a great american. the first african—american to become the top soldier and the top diplomat in america and many say he could have been president as well. it is america and many say he could have been president as well.— been president as well. it is a very sad moment- _ been president as well. it is a very sad moment. he _ been president as well. it is a very sad moment. he was _ been president as well. it is a very sad moment. he was a _ been president as well. it is a very sad moment. he was a great - been president as well. it is a very - sad moment. he was a great american, and he brokejust about sad moment. he was a great american, and he broke just about every possible glass ceiling that it would be possible to break for an african—american. he was national security adviser under ronald reagan and he became chairman of thejoint chiefs of staff is and the first ?
2:46 pm
under the first president bush and then after a timeout who became the secretary of state under the second president bush. so the only great office of state he might have had that he didn't was to become president. there was lots of talk about him running for president and in the end i think may be forfamily reasons he didn't do that. but it is extraordinary care for the son of immigrantjamaican parents brought immigrant jamaican parents brought up immigrantjamaican parents brought up in the bronx who got to the very top of american public life and then political life. and quite apart from his professional accomplishments, there was just the extraordinary gift of personality. he was an extremely nice man, if that does not sound but now, he was always very open and humorous. easy with everyone, whether they were princes or paupers, and just an exceptional person in every way. i
2:47 pm
or paupers, and just an exceptional person in every way.— person in every way. i was talking to jack straw _ person in every way. i was talking to jack straw earley _ person in every way. i was talking to jack straw earley about - person in every way. i was talking to jack straw earley about his - person in every way. i was talking to jack straw earley about his life | to jack straw earley about his life and we were talking about colin powell's regret about the way he presented the case for war against iraq in 2003, going to the united nations and persuading the un, or trying to, that saddam hussein had weapons of mass destruction. it was always said that he regretted that, that he felt that was a blot on his career, what is your view of that whole episode in his career? he didn't whole episode in his career? he: didn't regret it, he said he did. it does cast a shadow and it would be foolish to pretend it didn't. it is important to remember that colin powell found himself very much a centrist in his political sympathies and in an administration which was basically much more to the right than he was himself. i think he, after all, use the famous phrase,
2:48 pm
you break it, you own it, about invading iraq, and he warned the administration what they were taking on. as a former soldier he knew what it was like to fight on the ground. he had done it in the first gulf war. it was not theoretical for him, it was real. but i think as a good soldier, in the end he did what the administration asked of him, what the president asked of him, and i suspect he produced that intelligence and i think it was in fabry 2003 at the united nations, in good faith, and then found it did not stack up, and as a man of great integrity, he must have greatly regretted that, but having said that, i think it is very important that, i think it is very important that we don'tjust remember colin powell over the iraq issue. so much more to this man and so much more that he did. while people will inevitably be talking about the iraq dimension, there is so much more to this extraordinary african—american
2:49 pm
story than that. igrate this extraordinary african-american story than that-— this extraordinary african-american story than that. we began by talking about whether _ story than that. we began by talking about whether he _ story than that. we began by talking about whether he could _ story than that. we began by talking about whether he could have - story than that. we began by talking about whether he could have been i about whether he could have been president. do you think because he was quite a bipartisan figure, he wasn't very ideological, was that one of the reasons may be that he never sought the white house? i don't know, to be honest. i never discussed that in those terms with him. at the time it was said that his family did not want him to run for president. they felt, i think, that he had done enough in public life and they did not want to run the risks, there would have been risks, notjust in terms of the amount of time it would have taken out of his personal life but also risks of violence against him and his family. it is very hard to know but i think he would have been a very remarkable candidate, and i'm not necessarily saying he would have won, but he was very much where you placed him, in the centre of
2:50 pm
american politics and i think he would have had great appeal across the aisle as they say in the us, both to republicans and democrats, is a great figure. 5ir both to republicans and democrats, is a great figure.— is a great figure. sir david manning. _ is a great figure. sir david manning, thanks - is a great figure. sir david manning, thanks for- is a great figure. sir david manning, thanks for your | is a great figure. sir david - manning, thanks for your memories is a great figure. sir david _ manning, thanks for your memories of colin powell. david manning, former ambassador to the united states, many thanks. the ford motor company, is investing more than £200 million in its halewood plant on merseyside, to build power units for electric vehicles. partly funded by the government, it will be the first dedicated factory, assembling components for electric cars in europe, safeguarding 500 jobs. our business correspondent, ben king, has the full story. ford has been making cars in north—west england for more than a century. but in nine years time, the company will make petrol and diesel things of the past. the new era will be electric and it starts at this plant in halewood on merseyside.
2:51 pm
electric power units, motoring transmission in one, will start rolling off the production lines in 2024. this is our first investment in electrified components in europe. 500 people we have in halewood today, this will secure the future of those jobs for the foreseeable future. so, great news for the people in halewood. it is a small part of ford's plan to go electric. a £230 million investment, some of which is government money. it is spending billions on two plants in the usa in kentucky and tennessee. but it comes off the back of nissan investing billions in its factory in sunderland. which sees the emergence of over a thousand jobs. the plan see the construction of a gigerfactory, the giant battery facility which makes up such an important part of the manufacture of electric cars. the more investments
2:52 pm
we have like that, the more it will draw in other components into the electric vehicle supply chain. we are in the transition phase from internal combustion to electric. once you start the momentum, like with this investment, it will attract more companies in. the owner of vauxhall is also investing 100 million at its plant in ellesmere port. but critics say it is still not enough. what we are seeing is other european countries are racing ahead in building battery plants, clean technology, new vehicle production and comparatively there's limited action in the uk. the electric future of the uk car industry is far from assured. but today's news is another important step on the road. a teenager has been arrested, in connection with the death of a 14—year—old boy at a railway station in glasgow. justin mclaughlin was stabbed on saturday, and died in hospital. police scotland has begun a murder inquiry, saying a 16—year—old boy has been arrested, in connection with the attack.
2:53 pm
scotland's covid passport scheme has come into force today — a fortnight after it was first introduced on a voluntary basis, to give venues more time to prepare. proof of full vaccination will be required for entry into big events — including concerts and football matches. a negative test result won't be accepted as an alternative. rescue efforts have been stepped up in the southern indian state of kerala, following devastating flooding. at least 26 people, including five children have died, and many more are missing. homes have been swept away by the rising floodwaters, and there have been landslides, after days of heavy rain. here's our south asia correspondent, rajini vaidyanathan. every year, this region braces itself for monsoon season. once again, the forces of nature are showing no mercy. heavy rainfall and landslides have left a devastating and deadly mark
2:54 pm
on the southern state of kerala. as rivers overflow, villages have been cut off. "this was my livelihood", this shopkeeper says. "now, everything is gone." rescuers have been retrieving the bodies of the dozens who have died. many of the victims were young. officials say they've found three children who had been buried together under the mud, holding onto each other. translation: the hill broke off near us, there's been _ a lot of damage and loss. the house is gone, children have gone, the water came in our homes. that's when they moved us here. with many homes submerged, relief camps have been set up. to many in kerala, these scenes evoke painful memories of 2018 when the state experienced the worst floods in a century. leaving 400 people dead and hundreds of thousands displaced.
2:55 pm
experts say that in the last two decades the number of cyclones over the arabian sea have doubled due to rising sea temperatures. a changing climate and a cycle of devastation, and with more heavy rain forecast in the coming days, it looks like the misery could continue. rajini vaidyanathan, bbc news. a bronze disc, believed to be the world's oldest map of the stars, is to go on display at the british museum in the new year. the nebra skydisc, discovered in germany in 1999, is understood to be more than 3,500 years old. it measures around 30 centimetres, with gold symbols representing the sun, moon and stars, which are thought to have been objects of worship. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. over the week ahead we will find some very big temperature fluctuations and to explain why we need to look at the upper level winds and this is where the jet is
2:56 pm
today. we are on the warmer side of thatjet today. we are on the warmer side of that jet stream so today. we are on the warmer side of thatjet stream so we are drawing in milder airfrom the thatjet stream so we are drawing in milder air from the south, thatjet stream so we are drawing in milder airfrom the south, and thatjet stream so we are drawing in milder air from the south, and with a long sea track the milder is bringing in a lot of cloud as you can see. that cloud is producing some rain as it moves from west to east. this is where we have got most of the rain by the end of the afternoon into the early evening at those temperatures are still 15—18 so very mild. the rain over east anglia and the south—east will clear away slowly through the evening and the wetter weather in northern scotland pushes through but there could be a few breaks in the cloud for while leading to some mist and fog patches but then the cloud thickens late in the night. another dose of rain in the western side of the uk. mild air it's a minimum temperatures 12—14. a lot of cloud tomorrow and more rain around, especially in the morning for wales and northern england, pushing north into scotland. showers in northern ireland and it gets wet late in the south—west of england. ahead of that rain it should slowly brighten up through east anglia and the south
2:57 pm
east in particular, temperatures making 20—21, or typical of early summer. very mild 17—18 typically. on wednesday, more rain in the forecast and that will be moving northwards primarily over england and wales, it may be thunderstorms as well, some sunshine either side of the rain, temperatures not as high on wednesday. rain coming into northern scotland which will be significant because behind that we have got much cooler air coming our way for the rest of the week and with some stronger winds it will certainly feel very different. if we look at where the jet stream is by the time we get to wednesday and thursday, starting to come in from the north, and that means we will be on the cooler side, and that is why the damages are going to be dropping. we still have some wet weather to start the day ? the temperatures are going to be dropping. that will slowly move away and then the showers will come chasing intimate some of those will be heavy and they could well be wintry over the higher ground, across northern and western parts, and also windy. more from the north
2:58 pm
on wednesday, it could touch gale force around north sea coasts and that will make it feel much colder and around eight in northern scotland and 13 in southern parts of finland. ? england.
2:59 pm
3:00 pm
this is bbc news. the headlines... let us keep silent. a minute's silence is held in the house of commons to commemorate sir david amess. the circumstances of sir david's death were despicable and raise the most fundamental issues about how members of this house are able to perform their vital democratic responsibility safely and securely. it comes after his family visited the scene of his killing in essex. they say they're shattered by his death. borisjohnson will lead tributes to the mp shortly
3:01 pm
the former us secretary of state colin powell has died. us media say the cause of death was covid complications. are social media companies doing enough to tackle online hate, especially towards women? we have a special report. good news for hundreds of ford workers on merseyside, with a multi million pound investment, to make components for electric cars. and cameron norrie becomes the first british player to win the prestigious indian wells tournament, in california. it's an amazing couple of weeks and i'm so happy with how i treated all the occasions, all the big moments, all the matches. yeah, i'm so happy, so pleased to win my biggest title.
3:02 pm
mps are at westminster this afternoon for a special parliamentary session to pay their own official tributes to sir david amess who was stabbed and killed during a constituency surgery on friday. there'll also be a special service at st margaret's church, in the grounds of westminster abbey. since sir david's death, a number of mps have been speaking out, about the abuse and threats they receive, while the home secretary has called for a review of mps security arrangements, and in the past half hour, the house of commons has fallen silent in his memory. maybe bright memory of his richer life ever outshine the tragic manner of his death. let us keep silence.
3:03 pm
thank you. i'm sorry the house is returning — thank you. i'm sorry the house is returning in — thank you. i'm sorry the house is returning in such tragic
3:04 pm
circumstances. since we last met, we have lost _ circumstances. since we last met, we have lost two — circumstances. since we last met, we have lost two outstanding friends and colleagues, sir david amess and sirjames _ and colleagues, sir david amess and sirjames broke in shia. i know honourable and right honourable members all areas of the house will share _ members all areas of the house will share a _ members all areas of the house will share a deep sadness at the loss and want to— share a deep sadness at the loss and want tojoin— share a deep sadness at the loss and want tojoin me in sending out... condolences _ want tojoin me in sending out... condolences to their families. the circumstances of sir david's death were _ circumstances of sir david's death were despicable and they raise the most _ were despicable and they raise the most fundamental issues about how members _ most fundamental issues about how members of this house are able to perform _ members of this house are able to perform are vital democratic responsibility are safely and securely. in light of the ongoing police _ securely. in light of the ongoing police investigation, iwill securely. in light of the ongoing police investigation, i will not say more _ police investigation, i will not say more about the event but i give the house _ more about the event but i give the house my— more about the event but i give the house my undertaking and i will do everything — house my undertaking and i will do everything within my power to ensure that these _ everything within my power to ensure that these issues are treated with urgency— that these issues are treated with urgency and with the sense of priority— urgency and with the sense of priority that they deserve.
