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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 2, 2021 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. i'm ben brown. world leaders at the un climate summit in glasgow have agreed their first major deal — a pledge to halt and reverse deforestation by 2030. brazil is one of the signatories to the deal — but the bbc has seen evidence of the growing deforestation of the amazon rainforest. we're being led to an area where illegal logging is taking place. and here we are at the edge of a national park, an area that is supposed to be protected. (00v) i'm here in glasgow, with all the latest from this crucial climate change conference. i'm annita mcveigh. over the course of the day i will be talking to a huge number of people from around the uk and around the world.
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the uk environment secretary has welcomed what he calls a big de—escalation of the post—brexit fishing row with france. paris says it will delay introducing punitive trade measures while further talks are held. mps are calling for the introduction of smart motorways to be paused until the government can prove they�* re safe. the system uses the hard shoulder to increase capacity, but critics say that's contributed to road deaths. welcome to glasgow. this is our continuing coverage of the crucial climate summit at bbc news and bbc well to. it is day two of the leaders�* summit, the opening
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stage of cop26, and after today they will go away and by delegations, the negotiators, will get down to the detailed discussions. —— the delegations. but we have news of the first major deal of the climate summit. it is expected to be signed today and it is to end deforestation by 2030. it is notjust about cutting forests jamboree planting forests were they have been cleared forests were they have been cleared for various reasons. the uk prime minister borisjohnson has called it a landmark agreement and it ties in with one of the four main goals of cop26, restoring habitats. it is particularly important because brazil will be a signatory. since chapel scenario was elected he has
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been encouraging activities in the amazon rainforest which have led to deforestation like clearing land for cattle rearing and mining —— since jair bolsonaro was signed in. there are some questions from environmentalists about the possible impact of this. the countries making the deal account for 85% of the world�*s forests. it is important to remember that experts are giving this a cautious welcome. tanya steele is chief executive of the world wildlife fund in the uk. i mean, this is a hugely ambitious pledge from world leaders because of the sheer scale of it. we have destroyed over 50% of land—based ecosystems, and this announcement, it�*s notjust about protecting forests to keep them standing, it�*s actually about starting to restore and put so much of our wild landscapes back. there is no path to a 1.5 degree world that doesn�*t rely on us keeping our forests standing and actually starting the process, the hard task, of restoring so much
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of our land and our nature. this is a critical climate promise and it is a promise that has to be met. the amazon rainforest is seen as vital in the fight against climate change. because of its sheer size and the amount of carbon dioxide it absorbs from the atmosphere, it has often been described as the lungs of the world. from rondonia state in the brazilian amazon, our international correspondent orla guerin reports. the amazon dream, a forest haven combating climate change. but the reality can look like this. no more tree canopy, the land stripped bare for planting crops. we were shown how easy it is to plunder the amazon, just one man and a chainsaw.
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well, we are making our way now deeper into the forest. we�*re being led to an area where illegal logging is taking place. and here we are at the edge of a national park, an area that supposed to be protected. but campaigners say illegal loggers have a green light from president jair bolsonaro. they accuse him of carving up environmental protections and fuelling climate change. miguel isn�*t worried about the planet, he�*s worried about his family. his handiwork, seen from above. every tree that falls here releases carbon dioxide back into the atmosphere,
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contributing to global warming. by night, specialist police are on the lookout for crimes against the forest. illegal logging is big business, there is a rainforest mafia. the timber can wind up in europe or the us. this load is legal, but sergeant robertson says he is fighting a losing battle.
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but we got a very different perspective from this activist. she has spent her life defending the rainforest and its indigenous peoples — or trying to. this rich but fragile ecosystem
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is changing its colours. deforestation means the rainforest in brazil now emits more carbon than it stores. the message from here is a distress signal. orla guerin, bbc news, in the amazon rainforest. iamjoined i am joined now byjames shaw, who is new zealand�*s minister dealing with climate change. mr shaw, really good to have you with that. i would love your reaction firstly on the news on deforestation, ending deforestation by 2030, because new zealand prides itself, doesn�*t it, on its green, outdoorsy image? we do. it is on its green, outdoorsy image? - do. it is not always fully borne out by reality but we have about 30% of new zealand�*s landmass covered by
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department of conservation estate, including lots of our original old—growth indigenous rainforests, and it is an area of concern for us and it is an area of concern for us and something we are talking to other countries around the asia—pacific about how we can work together to draw that to a close. has new zealand signed up to this deal, mr shaw?— has new zealand signed up to this deal, mr shaw? . . . ., deal, mr shaw? yes, we have. we made that decision _ deal, mr shaw? yes, we have. we made that decision in — deal, mr shaw? yes, we have. we made that decision in cabinet _ deal, mr shaw? yes, we have. we made that decision in cabinet yesterday - that decision in cabinet yesterday just in time so we are able to do so. just in time so we are able to do so, ., ., , just in time so we are able to do so. . ., , ., ., so. new zealand is one of the few countries in _ so. new zealand is one of the few countries in the _ so. new zealand is one of the few countries in the world _ so. new zealand is one of the few countries in the world that - so. new zealand is one of the few countries in the world that has - countries in the world that has enshrined in law a net zero target by 2050, but looking at that closer targets, the end of this decade, 2030, what are you doing to try to make sure we can keep 1.5 degrees, stopping global warming going beyond 1.5 degrees above preindustrial
