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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 18, 2021 5:00pm-6:00pm BST

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a re are still the best of us. all of us are still in shock and our hearts go out to his family. i hope that people listen to their words. my honourable friend for rayleigh spoke powerfully about the abuse that people, especially mps, but other public servants, as well, sufferfrom online, on social media, and i have been heartened by the huge number of messages that i have had from my constituents and from others, firstly to express condolences, and secondlyjust firstly to express condolences, and secondly just to express firstly to express condolences, and secondlyjust to express their appreciation of the work that we do in this place. i would like to think that i strongly believe, that those horrible aggressive voices that sometimes seem to dominate social media, are not representative of the views of the vast majority of people who share all the qualities and would respond to the appeal of
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david's family, that we should show each other kindness and love, and that should be his lasting legacy. we've rightly been reminded of davidson enthusiastic advocacy for the constituencies that he represented. but he was also in an enthusiast for the london bureau where he was born and grew up, where he attended the excellent catholic school which he stayed in touch with for the rest of his life, where he is supported western united football club and where his mother lived on until her death as we been reminded at the age of 104 five years ago. i heard over the weekend from somebody who is in david but unlike david supported the labour party. he told me that the politics teacher mister cunningham predicted that david was going to be a conservative mp. but
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he also told me that in a period when he wasn't able to attend quite a lot of the politics lessens david very carefully wrote out all his notes so that his friend could copy those notes afterwards. kindness was evident at that early stage as well. david stood for election to the council in 1974 in 1978 and for parliament in newer northwest in 1979 before finding more promising opportunities further east. but notwithstanding, party differences his supported interests remain. his council leader from 1990. i his supported interests remain. his council leaderfrom 1990. i pressed the conservative government to bring the conservative government to bring the channel title railroad to a station in strafford. david was our unwavering ally on the government side. he may do next made single—handedly the campaign cross party. that was crucial to success
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leaning to london 2012, the regeneration that is under way at the moment. of course david was not initially seen as a friend by my new council colleagues. you haven't seen a conservative elected for 32 years. we all remember david dashing our 1992 general election hopes by holding bezels and was up but we invited him to our town hall celebration when the campaign succeeded. i wasn't quite sure how that was going to go but david won over everybody with a beautifully judged speech. newham has lost a great friend. he was accessible to his constituents, tragically he has now given his life. we will rightly reflect on what more we can do to stop that happening again. i wonder if we might ask the police to review our appointment list ahead of its
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surgeries, for example. but we mustn't give up on the accessibility of members of parliament. if we do the apparent response to this of those that attacked david n who attacked me will have succeeded. that must not happen. we attacked me will have succeeded. that must not happen.— attacked me will have succeeded. that must not happen. we would all like to have — that must not happen. we would all like to have a _ that must not happen. we would all like to have a long _ that must not happen. we would all like to have a long time _ that must not happen. we would all like to have a long time to - that must not happen. we would all like to have a long time to hear - like to have a long time to hear more _ like to have a long time to hear more of— like to have a long time to hear more of these _ like to have a long time to hear more of these heart—warming l like to have a long time to hear- more of these heart—warming stories and recollections— more of these heart—warming stories and recollections of— more of these heart—warming stories and recollections of our— more of these heart—warming stories and recollections of our dear- more of these heart—warming stories and recollections of our dear lost - and recollections of our dear lost friend _ and recollections of our dear lost friend but— and recollections of our dear lost friend but we _ and recollections of our dear lost friend but we are _ and recollections of our dear lost friend but we are due _ and recollections of our dear lost friend but we are due to - and recollections of our dear lost friend but we are due to go - and recollections of our dear lost friend but we are due to go to i friend but we are due to go to church— friend but we are due to go to church quite _ friend but we are due to go to church quite soon. _ friend but we are due to go to church quite soon. so - friend but we are due to go to church quite soon. so i - friend but we are due to go to. church quite soon. so i implore colleagues, _ church quite soon. so i implore colleagues, please _ church quite soon. so i implore colleagues, please just- church quite soon. so i implore colleagues, please just take i church quite soon. so i implorel colleagues, please just take two minutes— colleagues, please just take two minutes or— colleagues, please just take two minutes or so _ colleagues, please just take two minutes or so each _ colleagues, please just take two minutes or so each because - colleagues, please just take two| minutes or so each because then everyone — minutes or so each because then everyone will_ minutes or so each because then everyone will get— minutes or so each because then everyone will get a _ minutes or so each because then everyone will get a chance - minutes or so each because then everyone will get a chance to - minutes or so each because then everyone will get a chance to say what _ everyone will get a chance to say what they— everyone will get a chance to say what they would _ everyone will get a chance to say what they would like _ everyone will get a chance to say what they would like to - everyone will get a chance to say what they would like to say. - everyone will get a chance to say what they would like to say. we've heard magnificent _ what they would like to say. we've heard magnificent tributes - what they would like to say. we've heard magnificent tributes from i what they would like to say. we've | heard magnificent tributes from the prime _ heard magnificent tributes from the prime minister, from the leader of the opposition, from david's essex colleagues and from many on the opposition benches as well. i think we are _ opposition benches as well. i think we are all— opposition benches as well. i think we are all grateful for that. and the tone —
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we are all grateful for that. and the tone of the house is as the house — the tone of the house is as the house can _ the tone of the house is as the house can be at its best. i speaking on behalf— house can be at its best. i speaking on behalf on — house can be at its best. i speaking on behalf on the remnants of the class _ on behalf on the remnants of the class of— on behalf on the remnants of the class of 83. we came in, 100 of us in 1985 _ class of 83. we came in, 100 of us in 1985 now— class of 83. we came in, 100 of us in 1983. now there are sadly only to remaining _ in 1983. now there are sadly only to remaining with continuous service and another three who have come back having _ and another three who have come back having left _ and another three who have come back having left the house briefly. we had all— having left the house briefly. we had all hoped and expected that in the performance of time once my right honourable friend surrendered his position by which i'm of course david _ his position by which i'm of course david would've been a very old man. we had _ david would've been a very old man. we had hoped that he would become the father— we had hoped that he would become the father of the house. because he would _ the father of the house. because he would have — the father of the house. because he would have made a magnificent successor— would have made a magnificent