3:05 pm
let's talk to the conservative mp for beaconsfield, joy morrissey. i know we will heal tributes from mps in the chamber but perhaps you want to pay a tribute to sir david amess because you worked with him and he was a close colleague. it was and he was a close colleague. it was a wonderful— and he was a close colleague. it was a wonderful man, _ and he was a close colleague. it was a wonderful man, a _ and he was a close colleague. it was a wonderful man, a very _ and he was a close colleague. it was a wonderful man, a very gentle - and he was a close colleague. it was| a wonderful man, a very gentle man, always kind and generous to those in the new intake and to everyone and he always had a wonderful sense of humour. i know that they will be missed by all of us.— humour. i know that they will be missed by all of us. there was one incident to — missed by all of us. there was one incident to do _ missed by all of us. there was one incident to do with _ missed by all of us. there was one incident to do with a _ missed by all of us. there was one incident to do with a debate - missed by all of us. there was one incident to do with a debate about| incident to do with a debate about qatar and camels. he incident to do with a debate about qatar and camels.— incident to do with a debate about qatar and camels. he was... he was alwa s qatar and camels. he was... he was always making _ qatar and camels. he was... he was always making everyone _ qatar and camels. he was... he was always making everyone laugh - qatar and camels. he was... he was always making everyone laugh and l qatar and camels. he was... he was. always making everyone laugh and he did a debate on qatar and talked about how the prince said that mackie admire the prince was my camel so much that when he returned, there was a camel from the prince and we all sort of stood there and
3:06 pm
burst out in laughter and the chairman of the westminster hall then said, i think we will refer to you now as to camel —— refer to you now as two camel amess. he will be missed. �* , ~ , now as two camel amess. he will be missed. �* _ ~ , ., ., now as two camel amess. he will be missed. _ ~ ., , , now as two camel amess. he will be missed. �* _ ~ ,., ., , ,., missed. and by mps on all sides of the house because _ missed. and by mps on all sides of the house because he _ missed. and by mps on all sides of the house because he crossed - missed. and by mps on all sides of the house because he crossed the. the house because he crossed the political divide ? might unite political divide ? might unite political divide ? might unite political divide due to the things he cared about was that he had strong opinions on his own but he worked with mps of all parties. mackie did and he spoke out about issues ? mac he mackie did and he spoke out about issues ? ma— issues ? mac he did and he spoke out. as someone _ issues ? mac he did and he spoke out. as someone who _ issues ? mac he did and he spoke out. as someone who spoke - issues ? mac he did and he spoke out. as someone who spoke on i issues ? mac he did and he spoke i out. as someone who spoke on the monarchy society and she really cared about local issues. he
3:07 pm
monarchy society and she really cared about local issues.- monarchy society and she really cared about local issues. he did not seek climbing _ cared about local issues. he did not seek climbing the _ cared about local issues. he did not seek climbing the greasy _ cared about local issues. he did not seek climbing the greasy pole - cared about local issues. he did not seek climbing the greasy pole up i cared about local issues. he did not. seek climbing the greasy pole up the career ladder, and it said that he didn't even sometimes take a call from the prime minister. h0. didn't even sometimes take a call from the prime minister.- didn't even sometimes take a call from the prime minister. no, i think ou 'ust from the prime minister. no, i think you just wanted _ from the prime minister. no, i think you just wanted to _ from the prime minister. no, i think you just wanted to serve _ from the prime minister. no, i think you just wanted to serve the - from the prime minister. no, i think you just wanted to serve the people | you just wanted to serve the people of southend and that really does make you seem that in the out pouring of respect and the tributes to him. he wasjust pouring of respect and the tributes to him. he was just a pouring of respect and the tributes to him. he wasjust a very pouring of respect and the tributes to him. he was just a very loved, gentle soul, a good, family man. a good catholic. and what we wanted to be as backbench mps. —— what we all want to be. be as backbench mps. -- what we all want to be— want to be. how worried are you that this is the second _ want to be. how worried are you that this is the second colleague - want to be. how worried are you that this is the second colleague to - want to be. how worried are you that this is the second colleague to have i this is the second colleague to have lost their life violently? what do you think needs to change? will anything change? will more security make you more remote from the constituents you serve? iovate make you more remote from the constituents you serve?- make you more remote from the constituents you serve? we can still be available — constituents you serve? we can still be available to _ constituents you serve? we can still be available to the _ constituents you serve? we can still be available to the constituents - constituents you serve? we can still be available to the constituents and| be available to the constituents and use a reasonable security. there are many things in place that some of us
3:08 pm
just have not followed up with, quite frankly, and we will be doing that now and i'll be taking greater steps to monitor my own security but i think it is very important to meet constituents, to be visible, to be with those that we represent and i think it's one of the most important parts of thejob think it's one of the most important parts of the job and they really enjoy doing it and will continue to do it. ~ ., enjoy doing it and will continue to do it. . ., ., enjoy doing it and will continue to doit. ., , ., ~, do it. what about the abuse that mps net? i've do it. what about the abuse that mps get? i've been _ do it. what about the abuse that mps get? i've been telling _ do it. what about the abuse that mps get? i've been telling us— do it. what about the abuse that mps get? i've been telling us since - do it. what about the abuse that mps get? i've been telling us since sir- get? i've been telling us since sir david's death, so many mps have spoken about the torrent of abuse they get, really vicious hate and mps of all parties, it's really alarming, isn't it? but what can be done about that? tell me about your own experience of that. find own experience of that. and something _ own experience of that. and something you _ own experience of that. and something you just - own experience of that. jifyc something you just accept as own experience of that. fific something you just accept as part of thejob. i don't even report the death threats for myself any more, it's only if they are directed to my family and i think the worst to me was in 2017 and i had death threats,
3:09 pm
people vandalising our house, the office, my volunteers, people telling us that we should have our throats slit and be in the ground, and these are just part and parcel of the sort of political climate that we are in.— of the sort of political climate that we are in. should you accept those? should _ that we are in. should you accept those? should you _ that we are in. should you accept those? should you just _ that we are in. should you accept those? should you just say - that we are in. should you accept those? should you just say it - that we are in. should you accept those? should you just say it is l those? should you just say it is part and parcel of the climate? should that not be challenged? l should that not be challenged? i think this, i hope, willallow should that not be challenged? i think this, i hope, will allow us to look at how we can raise the level of debate and that we can go back to a level of discourse where we can disagree but the civil to one another and that is very important that we remember how to do that and do not become so polarised that we forget we are all human beings at the end of the day.— forget we are all human beings at the end of the day. good to talk to ou, the end of the day. good to talk to you. thank — the end of the day. good to talk to you. thank you _ the end of the day. good to talk to you, thank you for _ the end of the day. good to talk to you, thank you for your _ the end of the day. good to talk to you, thank you for your time - the end of the day. good to talk to | you, thank you for your time ahead of those tributes to sir david. a 25 year old man — ali harbi ali — is still being questioned over the killing of sir david amess.
3:10 pm
our security correspondent, frank gardner gave us this update on what we know about him. he is british born and raised, 25 years old, born in 96, grew up in croydon. his parents came from somalia in the 1990s and his father was an adviser to somalia's prime minister and that caused some people to look at a possible somali connection but so far, from talking to people at whitehall, there doesn't appear to be any connection we are told to a prescribed somali terrorist group. detectives have him until friday, he has been rearrested under section 41 of the terrorism act 2000 and they are going through every possible line of inquiry, looking particularly at the forensic evidence on his phone. police also recovered the weapon that was used to murder sir david amess, that was recovered from the scene, and the suspect made no attempt to flee the scene at all. witnesses at the time
3:11 pm
said that he did not utter what is known as the takbir, which is the cry that is often mentioned injihadist terrorist attacks, and that his phone has been... taken away by the police are not saying very much, there is a dearth of information. the former us secretary of state colin powell has died at the age of 84. us media say he died of covid complications. in a statement, colin powell's family say they have lost "a remarkable and loving husband, father, grandfather and a great american". colin powell was raised in the bronx and rose to become a four—star general in the us army.
3:12 pm
later, he became the first african—american secretary of state. before barack obama, he was the highest ranking african—american politician in the history of the us government. the former british foreign secretary jack straw told us that colin powell had an extraordinary ability to get on with people across the political spectrum. it's to ronald reagan's great credit that he was spotted when he was a middle ranking officer in the military and taken into the white house to work there again at a middle ranking position, and then british terms, it is sort of ironic that his career was nurtured by republicans, not by democrats, but that goes back to the fact that, at the time that he was a young man, the time that he was a young man, the southern democrats were the people in control of the southern
3:13 pm
states of the us, the republicans were ready to go there and despite the fact he was a republican, he had extraordinary links across the aisle and he was a brilliant diplomat because he always had time for people and in diplomacy, yes, if you are a secretary of state, you're backed bye—bye far and away the most powerful military machine in the world but you still have to get people on site and he had good relationships notjust with the uk but also for example with a very long serving foreign minister in russia and many others who were potential adversaries. and he was incomparable with the amount of work you put in. incomparable with the amount of work ou out in. , incomparable with the amount of work ou outin. , , you put in. many people said he could be president _ you put in. many people said he could be president but - you put in. many people said he could be president but perhaps| you put in. many people said he l could be president but perhaps he was not quite ideological enough, not fervent enough in his political views, do you agree with that? foretell.