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levels? fin 1.5 degrees above preindustrial levels? ., ., 1.5 degrees above preindustrial levels? ,, ., ., . ., levels? on sunday i announced our government _ levels? on sunday i announced our government has _ levels? on sunday i announced our government hasjust _ levels? on sunday i announced our government hasjust decided - levels? on sunday i announced our government hasjust decided to - government has just decided to increase our nationally determined contribution, we previously lodged a target of 30% below 2005 levels, we launch that in 2016. we have lodged a new target on sunday of 50% below 2005 levels, just shy of half from where we are today so it is quite a steep decline. forests will have to be a very large part of how we make that commitment. it is roughly in line with the ipcc report on 1.5 degrees that came out a few years ago and the temperature threshold is baked into the legislation you just mentioned. baked into the legislation you 'ust mentioned. ~ . baked into the legislation you 'ust mentioned. . , baked into the legislation you 'ust mentioned.— baked into the legislation you 'ust mentioned. ~ . ., mentioned. methane accounts for a hu . e mentioned. methane accounts for a huge percentage. _ mentioned. methane accounts for a huge percentage, 4096, _ mentioned. methane accounts for a huge percentage, 4096, of- mentioned. methane accounts for a l huge percentage, 4096, of emissions huge percentage, 40%, of emissions in new zealand, both from the agricultural sector which is
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obviously very important from your country, and from waste. but i understand that is not included in your net zero strategy, there is a separate strategy for that. surely it should be included in the overall net zero strategy of new zealanders to meaningfully contribute towards this goal? ilin." to meaningfully contribute towards this coal? , ., ., , this goal? our legislation is based on the ipcc _ this goal? our legislation is based on the ipcc report _ this goal? our legislation is based on the ipcc report from _ this goal? our legislation is based on the ipcc report from 2019 - this goal? our legislation is based on the ipcc report from 2019 to i this goal? our legislation is based | on the ipcc report from 2019 to 1.5 degrees, and one of the things that reported was was disaggregated the different gases in terms of their impact on global warming. what they obviously said was that fossil methane is, the methane associated with the fossil fuel industry, barely needs to come to zero because thatis barely needs to come to zero because that is what is taking in the lithosphere and the ground and putting it into the atmosphere, they said biogenic methane associated with both agriculture and waste has to decline but at a shallower rate
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and so we actually use the ipcc range, about 24 to 47%, as our target for 2050. range, about 24 to 4796, as our target for 2050.— target for 2050. you need to do better, target for 2050. you need to do better. don't — target for 2050. you need to do better, don't you? _ target for 2050. you need to do better, don't you? i— target for 2050. you need to do better, don't you? i think- target for 2050. you need to do better, don't you? i think every| better, don't you? i think every country pretty _ better, don't you? i think every country pretty much _ better, don't you? i think every country pretty much needs - better, don't you? i think every country pretty much needs to i better, don't you? i think every| country pretty much needs to do better on reducing greenhouse gases over the course of the coming decades. new zealand like most countries around the world has allowed our nations to increase since 1990, which was the year that the world collectively said we needed to start reducing greenhouse gases. i am needed to start reducing greenhouse gases. iam not needed to start reducing greenhouse gases. i am not delighted with the lack of progress over the course of the last three decades, and what thatis the last three decades, and what that is meant for new zealand under the countries around the world is that actually we need to work even harder in the coming ten years to make sure we actually reduce emissions in line with that goal of staying within1.5 degrees. emissions in line with that goal of staying within 1.5 degrees. because the climate action _ staying within 1.5 degrees. because the climate action tracker - staying within 1.5 degrees. because the climate action tracker looks - staying within 1.5 degrees. because the climate action tracker looks at| the climate action tracker looks at countries around the world and has
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new zealand not sitting in a great place in terms of reaching targets for 2030 and 2050, i am sure you are not comfortable with that. as we listen to activists here at glasgow, greta thunberg yesterday saying that the politicians across the water from where i am sitting in the armadillo building and elsewhere are not really listening to the voices of activists, that the real leadership will come from outside, the activists. what you say to that? i agree with her, i am tremendously frustrated. you have to acknowledge the fact that since 1990, the year the fact that since 1990, the year the world collectively said it is time for a stew start reducing emissions, we have actually doubled the amount of carbon dioxide that has gone into the atmosphere since 1990 than we did in the entire period from the industrial revolution leading up to 1990. there is absolutely no room for
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self—congratulation or self—delusion, we have generated terrible job on a planetary scale at the level of individual countries of reducing emissions in line with what science requires, and where that leads us today is we need to have an incredibly steep decline which will be very difficult and challenging, because we have left it so long to get started. because we have left it so long to get started-— because we have left it so long to get started. one final question if i ma , i get started. one final question if i may. i was _ get started. one final question if i may, i was reading _ get started. one final question if i may, i was reading in _ get started. one final question if i may, i was reading in your- get started. one final question if i i may, i was reading in your biography on the new zealand government website how you were inspired to get into politics, you were in business and studying for a masters in sustainable development and business leadership, you said that lead to you being inspired to realise that business alone could not respond to the challenge of climate change with scale and speed necessary, so you got into politics, but so much of the conversation already at the summit has been about the vital role of the private sector. have your