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successor to my right honourable friend _ successor to my right honourable friend. sadly and truly that has been _ friend. sadly and truly that has been denied. for those of us many on both sides _ been denied. for those of us many on both sides of — been denied. for those of us many on both sides of the house work with david _ both sides of the house work with david on — both sides of the house work with david on his campaigns had that privilege — david on his campaigns had that privilege whether that was on fox hunting _ privilege whether that was on fox hunting when it was unfashionable to do so, _ hunting when it was unfashionable to do so, whether it was on the reunification of cyprus or iran or pensions — reunification of cyprus or iran or pensions for ex—pats, uk citizens or a whole _ pensions for ex—pats, uk citizens or a whole range of other issues know 'ust a whole range of other issues know just what _ a whole range of other issues know just what a — a whole range of other issues know just what a dowdy campaigner he was. and that _ just what a dowdy campaigner he was. and that clearly is why he was so loved _ and that clearly is why he was so loved and — and that clearly is why he was so loved and his constituency for that nfatter— loved and his constituency for that matter deputy speaker, the speaker said at— matter deputy speaker, the speaker said at the _ matter deputy speaker, the speaker said at the weekend that david's death— said at the weekend that david's death had left a void in this house was was _ death had left a void in this house was was absolutely right. there is another— was was absolutely right. there is another void and david's family home — another void and david's family home i— another void and david's family home. i hope that david's wife julia and his— home. i hope that david's wife julia and his children will take comfort from _ and his children will take comfort from the — and his children will take comfort from the fact that across this house
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there _ from the fact that across this house there is— from the fact that across this house there is clearly nothing but affection for his memory. and that must _ affection for his memory. and that must speak volumes for the man whose life we _ must speak volumes for the man whose life we celebrate today. i spent a lot of time over the weekend thinking about what to say if i got called today or indeed whether to say anything at all. because i didn't know david personally. it's been a traumatic few days for many people, no more so than david's family and friends and it's them who remain at the forefront of my mind this afternoon. sadly i know from my own all too similar experience that the reality there is nothing anyone can say to make things for them. but not is it any use to say silent. so i welcome this opportunity to pay tribute to
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someone who was clearly a well respected and much—loved colleague to many people in this place. for reasons that i would never wish on any of the members of the house or indeed anyone i do have a unique perspective on what those closest to david are going through and i want to send them my love, support and solidarity from myself, my parents, our family. solidarity from myself, my parents, ourfamily. i blocked out much of what happened whenjoe was murdered. but i remember very clearly the moment i took the phone call saying she had been attacked. i remember physically trembling and the visceral pain that overtook me. and it breaks my heart to think that another family has had to experience that phone call and a nightmare which follows. it's a roller—coaster of deep trauma that no one should have to experience. i also know that david's family will still be in utter shock as i know many of you
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are. but i hope at some point they are. but i hope at some point they are able to hear at least some of the beautiful and very funny tributes that have been paid here today. and that that will provide a morsel of comfort amidst their pain. i can't talk about david on a personal level as i say, i didn't know him from what i've heard he strikes me as the sort of mp who i may well have come across in the coming months and ended up going for a couple with him to hear his thoughts on the work he was doing on the children's parliament or animal welfare or getting more support for people with learning disabilities. we would to backbench mps from different parties in different parts of the country discussing issues close to our hearts and i imagine it would've been a lot of fun. but sadly that they will never come. i know that wider discussions will now take place about the safety of mps,
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the awful abuse and intimidation we face, the nature of political discourse and how we can deal with the evils of terrorism will stop and it's quite right that they do. but todayis it's quite right that they do. but today is about david and his family. along with his staff, colleagues and the community he served so well. the service he gave in the support we should show all of them in the coming days, weeks and months. it is “p coming days, weeks and months. it is up to us to make sure that we do because i know more than most that they will need it and the powerful difference it will make to them. david was indeed a great character with a fantastic sense of humour and i'm honoured to have been able to call him my friend. so much is already been said about him i don't want to do reputation. but we both elected to parliament for the first time in 1983 was mall majorities and
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became firm friends are in the 1980s and shared an office together and till 87 in the abbey gardens. we shared staff also for a while and in those days the comments sat very late and i was fortunate to get to know david really well during this time. his cheerfulness and dedication were his hallmarks throughout his parliamentary career. his boundless energy while many of us could couldn't keep up and when he took us canvassing and campaigning at basil didn't we certainly can keep up. working together in the office however with david was quite an experience as we've already heard the menagerie of things that were in his office. but david also was never backward in coming forward. i remember going first occasion to a number ten reception after we been elected. 0f reception after we been elected. of course i was in awe of everything of course. margaret thatcher was a
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prime minister and of course she said and egg into her accent but she put her head to unsaved and said the two danes. and ijust said prime minister lovely to be here and all the rest of it and david said well i've never been to before can you do me a tour? at that moment i wished i had rightly died. but she said, yes i'll come get you later. and she did. we had a tour and she said, and it take you upstairs to the flat. and show you upstairs with her and she said this is where of course i can cook dennis was a really, he said, he has good breakfast was like yes, she said. that's really pokey appear. he didn't think much of it at all. but it never had aspirations to be prime minister, i think. anyway, he was a friend, i was
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privileged to know him, privilege to work with him on so many campaigns. he was a great parliamentarian, a great politician, a fantastic advocate on behalf of his constituents and a great champion of our nation. he was also one of the nicest, kindest and most genuine people i've ever met. always smiling and was antithetical campaigner for all the many issues that he held dear. we are all devastated by his murder was a privilege to know his wife and family over the years and we think of them and we grieve with them. but we will remember his legacy and we will look on the positive side because wanting david amess always was was very positive. and on pride to have known him, thank you. if and on pride to have known him, thank yon-— thank you. if you head told me before i was _ thank you. if you head told me before i was elected _ thank you. if you head told me
