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tv   Newsday  BBC News  November 1, 2021 12:00am-12:31am GMT

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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... 12 days of crucial talks on the future of the planet. copp 26 is largely seen as the rolled's last chance to prevent irreversible damage from climate change. earlier leaders of the world's richest nations meeting in rome fell short of siding specific net zero targets. the cop26 host spelled out the challenge ahead. there are no compelling excuses for our procrastination. not only have we acknowledged the problem, we're already seeing first hand the devastation that climate change causes.
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we also have a spectral report from bangladesh where we will see the impact of rising sea levels on coastal communities —— special report. and for the first time in more than 18 months, australia opens its international borders as flights resume from sydney and melbourne. live from our studio in singapore. this is bbc news. it's newsday. hello, and welcome to the programme. the long—awaited climate summit, cop26, has opening glasgow. world leaders, prominent scientists and advisers are ready for 12 days of discussion with one principal aim of discussion with one principalaim — to of discussion with one principal aim — to get the world to commit to reduce carbon emissions and avoid a climate catastrophe. and to
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confirm the urgent need for action, the world meteorological organisation has published its annual global climate report stating that the past seven years have been the hottest on record, with far—reaching repercussions for current and future generations. rebecca morel has more details. a gloomy start to proceedings in glasgow. but there are high hopes for a sunnier outcome. in a socially distanced conference centre, a reminder we are still in a time of covid as alok sharma formally takes the reins for what summit say is the last chance to save the planet secular floods, cyclones, wildfires, record temperatures. we know that our shared planet is changing for the worse. and we can only address that together through this international system. the together through this internationals stem. ., international system. the world meteorological _ international system. the world meteorological organisation - meteorological organisation warns today that these extremes are the new normal. but it is
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developing countries who are suffering the most, and they say the onus should be on richer nations.— say the onus should be on richer nations. malawi, like many countries _ richer nations. malawi, like many countries that - richer nations. malawi, like many countries that are - many countries that are developing, and has been on the receiving end of climate change issues pretty much brought by those developed nations who continue to admit so much carbon. ., ., , ., carbon. central to these talks is a vital number, _ carbon. central to these talks is a vital number, 1.5 - carbon. central to these talks is a vital number, 1.5 celsius | is a vital number, 1.5 celsius — if temperatures go above this, the world is already 1.1 degrees above preindustrial levels and we see the impact of that right now. . but even if every country does what it's promising, we're on course for 2.7 degrees by the end of the century. activists are demanding more action now, led by greta thunberg, mobbed as she arrived in glasgow, but
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she says there's still hope. if we can't keep the global average temperature rise to below 1.5, then we do 1.6, then 1.7, and so on. we can always prevent things from getting worse. it's never too late to do as much as we can. as the meeting gets under way, protesters say the time to tackle climate change is now. but after nearly three decades of talks, there are questions over how much can be achieved. with world leaders soon to arrive, all eyes will be on whether cop 26 will succeed. rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. already there's been a taste of the problems i had. the world's richest nations, the g20, have been meeting in rome where leaders were accused of failing to make the commitments that were needed. the british prime minister borisjohnson admitted minister boris johnson admitted the minister borisjohnson admitted the pledges were too vague and not enough. the united nations secretary—general said the time for diplomatic niceties was over, and that the summit and glasgow was the last hope. our political editor laura kuenssberg begins our coverage with a report
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on events in rome. a roman sunday stroll. a stylish canine seems the perfect accessory among the ancient alleys. what conflicts, what epic political struggles have these streets seen? history round every corner. then spot 15 of the most powerful leaders in the world taking in the sights. a coin in the famous fountain to guarantee a wish, but it might take more than tradition to stop the uk and france pulling away. others watch on as the two allies are stuck in a spat over fishing rights in channel waters. even borisjohnson wanted italy to inspire progress ahead of the cop climate meeting getting under way at home. there are no compelling excuses for our procrastination. not only have we acknowledged the problem, we are already seeing first—hand the devastation climate change causes. the science is clear, that we need to act now.