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views changed on the balance between what needs to be done, whether leadership has to come from politicians or indeed the necessary money from the private—sector? mr; money from the private-sector? my views, i money from the private—sector? m views, i think, money from the private—sector? m: views, ithink, have become money from the private—sector? m; views, ithink, have become oriented views, i think, have become oriented strand that point. i have worked with businesses both before getting into politics and since, that want to do the right thing, that are putting significant resources into it, but collective action right across the economy matters in every sector in the context that an individual business operating is really determined by the regulatory environment, price signals and so on a failed set by government, government has an absolutely critical role to play in facilitating the private sector taking the action it needs, and in many cases it wants to take a boat is constrained by the environment it
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finds itself operating in. business is absolutely critical to being able to do this but it has to be facilitated by government leadership. facilitated by government leadership-— facilitated by government leadershi -. g . ,, . ., leadership. jamie shaul, climate chan . e leadership. jamie shaul, climate change minister _ leadership. jamie shaul, climate change minister for _ leadership. jamie shaul, climate change minister for new - leadership. jamie shaul, climatel change minister for new zealand, thank you so much for your time —— james shaw. i am joined by the prime minister of andorra, located between france and spain, xavier espot zamora. thank you forjoining us on bbc news today. andorra is a member of the small countries initiative set up by the world health association in europe in 2013 and one of your key objectives is protecting from the impact of climate change. what has that initiative been doing to change that? �* ., ., initiative been doing to change that? ., ., ., , ., ., ., , that? andorra does not avoid its responsibilities _ that? andorra does not avoid its responsibilities and _ that? andorra does not avoid its responsibilities and we - that? andorra does not avoid its responsibilities and we are - that? andorra does not avoid its responsibilities and we are fully| responsibilities and we are fully convinced that wattage done by small states like andorra can have a role,
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but it is imperative for other countries —— what is done by small countries. we are a leading country in greenhouse gas mitigation, which requires the implementation of a series of measures, such as the declarations you just said. in series of measures, such as the declarations you just said. declarations you 'ust said. in terms ofthe declarations you 'ust said. in terms of the impact — declarations you 'ust said. in terms of the impact on— declarations you just said. in terms of the impact on people's - declarations you just said. in terms of the impact on people's health i declarations you just said. in terms of the impact on people's health ofj of the impact on people�*s health of climate change, can you give us more specifics? is that something you are giving among the eight countries involved in the initiative, or are you trying to set targets and goals for the world on a global scale? andorra, for example, is a small country, can have a role. the fact andorra has one of the best health systems of the world, we think we can show other countries, among these eight countries but other countries also, that climate change has a real and important impact on
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health, not only on economic growth, on social cohesion, not only on environmental protection but also on the health of our citizens, which is why we are working on this commitment and we can show the world and we want to show the world that we cannot put out risk the health of our citizens because of climate change. chi our citizens because of climate chante. . ., . our citizens because of climate chante. , , change. of course, considering the covid pandemic _ change. of course, considering the covid pandemic and _ change. of course, considering the covid pandemic and how _ change. of course, considering the covid pandemic and how countries | covid pandemic and how countries have worked together, and there has been criticism they have not worked closely enough in some respects, but very much linked to how the world can work together or not to tackle climate change? chi can work together or not to tackle climate change?— can work together or not to tackle climate change? of course. i think the main problem _ climate change? of course. i think the main problem we _ climate change? of course. i think the main problem we had - climate change? of course. i think the main problem we had to i climate change? of course. i think the main problem we had to face l climate change? of course. i think| the main problem we had to face at this moment is climate change, we cannot solve this problem, we cannot find good solutions if we do not act with common work. that is why
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andorra is always committed with the united nations, challenges and the response the united nations act offers, these multilateralism is and staying together, small countries and big countries, to face a common problem, that is climate change. prime minister, thank you very much for your time, prime minister, thank you very much foryourtime, much prime minister, thank you very much for your time, much appreciated. prime minister xavier espot zamora of andorra. with me and our glasgow studio is chris stark, he is from the committee on climate change, he is their chief executive. i want to get your reaction to this big first announcement from the climate summit on stopping deforestation by 2030 and restoring areas that have been
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deforested, planting more trees? this is the first of the really big announcement we have seen, day one was about the big statements from leaders, india�*s pledge was the first thing to reflect on but i am more excited about this, it is great to see a political commitment at police to discuss deforestation and retreat from the position that many of the countries in the world most guilty of differing sting appear to have signed up to, i and pleased, it is a testament this conference can work —— many of the countries in the world most guilty of deforestation. your point is largely in the uk, but how worried are you about brazil? brazil is signing up but president bolsonaro has encouraged mining activities, deforestation for cattle rearing in the amazon and he has cut funding to departments with the power to go and find and arrest people breaking environmental laws. there is a real tension between his