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before i was elected in - thank you. if you head told me before i was elected in 2015 i before i was elected in 2015 that 'ust before i was elected in 2015 that just a _ before i was elected in 2015 that just a few— before i was elected in 2015 that just a few years later i'd be sitting _ just a few years later i'd be sitting at— just a few years later i'd be sitting at home grieving over the death— sitting at home grieving over the death of— sitting at home grieving over the death of a — sitting at home grieving over the death of a tory mp i would not have believed _ death of a tory mp i would not have believed you. but my partner did 'ust believed you. but my partner did just that — believed you. but my partner did just that for it was david who had died _ just that for it was david who had died. david was the first cross party— died. david was the first cross party friend i made in the commons when _ party friend i made in the commons when t _ party friend i made in the commons when t was — party friend i made in the commons when i was elected. he was a joy to work— when i was elected. he was a joy to work with— when i was elected. he was a joy to work with on— when i was elected. he was a joy to work with on committee and he hooked me into _ work with on committee and he hooked me into all— work with on committee and he hooked me into all sorts of abgs and escapades as well. and he will be sorely— escapades as well. and he will be sorely missed. he will not ever be forgotten — sorely missed. he will not ever be forgotten and when i think back in my memories and displays my most favourite _ my memories and displays my most favourite ones will feature david. he already i should say features in a number— he already i should say features in a number of my speeches but that's too long _ a number of my speeches but that's too long to — a number of my speeches but that's too long to tell in this short time. i hope _ too long to tell in this short time. i hope i_ too long to tell in this short time. i hope i can— too long to tell in this short time. i hope i can find the energy and enthusiasm to tell it with the fun that it _ enthusiasm to tell it with the fun that it deserves. so let me just paid _ that it deserves. so let me just paid my— that it deserves. so let me just paid my respects to david and sent my best _ paid my respects to david and sent my best wishes to his family. i cannot— my best wishes to his family. i cannot believe what they will be going _ cannot believe what they will be going through at this time. thank you _ going through at this time. thank you i _ going through at this time. thank ou. , , , .. , going through at this time. thank ou. , , , . ., , " ., you. i will be brief because i know there are many — you. i will be brief because i know there are many others _ you. i will be brief because i know there are many others who - you. i will be brief because i know there are many others who still. there are many others who still want
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to pay their respects and attributes. as a dedicated and effective back bench member of parliament it's right that i should pay tribute as chairman of the committee but i wanted to say a few words today because like so many others had the friendship for the last 24 years. i am deeply touched by the tribute that have been paid across the house, moving tribute from the prime minister and the opposition. and pleased to follow my friend, my neighbour who is one of the first on friday to get in touch with me to offer his condolences which is much appreciated. i think we all have had so many messages of condolence from constituents and others sense that terrible news on friday. i think people across the
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country could sense the goodness, kindness, decency of the man that we have lost. and i think it's wonderful with attributes and the great achievements that david had in politics. it's also wonderful we've had so many references right from the start to the joy that david brought into all of our lives and into so many other lives too. he clearly enjoyed the house of commons, he enjoyed politics, he loved meeting people and i hope that is something that will state with us. i'lljust say, my recollection always over the last few years especially at see him at his house to see me go on the other way the infectious smile would begin and you knew that he was looking forward to
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starting the conversation. what are they doing now graham, had say. why? and i know we will miss that. like others i will still be looking forward to. and the final thing that i wanted to say if you let me on a serious point is that this is the most open and accessible parliament of any major country in the world. and the right tribute to david must be that it remains so. we will take sensible precautions but we will keep open and we will continue to connect with our constituents as needed. it connect with our constituents as needed. , . , needed. it is with incredible sadness and _ needed. it is with incredible sadness and i _ needed. it is with incredible sadness and i have - needed. it is with incredible sadness and i have to - needed. it is with incrediblej sadness and i have to admit needed. it is with incredible - sadness and i have to admit some anger that i rise to pay tribute to my friend david today. i was
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fortunate enough to have known david before he entered this house is a friend, a family friend and some three decades later as a parliamentary colleague. my mother elizabeth was his association chairman and at times election elizabeth was his association chairma i and at times election elizabeth was his association chairma i rememberrs election elizabeth was his association chairma i remember them. :ion elizabeth was his association chairma i rememberthem. now in 1983. i rememberthem. now that young that very enthusiastic candidate, a very good looking unconfirmed bachelor with a flowing new romantic hairstyle. he fought in
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very energetic campaign in 1983 with a very small team of helpers. we all had ourjobs with i made tea, we came back after a canvas and my father often had to go find him, had been talking to somebody or more often he would just have run out of petro, that was david. david was of course a reese cyprian of motherly advice from my mother who was his chairman, it was "don't worry, of course you're going to win. you better get married now david and you need to have some children right through to you better get a haircut. 0f through to you better get a haircut. of course he did when heselton, he married his love of his life julia and the children followed one after the other in rapid succession but he never did get that haircut. i know david is a showman, i can tell you numerous stories but what i will
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say is when i found myself on these benches following the last election he was delighted, he went out of his way to settle me in into the institution he loves so much. and i know that he meant it and many others notjust me and i speak on behalf of all of the 2019 intake and say how very sad we are to lose them. it say how very sad we are to lose them. , ., ., ., ., , them. it is an honour to rightly seak on them. it is an honour to rightly speak on behalf— them. it is an honour to rightly speak on behalf of _ them. it is an honour to rightly speak on behalf of my - them. it is an honour to rightly speak on behalf of my party i them. it is an honour to rightlyl speak on behalf of my party and them. it is an honour to rightly i speak on behalf of my party and sank in his— speak on behalf of my party and sank in his rations— speak on behalf of my party and sank in his rations to sir david's family and friends — in his rations to sir david's family and friends and colleagues. i think the one _ and friends and colleagues. i think the one think that i would really like to— the one think that i would really like to emphasise, i think the people — like to emphasise, i think the people outside do not actually appreciate possibly how much we work together— appreciate possibly how much we work together and how much of an an honour— together and how much of an an honour it — together and how much of an an honour it is _ together and how much of an an honour it is to work together and by that achieve — honour it is to work together and by that achieve so much. and it's one of the _ that achieve so much. and it's one of the thing — that achieve so much. and it's one of the thing that i would like to say i _ of the thing that i would like to say i think— of the thing that i would like to say i think for all of us here, just the reality— say i think for all of us here, just the reality of what democracy actually — the reality of what democracy actually is. democracy is what we have _ actually is. democracy is what we
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have developed as a means that we no longer— have developed as a means that we no longer attack each other and use violence — longer attack each other and use violence to achieve our aims. and when _ violence to achieve our aims. and when we — violence to achieve our aims. and when we see this terrible, apartment death— when we see this terrible, apartment death which has struggled so badly and struck across the constituents in so _ and struck across the constituents in so many — and struck across the constituents in so many who knew so david so well it is struck— in so many who knew so david so well it is struck as — in so many who knew so david so well it is struck as a constituents and so many— it is struck as a constituents and so many who knew so david so well it is structured — so many who knew so david so well it is structured so hardly that we remember that when we stand up for democracy— remember that when we stand up for democracy we are standing up for that, _ democracy we are standing up for that, for— democracy we are standing up for that, for civility and for good behaviour and for treating people properly — behaviour and for treating people properly. because historically the alternative has been violent. and violence — alternative has been violent. and violence must never be allowed to succeed _ violence must never be allowed to succeed again. | violence must never be allowed to succeed again-— succeed again. i rise to pay respects — succeed again. i rise to pay respects to _ succeed again. i rise to pay respects to our _ succeed again. i rise to pay respects to our dear - succeed again. i rise to pay i respects to our dear colleague succeed again. i rise to pay - respects to our dear colleague and my friend sir david amess. i got to know david from 2017 when he reached out to meet with that characteristic kindness. he had an extraordinary gift of knowing what to say as well as when to say it. his many kindnesses provided a firm foundation for our work together on