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what chance do you really think you have of making progress with 200 countries in glasgow when you haven't made enough progress with 20 countries here, and you don't seem able to sort out the question of a few dozen fishing permits with one of your closest allies, with the french? i think that the chances of progress in glasgow are exactly as i said, laura. i think they depend on the will, the courage, the leadership of everybody in the room. on fish, i've got to tell you the position is unchanged. i must say i was puzzled to read a letter from the french prime minister explicitly asking for britain to be punished for leaving the eu. number ten says it's all up to france to fix and withdraw their threats, but president macron claims it's down to the uk to grant more permits. "borisjohnson loves france," he said, "but if the uk continues to act like this, there will be retaliation." the irritation on both
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sides of the channel shows no signs of fading, and for borisjohnson, a rumbling row with an important ally like france is not exactly helpful just when he is trying to achieve a far wider, granderaim, persuading all of his counterparts from right around the world that slowing down the changes to the climate is a non—negotiable whose time has come. it's not easy, though. some countries don't want to move as fast. the russians questioning the uk ambition for countries to absorb as much carbon as they emit by 2050. why do you believe 2050 is some magic figure? i want an answer, because you are asking the question, being convinced that 2050 is non—negotiable. but the prime minister has regal backing, and for the heir to the throne, it's been a moment long in the making. now, after i suppose very nearly 50 years of trying to raise awareness of the growing climate
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and environmental crisis, i'm at last sensing a change in attitudes. when cop26 begins in glasgow tomorrow, quite literally it is the last—chance saloon. as the diplomatic caravan moves from rome's streets to scottish streets, borisjohnson still has a lot of arm—twisting to do. do you like roma? i love rome. hope may spring eternal, reality does not. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, rome. in glasgow, no one is underestimating the size of the challenge facing the delegates over the coming days. and as we've been telling you, the world meteorological organisation has just published their annual global claimant report stating that the past seven years have been the hottest on record with far—reaching repercussions for both the current and future generations, reinforcing the
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need for urgent action now. helen mountford is vice president for climate economics at the world resources institute. she spoke to my colleague, christian fraser, in glasgow about the devastating impact of climate change. we've been seeing the impacts of climate change now and pretty much every country around the world, dramatic record—breaking wife, her wildfires, heat waves, droughts, flood events wiping out communities, and we've only seen that at 1.1 celsius. so it will get so much worse for each fraction of a degree we go up. and the pressure really is on now here in glasgow to keep global warming at levels of no more than 1.5 celsius, or at least put forward a trajectory which will keep us there, will get us there. your organisation looks both at the climate science and also the mitigation, how we put new technologies in place to stop the rise in emissions.
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when you look at the investment that goes into the extraction of fossil fuels and put that into what goes into renewables, it's depressing. how do we correct the balance? it is indeed, and we saw this even under the covid crisis, governments were pumping in money, a lot more money than we've seen before, to renewables to clean energy, public transport — and we saw that, but the amount they pumped into fossilfuels, production and consumption was still even greater. so even under covid, as we knew we needed to go to a new clean economy, it will be more jobs—rich if you go to nature—based solutions — even that, they were pumping in a law in fossil fuel subsidies. one of the things we are seeing is there is this movement
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of both the youth movement, activists, what we are seeing in voting publics — the voting publics are starting to say, "look, we cannot do this anymore, we need to shift tack". the exciting examples we are seeing are from some countries that are starting to really look at how do you manage a just transition for the fossil fuel industries, for the workers there? in scotland, they've had a just transmission, south africa importantly are embedding just transition and what's a very ambitious government approach to reducing emissions to 2030. and i think that has to be the way forward, recognising it'll be a big shift and how do we react —— manage it well? the effects of climate change are already clear — for some nations, more than others. bangladesh is among the most vulnerable so our science editor david shukman looks now at one village there and what it needs. in a village on the coast
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of bangladesh, people are using mud to try to hold back the sea. it's all they've got. the rising level of the ocean means they are getting flooded more often. and we saw the same villagers struggling in the same way, back in 2009. the people who have done least to cause climate change suffering the most from it. if the forecasts of climate scientists are right and the sea rises even more, maybe by a metre by the end of the century, how on earth are these millions of people going to cope? with life so precarious, this community has long been desperate for international help. that's why this woman wanted to share her story at the climate summit in copenhagen 12 years ago. she told me she was pleased to be there and believed that world leaders would do something. they didn't.