3:14 pm
views, do you agree with that? well, he could have _ views, do you agree with that? .ii he could have been president. we talked about this a number of times that he decided not to run because of his wife and he had a very close relationship right until the end with his wife and his children and grandchildren. hejudged that his wife would not be able to bear it. so he decided to say thanks but no thanks but otherwise there is no denying he would have... could have stood as a republican. he would have been elected and he would have run, and he —— he would have won. and he used to write to me asking if i'd seen his numbers and if i had not i had to look up and what he was saying was they were better than anyone else's and they were because people trusted him and they had very good reason to trust him as well. and just to sum up, looking back on
3:15 pm
his life, so many achievements but so many barriers broken, clearly barack obama broke barriers but colin powell really broke so many in terms of colour in the united states. ., ., ._ states. colin powell led the way in breakin: states. colin powell led the way in breaking this _ states. colin powell led the way in breaking this awful _ states. colin powell led the way in breaking this awful feeling - states. colin powell led the way in breaking this awful feeling above i breaking this awful feeling above african americans and broke through itjust by a combination of determination and his own brilliance and potential goodness and greatness as well. and he succeeded. it's quite remarkable his career given where he came from and given the fact that he is an african—american, had the wrong colour of skin, and we are at a time of the most intense racial prejudice in the united states. racial pre'udice in the united states. ., �* , ., states. former british foreign
3:16 pm
secretary jack _ states. former british foreign secretary jack straw _ states. former british foreign secretary jack straw there. i states. former british foreign - secretary jack straw there. former president george w bush has paid tribute as well to colin powell saying he was a great public servant and such a friend of presidents that he earned the presidential medal of freedom twice. suzanjohnson cook was the first female and african—american to hold the position of us ambassador for international religious freedom. she met and worked with colin powell during her six year tenure at the white house. thank you so much for being with us and perhapsjust give thank you so much for being with us and perhaps just give us your memories of colin powell, the man and the politician.— and the politician. thank you for havin: and the politician. thank you for having me- _ and the politician. thank you for having me- my _ and the politician. thank you for having me. my condolences - and the politician. thank you forj having me. my condolences first missus alma powell and the children and grandchildren, and my remembrances are that he was with my class of white house fellowships 1993- 94, class of white house fellowships 1993— 94, one of my colleagues. and every week we had lunches with the of the world and colin powell was
3:17 pm
one that we look forward to coming and having lunch with us, very casual and also very formal, showing his life story. my remembrances are number one that he was all the other white house fellows, served as one himself, was from the bronx, new york, and i was from the bronx, new york. so we bonded as bronx i. and as my —— bonded as bronxites. but i remember the power principle is where he made his determination that this is how we are going in and this is what you're going to do, and he did it, and he followed through, so is leadership was admired by not just those in the military but those
3:18 pm
of us watching and as you see he came out and created global, leadership and that is how he sat with us. we were leaders just trying to find out how government works, how the world worked and he gave us his time and his talent. lastly, i remember him because the 100 black men of new york under the leadership of... honoured me and colin powell... and again we were the two bronxites sitting next to each other and it was great to just be in bronxites sitting next to each other and it was great tojust be in his presence and he had that human touch and to have his greatness, i am so glad i was able to sit beside him,
3:19 pm
walk beside him but also sit and learn from him, there is my remembrances and i'm so grateful for the life of colin powell, may he rest in peace and continue to live on. his legacy does live. what rest in peace and continue to live on. his legacy does live.- on. his legacy does live. what is his legacy? _ on. his legacy does live. what is his legacy? tot _ on. his legacy does live. what is his legacy? tot was _ on. his legacy does live. what is his legacy? tot was about - on. his legacy does live. what is his legacy? tot was about that i his legacy? tot was about that because you're both from the bronx in both broken glass ceilings in a respect but he was american's top diplomat, top soldier and as a black man that is an extraordinary achievement. we heard how he could have been president earlier. that achievement. we heard how he could have been president earlier.- have been president earlier. that is what made him _ have been president earlier. that is what made him great _ have been president earlier. that is what made him great was - have been president earlier. that is what made him great was that - have been president earlier. that is what made him great was that his i what made him great was that his legacy as he made decisions that will good for his life. this family was important to him, he knew
3:20 pm
running for presidency would take its toll on his life and his family but he also in his legacy is that he backs young leaders and he was america's diplomat, he did not have backs young leaders and he was am term; diplomat, he did not have backs young leaders and he was am term ambassador. 9 did not have backs young leaders and he was am term ambassador. hei not have backs young leaders and he was am term ambassador. he had: have backs young leaders and he was am term ambassador. he had other the term ambassador. he had other terms, secretary of state he wasn't because i was a us ambassador, i just tried to follow in his footsteps, just knowing that when you go to a country, you are... breaking it and there are many lives that were broken because of war and other things are learning as a dip that how you go into a country is how you receive the mission back to being on assignment, you're not there because you're popular, you're there because you're popular, you're there because you're on a mission and i learned those things from him and i believe that it is legacy. he understood what he was called to do and he did it with greatness and with great fervour, and i will always be grateful that i was able to follow such a man and his leadership. to follow such a man and his leadership-— to follow such a man and his leadershi-. �* ., , ., . ., leadership. and he was a reluctant warrior but — leadership. and he was a reluctant warrior but i did support - leadership. and he was a reluctant warrior but i did support the - leadership. and he was a reluctant warrior but i did support the war| warrior but he did support the war in 2003 against saddam and the best decision at the time you can and what is great about ms is transparency that he came back and said he regret making that decision and also he was transparent about his education and he said, look, i am not a west point graduate, i —— i could have got in... but because of rotc, he climbed his way to the top and he earned his position so those
3:21 pm
are the kind of things we talk about with legacy that not everyone is born to a certain family and has a silver spoon handed to them, some people work their way to the top and only respect of the world, and he was one of those leaders that earned the respect not only of the united states was of the world, he is a world leader and will be missed. and a great american asses family have said. thank you your time. that was memories of sir colin powell who has died at the age of 94 in the united states. from politicians to reality tv stars, for many in the public eye, having to deal with abuse, is a fact of life and its particularly bad for women. social media is a big problem, with tech firms saying they re doing all they can to tackle online hate. but a panorama investigation, has revealed that facebook and instagram are continuing to promote content hostile to women on their platforms. here's our specialist disinformation reporter, marianna spring. kaz was a contestant
3:22 pm
on love island earlier this year. as a social media influencer, she now has 850,000 followers on instagram. although she gets lots of love on social media, she also gets a lot of hate. instagram is my workplace. no—one walks into your office and has people yelling abuse at them, do they? so why should it be the same thing on my instagram? the think tank demos has looked at the abuse received by both male and female contestants on love island and another reality tv show. they studied more than 90,000 posts and comments. and found women got far more abuse than men. people were using explicitly gendered slurs. women being manipulative, women being sneaky, women being sexual and women being evil or stupid. politicians were also targeted with some female mps saying they constantly receive violent and sexualised abuse online. before social media existed, you know, somebody could get done for being threatening. for being threatening in the street, for being threatening in real life for some of the things that they said and the hate speech that they had. the fact that they're talking
3:23 pm
directly to someone online, the fact that it's through the medium of their phone, doesn't stop that being threatening. as the bbc�*s specialist disinformation reporter, i also get a lot of abuse. so i'm recording this because last night i got some of the worst abuse i've received during thisjob, really. i'm quite used to getting it now. all the main social media companies say they don't promote hate on their platforms and take action to stop it. to test this, panorama set up a fake profile of a man who'd already shown some hostility to women on his profile. and found facebook and instagram recommended him more and more anti—woman content. some involving sexual violence. this profile, if it were a real person, would have been brought into a hateful community full of misogynistic content very, very quickly within two weeks. facebook, which also owns instagram,
3:24 pm
says it tries not to recommend content that breaks its rules and is improving its technology to find and remove abuse more quickly. they've just announced new measures to tackle sexualised hate targeting journalists, politicians and celebrities. it comes a time when women are increasingly standing up against hate and violence both online and in the real world. i am just as human as you, and it hurts me in the same way as this would hurt you, and i would never wish for anyone to experience it. i would never wish that at all.
3:25 pm
but isn't revealing how much. their european president says it's good news for staff on merseyside. these are the power units take the energy from the traction that drives the pot but it is that combined in 500 people we have inhaled it today which will really secure the future of those jobs for the foreseeable future, so great news for people inhaled. we have a great workforce, excellent labour relations, very productive plans, good quality, and we did get support from the uk government, the automotive transformation fund and we are really pleased about that but we also had the technology inhaled,
3:26 pm
precision gear, machining that we need to produce the components and we are happy to make that choice. almost three million, six hundred thousand covid booster jabs have been administered in a month according to the latest nhs england figures. two in five people aged 50 and over who are eligible have come forward. the health secretary says the boosters �*it will help keep the virus at bay'. but there are concerns around the number of cases, hospitalisations and deaths which remain higher in the uk than elsewhere in western europe. we can speak now to azeem majeed, a professor of primary care and public health at imperial college london. how important is the bristol programme? element very important. we know that acting immunity does wane over time and we know these boosters can really increase your immune levels and protect against serious illness and death, so they are essential for people of high
3:27 pm
risk of death or those with complex medical problems. the data from the nhs suggests only half of those eligible over 80 who are some of the most older people in society. does it worry you? it most older people in society. does it worry you?— it worry you? it is a concern because _ it worry you? it is a concern because we _ it worry you? it is a concern because we are _ it worry you? it is a concern | because we are approaching it worry you? it is a concern - because we are approaching winter of the risk from viral infections as greatest and it's very important to be vaccinated for when winter hits us. it is going a bit slowly and we need to try and speed up the process as soon as possible. do need to try and speed up the process as soon as possible.— as soon as possible. do you think there is a psychological— as soon as possible. do you think there is a psychological reason? i as soon as possible. do you think i there is a psychological reason? do people think it's all over? i think the pandemic has been and gone? there are two main reasons and that is one factor. the government to relax most rows back injuly, people think that we are getting 45,000 cases per day which is still a very high number. the second reason is to cut back a number of acting sites earlier in the year, a lot of
3:28 pm
surgeries were running vaccine surgeries were running vaccine surgeries and many have been shot down by the nhs. we have to look at how we deal with vaccines and do that as soon as possible. that how we deal with vaccines and do that as soon as possible.- that as soon as possible. at the other end _ that as soon as possible. at the other end of — that as soon as possible. at the other end of the _ that as soon as possible. at the other end of the age _ that as soon as possible. at the other end of the age spectrum, | that as soon as possible. at the - other end of the age spectrum, the 12- 15 other end of the age spectrum, the 12— 15 —year—olds, good uptake in scotland but not so much in england. does that for you as well? it is very worrying _ does that for you as well? it is very worrying because - does that for you as well? it 3 very worrying because we are seeing large outbreaks in schools and the spread to other members of the family which is parents or grandparents. they are needing to attend walk—in centres as well rather than waiting for people to come to the schools which is a very slow process so far.— slow process so far. what are your thou . hts slow process so far. what are your thoughts about _ slow process so far. what are your thoughts about the _ slow process so far. what are your thoughts about the winter - slow process so far. what are your thoughts about the winter ahead? | thoughts about the winter ahead? what's afoot that we could be hit by a double whammy of resurgent covid and research in flu. it
3:29 pm
a double whammy of resurgent covid and research in flu.— and research in flu. it will be a tou:h and research in flu. it will be a tough winter. _ and research in flu. it will be a tough winter. it _ and research in flu. it will be a tough winter. it is _ and research in flu. it will be a tough winter. it is important i and research in flu. it will be a| tough winter. it is important to that we vaccinate people against covid and flu, and also things like wearing face masks, being in cautious environments and having a hard winter for the cautious environments and having a hard winterfor the uk. goad cautious environments and having a hard winter for the uk.— cautious environments and having a hard winter for the uk. good to talk to ou as hard winter for the uk. good to talk to you as ever- _ cameron norrie has become the first briton to win the indian wells title afterfighting back from a set and break down in california. the british number one won in three sets to win the men's singles title. he'll now rise to 16th in the world rankings. he gave his reaction after the match. well, he did give his reaction but we haven't got it so there you go. you will get that for you a little bit later on but what we have got, just as important, may be more important, as the weather with darren. hello, it's a mild day today and it could be even warmer for tomorrow. with that mild air comes a lot of cloud and some
3:30 pm
rain and drizzle around. these are the temperatures late afternoon into the early evening and this is where we have got most of the rain, clearing slowly through the evening away from east anglia and the south—east, the rain scooting away from scotland. there could be a few breaks in the cloud for a while with some mist and patchy fog but then the cloud thickens later and we get some more rain, mainly coming into western areas. mild air, cloudy air, so temperatures 12— 14, and it looks pretty cloudy for many tomorrow. going to find some more rain, especially affecting wales and northern england in the morning, pushing northwards into scotland. showers returning to northern ireland and wetter in the south—west later. ahead of that rain it should brighten up a bit over east anglia and the south—east in particular, and temperatures will be more like summer sort of values, 20—21. pretty mild elsewhere generally, 17—18. more rain to come on wednesday. thursday and friday, with a northerly wind, though, it will feel an awful lot colder. hello, this is bbc news.