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actions and these words in glasgow, is there a change on the way? i think it looks like it, that you are right, there is a lot to be concerned and even suspicious about when it comes to brazil and these issues. i hope this is a sign they are moving in a different direction. one key issue of cop26 will be how we deal with notjust deforestation but the pretension for the sharing of carbon credits across the world, countries like brazil have always tried to have their cake and eat it when it comes to forestation and deforestation. if they are more willing to talk about this constructively it will be a huge step forward, i hope it is the case. how big an issue is deforestation in the uk? $5 how big an issue is deforestation in the uk? �* , ., how big an issue is deforestation in theuk? a. y how big an issue is deforestation in the uk? as a country we were once covered in _ the uk? as a country we were once covered in forest, _ the uk? as a country we were once covered in forest, before _ the uk? as a country we were once covered in forest, before many i the uk? as a country we were once covered in forest, before many of l covered in forest, before many of the other countries in the world we went through a process to remove those forests for agriculture. we have to move to a much more forested position in the future and one
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critical test of uk leaders is whether they are willing to fund that strategy, so far they have been willing, particularly here in scotland. willing, particularly here in scotland-— willing, particularly here in scotland. . ., ., scotland. the committee run an event esterda scotland. the committee run an event yesterday called _ scotland. the committee run an event yesterday called making _ scotland. the committee run an event yesterday called making ambition i yesterday called making ambition count: the role of climate chills and turning ambition to action. what advice do you have for world leaders to make this rhetoric turn into concrete actions that will make a difference? we concrete actions that will make a difference?— difference? we run an event last nitht, it difference? we run an event last night. it is _ difference? we run an event last night, it is brilliant _ difference? we run an event last night, it is brilliant to _ difference? we run an event last night, it is brilliant to do - difference? we run an event last night, it is brilliant to do this, i night, it is brilliant to do this, we brought together around 30 bodies around the world similar to ourselves, giving advice to world leaders notjust on what climate changes but how to tackle edge, that is what the event was about. the crucial part of the role we play in the uk is we offer advice to technical pathways that parliament has such, many countries do not have the legislation in place we have in the legislation in place we have in the uk, having it in the uk allows us to say the difficult stuff before
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the world leaders had to implement it. �* , ., ~ the world leaders had to implement it. let's talk about the proposed coal mine _ it. let's talk about the proposed coal mine in _ it. let's talk about the proposed coal mine in cumbria, _ it. let's talk about the proposed coal mine in cumbria, the i it. let's talk about the proposed coal mine in cumbria, the prime minister said a couple of days ago for the first time on record that he does not want to see a tap in but it is up to local planning officials, and also the kampl oilfield off shetland. you must have concerns about these projects alongside what the uk says it wants to do. —— the cambo oilfield. if we open == the uk says it wants to do. -- the cambo oilfield. if we open- the uk says it wants to do. -- the cambo oilfield. if we open -- if we o ten a cambo oilfield. if we open -- if we open a minefield _ cambo oilfield. if we open -- if we open a minefield it _ cambo oilfield. if we open -- if we open a minefield it is _ cambo oilfield. if we open -- if we open a minefield it is not - cambo oilfield. if we open -- if we open a minefield it is notjust i cambo oilfield. if we open -- if we open a minefield it is notjust for. open a minefield it is notjust for people in cumbria, there is impact for others. we suggested they should be aimed at zero test in this country for new developments of any ti’pet country for new developments of any type, that could be housing as much as oil and gas. you type, that could be housing as much as oil and gas-— as oil and gas. you want those tro'ects as oil and gas. you want those projects cancelled? _ as oil and gas. you want those projects cancelled? i _ as oil and gas. you want those projects cancelled? i want i as oil and gas. you want those l projects cancelled? i want them properly accounted for, i don�*t think i was a place for a new coal mine in this country, i am happy to say that, i think it is difficult
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for a local authority to make that kind of planning decision. thank you to talk —— for talking to us, chris stark. you are watching bbc news. the last really major climate change conference was parroting —— paris in 2015, by the paris climate accord was signed. the main architect of the paris climate agreement, christiana figueres has praised the uk�*s leadership at cop26. what is really fascinating about the uk, learning from history, this is where the industrial revolution was born, so the fact we are being hosted here where we are creeping ourselves out of the industrial revolution into the new energy revolution is very historic, i do
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not think there is any other country in the world that has moved away from coal as quickly as the uk. what we have also seen as the move away from coal and gas and oil has not been as smooth as many would you want, but the direction of travel is definitely the right one. let�*s return to the big news from today so far, deforestation, the plan being signed up to by around 100 leaders on day two of the leaders�* summit at cop26 in glasgow to end deforestation by 2030 and replant areas that have already been deforested. it is a big deal because the forests are the lungs of the world and have the ability to absorb c02, world and have the ability to absorb co2, carbon dioxide, from the atmosphere. if they are put down, they can�*t. let�*s look behind the headline little bit more with our