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now her life is tougher than ever. extreme weather is striking more often, and there's still very little assistance. translation: we have no idea what we can do. - if people can help us, then something can change. we don't have the money to move to other places. i have nothing that i can give to my children. along some stretches of coast, there are now rows of sandbags to try to keep the sea at bay. a new school provides shelter during cyclones. but fresh water is harder to find. most supplies are contaminated by the rising sea. more than a decade ago, developing countries were given a promise that by now they'd be getting $100 billion a year in climate aid. here we are at the glasgow summit, and that promise still hasn't been fulfilled. the 100 billion wasjust
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a promise that has not been kept, and its importance is that leaders who made the promise are not keeping their promise and therefore, these leaders have no credibility. back in bangladesh, she says she doesn't want her children and grandchildren to suffer more than she has. but they are facing a hotter and more hostile climate, so there's real pressure for the talks in glasgow to get somewhere. david shukman, bbc news. if you want to get in touch about any of if you want to get in touch about any 0— about any of the stories you've seen, about any of the stories you've seen. like _ about any of the stories you've seen, like your— about any of the stories you've seen, like your hopes - about any of the stories you've seen, like your hopes and - seen, like your hopes and ambitions for cop26, i'm on twitter. i'm looking forward to hearing your thoughts. you're watching newsday on the bbc. australia opens up to national travel after strict border controls.
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the israeli prime minister, yitzhak rabin, the architect of the middle east peace process, has been assassinated. a 27—year—old man has been arrested and an extremist jewish organisation has claimed responsibility for the killing. at polling booths throughout the country, they voted on an historic day for australia. as the results came in, it was clear — the monarchy would survive. of the american hostages, there was no sign. they are being held somewhere inside the compound. and student leaders have threatened that, should the americans attempt rescue, they will all die. this mission has surpassed all expectations. _ voyager one and is now the most distant man—made object - anywhere in the universe — and itjust seems - to keep on going. tonight, we prove once more that the true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals.
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this is newsday on the bbc. i'm karishma vaswani in singapore. our headlines... in a stark illustration of the challenge facing the cop26 claimant conference in glasgow, scientists say average temperatures have reached new at record highs. earlier in rome at the g20, the role's largest economies pledged to become carbon neutral by or around the mid century. —— the world's largest economies. libya is the main hub for migrants and refugees, hoping to cross from africa to europe via the mediterranean. and thousands were detained at the beginning of the month in a crackdown by the libyan authorities.
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but detention centres are dangerously overcrowded, with migrants living in appalling conditions. and after a recent mass break—out, guards shot dead six people. our international correspondent orla guerin reports now from the capital tripoli, and a warning, her report contains some distressing images. consigned to the cold, hard ground. many who dream of reaching europe. as the sun rises, some stir awake among the piles of rubbish, discarded as they seem to be. trying to face another day of hunger and worry. they fled here in terror. guards opening fire during this mass escape from a packed detention centre. within minutes, six migrants lay dead. maybe i will leave, maybe i will die. they kill people, they shoot
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like this, they should. —— they shoot. living here is dying. escaping from shooting is dying. it's all the same. and, after a month on the streets here, rashid is between life and death. he is from war—torn darfur. he is disabled. and he is getting sicker by the day. they are camped out on the doorstep of the united nations, outside a community centre run by the un refugee agency, an obvious place to look for support. we have gathered here in front of the united nations office needing help. but until today, we haven't got any response. no help at all? no help at all, no food, no medical assistance. not even water to drink. so we are struggling.
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the messages here are so clear — "we need help, we need evacuation, get us out of libya." people here say they feel abandoned by the united nations and by the world. they tell us they have been left to fend for themselves, trying to survive on the streets. this looks very, very bad for the unhcr, these people on your doorstep and on the street. it looks very bad, and it is very bad for them, so it's important for us to continue to make assistance available to them. we have provided emergency cash to many of them, food parcels to many of them. not in front of the cdc, because it's not a safe place, that has to be understood. that's why we have provided assistance in other locations where we can provide access, order and safety and security for these refugees will stop there was no security for abdullah, who is from sudan and has burns on most of his body.
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he is now being cared for in hospital in tripoli. he was held by smugglers in southern libya. when he couldn't pay what they demanded, they doused him in petrol and set him alight. many are drawn here by the hope of crossing the mediterranean to a better life, but there is suffering and danger long before they reach the sea. orla guerin, bbc news, tripoli. such a tragic report there of the conditions people in that camp have to put up with. i want to bring you another story now, sunday has marked the beginning of a two day holiday observed in catholic communities around the world called the day of the dead, a celebration of the lives of the departed. in mexico city, where roots of the tradition run deep, elaborate altars have gone up all over the town.