3:31 pm
the headlines: let us keep silence. a minute's silence is held in the house of commons to commemorate sir david amess. we can go to go to the chamber where tributes are being paid to sir david amess. , , ., amess. our focus this afternoon should be _ amess. our focus this afternoon should be on _ amess. our focus this afternoon should be on sir— amess. our focus this afternoon should be on sir david's - amess. our focus this afternoon should be on sir david's life - amess. our focus this afternoon should be on sir david's life and | should be on sir david's life and his contribution— should be on sir david's life and his contribution to _ should be on sir david's life and his contribution to our - should be on sir david's life and i his contribution to our democracy. nearly— his contribution to our democracy. nearty four— his contribution to our democracy. nearly four decades— his contribution to our democracy. nearly four decades in _ his contribution to our democracy. nearly four decades in this - his contribution to our democracy. | nearly four decades in this house, there _ nearly four decades in this house, there was— nearly four decades in this house, there was second _ nearly four decades in this house, there was second to _ nearly four decades in this house, there was second to none - nearly four decades in this house, there was second to none in- nearly four decades in this house, there was second to none in his i there was second to none in his determined _ there was second to none in his determined commitment- there was second to none in his determined commitment to - there was second to none in his determined commitment to his| determined commitment to his constituents, _ determined commitment to his constituents, firstly— determined commitment to his constituents, firstly as - determined commitment to his constituents, firstly as the - determined commitment to his - constituents, firstly as the member for basildon — constituents, firstly as the member for basildon between _ constituents, firstly as the member for basildon between 1983 - constituents, firstly as the member for basildon between 1983 and - constituents, firstly as the memberj for basildon between 1983 and 1997 and then— for basildon between 1983 and 1997 and then since _ for basildon between 1983 and 1997 and then since then _ for basildon between 1983 and 1997 and then since then as— for basildon between 1983 and 1997 and then since then as the - for basildon between 1983 and 1997 and then since then as the memberj and then since then as the member for southend — and then since then as the member for southend west. _ and then since then as the member for southend west. he _ and then since then as the member for southend west. he was - and then since then as the member
3:32 pm
for southend west. he was a - and then since then as the member. for southend west. he was a tireless member— for southend west. he was a tireless member in_ for southend west. he was a tireless member in making _ for southend west. he was a tireless member in making sure _ for southend west. he was a tireless member in making sure that - for southend west. he was a tireless member in making sure that the - for southend west. he was a tireless. member in making sure that the voice of his— member in making sure that the voice of his constituents _ member in making sure that the voice of his constituents was _ member in making sure that the voice of his constituents was heard - member in making sure that the voice of his constituents was heard in - of his constituents was heard in this chamber~ _ of his constituents was heard in this chamber. it— of his constituents was heard in this chamber. it is— of his constituents was heard in this chamber. it is difficult- of his constituents was heard in this chamber. it is difficult to i this chamber. it is difficult to believe — this chamber. it is difficult to believe that— this chamber. it is difficult to believe that we _ this chamber. it is difficult to believe that we will- this chamber. it is difficult to believe that we will not - this chamber. it is difficult to believe that we will not hearl this chamber. it is difficult to - believe that we will not hear him make _ believe that we will not hear him make the — believe that we will not hear him make the case _ believe that we will not hear him make the case for— believe that we will not hear him make the case for southend - believe that we will not hear him - make the case for southend achieving city status _ make the case for southend achieving city status. before _ make the case for southend achieving city status. before the _ make the case for southend achieving city status. before the next _ make the case for southend achieving city status. before the next recess. i city status. before the next recess. he worked — city status. before the next recess. he worked equally— city status. before the next recess. he worked equally hard _ city status. before the next recess. he worked equally hard outside - city status. before the next recess. he worked equally hard outside of. he worked equally hard outside of the chamber— he worked equally hard outside of the chamber for— he worked equally hard outside of the chamber for his _ he worked equally hard outside of the chamber for his constituents, | the chamber for his constituents, always— the chamber for his constituents, always going _ the chamber for his constituents, always going the _ the chamber for his constituents, always going the extra _ the chamber for his constituents, always going the extra mile - the chamber for his constituents, always going the extra mile to i the chamber for his constituents, i always going the extra mile to make sure their— always going the extra mile to make sure their case — always going the extra mile to make sure their case was _ always going the extra mile to make sure their case was heard _ always going the extra mile to make sure their case was heard and - always going the extra mile to make sure their case was heard and their. sure their case was heard and their needs— sure their case was heard and their needs were — sure their case was heard and their needs were met _ sure their case was heard and their needs were met. he _ sure their case was heard and their needs were met. he used - sure their case was heard and their needs were met. he used his - sure their case was heard and their needs were met. he used his skills as a parliamentarian _ needs were met. he used his skills as a parliamentarian to _ needs were met. he used his skills as a parliamentarian to pilot - as a parliamentarian to pilot numerous _ as a parliamentarian to pilot numerous pieces— as a parliamentarian to pilot numerous pieces of- as a parliamentarian to pilot i numerous pieces of legislation as a parliamentarian to pilot - numerous pieces of legislation onto the statute — numerous pieces of legislation onto the statute books, _ numerous pieces of legislation onto the statute books, reflecting - numerous pieces of legislation onto the statute books, reflecting his - the statute books, reflecting his political— the statute books, reflecting his political priorities _ the statute books, reflecting his political priorities such - the statute books, reflecting his political priorities such as - the statute books, reflecting his political priorities such as fuel i political priorities such as fuel poverty— political priorities such as fuel poverty and _ political priorities such as fuel poverty and of— political priorities such as fuel poverty and of course - political priorities such as fuel poverty and of course animal. poverty and of course animal welfare _ poverty and of course animal welfare he _ poverty and of course animal welfare. he was _ poverty and of course animal welfare. he was much - poverty and of course animal welfare. he was much morel poverty and of course animal- welfare. he was much more admired poverty and of course animal— welfare. he was much more admired as a member— welfare. he was much more admired as a member of— welfare. he was much more admired as a member ofthe— welfare. he was much more admired as a member of the panel— welfare. he was much more admired as a member of the panel of— welfare. he was much more admired as a member of the panel of chairs, - a member of the panel of chairs, respected — a member of the panel of chairs, respected across— a member of the panel of chairs, respected across this _ a member of the panel of chairs, respected across this house - a member of the panel of chairs, respected across this house for i a member of the panel of chairs, i respected across this house for his fairness _ respected across this house for his fairness and — respected across this house for his fairness and expertise, _ respected across this house for his fairness and expertise, and - respected across this house for his fairness and expertise, and i- respected across this house for his| fairness and expertise, and i would also like _ fairness and expertise, and i would also like to— fairness and expertise, and i would also like to thank— fairness and expertise, and i would also like to thank the _ fairness and expertise, and i would also like to thank the speakers - fairness and expertise, and i would. also like to thank the speakers from around _ also like to thank the speakers from around the — also like to thank the speakers from around the world _ also like to thank the speakers from around the world who _ also like to thank the speakers from around the world who have - also like to thank the speakers from around the world who have sent - around the world who have sent messages — around the world who have sent messages of— around the world who have sent messages of support _ around the world who have sent messages of support including i messages of support including speaker— messages of support including speaker nancy—
3:33 pm
messages of support including speaker nancy pelosi - messages of support including speaker nancy pelosi and - messages of support including - speaker nancy pelosi and speaker smith— speaker nancy pelosi and speaker smith of— speaker nancy pelosi and speaker smith of australia _ speaker nancy pelosi and speaker smith of australia along _ speaker nancy pelosi and speaker smith of australia along with - speaker nancy pelosi and speakerl smith of australia along with many more _ smith of australia along with many more who— smith of australia along with many more who wanted _ smith of australia along with many more who wanted to _ smith of australia along with many more who wanted to let _ smith of australia along with many more who wanted to let us - smith of australia along with many more who wanted to let us know i smith of australia along with many. more who wanted to let us know that congress _ more who wanted to let us know that congress and — more who wanted to let us know that congress and the _ more who wanted to let us know that congress and the australian - congress and the australian pariiament— congress and the australian parliament are _ congress and the australian parliament are thinking - congress and the australian parliament are thinking of i congress and the australian i parliament are thinking of us, david's — parliament are thinking of us, david's family— parliament are thinking of us, david's family and _ parliament are thinking of us, david's family and everyone i parliament are thinking of us, | david's family and everyone at parliament are thinking of us, - david's family and everyone at this time _ david's family and everyone at this time on— david's family and everyone at this time on a — david's family and everyone at this time. on a personal— david's family and everyone at this time. on a personal level, - david's family and everyone at this time. on a personal level, david. david's family and everyone at this i time. on a personal level, david was a lovely— time. on a personal level, david was a lovely man — time. on a personal level, david was a lovely man he _ time. on a personal level, david was a lovely man. he was— time. on a personal level, david was a lovely man. he was well— time. on a personal level, david was a lovely man. he was well liked - time. on a personal level, david was a lovely man. he was well liked by. a lovely man. he was well liked by members — a lovely man. he was well liked by members and _ a lovely man. he was well liked by members and staff— a lovely man. he was well liked by members and staff alike. - a lovely man. he was well liked by members and staff alike. during i a lovely man. he was well liked by. members and staff alike. during his almost _ members and staff alike. during his almost four— members and staff alike. during his almost four decades _ members and staff alike. during his almost four decades here, - members and staff alike. during his almost four decades here, he - members and staff alike. during his almost four decades here, he built. members and staff alike. during his| almost four decades here, he built a reputation _ almost four decades here, he built a reputation for — almost four decades here, he built a reputation for kindness, _ almost four decades here, he built a reputation for kindness, generosity, | reputation for kindness, generosity, sustained _ reputation for kindness, generosity, sustained by— reputation for kindness, generosity, sustained by his _ reputation for kindness, generosity, sustained by his faith, _ reputation for kindness, generosity, sustained by his faith, david - reputation for kindness, generosity, sustained by his faith, david was - reputation for kindness, generosity, sustained by his faith, david was a i sustained by his faith, david was a devoted _ sustained by his faith, david was a devoted man— sustained by his faith, david was a devoted man to _ sustained by his faith, david was a devoted man to his _ sustained by his faith, david was a devoted man to his family, - sustained by his faith, david was a devoted man to his family, as - sustained by his faith, david was a. devoted man to his family, as much as we _ devoted man to his family, as much as we will— devoted man to his family, as much as we will miss _ devoted man to his family, as much as we will miss a _ devoted man to his family, as much as we will miss a much _ devoted man to his family, as much as we will miss a much loved - devoted man to his family, as much as we will miss a much loved fellowj as we will miss a much loved fellow parliamentarian, _ as we will miss a much loved fellow parliamentarian, the _ as we will miss a much loved fellow parliamentarian, the loss— as we will miss a much loved fellow parliamentarian, the loss felt - as we will miss a much loved fellow parliamentarian, the loss felt by. parliamentarian, the loss felt by his wife — parliamentarian, the loss felt by his wife and _ parliamentarian, the loss felt by his wife and their— parliamentarian, the loss felt by his wife and their children - parliamentarian, the loss felt by his wife and their children is- his wife and their children is unimaginable. _ his wife and their children is unimaginable. i— his wife and their children is unimaginable. i know- his wife and their children is unimaginable. i know the i his wife and their children is- unimaginable. i know the whole his wife and their children is— unimaginable. i know the whole house will want _ unimaginable. i know the whole house will want to— unimaginable. i know the whole house will want tojoin— unimaginable. i know the whole house will want to join me _ unimaginable. i know the whole house will want tojoin me in _ unimaginable. i know the whole house will want tojoin me in sending - unimaginable. i know the whole house will want tojoin me in sending them i will want tojoin me in sending them our deepest — will want tojoin me in sending them our deepest condolences. _ will want tojoin me in sending them our deepest condolences. i- will want tojoin me in sending them our deepest condolences. i now- will want tojoin me in sending them our deepest condolences. i now call| our deepest condolences. i now call the prime _ our deepest condolences. i now call the prime minister. _ our deepest condolences. i now call the prime minister. [— our deepest condolences. i now call the prime minister.— the prime minister. i beg to move that this house _ the prime minister. i beg to move that this house do _ the prime minister. i beg to move that this house do now— the prime minister. i beg to move that this house do now adjourn. i the prime minister. i beg to move i that this house do now adjourn. the passing of 72 hours has done little
3:34 pm
to numb the shock and sadness we all felt when we heard of the tragic and senseless death of sir david amess. this house has lost a steadfast servant, we have lost a dearfriend and colleague. and julia and her children have lost a loving husband and devoted father. nothing i or anyone else can say it will lessen the pain, the grief, the anger, they must feel at this darkest of times. we hold them in our hearts today and we mourn with them and we grieve alongside them. sir david was taken from us in a contemptible act of violence, striking at the core of what it is to be a member of this house and violating the sanctity both of the church in which he was killed and the constituency surgery
3:35 pm
thatis killed and the constituency surgery that is so essential to our representative democracy. but we will not about the manner of his death in any way to detract from his accomplishments as a politician or as a human being. because sir david was a patriot who believed passionately in this country, in its people, in its future. he was also one of the nicest, kindest and most gentle individuals ever to grace these benches. a man who used his decades of experience to offer friendship and support to new members of all parties, whose views often confounded expectations and defied easy stereotype. and who believed notjust in out what was wrong with society, in getting on and doing something about it. ? but
3:36 pm
in getting on. it was that determination to make this country a better place that inspired his outstanding record on behalf of the vulnerable and voiceless. the master of the private members bill and the ten minute rule bill, he passed legislation on subjects as diverse as animal welfare, fuel poverty, and the registration of driving instructors. he was a prodigious campaignerfor instructors. he was a prodigious campaigner for children with learning disabilities and for women with intimate rotas, a condition on which he became an expert after meeting a woman at one of his constituency surgeries. behind the famous and irresistible smile lay a seasoned campaigner of verve and grit. whether he was demanding freedom for the people of iran or courting votes in the west minster
3:37 pm
dog of the year contest. ? westminster. whether he was battling for brexit or finding his way to the front of the parliamentary pancake race and as every member of the house will know, as you have just confirmed, mr speaker, he never once witnessed any achievement by any resident of southend that could not somehow be cited in his bid to secure city status for that distinguished town. highlights of that bulging folder included a world record for playing the most triangles at once, a group of stilt—walkers travelling nonstop from the essex coast to downing street, and a visiting foreign dignitaries allegedly flouting protocol by saying he liked southend more than cleethorpes. laughter a compelling case, mr speaker, and as it is only a short time since sir
3:38 pm
david last but that there are a case to me in this chamber, i am happy to announce that her majesty has agreed that southend will be accorded the city status it so clearly deserves. that sir david spent almost 40 years in this house but not one day in ministerial office tells everything about where his priorities lay. he was not a man in all of this chamber nor one who sought pension age or advancement, he simply wanted to serve the people of essex ? sort patronage. first in basildon and then in southend and it was in the act of serving his constituents that he was so cruelly killed. in his recent men what he called surgeries
3:39 pm
are part of the great british tradition of the people openly meeting their elected politicians ? recent memoir. even after the murder ofjo cox and the savage attacks on stephen timms and nigeljones, he refused to accept that he should be in any way deterred from speaking face—to—face with his constituents. and so when he died he was doing what he firmly believed was the most important part of any mp's job, offering help to those in need. in the awful moments before we knew the full horror of the tragedy, a member of his constituency association, her voice breaking with emotion, told an interviewer that we need him, the country needs him. and we do. this
3:40 pm
country needs him. and we do. this country needs him. and we do. this country needs people like sir david, this house needs people like sir david and our politics needs people like sir david. dedicated, passionate, firm in his beliefs but never anything less than respectful for those who thought differently. those are the values he brought to a lifetime of public service. there can be few among us morejustified than him in his deep faith in the resurrection of the life to come. and while his death leaves a vacuum that will not and could never be filled, we will cherish his memory, we will celebrate his legacy, and we will never allow those who commit acts of evil to triumph over the democracy and the parliament that sir david amess love so much. ?