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the memorial project. he was a christian soul, a fellow catholic and his life fully reflected his beliefs. he also enjoyed life, he loved people and had that lightness of veracity and enthusiasm that drew people to him and was infectious. for so many months we have been working together on the memorial for the white cliffs of dover. he spearheaded this project from the very beginning. from similar working—class backgrounds we shared a commitment to creating opportunity and social mobility so it made sense so that game there are project is the centrepiece of our levelling up bid for dover. 0ne the centrepiece of our levelling up bid for dover. one that brings to gather opportunities culture and entertainment for as the house knows, david was a great entertainer as well as campaigner. my enduring memories of david will be arm in arm
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around the piano singing to dame vera songs. him taking selfies of the white cliffs of dover. the dame vera project was very close to david's heart. sir david's family had made a call for public support for the dame vera funding in his memory. so let's get behind that and get the fundraising done. build the memorial and include the life of sir david amess a lovely man who was a true friend to be, a friend to dover and to our nation.— true friend to be, a friend to dover and to our nation. thank you mister seaker. i and to our nation. thank you mister speaker- i want _ and to our nation. thank you mister speaker. i want to _ and to our nation. thank you mister speaker. i want to join _ and to our nation. thank you mister speaker. i want to join the - and to our nation. thank you mister speaker. i want to join the tribute l speaker. i want to join the tribute to the honorable memberfor south and west, it was a kind and generous colleague in the house in a committed and conscientious constituency. just how conscientious he was can be seen in his record of speaking and action in the up i had a recollection of him speaking in a pre— recess a german debate back in
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2009 when i was deputy leader of the houseit 2009 when i was deputy leader of the house it was myjob to reach bond to that debate. in a couple of the speeches we heard about sir david's performance. i remember that sir david had raised many many points that day to be answered are sent for action and departments. sol that day to be answered are sent for action and departments. so i look back at the pre— christmas recess adjournment debate in 2009, i found this amazing list of matters which sir david raised with me. the state of the economy, small shops have been visited, every small shop in his constituency in the summer recess to pay public servants and the scrutiny of public—sector pay, communications with constables and decision—making process in place, our forces serving decision—making process in place, ourforces serving in decision—making process in place, our forces serving in afghanistan, the solvent abuse, vioxx and compensation for uk users of it, tax credits of the tax credits helpline, the south end association voluntary services and funding for them, services and funding for them, services to people with arthritis, seat belts and the rest of people not wearing them. and he concluded
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it was the pre— christmas adjournment debate this impressive list talking about the issues of pecks at christmas and the international fund for animal welfare. i have to say that was 15 issues. the reason he beat you in these debates is was it wasn't eight, nine or ten that's he wants. 7 eight, nine or ten that's he wants. ? that's why he won. i fast forwarded to the most recent pre— recess adjournment debate on the 26th ofjuly just to see recess adjournment debate on the 26th ofjulyjust to see if it was a similarly impressive list and it was. care costs both for self is an council for a cost of the accessibility of housing for people disability, use of tidal power, the safety of jet skis, disability, use of tidal power, the safety ofjet skis, single—use plastic, sewage discharge and storm water overflows, planting of trees in the south end for thejubilee, panic live export of animals are slaughtered, the pension meds augments mud come up honourable
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children, the public appealfor a permanent memorial in dover to dame vera which we help to launch. good wishes for our olympic and paralympic athletes, praise for a constituents who had done a walk for charity, century of the british legion and as ever mister speaker, a plea to make south bend a city. how wonderful that his strongest campaign for city status of solvent will happen. the city he loved. and thanks to improving that. i'll finish by saying there were so many causes that sir david champion and so many of us will of cross parties on issues such as support people with endometriosis. this can be a bait to inactivate on that today in children with learning disabilities. david's family is as to renew our commitment to the many causes he champion. it is a heart—warming tribute to david to work at south bend will become a city. we will continue that attribute by renewing and carrying on with the work he started. ~ . ,
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and carrying on with the work he started. a, , , , started. may i begin by giving my condolences _ started. may i begin by giving my condolences and _ started. may i begin by giving my condolences and prayers - started. may i begin by giving my condolences and prayers to i started. may i begin by giving my condolences and prayers to his i started. may i begin by giving my l condolences and prayers to his wife julia and _ condolences and prayers to his wife julia and his five children. mister speaker— julia and his five children. mister speaker not only did sir david represent the people of south and west and — represent the people of south and west and was a dedicated campaigner and a broad _ west and was a dedicated campaigner and a broad range of issues and achieving — and a broad range of issues and achieving some real meaningful changes— achieving some real meaningful changes with up he also spent a great _ changes with up he also spent a great deal of time representing his house _ great deal of time representing his house and — great deal of time representing his house and obviously his delegation. and this _ house and obviously his delegation. and this is — house and obviously his delegation. and this is what i want to focus on this afternoon. so david was an active _ this afternoon. so david was an active made during that member of the icu. _ active made during that member of the icu, the cba and a number of abgs _ the icu, the cba and a number of abgs including the apg for the holy city. abgs including the apg for the holy city it— abgs including the apg for the holy city it was— abgs including the apg for the holy city. it was an delegation like this that i_ city. it was an delegation like this that i first — city. it was an delegation like this that i first got to know sir david well _ that i first got to know sir david well it's— that i first got to know sir david well it's a _ that i first got to know sir david well. it's a well documented that sir david — well. it's a well documented that sir david was a devout catholic but even _ sir david was a devout catholic but even in _ sir david was a devout catholic but even in a _ sir david was a devout catholic but even in a hallowed walls of the vatican sir david did not lose his mysterious sense of humour. i think of a time _ mysterious sense of humour. i think of a time 7 — mysterious sense of humour. i think of a time ? mischievous. mysterious sense of humour. i think ofa time ? mischievous. i mysterious sense of humour. i think of a time ? mischievous. i think for that realisation of newman which is already— that realisation of newman which is already been referred to and we attended a highbrow theological seminar— attended a highbrow theological seminar midway through david whispered to me "isn't this fabulous, i can see your loving it.