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reality check correspondence chris morris. what do you make of this statement, there has been a lot of reaction talking about a previous deal to end deforestation in 2014 that has not come to fruition, do we know what went wrong with that? people kept cutting trees down, basically. there was a un strategic plan for forests in 2017 which set a series of goals for 2030, so reaching an agreement does nothing on its own, but the timing, the nature of the event, the high—level political involvement makes this more significant, but the proof of the pudding is in the eating, there are questions about enforcement, how we know the pledges are actually followed through on the ground, there is a question about punishment, what happened to a country that does not live up to its commitments. brute country that does not live up to its commitments.— country that does not live up to its commitments. . ., ., ., commitments. we have no idea whether this agreement — commitments. we have no idea whether this agreement will _ commitments. we have no idea whether this agreement will do _ commitments. we have no idea whether this agreement will do any _ commitments. we have no idea whether this agreement will do any better- this agreement will do any better than the ones that went before a
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century? fist than the ones that went before a centu ? �* ., ., ~' century? at the moment, no, i think we will have — century? at the moment, no, i think we will have more _ century? at the moment, no, i think we will have more detail in - century? at the moment, no, i think we will have more detail in the next| we will have more detail in the next couple of days about how some of the detailed nature of the plan will be put into practice again it is very well for leaders sitting in glasgow but it is different if you are in the middle of the congo or the middle of the amazon. something we talked about quite a debate yesterday is the role of the private sector, alongside the countries signing up to this a fine number of international financial institution to collectively control about $9 trillion in assets have promised, or will be promising, to remove deforestation from their investment portfolios by 2025 and two publicly accountable how they are doing that. that should drive more sustainability?- that should drive more sustainability? that should drive more sustainabili ? ., ., ., , sustainability? follow the money often works _ sustainability? follow the money often works in — sustainability? follow the money often works in these _ sustainability? follow the money often works in these cases i sustainability? follow the money often works in these cases but i sustainability? follow the money i often works in these cases but there is often the question about what happens on the ground, the somebody
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like president bolsonaro, known to be sceptical about climate action, really mean what he says when he signed paper? —— does somebody like president bolsonaro? signed paper? -- does somebody like president bolsonaro?— president bolsonaro? people will be lookint for president bolsonaro? people will be looking for countries _ president bolsonaro? people will be looking for countries replanting i looking for countries replanting forests, who trumpet bat, but are still using fossil fuel such a significant level. they would cancel each other out, effectively no net benefit? ., , ., , , benefit? one of the problems with trees is how _ benefit? one of the problems with trees is how permanent _ benefit? one of the problems with trees is how permanent are i benefit? one of the problems with trees is how permanent are they i benefit? one of the problems with | trees is how permanent are they as benefit? one of the problems with i trees is how permanent are they as a climate solution, which gets us to the question of offsetting. if people know they can fly somewhere and then get trees planted, sometimes trees burned down that the carbon dioxide states and the atmosphere for hundreds of years, lots of the trees burned down in the california wildfires this summer were from big offsetting projects. trees are great, we know they absorb carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, but the carbon stays once it is produced for a long time and trees
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are much more vulnerable, so it is notjust a question of planting bed protecting the forest habitat. thank ou, chris protecting the forest habitat. thank you, chris morris, _ protecting the forest habitat. thank you, chris morris, our _ protecting the forest habitat. thank you, chris morris, our reality i protecting the forest habitat. thank you, chris morris, our reality check correspondence. her majesty the queen recorded a message for world leaders which was played to them last night. the queen had very much wanted to be yet in person but ended up wanted to be yet in person but ended up recording the message because her doctors advised her to rest. it was interesting, she told with great pride about the work of her son prince charles, her grandson prince william, their endeavours and trying to deal with climate change. i will come back to back, we are going to uk prime minister borisjohnson. uk prime minister boris johnson. and uk prime minister borisjohnson. and instead become nature's and instead become nature�*s custodian. we had to stop the devastating loss of the great
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teaming ecosystems, trillion tillage cathedrals of nature, 3 trillion pillared cathedrals of nature that are the lungs of our planet, and the destruction, together with agriculture and other change of land use that account for almost a quarter of all global emissions. if we want to keep the paris goal of 1.5 degrees in sight and support communities in the front line of climate change, we must protect and restore the world�*s forests, and i believe we can do it. many in this room have made bold commitments, including a president who has introduced a moratorium on forest and preplanned exploitation in indonesia, thank you. that president has taken fantastic strides in safeguarding the colombian amazon, as well as leaders of the countries of the congo basin who are working to protect their precious forests, and with today because my glasgow
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leaders�* declaration, i and told 110 leaders�* declaration, i and told 110 leaders have come together, representing over 85% of the world�*s forest estate, they have made a landmark commitment to work together to reverse deforestation and land degradation by 2030, notjust halt at the traverse, meaning more leaders than ever before had signed up leaders than ever before had signed up to protect the forests, from countries in the north and the south, with temperate forests, tropical forests and including nations like china, russia, brazil, some of the largest forest estate in the world. what is most significant about this declaration is notjust the range of countries coming together but also we are working in partnership with the private sector, philanthropists, indigenous people and local communities to address the economic drivers of deforestation. there are interesting parallels with