3:41 pm
loved. , ., , , ., , ., loved. the question is this house do now adjourn- — loved. the question is this house do now adjourn- i _ loved. the question is this house do now adjourn. i now _ loved. the question is this house do now adjourn. i now caught _ loved. the question is this house do now adjourn. i now caught the i loved. the question is this house do. now adjourn. i now caught the leader of the _ now adjourn. i now caught the leader of the opposition, _ now adjourn. i now caught the leader of the opposition, keir— now adjourn. i now caught the leader of the opposition, keir starmer- now adjourn. i now caught the leader of the opposition, keir starmer ? ii of the opposition, keir starmer ? i now call~ _ of the opposition, keir starmer ? i now call~ in— of the opposition, keir starmer ? i now call. ., , ._ , now call. in the last few days there have been many — now call. in the last few days there have been many tributes _ now call. in the last few days there have been many tributes to - now call. in the last few days there have been many tributes to sir i have been many tributes to sir david, from politicians of all parties, from his constituents and members of the public, from friends and from family, and from faith leaders, especially the catholic church of which he was such a devoted follower. each tribute paints its own picture of a committed public servant, of kindness, and of a committed public servant, of kindness, and ofa man committed public servant, of kindness, and of a man whose decency touched everybody that he met. taken together, these tributes are a powerful testimony to the respect, the affection and yes, the love that david was held in across politics
3:42 pm
and across different communities. together they speak volumes about the man that he was and that loss that we grieve. sir david was a dedicated parliamentarian and his loss is felt profoundly across this house. we are united in our grief at this terrible time. we are thinking of david and his family. we are thinking once again of our dear friend jo cox who was killed just five short years ago and i know that honourable members and their staff will have spent the weekend worrying about their own safety. the emotion is the same across the house. but i rememberjust how is the same across the house. but i remember just how acutely the loss ofjo cox was felt on these benches, so today, on behalf of the entire labour party, i want to lean across,
3:43 pm
to reach across and to acknowledge the pain that is felt on the opposite benches. and i do. of course our differences matter, after all that is what democracy is about, but today we are reminded that what we have in common matters far more. i spoke tojo cox's parents on friday afternoon because i knew that they would be reliving that terrible day. they said to me, they were thinking of david's family and how their lives would be changed forever. so today, as the prime minister has said, this house holds in our hearts david's wifejulia, his children, catherine, david union, sarah, and florence ? david,
3:44 pm
sarah and florence and all of those who loved him. we cannot begin to imagine what they are going through but our thoughts, our love, and our prayers, are with them. i also thank those who did everything they good to save his life at our emergency services who run towards danger to protect us. ijust services who run towards danger to protect us. i just want to take a moment to think about, for everyone to think about david's staff, and what they must be going through. this parliament that david loved so much has lost one of its finest advocates, his colleagues have lost advocates, his colleagues have lost a dearfriend, and the people of southend i have lost one of their own. sir david was a dedicated constituency mp. when i visited southend on saturday i was struck by the affection and regard he was held in by everybody i met. he rejected
3:45 pm
ministerial office to focus on southend. and we'll remember his historic battle to see it given city status and i'm so pleased by the announcement of the primary said just make a fitting tribute to the hard work of sir david, ? announcement the prime ministerjust said. he passed a bill which forced action on fuel poverty and he paved the way for better standards of fire safety and delivered protections for animal welfare. safety and delivered protections for animalwelfare. no safety and delivered protections for animal welfare. no tribute has emerged in recent days that resonates more vividly than that of his former parliamentary staffer edward holmes. he was in his first job out of university, and he forgot to tell sir david about an urgent call that the then prime minister david cameron had made and he said he felt terrified until he finally plucked up the courage to tell david. his response was typical.
3:46 pm
don't worry about that, edward. so relaxed was david that mr holmes suspect for he never actually called the prime mr back ? suspects he never actually called the prime minister back. that suggests he would put his people before his party and his patch before his personal advancement. even as a political opponent, he was a man and a politician we can all learn so much from. i use that phrase political opponent very deliberately because david held his believes passionately but gently. and i believe that not only can we learn from that, but we have a duty to learn from that. civility matters and it matters in politics. we must
3:47 pm
not lose sight of the fact that david's killing was an act of terror in our country. we can't help today but think ofjo cox, andrew pennington, pc keith palmer, who lost his life defending all of us in this place in 2017. we thank god that the memberfor this place in 2017. we thank god that the member for east ham is with us in the chamber today. and that the member for west lancashire would—be attackers were stopped in their tracks. would—be attackers were stopped in theirtracks. i would—be attackers were stopped in their tracks. i know that politicians across the country and across this house have got their own experiences of threats to their security. today is a chance to remember david back in the weeks and days to come up we must confront the threats and violence that everyone faces in enacting this country's democracy. it is too early to
3:48 pm
comment on the exact circumstances of david's killing but i want to finish by saying this, a cowardly attack on a public servant doing his job is an attack on our country and on our way of life. a way of life that prizes tolerance, democracy and respect, that accept our differences but cherishes our commonalities. that refuses to succumb to the poison of extremism. no matter what perverted because, faith or ideology, that these attackers support, their intention is always the same, to sow division amongst us. and that is why our response must always be to show that we will never be cowered, and that our bombs to each other can never be eroded, but ? that our bonds to each other can
3:49 pm
never be eroded, that the hatred can never be eroded, that the hatred can never win. never be eroded, that the hatred can neverwin. lead never be eroded, that the hatred can never win. lead us use the memory of sir david's life and his passion is to recommit ourselves in standing for the things that he stood for, the things that extremists will never comprehend. the decency in our disagreements, for kindness in our hearts, for our great democracy, and for the hope that through it we can make our country and our world a better place. thank you, mr speaker. mark fran ois. better place. thank you, mr speaker. mark fran ois-— mark fran ois. thank you, mr speaker- _ mark fran ois. thank you, mr speaker- sir— mark fran ois. thank you, mr speaker. sir david _ mark fran ois. thank you, mr speaker. sir david amess i mark fran ois. thank you, mr| speaker. sir david amess was mark fran ois. thank you, mr i speaker. sir david amess was my mark fran ois. thank you, mr - speaker. sir david amess was my best and oldest friend in politics. so i confess that i'm out hurting
3:50 pm
terribly and i hope the house will forgive me if because of that might contribution this afternoon is even more incoherent than usual. i certainly cannot match those two beautiful and if i may so extremely moving tributes from the prime minister and the leader of the opposition. thank you. everything i ever learned about how to be a constituency mp, i learned from david amess. he sponsored me for the candidates list and he meant awed me when i arrived and without him i would never have become a member of parliament soaked some would argue he has much to answer for parliament soaked some would argue he has much to answerfor ? so some would argue. i grew up in basildon, the working class state when he was the working class state when he was the local mp and he helped me to campaign, to win an election onto basildon council, quite a robust place to learn your trade, once
3:51 pm
described as the only local authority in britain where a council meeting has the councillors actively heckling the public gallery... laughter i was there. trust me, i'm a politician. in return i rang his ? ran his ground in his iconic defence of basildon in 1992, and during that can pay the late paul channon came down from southend to help and we were out canvassing on a council estate and we knocked on this door and this monster of a bloke opened and this monster of a bloke opened and he looked at us both and he looked that us and said, conservatives, tory? you must be bloodyjoking. i'm voting for that david amess, he said. and i said,
3:52 pm
well done. my partner olivia and myself were due to be on his table at the southend west conservatives annual dinner. on the day that he was killed. but david is now our our fallen colleague and our deepest of these are with his widowjulia and his five children who produced the most amazingly courageous statement yesterday. the essence of which i think is that love must conquer hate. and i'm sure we would all agree with that. he was an animal lover. a patriot. a thatcherite, eurosceptic. monarchist. and a staunch roman catholic. his fate
3:53 pm
sustained him throughout his life. and he was a truly great friend in need ? his faith. i can vouch for that. and a fine parliamentarian. he was probably the best potential father of the house we will now never have. he had a zest for life. for him the glass was never half empty, it was three quarters full, it was a dowdy champion for southend and basildon, so thank you, prime minister, and her majesty, and the privy council, for making southend city after all. it was the right thing to do. and our apologies to cleethorpes. while you are at it, if you can help southend united, they are having a bit of a sticky patch at the moment, they really need all the help they can get. but you never
3:54 pm
knew what david was going to do next. that essex cheeky chappie smile, that impish grin, always mischief behind it, he once persuaded the pope to bless a oiled sweet, but my friend and neighbour will explain this in a moment? boiled sweet. he did have a serious side and it is that i want to focus the rest of my contribution today. in the last four years he had become increasingly concerned about what he called the toxic environment in which mps, especially female mps were having to operate. he was appalled by what he called the file misogynistic abuse which female mps had to suffer online and he told me very recently that he wanted something done about it. three years ago, three years, the memberfor mid
3:55 pm
bedfordshire wrote a powerful article in which he quoted the following social media post, i want to see you trapped in a burning car and watch the heat from the flames as they melt the flesh from your face. i ask you, what did she do to ever deserve that? another fallen comrades, jo cox, whose sister now graces this place, said, we have more in common than divides us, and i think she absolutely right. all of us, wherever we come from, we came here to try and help people, and we may disagree sometimes passionately about how best to help people, but surely we can all agree that we came here to try, for which we are now
3:56 pm
systematically vilified. day after day. and i simply say to you, ladies and gentlemen, that enough is enough. because we all have absolutely one thing in common, we are legislators, so i humbly suggest that we get on and do some legislating. i suggest that if we want to make sure that our colleague did not die in vain, we collectively pick up the baton, regardless of our party, and take the forthcoming online commerce bill and toughen it up online commerce bill and toughen it up markedly. ? online harms bill. so let's put david's law onto the statute book, the essence of which would be that while people in public life must remain open to legitimate criticism, they can no longer be vilified or theirfamilies criticism, they can no longer be vilified or their families subject to horrendous abuse, especially from
3:57 pm
people who hide behind the cloak of anonymity. with the connivance of the social media companies for profit. the mood i'm in, i confess i would like to drag mark zuckerberg and jack dorsey to the bar of the house, if necessary kicking and screaming, so they can look everyone in the eye and account for their actions or inactions which make them richer than they already are, and let's do that for all of our councils, who are sick and tired of reading after every planning committee, the night before, it must have been a brown envelopejob... let's do it for all those other people who hold surgeries, the gps who have carried on tending to the sick during the pandemic but who are now being vilified online along with their royal receptionists and staff, just for trying to do theirjob ? royal receptionists. if the social
3:58 pm
media companies don't want to help us drain the twitter swung, let's compel them to do it. ? swamp. by law. because they have had more than enough chances to do it voluntarily so please bring in this bill, prime minister, and if you need any assistance in toughening it up, we are called the backbenches and we are called the backbenches and we are here to help. what better way to make sure that a fine parliamentarian did not die in vain then to enshrine one of his last wishes in legislation forever. for the benefit of all of those in public life. there were many ? there are many who wish to pay tribute so i will end with this, another thing about david with his legendary timekeeping or the lack of it, he was so popular that his constituency events always run late, so many people always wanted to speak to him. by the end of a constituency
3:59 pm
friday, which he had many, he was sometimes an hour late, and invariably he overran. in his honour this afternoon, i'm afraid, so will i. laughter sorry. but because of this wonderful trait, what better fault to have the matter? amongst some of his closest friends he was known affectionately as the late sir david amess. but now he really is the late sir david amess. but i am absolutely determined and i ask for your support in this, that he will not have died in vain. he is now resting, in the arms of the god he worshipped so devotedly his whole life. so farewell, david. my
4:00 pm
colleague, my great friend. in fact, quite simply, the best bloke i ever knew. i thank the house for its indulgence. l knew. i thank the house for its indulgence-— knew. i thank the house for its indulaence. ., .., ., ., indulgence. i now come to the leader ofthe indulgence. i now come to the leader of the snp, — indulgence. i now come to the leader of the snp, ian _ indulgence. i now come to the leader of the snp, ian blackford. _ considerable pleasure to follow the honourable member and i have to say that i do not think i have ever said this at any of his contributions, i agree with every single word he said and i hope the house does listen very carefully to what he said and responsibilities we all have. mr speaker, we are gathered here, united in mourning and grief at the loss of a proud champion of southend, now to be the city of southend, now to be the city of southend, a great backbencher, a beloved husband and father and a dear friend to so many, beloved husband and father and a dearfriend to so many, particularly on the government benches. sir david
4:01 pm
amess was valued in so many ways, but i think the most powerful description he has achieved was in some ways the simplest and most human. david was, above all else, a good and deeply decent man. i man that would always greet you with a welcoming smile whenever you met him. but members and staff across this house, it will take time to come to terms with the terrible shock of the senseless loss of another colleague. becausejust shock of the senseless loss of another colleague. because just as our thoughts and prayers today are with the entire family, we think too of family ofjo cox, who are forced to think of the nightmare of their experience again. mr speaker, members of this house are being murdered while simply doing their job. that is the terrible reality we
4:02 pm