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to which— fabulous, i can see your loving it. to which i— fabulous, i can see your loving it. to which i replied "not really, david — to which i replied "not really, david l'm _ to which i replied "not really, david i'm not really understanding it. david i'm not really understanding it and _ david i'm not really understanding it and it — david i'm not really understanding it. and it was at the tea break that sir david _ it. and it was at the tea break that sir david and i slipped out like schoolboys. i said david are we lucky _ schoolboys. i said david are we lucky to — schoolboys. i said david are we lucky to get into trouble walking through— lucky to get into trouble walking through the vatican gardens? he said matt, _ through the vatican gardens? he said matt, nor— through the vatican gardens? he said matt, nor did we. as you're aware not all— matt, nor did we. as you're aware not all meeting are engaging and -oat not all meeting are engaging and goat according to plan for salerno for vividly— goat according to plan for salerno for vividly meeting with the foreign minister— for vividly meeting with the foreign minister in — for vividly meeting with the foreign minister in this case a foreign minister— minister in this case a foreign minister that demanded that the meeting — minister that demanded that the meeting take place in english. the only problem being that that foreign minister— only problem being that that foreign minister did not actually speak english — minister did not actually speak english. but had instructed his translators not to intervene. with only the _ translators not to intervene. with only the minister understanding what had been _ only the minister understanding what had been said and parliamentary colleagues becoming increasingly frustrated i passed david a note saying _ frustrated i passed david a note saying that this was getting ridiculous. david simply smiled in his usual— ridiculous. david simply smiled in his usual way, about a minute later sir david _ his usual way, about a minute later sir david lean forward and said to the minister, "minister, your
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english — the minister, "minister, your english is _ the minister, "minister, your english is superb. "for that where did you _ english is superb. "for that where did you study? with tears rolling down kylie's cheek and not being able to— down kylie's cheek and not being able to make i for fear of damaging the reputation of the cells thought this was— the reputation of the cells thought this was a — the reputation of the cells thought this was a perfect example of sir david _ this was a perfect example of sir david deploying his sense of humour and an— david deploying his sense of humour and an ability to address serious situation — and an ability to address serious situation in a polite and jovial tone~ — situation in a polite and jovial tone. mister speakerjust last week i end this _ tone. mister speakerjust last week i end this house had tone. mister speakerjust last week lend this house had the privilege of spending time with this house on a delegation he was leaving. he was at his— a delegation he was leaving. he was at his very— a delegation he was leaving. he was at his very best in showing that colleagues of all levels of seniority were made to feel included and played an active role. every day we conducted serious business but he made _ we conducted serious business but he made sure _ we conducted serious business but he made sure we always found talent during _ made sure we always found talent during that time to laugh. it will come _ during that time to laugh. it will come as— during that time to laugh. it will come as no surprise that even there he found _ come as no surprise that even there he found time to demand that south bend be made a city. this house is lost a _ bend be made a city. this house is lost a good — bend be made a city. this house is lost a good representative, his family. — lost a good representative, his family. a — lost a good representative, his family, a father and husband, lost a good representative, his family, a fatherand husband, i have lost a _ family, a fatherand husband, i have lost a dear— family, a fatherand husband, i have
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lost a dear friend but it was a real privilege — lost a dear friend but it was a real privilege to — lost a dear friend but it was a real privilege to be with him on his final— privilege to be with him on his final adventure. thank you. | privilege to be with him on his final adventure. thank you. i think if david had _ final adventure. thank you. i think if david had been _ final adventure. thank you. i think if david had been here _ final adventure. thank you. i think if david had been here to - final adventure. thank you. i think if david had been here to hear i final adventure. thank you. i think i if david had been here to hear today he would've loved the fact it was so much you bar in the contributions from people as well is the obvious warmth and respect for his decency. it's just so obvious how genuine these tributes are. i knew him fairly well because of working with him on animal world welfare issues all we want is to quote on some of the animal welfare groups that are paid tribute to him on social media. animal protection talked about his support for a call to the end to the global wildlife trade, the doctor said that they were devastated to hear of his death, he worked with them on supporting the end to the cruel poppy smuggling trade. the animal aid posted a picture of him supporting a call for an end to the... calling for a
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supporting a call for an end to the... calling fora ban supporting a call for an end to the... calling for a ban on battery cages saying they were shocked and saddened as a friend to animals everywhere. ifelt saddened as a friend to animals everywhere. i felt particularly for what the blue fox campaigners which is the conservative campaign against fox hunting, when it was first established only a very few mps on the conservative benches supported that. sir david was so integral and its guts as to a place where now it's a bit of a moot point whether there will ever be a successful attempt to overturn fox hunting band. that's because we managed to win the debate on both sides of the house rather than just on the side. he wasjust so house rather than just on the side. he was just so much a part of that. peter and the animal welfare campaign said they're going to aid it had a leave to the tree of life memorial which celebrates individuals which made a difference and they say he did that in space. finally ijust and they say he did that in space. finally i just wanted and they say he did that in space. finally ijust wanted to... there was a lovely tribute to him from nick palma who was an mp on the labour side in his house and he is now in world farming he wrote a
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lovely article in the last few days and he said he was especially struck by alastair is campbell's comment at the first thing you notice when david entered the room was his beaming smile and that many of us, not many of us remembered in politics remember it especially for our smiles. politics remember it especially for oursmiles. he politics remember it especially for our smiles. he concluded which i think it's fair to say, he concluded in the article, when animal sentiments especially on the statute books, with live exports and couple cages on farms are banners in history all of us in the eye animal welfare movement will celebrate and welfare movement will celebrate and we should remember the quiet thank you mister speaker. in this debate, the life of david amess keeps invoking one word above all, kindness. and the fact that the heart rending statement the archbishop wrote that his life showed the true meaning of kindness and this will be the greatest of all tributes to david, or evenjust tributes to david, or even just some of us were engaged in the daily
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political battles, made kindness of resolution from this day forward, there is much reaching across the chamber in this debate today and we must ask, but we look across the chamber and those of our that we have never felt fallen prey to feelings of contempt or lack of respect or unkindness towards those who oppose us kindness is giving without an expectation of getting. it inspires hope and optimism and also with many on all sides, we have had disagreements but we do not doubt his sincere goal to make the world a better place with this kindness. the principles of public life do not include the principle of kindness? henceforth, let kindness be known as the david amess principle of public life. he, juliet and the rest of his