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our wider efforts on reducing emissions. what really matters is the rapid development of clean technologies with private sector investment and this transformation has become an unparalleled economic opportunity for growth and forjob creation and still we are taking similar steps today to make forest conservation not just today to make forest conservation notjust right for our planet but right for rare economies too. we know 80% of tropical deforestation is driven by the global trade in agricultural commodities so the uk and indonesia have brought together countries that produce and consume these goods to agree a road map for sustainable trade so we can grow our economies whilst reducing the pressure on our forests. and economies whilst reducing the pressure on ourforests. and i am delighted this has been signed by 28 countries accounting for around three quarters of global trade in these commodities. as a result cocoa
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farms in west africa should receive a better, fairer price for their products in return for protecting their forests. products in return for protecting theirforests. international products in return for protecting their forests. international trade standards should reward producers who shift their production to more sustainable methods and assisted by new technology should receive a better, fairer price for their products in return for protecting their forests. products in return for protecting theirforests. international products in return for protecting their forests. international trade standards should reward producers who shift their production to more sustainable methods and assisted by new technology supply chains can and will become ever more transparent, so as consumers we will be able to enjoy guilt free chocolate. i suppose that is carbon guilt free note calorie guilt free chocolate. safe in the knowledge that we have notjust helps to prevent deforestation but unlocking the opportunities of a sustainable food and land use system worth £4.5
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trillion worth of trade by the end of this decade. we also want to mobilise globalfinance of this decade. we also want to mobilise global finance and an unprecedented scale. in the last decade roughly 40 times more finance flowed into unsustainable land—use practices that enter forests, protection and conservation while agriculture, forests, other planters receive just 2% of available finance. as we sign this declaration today let�*s also galvanise a radical shift in public and private finance, writes channel funds towards securing the rights of indigenous people and local communities and shift chileans toward supporting sustainable jobs. shift chileans toward supporting sustainablejobs. so shift chileans toward supporting sustainable jobs. so that protecting our forests is notjust the sustainable jobs. so that protecting ourforests is notjust the right course of action for climate change but the rachel course for a more prosperous future —— shift trillions. at the end of
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shakespeare�*s great scottish tragedy, working together to protect the forests but to ensure that the forests return. thank you very much. i really interesting speech from the uk prime minister borisjohnson. 110 metres signing up to this deal to end deforestation and restore forests notjust to end deforestation and restore forests not just to to end deforestation and restore forests notjust to holtz but to reverse including china, russia, brazil. environmentalists have some questions over whether the steel will make a difference when previous deals have not. how will this be enforced? we got some clues to that in what the prime minister had to see and again very much driven by the economy. if you were watching yesterday with us you will have seen us explore that thing about the economy driving what might happen here at cop26 and he talked about
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working in partnership with the indigenous people in the private sector to address the economic drivers of deforestation and a lot of that is around the issue of sustainable trade. one of the examples he used, cocoa farmers getting a fair price for their product in orderfor getting a fair price for their product in order for protecting their forests. product in order for protecting theirforests. growing the product in order for protecting their forests. growing the economy while protecting their forests. their forests. growing the economy while protecting theirforests. that is something that has been missing on a significant scale in the past. we will be exploring that deal much more throughout the day and anything else that emerges from day two of the leaders summit. right now i am joined by a professor at york university and chair of the fossil fuel non—proliferation treaty. great to have you with us. climate goals are not in short supply at the summit. whether they are achieved is the big question but the actual goals are not in short supply so why is the sort of treaty needed? because what we had been seeing is
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that for years our governments have been committing to climate goals and new targets but simultaneously we have been growing the problem, so we are currently on track to produce 110% more oil, gas and coal than the world could ever burn if we want to stay below two degrees and the governments are not negotiating who gets to produce what and how much. we are hearing a lot of statements he that cop26 about countries committing to climate ambition, staying below two degrees yet those countries, including my own, canada, are here in the uk, are still appraising and building more oil, gas and coal. appraising and building more oil, gas and coal-— appraising and building more oil, gas and coal. which scientists tell us is incompatible _ gas and coal. which scientists tell us is incompatible with _ gas and coal. which scientists tell us is incompatible with two i gas and coal. which scientists tell l us is incompatible with two degrees let alone 1.5. he has signed up to the treaty so far? it let alone 1.5. he has signed up to the treaty so far?— the treaty so far? it has been tremendously _ the treaty so far? it has been tremendously fast. _ the treaty so far? it has been tremendously fast. we i the treaty so far? it has been tremendously fast. we have l the treaty so far? it has been i tremendously fast. we have 101 the treaty so far? it has been - tremendously fast. we have 101 nobel laureates including the dalai lama who have endorsed the principles of the treaty. civil society
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organisations from around the world. 2500 scientists and academics have endorsed the treaty. recently parliamentarians, elected officials, from over 24 countries, about 150 elected officials, have endorsed the principles of the treaty as well. presumably you would like at a national level the first government to sign up to lead the way on this. certainly guido. like with other treaties —— we do. we often see the drumbeat towards it, the push for nation states to agree to a new treaty from civil society, but also from cities, and we are starting to see cities around the world passing motions to endorse the fossil fuel non—proliferation treaty, barcelona, la, vancouver, sydney, cities from all over the world, so tremendous momentum. it means countries here have to commit to stop expanding