are faced with. and just as we face it together, we must put an end to it together, we must put an end to it together, we must put an end to it together and, providing that security and safety, we must protect all of those at risk, because we all know that it is often our staff that are at the very front line of the threats and abuse as well. so i welcome the review into mp security, but i would urge the home secretary to also include our staff as a central part of that security review. the devastating loss of sir david has once again laid bare the twin threat of terrorism and the toxic culture of hate and intolerance that has become all too common, so today of all days, it is crucial that we show the same spirit and speak with one voice across this house, as indeed we are doing. i stand firmly with and echo the
4:03 pm
poignant words of the prime minister and leader of the opposition, but i also want to commend them for jointly going and standing together in southend on saturday. that was exactly the right image and the right message to send. people need to see that image of unity on saturday and it is an image and ethos of political leadership that need to project in public are more often. a healthy democracy that engages with passionate disagreement as appropriate. but we all know that somewhere along the way we have been badly diverted, for too long, we have been dragged down a pathway passionate disagreement has been infected by poison. all of us can do better, not to feed into that corrosive culture not all of us have been a victim of it and every single one of us has a responsibility to
4:04 pm
put an end to it. it is the truest tribute to sir david that he personified exactly what we must get to, he was a person whose politics could be forceful but always friendly, a person who could disagree without ever, not ever, being disagreeable. for the rest of the session, i look forward to hearing fond memories from many of his colleagues and friends, the beautiful statement released by his family last night put it better than i possibly could. david's lesson and legacy is to show kindness and love to all. all of our memories will be of a good man and a life well lived. his family and community today and know the true depth of respect and love he enjoyed across this house and may his gentle soul now rest in peace. god bless you, david. daeid
4:05 pm
peace. god bless you, david. david was a man — peace. god bless you, david. david was a man of— peace. god bless you, david. david was a man of faith _ peace. god bless you, david. david was a man of faith and _ peace. god bless you, david. david was a man of faith and convictions, faith in his religion and convictions in his politics. he was, above and beyond, a family man, and above and beyond, a family man, and a very funny man. he would often break all the rules, cutting through pump and ceremony and connecting with people. when introducing me, he would always make up the story. i was the strictly come dancing winner for his competition at his birthday party for people over 100. he would also describe it as a lottery winner at his charity fundraiser. his favourite icebreaker was meetjames, favourite icebrea ker was meet james, he favourite icebreaker was meetjames, he is my neighbour, he has recently got out of prison. he would hold the audience with his anecdotes and stories and i would like to share
4:06 pm
the story of the boiled sweet. david was a regular visitor to the vatican, given his faith, and in the receiving line, perhaps absentmindedly being used these things, people getting items bless, david, having a sore throat, reached into his pocket for a boiled sweet. david got his timing wrong. the pope took the sweet thinking it was a revered object to be blessed. he blessed the revered object and david had to put it in his pocket. a holy suite. and when debut tell the anecdotes, as he would do many a time, are you have all heard it, he would reach into his pocket and say, this was the suite that was lest! i expect there have been many sweets passed off as the holy suite, but there can only be one chosen one. as a member of parliament for southend
4:07 pm
city, thank you, prime minister, it means a loss to everybody, it really does, people would sidle up to me and say, you are david's neighbour, onto? a bit tentatively i would say, yes, and i knew it would be coming, a story about his behaviour on overseas trips that broke the ice. he was a great man. he loved animals, but there will no longer be the infamous dog of the day tweets, he would never again address as a night in full finery, mount a horse and ride across the city of southend as he did after receiving a knighthood. it really is unbelievable. i'm making it up now. seriously, thank you for coming on saturday, mr speaker, to have a prime minister and leader of the opposition, and yourself there, it sent a real message to the town, the
4:08 pm
city, that the nation cares and the nation is mourning with us. the impact of david's death has been profound on the city, southend are in shock and i am in shock and the pathway going forward will be difficult, having spoken to people around jo cox's family, i know this will be a long process. we do not want to beat the city where the mp was murdered, we want to be the city of great a successful football team, evenif of great a successful football team, even if david was conflicted on the latter matter as i confirmed west ham supporter. he loved his mum, who lived to 104. in southend, we assumed david would go on forever. i was told david would be the father of the house, and i thought it would be thus one day, but it was not so. gathering my words, i thought of the
4:09 pm
phrase cut short in his prime, and then i smirked to myself. ridiculous age of 69, but he was sprightly, a secret gym goer, a head full of floppy hair and i thought there was more ahead of him than behind him and sadly his future was stolen from us all and southend, and this house also is poorerfor it. i kept watching the news over the weekend, hoping the end of the news clip would be somehow different to the end of the previous one. in southend, there were hundreds of people in hundreds of walks of life, and every story is different yet the same. david listened, he cared, david delivered and had a knack of getting things done, and as has been said, i always expected him to turn up said, i always expected him to turn up late. i was surprised when he wasn't there, because he is always
4:10 pm
there. it is unbelievable he is not coming back, and you think of a mass meeting you have with him, i think of the last remembrance day service, last christmas with him dressing up as santa claus, going out and giving chocolates to the kids in southend, whether they wanted them or not. he brought the remainder to my kids. he would stick them to one side despite all the rules about eating chocolate. but this is not the last of david. he lives on in us all. i do not think david would have seen herself as a mental to people in this house, he wouldn't have called himself that, but that is what he was. —— as a mental to people. he inspired great loyalty and his office was always packed with people, paperwork and as anyone who has been there would know, fish and birds, despite house authorities�* ban on the subject. part office,
4:11 pm
part museum of decades of political memorabilia, part pension, it was an office like a politician, unique. he is survived by a lovely family, his wife, his children, and it is with sadness that the family comes from all corners to be back together in the city of southend. we pray for you collectively. in a statement yesterday, it was poignant, they said they asked people to set aside their differences and show kindness and love to all. that should not be beyond us all. it is not a bad instruction to this house. let�*s take this message back to our constituencies and make some good of this horror and tojulia, southend thanks your husband for his service, rest in peace, my good friend. rest in peace. rest in peace, my good friend. rest
4:12 pm
in -eace. ., , , ., in peace. can i 'ust say, 'ust to reassure the i in peace. can ijust say, 'ust to reassure the house, i in peace. can ijust say, just to reassure the house, the i in peace. can ijust say, just to i reassure the house, the animals in peace. can ijust say, just to - reassure the house, the animals are being _ reassure the house, the animals are being looked after. i would urge members — being looked after. i would urge members now to think of others as we try to _ members now to think of others as we try to get _ members now to think of others as we try to get through a long list. i now— try to get through a long list. i now come _ try to get through a long list. i now come to the mother of the house. thank_ now come to the mother of the house. thank you. _ now come to the mother of the house. thank you, mr speaker. beyond the horror we all feel, sir david's family is first and foremost in my thoughts and i want to add my heartfelt sympathy to his wife and his children met their statement this morning in their unimaginable shock and grief showed such extraordinary dignity. sir david was one of the most dedicated, but also the most affable mps. he looked party differences to work with so many of us on a multitude of issues of common concern, and that is why there are tears on all sides of the house this afternoon. most recently,
4:13 pm
just one example, he took the lead on a course which i then took up which was the injustice done to young unmarried mothers is babies were taken from them in the 1960s and 70s. we have all got examples where he has worked with us. my tribute to him will be to redouble my efforts on that and to remember and to work in the spirit that a exemplified, commitment to constituency, commitment to parliament, a belief that he could and did make a difference. sir david amess, rest in peace. i and did make a difference. sir david amess, rest in peace.— amess, rest in peace. i agree with harriet and — amess, rest in peace. i agree with harriet and ian, _ amess, rest in peace. i agree with harriet and ian, sir— amess, rest in peace. i agree with harriet and ian, sir david - amess, rest in peace. i agree with harriet and ian, sir david amess i amess, rest in peace. i agree with| harriet and ian, sir david amess in 2010 made a speech where he said, it is extraordinary listening to the acting leader of the labour party, now mother of the house, he said she
4:14 pm
made a splendid speech, one of the jokes was fantastic and he would use it in the future. david's fire safety all party group work with the all—party leaseholder and common reform group and we had a number of meetings over the years and can i put it to the prime minister and chancellor that we could make his legacy finding is responsible for the problems and making them pay up. if we look around the chamber, we see the shields of those who have died. some intellect service in the last world walk, other members went forward knowing the risks. —— some fell in service in the last world war. so did ec keep palmer, jo cox and herfamily is in our hearts and we remember andrew pennington, who also died in a constituency. —— so
4:15 pm
did pc keith palmer. robert bradford and i worked together in the house of commons football team, tony berry was my whip, but we can together in ulster. his death, i believe, was kind to make us forget the murder of the sister of murphy catherine done a few days earlier in catherine done. —— murder of catherine done. in david's first speech, he said charity has been described as an amiable quality that... he was able to say in his first speech that in the commons, when he made it, there were five people who had previously represented his own constituency there with him, so it must be some kind of parliamentary record. he was
4:16 pm
followed by the right honourable member for newcastle upon tyne east who cheerfully said that at the risk of dissent from those behind him on labour benches, i congratulate the member for labour benches, i congratulate the memberfor basildon, and do not agree with what his speech but it was no worse than the speech of the minister. which was a line douglas jay used when he congratulated me so it must be in the labour whip booklet. laughter he went on to wish the honourable member well in what time he had in the parliament. that time is well described by trevor phillips in the times today and his words were the simplicity of a man who served, knew his constituents well and showed him what the tory party could be. can we thank you and the party leaders for what you have said over the last
4:17 pm
three days? and if i may say, add john bercow who in an interview had represented feeling with those who had served with david in this house. many of these attacks are done for calculated publicity and public reaction. we should try to make both act against their wishes of perpetrators, the only guarantee is that when there is a gap, it will be filled. mps are in the middle of the pack of people at some risk, ministers of religion, mental health workers, public transport staff, shopkeepers, women police officers, journalists, fair employment builders in northern ireland and the judiciary and especially women and girls going home and at home. we should defend people in every walk of life, in politics and universities, and here i mention mildly the philosopher professor
4:18 pm
kathleen stock in my constituency of sussex. where i serve for the service on wednesday, we have learnt to stand with the irish and northern irish against violence. we stand with muslims against islamophobia, and all the targets of fascists and white supremacists. we have to continue to be diligent in contact with constituents. i would argue the insecure location of the national memorial presently. at the open of the national war museum i collected posters, david, wishes to remember their words sent directly to us and their words sent directly to us and their constituents. freedom is at peril, defended with all your might. which brings his face to my mind. your courage, your resolution will
4:19 pm
bring us victory and ind with the words from the prime minister's first speech the house of commons in 1940. let us go forward together. the grief, sadness and shock we are all feeling today on the offer loss of sir david amess, this collective sorrow unites us all today. like the opposition, i want to reach across the aisle and say to every conservative colleague who knew david much better than many of us on these benches has been so evident in the brilliant speeches we have heard, we feel for you. david's wonderfulfriendliness heard, we feel for you. david's wonderful friendliness and eclectic mix of campaigns that bridge the political divide were very special. his campaigns on animal airfare, championing the fuel poor, david spoke with compassion, authority and often humour. since friday, i have spoken to a range of people about
4:20 pm
david, not least liberal democrat councillors from southend. i have to confess to colleagues opposite, not all lib dems councillors are always complimentary about their city conservative mp. but about david amess, their affection was totally authentic. a counsellor in leigh—on—sea told me how appreciative she was of david's support for the society and local heritage centre it runs. local history was clearly a passion of david's, as shown by his championing of because of the endeavour. the only one of the little ships of the area to survive the years since dunkirk. endeavour has been brought back and restored and now takes part in dunkirk ceremonies and local events, not least thanks to david. as well as being proud of southend was not passed, david will always be
4:21 pm
deeply connected to its present and future. now we will have the city of southend. carol told knew how david would proudly boast of walking each road, each street, each drive and avenue of his constituency and how supportive he was of every community, not least the local fishing and cockle industry. mr speaker, every community needs champions league david. the point is that we don't have to agree with each other across our political divide, but we can learn to be kind and warm, even when we disagree. david was. today is not today for discussing implication for mp security and so on but i want to reflect on what happened to one of my close colleagues from these benches nearly 21 years ago. yesterday i spoke to nigeljones, former mp for cheltenham. who many
4:22 pm
will recall and a number have mentioned, was brutally assaulted during his constituency advice surgery. nigel was saved that day by the bravery of his member of staff andrew pennington. andrew pennington was killed. and it was a local councillor who nigel told me you to work seven days a week for local residents. it was, and he was nigel�*s right hand person. as we reflect on the loss of david, let us remember that this too. our staff and many in public services face abuse, threats, and violence on alarmingly frequent basis. it's incumbent on us in this house to defend them all. i'm sure that's what david would have wanted. thank ou, mr what david would have wanted. thank
4:23 pm
you. mr speaker- _ what david would have wanted. thank you, mr speaker. laughter, _ what david would have wanted. thank you, mr speaker. laughter, service, compassion. these are three of the words that spring to mind mind when i think of david amess. laughter, because you could never have a conversation with david without laughter and smiling. whether it was because of one of the outrageous stories he was telling, perhaps about one of his colleagues or somebody else,... laughter there was always smiles, always laughter, always fun around david. service because he had an extraordinary record of dedicated service to his constituents and i suggest to anybody who wants to be a first—class constituency mp, that you look at the example of david amess. he was deeply embedded in his constituency and as we all know, championed it on every possible occasion. i don't think a question