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the idealist where it does, the day of the dead. a mexican tradition marked by two days of celebrating departed loved ones with joy. the celebrating departed loved ones withjoy. the pandemic has brought a heightened meaning to this holiday. iii brought a heightened meaning to this holiday-— this holiday. if you put it in the context _ this holiday. if you put it in the context of _ this holiday. if you put it in the context of qovu - this holiday. if you put it in the context of qovu and i this holiday. if you put it in the context of qovu and all this holiday. if you put it in - the context of qovu and all the deaths that happened, it means even more because it gives people even more comfort in terms of how you can communicate to micro commemorate someone who passed away due to the virus. so overall i really enjoy it, i think it's very colourful, because you are a counting death was a burning life. it is believed in _ death was a burning life. it is believed in catholic - believed in catholic communities around the world that for the first two days of november, the souls of the dead return to the land of the living and reunite with family. the celebration is marked by food, drink, offerings, altars, and marigolds. the aztecs believed the ancestors followed the scent to find their way
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back. the traditions were even brought to the big screen in recent years in the animated film cocoa. recent years in the animated film cocoa-— recent years in the animated film cocoa. ., ., ., ., ., film cocoa. now that for a dead au ! not film cocoa. now that for a dead guy! not bad — film cocoa. now that for a dead guy! not bad yourself. - film cocoa. now that for a dead guy! not bad yourself. this - guy! not bad yourself. this ear, 16 guy! not bad yourself. this year, 16 altars _ guy! not bad yourself. this year, 16 altars have - guy! not bad yourself. this year, 16 altars have gone i guy! not bad yourself. this| year, 16 altars have gone up guy! not bad yourself. this . year, 16 altars have gone up in the centre of mexico city — a welcome scene of levity. a capital city that's lost nearly 300,000 people to go but 19. translation:— translation: after all we've one translation: after all we've gone delicate _ translation: after all we've gone delicate live _ translation: after all we've gone delicate live through - translation: after all we've| gone delicate live through and the people who passed away, we now see a boom after being locked up. these examples of mexican culture... in locked up. these examples of mexican culture. . ._ mexican culture... in a world where masks _ mexican culture... in a world where masks are _ mexican culture... in a world where masks are the - mexican culture... in a world where masks are the new - mexican culture... in a world . where masks are the new norm, in mexico city, they are much more pretty. nice to have some pretty masks than the kind we usually wear these days. after
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imposing some of the strictest border controls in the world, australia is now opening up to international travel, fully vaccinated citizens will no longer need permission to lead the micro leave, and the vaccination... reaches 80%. but what about travel within the country? while we can cross live now to sydney airport. we can cross live to sydney airport and the bbc�*s australia correspondent shaimaa khalil. you've been there all morning looking all the people who are getting to reunite with their loved ones, aren't they? what's the mood been at the airport this morning? it’s the mood been at the airport this morning?— the mood been at the airport this morning? it's been a very emotional— this morning? it's been a very emotional day _ this morning? it's been a very emotional day here _ this morning? it's been a very emotional day here at - this morning? it's been a very emotional day here at sydney| emotional day here at sydney airport. i met one of the arrival gates and we are just looking at families now arriving. this is one of the flights, people arejust arriving. this is one of the
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flights, people are just making their way back. welcome back! how do you feel?— how do you feel? pretty good. pretty good. — how do you feel? pretty good. pretty good. good _ how do you feel? pretty good. pretty good, good to - how do you feel? pretty good. pretty good, good to be - how do you feel? pretty good. | pretty good, good to be home. some have said that after waiting for such a long time, it doesn't seem to feel real. people have arrived here to embraces, cheers, and tearful reunions. fully vaccinated australians and australian residents have now been able to come home from overseas quarantine free for the first time in nearly two years. {line time in nearly two years. one ofthe time in nearly two years. one of the lucky — time in nearly two years. one of the lucky ones _ time in nearly two years. one of the lucky ones who - time in nearly two years. one of the lucky ones who actually -ot of the lucky ones who actually got permission to go. but, because _ got permission to go. but, because my mother died over a year— because my mother died over a year and — because my mother died over a year and a _ because my mother died over a year and a half ago, it's taken me that — year and a half ago, it's taken me that long to get out of the country— me that long to get out of the country to sort her affairs suckling _ country to sort her affairs suckling very emotional, it's good — suckling very emotional, it's good to— suckling very emotional, it's good to be home, and it's been very— good to be home, and it's been very tough, you know, not being able _ very tough, you know, not being able to— very tough, you know, not being able to get— very tough, you know, not being able to get on a plane whenever you want — able to get on a plane whenever you want to see your family. something happens to them, you can easily— something happens to them, you can easily make _ something happens to them, you can easily