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family plead the nation nothing more generous and could do a great service to them and learn to live this principle more evidently in our daily political lives.— daily political lives. mister speaker. _ daily political lives. mister speaker, the _ daily political lives. mister speaker, the brutal - daily political lives. mister speaker, the brutal killing | daily political lives. mister i speaker, the brutal killing of our friend david amess and i call him a friend. i know we have an adversary or workplace, we have a face—off, don't we. but some of our friends are often on the other side, aren't they. sometimes people on that side who help me out and have been friendly to me. it's shocking to me and painful because i'm probably the last, certainly the last labour in p who saw him alive and it on the delegation last week. and the baggage reclaim as it happens, everyone's stuff had gone and i've been tying up my shoelaces. he said no, i would with you. i said come
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on, you have to go to essex. he offered to you. that was the measure offered to you. that was the measure of the man, how kind he was. and the stragglers are saying that it was a great trip, thank you, he was the last whatsapp i saw thinking people for their service and how shocking he was taken in service of public servants in the line of duty, slain at his surgery. 0n the trip, his million dollar smile one over everyone. 0ne million dollar smile one over everyone. one of the signature trees i had to introduce them to and he's been a parliamentarian since the last century, but he never ages. and another one, he says in his own way, do you know what? i thought i had a lot of kids because after five, but you've got 24! and he said to us in advance, ladies, when we get there,
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i don't want any ruffling of his hair is sitting on his lap or any twiddling of this tie because it's already got three wipes and he doesn't need any more. everyone's got some many david amess stories and i miss him dearly. i was shocked. i cannot process that news, i had to do my own in person surgery when i got on the panel of chairs, they said, you should be a shadow minister by now, no comment. he didn't want them nor did i, and so brilliant to hearfrom different when she was taken from us, we should live by the, ifeel like in life we need to be more like david and that means less crossed and more
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cross party. the and that means less crossed and more cross -a . , ., , cross party. the question is that this do now _ cross party. the question is that this do now adjourned. - cross party. the question is that this do now adjourned. as i cross party. the question is that this do now adjourned. as manyj cross party. the question is that i this do now adjourned. as many as are of— this do now adjourned. as many as are of the — this do now adjourned. as many as are of the opinion, say "aye". to the contrary, _ are of the opinion, say "aye". to the contrary, "no". the ayes have it. the contrary, "no". the ayes have it the _ the contrary, "no". the ayes have it the ayes — the contrary, "no". the ayes have it. the ayes have it. order, order. we will— it. the ayes have it. order, order. we will process the service of remembrance, but can i say for mps and staff— remembrance, but can i say for mps and staff who wish to watch the service, — and staff who wish to watch the service, it — and staff who wish to watch the service, it will be live on the channel— service, it will be live on the channel 505. the speaker of the commons there bring proceedings to a close in a packed chamber, pretty much and i have to say, and incredible array of opinions from right across the political spectrum, all paying tribute to sir david amess, and many
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calling him theirfriend, the events of the day began very much on the floor of the commons with the prime minister borisjohnson leading the tribute and also make you clear that the queen had confirmed that something done see would be given city status and this is the cause that sir david amess had pushed for impressed forthright his parliamentary career and tribute from sir keir starmer, the leader of the opposition. theresa may, the former prime minister. the little essex mp of sir david's saying that he was his best friend. members of parliament s&p, labour, the liberal democrats, all paying tribute to a man that clearly is being fondly
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remembered after the tragic events of last friday and there are all making their way now over to st. margaret's church which is in the environment of westminster, not far away from the palace of westminster and their will be a service of remembrance held with an address from canterbury and the service itself led by the reverend of westminster. and they'll move out there solemnly now and many wondering what will happen at their next surgery appointments. will there be preventing by the police? of constituents who might want to speak to their mps? could there be personal bodyguards? this is
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something that is been mooted by many after what happened on friday and it is a balancing act, isn't it, between trying to protect members of parliament but also making them accessible to the people they serve. 0ur political correspondent is outside st. margaret's church for us now and jonathan, we heard so much tributes and i'd say i was struck by the level of fondness that there was, notjust from the conservative benches, but is so striking is that so many people called them his friend, called him theirfriend right across the political spectrum. it was striking. we see a lot of the confrontation here westminster, a lot of disagreement and debate but sometimes gets a little bit unpleasant, but there was nothing but affection and nothing but respect from across the house of commons this weekend and that
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special session led by the prime minister who described sir david amess as a kind and decent man who had strongly held beliefs but nothing but respect for those who disagreed with them. it was a surprise all around the prime minister confirmed that south bend would be granted city status in memory of sir david amess serve the constituency for so many years it is many people have said, there's really no more fitting tribute. people saw him is notjust a colleague but a friend, two of those who also constituencies nearby to further david's constituency talked very openly and very emotionally about how they were feeling it as well as the tributes as well as the fond memories in a lot of ways, funny stories about the antics of somebody who clearly was on a parliaments biggest most colourful
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personalities, there was also an under of urgency to perhaps address the problem of security for mps and perhaps somehow ensure that they are better protected in a way they go about the business and the problems we face in recent days.— we face in recent days. clearly from what we've — we face in recent days. clearly from what we've heard _ we face in recent days. clearly from what we've heard this _ we face in recent days. clearly from what we've heard this afternoon, i we face in recent days. clearly from | what we've heard this afternoon, sir david was not one of those backbenchers was sitting on the green benches up at the back, stewing that is not on the front benches as the minister. he did not seem to hold those ambitions. he was just a man who generally believed that the best he can offer in public service was to his constituents and that meant being, simple and straightforward parliamentary mp and local candidate. keeping, isuppose, the flame of ambition alive for those people in his constituency who
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wanted to better their lives. in wanted to better their lives. ll�*l that respect, he was the wanted to better their lives. in that respect, he was the epitome of a hard—working backbench mp and that is the vast majority of mps in the house of commons who don't really have any interest in climbing the ladder they are not career politicians looking for big jobs and governments around the opposition side, there really there to do good work on behalf of their constituencies and represent the people they are elected to serve and david amess was a fine example of that and held in very high regard on all sides of the house, think keir starmer put it in this way, he put his patch before his own political ambitions and that was definitely true and in that respect, he is part of a big cohort of mps who serve their constituencies and they are a