4:24 pm
or speech from david went by in this house without his constituency being mentioned in. but he did notjust promote his constituency here in the house, he was part of it, he understood it, he knew it, he was in the community. he was of the community and he was respected and loved by the community. his death is tragic and the manner of his death, appalling. but isn't it fitting that his last acts were acts of service to his constituents? and then there was david's compassion, born out of an strengthened by his faith, compassion for the vulnerable, for those in need. he did notjust talk about it, he acted. he changed law, he went out there and made a difference to people's lives. because he was also an accomplished parliamentarian and he knew that a
4:25 pm
backbencher who is dedicated and resolute can make a real difference. to echo some of the comments that have been made today, first of all, i think it's a wonderful legacy for david that southend is now a city but we can also add to the legacy of david amess by ensuring that in all our political debates and discourse, we bring to those debates and discuss the same respect, decency and compassion that we are symbols of his life. because david amess made a difference. his compassion made a difference. his compassion made a difference to people outside of this house. his kindness made a difference to people inside this house. ourthoughts difference to people inside this house. our thoughts and prayers are with julia house. our thoughts and prayers are withjulia and the family. their loss is devastating. his constituency has lost a much respected and loved member of parliament. this house has lost a
4:26 pm
remarkable and valued parliamentarian. and every member of this house has lost a friend. may he rest mps. —— may he rest in peace. so david was a man of deep catholic faith. the gospel ofjohn, chapter ten, verse ten, reminds us that the lord came notjust to give life, but to give it in abundance and david lived his life in abundance. a joyous service both to his constituents and here in this house. we would see him late at night, often in a tuxedo, going from charitable concern to charitable concern, championing the causes he believed in. he looked goodin causes he believed in. he looked good in a tuxedo. no daniel craig, but this was no time to die. my wife
4:27 pm
reminded me of the time when we went to the beautification in rome of john henry newmanjust to the beautification in rome of john henry newman just before loughton, i'd beautiful service presided over by pope francis. we were whisked to the college in one of the mountains of rome overlooking vatican city where prince charles addressed us billions and the royal cavalcade went, rushed out, unfortunately, the parliamentarians on the trip were left stranded, the former memberfor ealing north on the trip were left stranded, the former member for ealing north the former member for ealing north the former naval commander decided to lead the vanguard in a military operation to get us back down to our hotel, like toggling dates, we entered this cave and ended up in this vast franciscan monastery, the party became separated, more like an ealing comedy under stephen's leadership. my wife reminded me that i abandoned her to lifelong labour activist, to three tory mps getting stuck in a left, including basildon
4:28 pm
man, she said. because he was still etched on our 1992 election memory, the other two mps were north dorset and the file coast, so i will catch mark and simon up about what went on because my wife said what an utterly wonderful man. he participated fully in the liturgy of the church, in the sacrament of the church, while i have the attention of the frontbenchers, catholics believe that extreme unction helps guide the soul to god after death. so maybe we could come up with sir david amess amendment, that members and anybody may be can receive that sacrament. he believed fundamentally in the social teaching of the church, dignity, solidarity, subsidy to the nth degree when it came to southend, preferential option for the poor and care for environment. that meant he
4:29 pm
came with unique views on things such as life, death, europe, animal protection in chime with his party, sometimes in chime with the country he channelled julian of norwich. she said all things shall be well and all manner of things shall be well. that's difficult for us all here today. his
4:30 pm
famously. "trust god that you are exactly where you are meant to be mayer not forget the infinite possibilities ours on the love that has been given to you. david used those gifts and he passed on that love, so, sir david, may the choirs of angels come to greet you, may they lead you to paradise, may the lord unfold you in his mercy, may he grant you eternal life. eternal rest, give to him, 0 lord, and let perpetual light shine upon him, may his soul and the souls of all the faithful departed through the mercy of god rest in peace. mr
4:31 pm
speaker. it was a true privilege to have known david amess. he was simply one of the best people i've ever known in my entire life. he was a true friend and he had time for each and everyone. he looked down on no one. he was everyone across make equal, he was kind, he was generous, he was sincere, it was a man of principle and courage. he was uncompromising in what he believed to be right. he wasn't one of these who changed his views in order to progress. he knew what he believed in and he stood firm for those things. he was a man of enormous
4:32 pm
integrity but he was a true friend to so many of us. i knew him for around 40 years. we became friends instantly because we shared the same political views but we came from the same background. i'm from essex. some say east london but i say essex. and he knew that our instincts, coming from that neck of the woods, where the same, and we hit it off from day one. we were committed to this country, we love our country, he was a passionate believer in britain, a true patriot, he was a royalist. he was never afraid to fly the flag and to champion great british values. he was a christian and was proud to be a christian. and uphold the christian heritage of this country.
4:33 pm
he also loved animals, as i do. he almost loved my dogs as much as i loved his dogs and on many occasions visiting his home in southend, often taking my own elderly mother and he had an elderly mother who lived until 104, and when his mother died he spoke to my mother as if it was his mother. he treated me like family. my heart goes out tojulia and the five children who are wonderful people. he had a fantastic family. he was so dedicated, so dedicated to his constituencies, basildon and southend west. he lived for them and he didn't sacrifice everything else to put his constituency first. ? and he did sacrifice everything else. the one legacy we must hold true to david is not to let his horrific murder and
4:34 pm
the way he left us to change our democracy. i rememberthe the way he left us to change our democracy. i remember the day after the appalling grand hotel bombing in brighton in 1984 and i remember margaret thatcher, he was a dedicated supporter of hers, i remember her saying, it is business as usual, we must carry on. i take the same view, whatever happens, whatever we do to carry on and protect ourselves, we must not let our democracy be undermined by that kind of evil. we must stand up to evil and defend our democracy and cherish the freedom that gives all of us the right to be here and represent our constituents and defend and cherish the freedoms and the liberties that have held our country together for generations. david was a fine example of a
4:35 pm
parliamentarian, a magnificent constituency mp, a true friend, a gentleman, a truly wonderful human being, we are going to miss him but ifeel truly privileged being, we are going to miss him but i feel truly privileged to have known him. thank you, david. god bless you. known him. thank you, david. god bless ou. ' , known him. thank you, david. god bless vom— known him. thank you, david. god bless yom— on i bless you. jeffrey donaldson. on behalf of my _ bless you. jeffrey donaldson. on behalf of my right _ bless you. jeffrey donaldson. on behalf of my right honourable i bless you. jeffrey donaldson. on | behalf of my right honourable and honourable friends i rise to record the common and unified voice of the people of northern ireland who share in the grief and sorrow at the loss of our esteemed and much loved colleague and friend and my condolences and sympathy to you, prime minister, and your colleagues on the conservative benches. words cannot adequately describe our heartfelt sympathy but through the words that have been spoken here today and across our nation, in recent days, i pray that they sustain and give strength to david's
4:36 pm
family. no one will feel the loss of david more than his family. to his wifejuliet, his beloved children and to the wider family circle, on the half of my party, i offer my heartfelt condolences and deepest sympathy and trust and pray that almighty god, the greatest of all comforters, we will draw near to all of them. david epitomised the true meaning of public service. he was the model parliamentarian. he sought office not for himself but to serve others. influenced by his deep christian faith. to champion the needs of the most vulnerable, to give a voice to the voiceless, and to stand up for the interests of the people of southend west. david's greatestjoy people of southend west. david's greatest joy came people of southend west. david's greatestjoy came not in holding office but in how he could use that
4:37 pm
office but in how he could use that office to improve the everyday lives office to improve the everyday lives of those he was honoured to represent. the people of his constituency and now from the city of southend have lost their greatest champion. and i, like members on all sides of this house, have lost a dearfriend. the plaques at sides of this house, have lost a dear friend. the plaques at the entrance door to this chamber and around this chamber, in memory of the late airey neave, robert bradford, anthony barry, ian gow and jo cox, these are a daily reminder to everyone of the threat our democracy faces in modern times. in northern ireland all parties in this chamber have experienced these threats. and the loss of dear colleagues at the hands of the enemies of democracy. today this house sends a clear message, a resounding message, that democracy
4:38 pm
in the united kingdom will never be suppressed. ourvoices in the united kingdom will never be suppressed. our voices will never fall silent. we will never allow evil to triumph over good. david fall silent. we will never allow ev and triumph over good. david fall silent. we will never allow ev and tri make >ver good. david fall silent. we will never allow ev and tri make surejood. david fall silent. we will never allow ev and tri make sure that. david fall silent. we will never allow ev and tri make sure that the vid fall silent. we will never allow ev and tri make sure that the flame us and to make sure that the flame of his legacy is never extinguished. this house is the poorerfor his loss and this country, all of it,
4:39 pm
mourns the tragic passing of one of its most faithful servants. our response collectively to this is simple, when one of us falls, another will step forward. together we will continue to defend the values and ideals that david stood for and that are the foundation stones of this great nation. thank you. stones of this great nation. thank ou. ~ ., . ., ., stones of this great nation. thank ou. ., you. we now come to jackie doyle price. you. we now come to jackie doyle price- the — you. we now come to jackie doyle price. the whole _ you. we now come to jackie doyle price. the whole house _ you. we now come to jackie doyle price. the whole house will- you. we now come to jackie doyle price. the whole house will be - you. we now come to jackie doyle | price. the whole house will be left in no doubt — price. the whole house will be left in no doubt of _ price. the whole house will be left in no doubt of the _ price. the whole house will be left in no doubt of the genuine - price. the whole house will be left| in no doubt of the genuine affection that sir david's constituents held him, just by watching the tv footage this weekend, and as a friend of his i'm hugely comforted by the genuine affection that has been shown today and in response by honourable members. for me he was a great friend as well as a great
4:40 pm
parliamentarian. last week sir david led a delegation on a visit to qatar and he led that delegation with his characteristic good humour, dare i say great fun, and inclusivity. during the course of that visit we had the benefit of an audience with his highness of qatar and as the meeting came to a close david with great flourish referred to the need to present a gift and with his characteristic self—deprecation he said, what could i give the man who has everything? he an inscribed copy of my book, he said! and that was david. i can say to you, for those of you who have not read his book, can i suggest you go out and get a copy because the proceeds go to some of the charities he championed. good
4:41 pm
i also say, in actual fact, if you read the book, it is the authentic voice of david ? could i also say. some of his pen portraits, some of which are quite humorous, some of which are quite humorous, some of which are quite barbed, but it is a great insight into parliament from someone who is we have heard to date spent much of his career, all of his career on the backbenches, but he loved this place and he thought it was a privilege to be a member of parliament. he loved his work on the panel of chairs and he was proud of the legislation he had secured. end of term adjournment debates, they will never be the same again, will they? he may yet have become a father of the house. i want to make a serious bug in the 38 years that he served as a member of parliament, one of the things he lamented ? a serious point. he lamented the decline in respect for the institution and the members within it and he lamented this because he felt our constituents were the poorer for it because as the respect
4:42 pm
declined and we just became inconvenience to be managed by public authorities, rather than the genuine voice of challenge, and if we do anything to remember him, that is something he would wish us to collectively work to address, which is what makes this place worthwhile. we must in reflecting on his memory not remember the way in which his life was taken, but remember how he lived. his beaming face in 1992 when his victory marked a fourth election victory for the conservatives is of course iconic. but i should say, his biggest pride was actually not that result but the one in 1983 when he won basildon for the first time. a victory which is against the odds as much as the one in 1992. i would say that he held basildon as a marginal seat for all that time, he was an
4:43 pm
amazing campaigner, he had time for everyone, as we have heard before. his megaphone was never too far away and we enjoyed some visits with david and his megaphone over the years and always great fun. as an east end that he represented the politics of southend and he would describe himself as a working class conservative and very much a the kind of person who embraced the politics of margaret thatcher. he would talk with great pride of the occasion wear after every one had written of his election prospects in 1992, margaret thatcher came on the eve of poll to support him and he credited that with his victory. our thoughts are obviously now with his family and one final note, the last time i went to his house, he was proudly showing me his wedding video. the reason he was doing so it was notjust to show me the member of the derbyshire dales and her dancing back in those days in 1983,
4:44 pm
and he was hugely proud that she got here, as well, but the exact wedding here, as well, but the exact wedding he had tojulia in 1983 with westminster cathedral and the reception he was what he repeated for his daughter only a few weeks ago. i hope the whole family receives some comfort from the fact that we all loved him. john receives some comfort from the fact that we all loved him.— receives some comfort from the fact that we all loved him._ i i that we all loved him. john cryer. i knew david — that we all loved him. john cryer. i knew david for _ that we all loved him. john cryer. i knew david for maybe _ that we all loved him. john cryer. i knew david for maybe 25 _ that we all loved him. john cryer. i knew david for maybe 25 years - that we all loved him. john cryer. i i knew david for maybe 25 years and for eight years we were constituency neighbours when i was the mp for hornchurch and following on from one of the ionic dates dip ? anecdotes from the memberfor of the ionic dates dip ? anecdotes from the member for wickford, i remember david saying there were a number of people where people would say on the doorstep, especially in basildon, i'm going to vote for you david, because you are a good labour man. i once said to him, did you ever put them right? he said, er...