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oil, gas and coal. it does not mean we are going to turn off the taps overnight but it means we should not be building more of it. you overnight but it means we should not be building more of it.— be building more of it. you like and t int to be building more of it. you like and trying to keep _ be building more of it. you like and trying to keep track _ be building more of it. you like and trying to keep track of _ be building more of it. you like and trying to keep track of oil _ be building more of it. you like and trying to keep track of oil and i be building more of it. you like and trying to keep track of oil and coal. trying to keep track of oil and coal projects to playing a game of what camel and a global registry, how would that help?— would that help? there is no accountability _ would that help? there is no accountability or _ would that help? there is no| accountability or transparency would that help? there is no i accountability or transparency as to who is producing what and how much so we cannot easily adopt the global carbon budget. holding countries to account for their production not just technicians. so work is under way through carbon track on the global energy monitor to create a global energy monitor to create a global register which will allow citizens, scientists, countries, to be able to go online and immediately see what our country is permitting, but at the licensing and what is being built around the world given we say we are in a transition out of fossil fuels. we say we are in a transition out of fossil fuels-— we say we are in a transition out of fossil fuels. you need them to “ump to t ether, fossil fuels. you need them to “ump together, that i fossil fuels. you need them to “ump
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together, that would i fossil fuels. you need them to “ump together, that would make i fossil fuels. you need them to jump together, that would make life i together, that would make life easier for together, that would make life easierfor you, for together, that would make life easier for you, for everyone. for everyone. _ easier for you, for everyone. for everyone. yes- _ easier for you, for everyone. for everyone, yes. thank— easier for you, for everyone. for everyone, yes. thank you i easier for you, for everyone. for everyone, yes. thank you for i easier for you, for everyone. for i everyone, yes. thank you forjoining everyone, yes. thank you for 'oining us. really interesting * everyone, yes. thank you for 'oining us. really interesting to h everyone, yes. thank you for 'oining us. really interesting to talk_ everyone, yes. thank you forjoining us. really interesting to talk to - us. really interesting to talk to you. from glasgow we can head back to the studio in london. a group of mps has called for a pause in the rollout of smart motorways — until the government can prove they are safe. the updates to the motorway system are intended to increase capacity, but safety campaigners say they've contributed to deaths on the roads. here's our transport correspondent, caroline davies. marching through westminster yesterday. each coffin represents someone killed on a smart motorway. protesters want the hard shoulder to be brought back. more of england's roads are being turned into smart motorway intended to ease congestion. some have had the hard shoulder removed to add an extra lane
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without having to use more land. if the car breaks down in a live lane, a red cross tells other drivers not to drive it. now a group of mps have said that they think no more should be built for years until there is more data to prove whether or not smart motorways are safe. at the moment, we only have a five year evaluation record of 29 miles of smart motorway, because they are a relatively new concept. so the committee is calling for five years' worth of safety evidence on the network as currently exists. and then take a look and determine whether they are indeed safer, or less safe. the committee also wants the government and highways england to make the safety changes they promised five years ago on the smart motorways that are already operating. but it doesn't commit to bringing back the hard shoulder, saying in some cases it could be more dangerous. it argues that if the extra lane was taken away congestion could mean more drivers move to local roads which are often less safe. it's not gone far enough for some campaigners, including claire mercer, whose husband died on the m1 smart motorway. our aim is to just get the hard shoulder back
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in every single instance. so, you know, we don't feel that these proposals are strong enough. but i welcome the fact that they say to pause them. they propose pausing smart motorways, because that gives me more time to get the legal case in the high court moving. and hopefully, if they did pause them, then i can get them banned in the meantime. the government has argued that deaths on smart motorways are less likely than normal motorways. it's admitted that improvements have not always been made as quickly as they could have in the past, but it's committed to making smart motorways as safe as possible. caroline davies, bbc news. claire mercer's husband jason mercer was killed on a smart section of the m1 near sheffield. she is the founder of the campaign group "smart motorways kill". tell us more about what happened to
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your husband, as an illustration. he had your husband, as an illustration. he: had a minor incident on the m1 in sheffield and what started as a minor incident ended up as an absolute of carnage because they only had a small collision but they were at a sign that said no hard shoulderforfour miles were at a sign that said no hard shoulder for four miles but it did not say there was an emergency refuge area e—mail out of sight and the crash barrier stopped them getting the vehicles out of the line and they couldn't get over the cash barrier because there was a 30 foot drop. they were left in harm's me and that is exactly what happened to them. and hdv which cannot manoeuvre it as quickly as a smaller vehicle ploughed into them. if there had been a hard shoulder they would have been a hard shoulder they would have been on separate lines. the technology we are led to believe is there to protect you is not there and it was not there to protect them before they were killed and even the