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fine example of that at every possible opportunity at south and constituencies in speaking up for it whenever he could and parliament. why make it is going to be a long procession and the chamber and the commons packed today and so many of the members of parliament wanting to reflect on the record officially, there fond memories of sir david amess and they are still filing out. from the palace of westminster to st. margaret's church on the grounds of westminster abbey and the prime minister borisjohnson, keir minister boris johnson, keir starmer, minister borisjohnson, keir starmer, leader of the opposition and robertson of the snp already in the church there and they're already going to be listening to the words the archbishop of canterbury. in the service will be led by the reverend
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of westminster. we touched on this, the reflection of some of those on their own safety and security and we have been hearing the stories of the every day levels of abuse and hate that some mps have had to endure and clearly reflections will be on what can be done by the likes of the home secretary, leader of the commons to protect mps going about their daily business. , ., , protect mps going about their daily business. , ._ ., ., business. yesterday for that debate come to the — business. yesterday for that debate come to the fore _ business. yesterday for that debate come to the fore again _ business. yesterday for that debate come to the fore again in _ business. yesterday for that debate come to the fore again in the i business. yesterday for that debate j come to the fore again in the house of commons and the official business before the tributes with the home office questions with a home secretary and others took questions from across the house and the shadow home secretary was was being done in respect of mp safety and there
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should be greater consistency across the board in terms of the arrangements that mps have in place and some do have a level of police presence in the surgeries which are open to the public and others don't necessarily suppress rules see some moves there to tighten things up but downing street is set the date that it's for individual mps in discussion with local police force to decide whether they should continue to hold in person meetings with constituencies in public places. but there's definitely some urgencies and feelings of some urgencies and feelings of some urgencies westminster that need to be addressed and was on the session this afternoon, alongside the tributes to sir david amess of what must be done. attacked at a public event some time ago and said perhaps listings for who was attending open surgeries and mp constituencies can be passed the the police to be reviewed and also calls for the
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online harms bill which they're using to attempt to further regulate social media companies and address the problem of online abuse and call for that to be toughened up and strengthened by the conservative backbencher and she said sir david amess, we counted as a long—time friend had expressed concern about the level of abuse levelled online and particularly a female mps and in his name, he called for more to be done there. it is an ongoing issue, an ongoing problem that is receiving renewed attention in the wake of sir david amess's death. attention turns to the church service here at st. margaret's this evening and there will be a sombre tone in a much more reflective tone as those mps and peers who gathered in the congregation singing hymns and reflect in his memory. find
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congregation singing hymns and reflect in his memory.— reflect in his memory. and a reminder— reflect in his memory. and a reminder that _ reflect in his memory. and a reminder that you _ reflect in his memory. and a reminder that you can i reflect in his memory. and a reminder that you can watch j reflect in his memory. and a - reminder that you can watch special coverage of the memorial service for sir david amess here on the news channel of course, with my colleague in the service takes place right there at st. margaret's church and there at st. margaret's church and the grounds of westminster abbey, the grounds of westminster abbey, the place where sir david spencer much of his time as a man representing the people of essex into constituencies. close to 40 years. it is just after a quarter to six, will get a little bit more that the former us secretary of state colin powell has died at the age of 84. let's talk
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we can speak now to eric ham, a political commentrator in the us. he joins us from washington. colin powell had broken so many ceilings when it comes to people of colour, first chairman of thejoint chiefs of staff to be black. for secretary of state who happened to be black. the whole african—american community is going to be mourning the loss as well as so many others but also people of colour around the world because he showed them in a country with its own racial problems, america, it was possible to succeed. 50 problems, america, it was possible to succeed-— to succeed. so true and also what he did was he was _ to succeed. so true and also what he did was he was also _ to succeed. so true and also what he did was he was also a _ to succeed. so true and also what he did was he was also a groundbreakerj did was he was also a groundbreaker for the first black president of the united states. if we go back to 1996, remember, bill clinton was a very popular president, there was talk that colin powell would possibly run for president and he was very popular at the time and
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while he decided not to run, but it was it opened the door for the possibilities that america could actually get through this glass ceiling of electing the first person of colour and they thought he would run and of course many thought he would win and what it did was it paved the way for a nation to actually become more comfortable with a person of colour, it was not colin powell, he paved the way for barack 0bama.l colin powell, he paved the way for barack 0bama.— colin powell, he paved the way for barack 0bama. , ., , ., barack 0bama. i remember that period when the popularity — barack 0bama. i remember that period when the popularity was _ barack 0bama. i remember that period when the popularity was sky-high, i when the popularity was sky—high, particularly for republican politicians. can you imagine what he did not run at that time? he politicians. can you imagine what he did not run at that time?— did not run at that time? he had certainly dipped _ did not run at that time? he had certainly dipped his _ did not run at that time? he had certainly dipped his toe - did not run at that time? he had certainly dipped his toe in i did not run at that time? he had certainly dipped his toe in and i certainly dipped his toe in and certainly dipped his toe in and certainly begun the process of putting together an exploratory committee and he won votes for vice
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president in the state of new hampshire and many who actually believed that he could win and would win but it spoke to the seriousness in terms of viability and considering actually running but ultimately decided against it and he said himself, the fire was just not in the belly and of course, he was just not prepared for the rough—and—tumble that politics would certainly bring and of course, putting his family through such a tent and very stressful situation. he was worried about the personal impact of his own family in a run for the white house, do you think was inevitable that he would support barack 0bama even though he was republican?— republican? that is a really good cuestion. republican? that is a really good question- i _ republican? that is a really good question. i think— republican? that is a really good question. i think you _ republican? that is a really good question. i think you saw - republican? that is a really good question. i think you saw and i republican? that is a really good question. i think you saw and for| question. i think you saw and for someone who is whole life had a spouse being a conservative, being a