4:45 pm
that was the closest i got to an answer so i think we can deduce from that that he probably didn't put them right. ithink that that he probably didn't put them right. i think we all know that david was a hyper assiduous constituency mp and the member for thurrock mentioned this, david and myself were for a long time both contributors to every single pre—recess adjournment debate and we used to call it whingeing day and for those of you who have taken part in those debates, it can all probably imagined by david and myself would have called it that. used to be a competition to see who could get in the number of, the greatest number of constituency topics into the debate, and i don't think i ever won but david won every time. every debate i was in, he won come eight, nine, ten issues, that he would cover in that staccato way that he had. i would like to say one more thing about david. and that is,
4:46 pm
on a more general point, there are profound issues that divide parties in this place and individuals, but they are minuscule compared to what divides us from the forces of darkness who brought this about. just to say one more thing, and this is a deeply personal note, on the half of my wife and myself, one thing i will always remember about david is that he would always ask about our children, and how they were and how they were getting on and that is something i will carry for the rest of my life. iain duncan smith. for the rest of my life. iain duncan smith- i'm — for the rest of my life. iain duncan smith- i'm going _ for the rest of my life. iain duncan smith. i'm going to _ for the rest of my life. iain duncan smith. i'm going to be _ for the rest of my life. iain duncan smith. i'm going to be brief, - for the rest of my life. iain duncan smith. i'm going to be brief, i- smith. i'm going to be brief, i intend to _ smith. i'm going to be brief, i intend to be _ smith. i'm going to be brief, i intend to be brief, _ smith. i'm going to be brief, i intend to be brief, after - smith. i'm going to be brief, i intend to be brief, after all, i intend to be brief, after all, pretty much everything about david has been said but that doesn't mean i can't repeat it. can ijust say, i
4:47 pm
knew david for 29 years, when i first came in in 1992, he was outstandingly and unfailingly kind, conscientious and generous, even to new members who arrived after him, i remember very clearly, i also remember very clearly, i also remember late on when i got to know him better, recording that somebody in my constituency referred to david in my constituency referred to david in basildon as somebody that went always to the opening of an envelope, so i put this to him, i segment you are accused of going to the opening of an envelope and he said, i damn well hope so, because i wrote it to them so i could go there in the first place! ? i said to him you are accused. i also remember, when they won basildon council, for the first time, and he was there, not enough for david was it to just be with them when they went in, he formed a conga line outside the
4:48 pm
chamber and took the whole of the newly elected councils on a conga right through the council buildings and into the chamber. his sense of humour was always there and it was always preceded by this megawatt smile that he could turn on like that. the most of us in this chamber it is hard work sometimes to be able to smile enough but for david it was hard work not to smile and he would smile even in some of the most difficult circumstances. we already know, by the way, when i ceased being a leader, i say with some respect to the gentleman, it is really not what it is cracked up to be... laughter that's what i thought, as well. i simply say that when i have to go and speak at an event for him, he patted me on the shoulder and said, you did all right. he introduced me
4:49 pm
by saying i'm so pleased to have iain duncan smith here, he hasjust slid down the greasy pole and then he carried on. he did follow that by telling me afterwards that he had retired finally from a long time in government and he thought he would have more influence elsewhere, and he actually spent a short time in government but that did not bother him in the slightest bit. david has shown us the way, the weight of cooperation, and i know for a fact that most members in this place know that most members in this place know that you get things done by cooperating across this floor. very little is talked about that, as you know, but it is in fact the embodiment of exactly who we are in this place. we cannot get stuff done by ourselves so we form alliances whether it is on modern—day slavery
4:50 pm
or on gambling arms, you go on and you form these alliances and then you form these alliances and then you eventually move things and get them done. but he was the architect of this, there wasn't an alliance that he could not form even if there wasn't an issue on which he could form it, he would form it. the point about this is, this is who we are, we are often asjo cox said, more united by the things we believe in it are necessarily divided, and the fact is that we are in this place because we argue with each other about our ideas. the important feature with this is, we may disagree with our arguments but we don't disrespect the motives of those who hold them. we need to be very careful, this is a lesson to us, we need to be careful here what we legitimise in what we say about our colleagues. they are not evil people, nobody in this chamber is an evil individual, they have strong beliefs, i'm struck when the media
4:51 pm
reported and they had finished talking about him and then they said, he was a man with very strong held beliefs, but of course we come here because we have strong beliefs and we should be proud of that. we it front page all about him and on it
4:52 pm
it had like you, and i did think he might have done it, because it was spelt incorrectly, so even in that thread there is a sense of irony. i want to say, to his family this is a tragedy, this deranged and hateful individual has brought to them unwarranted and without cause, and david taught us something important that they can remember, that he believed in the power, not the power of position, but the power of purpose. mr speaker, they told us you were dead, they brought me bitter tears to hear and bitter tears to shed, i thought as i was crying how often you and i had tied the sign with talking and sent him down the sky. and now that there are light, the power of great ashes, long ago dead, and my nightingales, my voices, are awake and that is the
4:53 pm
important thing. he will be with us forever. . . important thing. he will be with us forever. ., , , ., , forever. can i 'ust urge us to be brief to get _ forever. can ijust urge us to be brief to get plenty _ forever. can ijust urge us to be brief to get plenty of _ forever. can ijust urge us to be brief to get plenty of others - forever. can ijust urge us to be brief to get plenty of others in. | brief to get plenty of others in. thank— brief to get plenty of others in. thank you _ brief to get plenty of others in. thankyou can— brief to get plenty of others in. thank you. can i— brief to get plenty of others in. thank you. can ijoin _ brief to get plenty of others in. thank you. can ijoin briefly- brief to get plenty of others in. | thank you. can ijoin briefly the tributes that we have heard because sir david amess has asked everyone about our families sir david amess has asked everyone about ourfamilies and sir david amess has asked everyone about our families and probably we send our condolences now to his family, notjust run all of us but from all of ourfamilies family, notjust run all of us but from all of our families as well, who will be feeling very much the need to reach out to them ? notjust from all of us. we pay tribute to his staff who just went to work on friday morning, just like all of our staff do, going to try and help his constituents like every one of our constituents, and had to face the unimaginable on friday morning. everyone of us has a story of things that we worked with david on, so many different issues, and for me it
4:54 pm
was the work we did together on amendments to help child refugees reunite with their families. something he felt strongly about. you could never predict what the issue he would feel strongly about next but then you look back and think of it made absolute sense that this was what he was championing because so often kindness and compassion were at the heart of it and helping others. his office is just above mine, so very often i would chat to him, coming across her, and it really felt itjust walking across here now, to come and pay tribute to him and knowing i would not walk across here with him again, chatting about our families. but you could never get wrong which thought you were on coming out of the lift to david's office, because as many of you will know, that is hanging on his door a giant cardboard cutout of a knight in shining armour. with the helmet
4:55 pm
tilted in a jaunty way, just looking at you, and that knight in shining armour is what david would have been to so many of his constituents. around the corner there is a box with a nodding reindeer declaration, just ready to be spread across the corridors, because that is what david would do at christmas time, just spreading joy. david would do at christmas time, just spreadingjoy. spreading friendship and a bit ofjoy. if you stand there by that knight in shining armour today, i will say you can hear the sound of birdsong, as well. forso can hear the sound of birdsong, as well. for so many reasons, for sir david. jo cox said to us, we have more in common than that which divides us, and david showed us how to do that because whilst he had disagreements with pretty much everyone of us, he also had the unerring instinct of finding what it was he had in common with each and
4:56 pm
every one of us as well. and so when we face awful things happening, when we face awful things happening, when we know that extremists try to divide us, we know that the most powerful thing that we have in our defence, in our armoury against them, and in defence of democracy, is the powerful words said on all sides of the house in unity and in defence of democracy but also in respect for david now. john whittingdale. _ respect for david now. john whittingdale. i— respect for david now. john whittingdale. i first - respect for david now. john whittingdale. i first met. respect for david now. john i whittingdale. i first met david amess nearly _ whittingdale. i first met david amess nearly 40 _ whittingdale. i first met david amess nearly 40 years - whittingdale. i first met david amess nearly 40 years ago i whittingdale. i first met davidl amess nearly 40 years ago and shortly after his historic election as mp for basildon, the image of which come at the picture of his smiling face, came to symbolise the conservative victory under margaret thatcher's leadership. he won because he embodied all that was best about essex man. he was patriotic and he came from a
4:57 pm
working—class background, he was devoted to his family, he was passionately independent. i got to know him when i was working for margaret thatcher in downing street. he adored her and was absolutely furious when she was removed from office and indeed remained furious long after. in 2013 he held an adjournment debate on her legacy following her death and she in turn hugely valued him. david championed many causes as others have said but most of all he loved his constituents. and the people that he was so proud to represent. my constituency is about 30 minutes away from his and a number of times i have spoken with him at events and he has spoken for me, and the huge respect and affection with which he was held was always obvious. he loved meeting people and he made sure that he spoke to every single person at whatever gathering he was
4:58 pm
present. as has been said, it became a joke that for his first 14 years he would make sure that in every question or in every speech he referenced basildon in ringing tones, as my honourable friend demonstrated, and then after his election for southend, his campaign for it to become a city was mentioned at every opportunity and it was well known that he was a great animal lover and devoted to his dogs. even when seeking support for his french dog vivian in the westminster dog of the year competition this year, the reason he gave as to why we should vote for vivian as the westminster dog of the year was that she is an enthusiastic supporter of southend becoming a city. laughter when in 2012, chelmsford as the county town of essex was granted
4:59 pm
city status, david took the news reasonably well. i can say on the half of my constituents in chelmsford how delighted we are that essex now has two cities. i represent part of the chelmsford local authority area but the member for chelmsford has the city itself and she is unable to be here today, she is on ministerial duties abroad, but she asked me to say on her behalf, how much she appreciated the kindness and gentle wisdom that david typically showed to her and other new essex mps when they were first elected. i also join other new essex mps when they were first elected. i alsojoin in her in paying tribute to the work that david did for all of us, to improve our hospitals across mid and south essex, a legacy that will benefit hundreds and thousands of essex residents. david was quite simply the best of us. all of us are still
5:00 pm
in shock and our hearts go out to his family. i hope that people listen to their words. my honourable friend for rayleigh spoke powerfully about the abuse that people, especially mps, but other public servants, as well, sufferfrom online, on social media, and i have been heartened by the huge number of messages that i have had from my constituents and from others, firstly to express condolences, and secondlyjust firstly to express condolences, and secondly just to express firstly to express condolences, and secondlyjust to express their appreciation of the work that we do in this place. i would like to think that i strongly believe, that those horrible aggressive voices that sometimes seem to dominate social media, are not representative of the views of the vast majority of people who share all the qualities and would respond to the appeal of
5:01 pm
david's family, that we should show

32 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on