make it— something happens to them, you can easily make it home. - something happens to them, you can easily make it home. 0r- something happens to them, you can easily make it home. or if. can easily make it home. or if something _ can easily make it home. or if something was— can easily make it home. or if something was to _ can easily make it home. or if something was to happen - can easily make it home. or if something was to happen to l can easily make it home. or if. something was to happen to me, i something was to happen to me, i have _ something was to happen to me, i have no— something was to happen to me, i have no one _ something was to happen to me, i have no one in— something was to happen to me, i have no one in the _ something was to happen to me, i have no one in the uk- i have no one in the uk to support— i have no one in the uk to support me _ i have no one in the uk to support me— i have no one in the uk to support me. just relief. so much relief. _ support me. just relief. so much relief. i— support me. just relief. so much relief. i have - support me. just relief. so
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much relief. i have a - support me. just relief. so much relief. i have a small ten—year—old son, and the thought— ten—year—old son, and the thought of having to quarantine the three — thought of having to quarantine the three of us in a hotel for two — the three of us in a hotel for two weeks is a nightmare. we were — two weeks is a nightmare. we were willing to do it, but yeah. _ were willing to do it, but yeah, it'sjust amazing. yeah, it's 'ust amazing. many have yeah, it'sjust amazing. many have been — yeah, it'sjust amazing. many have been overcome - yeah, it'sjust amazing. many have been overcome with - yeah, it'sjust amazing. many - have been overcome with emotion while some have stopped to talk to us telling us how happy they were, many of us were lost for words. i was being to a woman and i asked her, how does it feel to be back after all these months? she looked at me with tears in her eyes and said there are no words. this is been a busy day at sydney airport, another busy day in melbourne because new south wales and victoria have been the two —— three states, but it's still going to be a wait for millions as other states and territories have yet to open. it will be a longer wait for people. but your people are happy they are able to come home, travel overseas, and not have to worry about quarantine
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after more than 18 months. i’m after more than 18 months. i'm so sorry. _ after more than 18 months. i'm so sorry. but — after more than 18 months. i'm so sorry. but i _ after more than 18 months. i'm so sorry, but i have tojump in there, fantastic stuff from you as always, thanks. that's it for newsday, stay with bbc news. morning. a change of month brings with it a change of the weather. we'll start the week with sunny spells and scattered showers. by the middle part of the week, it gets noticeably quieter, cooler for all of us, and some frost and fog overnight, so plenty to pack in there. so on that monday morning, then, it looks somewhat like this — with low pressure easing away, and as we go through the week, high pressure will build in which acquaintance things down. but ahead of it, we can trace those isobars all the way back to the north — and that means a cold or wind direction, with that northerly wind and driving the blue tones, the cooler air, when you look a little bit further south, you really will notice the difference with the feel of the weather if you are out and about this week. so sunday spells and blustery showers from the word go, most
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of the showers to the north but some will push further south as we go into the afternoon, and it looks as if those temperatures will peak between 9—11; celsius. now the showers will tend to fade away as we move through the night, and we will have some clear skies, perhaps a few frequent showers continuing into the far north of scotland. but where skies clear away, temperatures will fall away and we could see low single figures to greet us first thing on tuesday morning, and that gives us the potential for some frost to form, and maybe some patchy fog. so first thing on tuesday morning, it'll be a bit of a chilly start, lots of sunshine, some showers around, most frequent ones along the exposed north coasts of scotland and northern ireland, and some running down through the irish sea. temperatures are likely to struggle, though — top temperatures of 11—12 celsius. now, as we move out of tuesday into wednesday, still the risk of some showers, but as the high desperately tries to squeeze in along the west, but again, we are likely to see sunny spells and scattered showers as we go through the day on wednesday. it will be quite a cool field
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to the day with those temperatures really struggling in some areas not getting into double figures by the middle part of the afternoon, so a top temperature of 7—11 celsius. out of wednesday into thursday, the high—pressure finally builds in, the winds will ease, we will see a good deal of quiet weather — that will kill off the showers, so that means on thursday, there is a greater chance of seeing more in the way of sunshine, but as you can see those temperatures are still set to struggle even for this time of year.
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this is bbc news. we'll have the headlines and all the main news stories for you at the top of the hour as newsday continues straight after hardtalk. welcome to hardtalk, i'm stephen sackur. it is tempting to be sceptical about a conference billed by some as humanity's last chance to save the planet. but the truth is the cop26 meeting in glasgow is a very big deal. global heating is real. it threatens to inflict existential harms on all life on earth unless greenhouse gas
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emissions are effectively eliminated within a generation.

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