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republican, having worked for a number of different republican administrations, the fact that he got behind the candidacy of barack 0bama, again, it spoke to what he believed in his heart in terms of just tapping into that aspirational tone and feel of what united states, the united states sees itself as editing would you saw from colin powell was someone who was carrying that banter to lift the mushu to be a place for all people, even if it meant a great cost to him politically, he was trying to move the nation closer to its aspirations in terms of lifting a president barack 0bama. brute
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in terms of lifting a president barack 0bama.— in terms of lifting a president barack 0bama. ~ . , ., barack 0bama. we are remembering a brilliant man — barack 0bama. we are remembering a brilliant man in _ barack 0bama. we are remembering a brilliant man in american _ barack 0bama. we are remembering a brilliant man in american public- brilliant man in american public life who knocked on so many barriers. certainly racial barriers. but also a conflicted man when it comes to some of the policies that he was willing to push as a member of various republican administrations and i was thinking particularly of the war in iraq. is there a sense and we know what he said behind the scenes to george w. bush. this is a delicate country, you break it, you've got to be responsible for it. is there a sense that his legacy is tainted by that? that he was willing is a good soldier to go to war, directed by his commander in chief, but not really believing in the mission. i think that is going to be a part of his legacy and its right to discuss that, i'll go back to a conversation
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that, i'll go back to a conversation that i had with the general back in 2006 or 2007 when i interviewed him, i spent an entire day with them talking about being part of the delegation with former president jimmy carterto delegation with former president jimmy carter to stave off that invasion, the us invasion of haiti and we got into his philosophy particularly as it relates to war and the iraq war did come up as well and the iraq war did come up as well and one thing about leadership that i think is so sacrosanct, so critical is that you have to lead when you are right, but yourself to lead when you are wrong and how you lead when you are wrong and how you lead when you are wrong is being willing to admit when you are wrong and when you made a mistake when i spoke with them, he was very clear eyed about he got it wrong, he recognised that he got it wrong and he is willing to publicly admit that he is willing to publicly admit that he got it wrong and the mistakes and the tragedies of any given wrong.
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what i saw from them was someone who was very comfortable and his own skin and recognising that he was in fact infallible and willing to admit it and he was comfortable with ? fallible. ~ . , , ., fallible. what is your personal recollection _ fallible. what is your personal recollection of _ fallible. what is your personal recollection of the _ fallible. what is your personal recollection of the man? i fallible. what is your personal recollection of the man? thel fallible. what is your personal- recollection of the man? the man was 'ust recollection of the man? the man was just completely _ recollection of the man? the man was just completely transparent. - recollection of the man? the man was just completely transparent. he - recollection of the man? the man was just completely transparent. he was i just completely transparent. he was someone who was affable and someone who, even though she managed to overtake the room, he was still someone who displayed great humility and this was a man who came from immigrant parents and raised in the bronx of new york city and went to the college of new york and even though he had risen to the highest heights of the military and public life, someone who was revered around the world, he is still very much
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connected to those very humble roots and she invited me to speak to the powell centre in new york and because that was near and dear to who he was in those how he identified himself, yes, he was a general and yes, he was a top diplomat and some of the world look to furthermore the authority but he was still someone who recognise that it was his duty, he was duty—bound to ensure that other people who came to ensure that other people who came to this country like him also able to this country like him also able to tap into that american dream and that was the essence of who colin powell was. that was the essence of who colin powell wee— powell was. thank you very much indeed, thank _ powell was. thank you very much indeed, thank you. _ powell was. thank you very much indeed, thank you. remember, l powell was. thank you very much l indeed, thank you. remember, we powell was. thank you very much - indeed, thank you. remember, we have that service coming for mps and peers remembering sir david amess.
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chill it on friday and that is coming up life, but not for a look at the weather. hello, good evening. quite a few parts of the country had temperatures of 18 today and it's likely to get warmer tomorrow if and when the sunshine does come out. the warmer air is coming our way thanks to the winds from the south or southwest. as we've seen already it is brought with it a lot of cloud, the cloud still around at the moment. this cloud here coming in from the atlantic is going to bring the next area of rain the earlier rain and drizzle is moving away and for a while there could be a few breaks in the cloud. that will lead to the odd mist and fog patch and then the ticket cloud arrives mainly across the western side of the uk to bring the rain to these areas. of course after the warmth that we had during the day then the temperatures are good of all very low overnight, 12 to 14. we start with a lot of cloud, outbreaks of rain around that could be heavy for a while over some of these western hills. mostly as we head into the afternoon the rain is in the north and west.
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it could cheer up again later across parts of northern ireland but ahead of the rain in the afternoon we should get some sunshine in east anglia and the southeast and it's here temperatures could reach 20 or 21 with a more typical of early summer. even when we have a cloud of outbreaks in rain at around 17 or 19 c was of a very mild day for the there is more rain in the forecast for wednesday. this time generally moving northwards across england and wales some thundery downpours possible. either side of that there's going to be some sunshine. still a mild day on wednesdayjust not quite as mild as tuesday. we've got this rain arriving in the northwest of scotland. that's going to be significant because to the north of that there is colder air. that will push the country across through the rest of the week and the weather will feel very different. we still have a tangle of weather fronts on the scene during wednesday as we head into thursday. these are the main ones drifting down across the uk bringing with it some showery outbreaks of rain. then those northerly winds come setting in and it's those northerly winds that will drop the temperatures as well.
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we've still got some outbreaks of rain to clear away from eastern parts of england on thursday. otherwise there will be some sunshine and a rash of showers, rash of showers in the far north over the higher ground may be of a wintry flavour as well. it's going to be a windy day. the winds generally from the north possibly touching gale force ransom north sea coast was up that of course will make it feel colder, very different from what were feeling at that moment put up 8 the best in northern scotland, 13 in southern england and wales.
6:00 pm
a day of emotion and tributes to the mp sir david amess after he was killed on friday. his family came to see the flowers and messages at the church where he died. after a minute's silence, mps on all sides of the house remembered their colleague — and friend. sir david was a patriot, who believed passionately in this country, in its people, in its future. there are tears on all sides of the house this afternoon. my colleague, my great friend, in fact quite simply—

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