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other technology that is there did not pick them up after they were killed. they were spread across four lanes of motorway in a scene of absolute carnage and even that did not pick up what was going on. it relied on members of the public phoning in and saying close the motorway, something terrible has happened. this technology is not there. ~ , ., , , happened. this technology is not there. ~ , , ., there. when you see it is not there, do ou there. when you see it is not there, do you think — there. when you see it is not there, do you think it _ there. when you see it is not there, do you think it could _ there. when you see it is not there, do you think it could be _ there. when you see it is not there, do you think it could be improved i do you think it could be improved so smart waterways could work eventually?— smart waterways could work eventuall ? ., . ., . eventually? no. it never could. we are not at that _ eventually? no. it never could. we are not at that level. _ eventually? no. it never could. we are not at that level. we _ eventually? no. it never could. we are not at that level. we think- eventually? no. it never could. we are not at that level. we think we i are not at that level. we think we are not at that level. we think we are very clever right now but we are nowhere near that level and we will never replace a solid strip of tarmac all the way down because we are trying to know and we are having problems with the software. having problems with the software. having problems where we do not have enough control room operators. recovery companies are refusing to stop on smart motorways. you will never replace the hard shoulder with
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technology. i know the hard shoulder is a dangerous place to be but do not make it more dangerous. iwhen is a dangerous place to be but do not make it more dangerous. when you talk about hard — not make it more dangerous. when you talk about hard shoulders, _ not make it more dangerous. when you talk about hard shoulders, the - not make it more dangerous. when you talk about hard shoulders, the chair - talk about hard shoulders, the chair of the transport committee that produced this report says he understands where you are coming from unless but we do lose lives on the hard shoulder as well. i from unless but we do lose lives on the hard shoulder as well.— the hard shoulder as well. i accept that they are _ the hard shoulder as well. i accept that they are dangerous, - the hard shoulder as well. i accept that they are dangerous, so - the hard shoulder as well. i accept that they are dangerous, so why . the hard shoulder as well. i accept - that they are dangerous, so why make them more dangerous? it is ludicrous. cherry pick of the data you like but common sense, it is absolutely ludicrous to suggest that it is safer to break down in a live running lane than it is to break down all the hard shoulder. what running lane than it is to break down all the hard shoulder. what do ou make down all the hard shoulder. what do you make of — down all the hard shoulder. what do you make of the _ down all the hard shoulder. what do you make of the report _ down all the hard shoulder. what do you make of the report we _ down all the hard shoulder. what do you make of the report we have - down all the hard shoulder. what do you make of the report we have had| you make of the report we have had from the transport select committee which is saying pours all of this for five years and assess the data? is that a sensible idea just to take a bit more time to think it through? when did we decide to think things through after there had been in
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operation for 17 years? my husband was not an experiment, collateral damage from an experiment, or he shouldn't have been. why is it only recommendations? why is it not being enforced? this is the 10th report this year. ivy are going to have ignored three successive reports from transport select committees. the previous ones were much more hardcore. this one is a much more watered down version and highways england have had no trouble ignoring the previous three so this one will have no effect. fine the previous three so this one will have no effect-— the previous three so this one will have no effect. one other argument in favour of — have no effect. one other argument in favour of smart _ have no effect. one other argument in favour of smart motorways - have no effect. one other argument in favour of smart motorways is - have no effect. one other argument| in favour of smart motorways is they increase the capacity of motorways and if you decrease the of motorway shippers drivers on to smaller country roads where there are likely to be more accidents and more deaths. i to be more accidents and more deaths. , _, , ., , ., to be more accidents and more deaths. , , ., , deaths. i wish i could show you my e-mails, comments, _ deaths. i wish i could show you my e-mails, comments, text - deaths. i wish i could show you my i e-mails, comments, text messages, e—mails, comments, text messages, everything. smart motorways are pushing people onto the a roads. i
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get 20 or 30 e—mails, comments, messages a week telling me i will not use a smart motorway. sometimes it is because they are terrified, sometimes there are other reasons. people are disabled or they have disabled people in their car. my husband was able—bodied and could not get over the crash barrier. if you have mobility issues you do not stand a chance. as well as corporate manslaughter charges we have to bring disability discrimination claims as well.— bring disability discrimination claims as well. ., ~ , ., , . claims as well. thank you very much for talkin: claims as well. thank you very much for talking to — claims as well. thank you very much for talking to us _ claims as well. thank you very much for talking to us and _ claims as well. thank you very much for talking to us and we _ claims as well. thank you very much for talking to us and we are - claims as well. thank you very much for talking to us and we are sorry - for talking to us and we are sorry for talking to us and we are sorry for your loss. france is postponing sanctions against british boats in order to give negotiations a chance to resolve a dispute about post—brexit fishing licences. the government in paris had said it would block british boats from some of its ports on tuesday, unless more permits were granted to french vessels. 0ur brussels correspondent,
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jessica parker is in boulogne—sur—mer. if this is sort of compromise offered by the french? they seem to be static back from the bank? i do not think hearing us but we will come back to her as her as soon as she does. can you hear us? i am here, she does. can you hear us? i am here. sorry- _ she does. can you hear us? i am here, sorry. excellent. _ she does. can you hear us? i am here, sorry. excellent. i- she does. can you hear us? i am here, sorry. excellent. iwas- she does. can you hear us? i am here, sorry. excellent. iwasjust here, sorry. excellent. iwas 'ust askin: if here, sorry. excellent. iwas 'ust asking if this �* here, sorry. excellent. iwas 'ust asking if this is i here, sorry. excellent. iwas 'ust asking if this is a i here, sorry. excellent. iwas 'ust asking if this is a case i here, sorry. excellent. iwas 'ust asking if this is a case offi here, sorry. excellent. iwas 'ust asking if this is a case of fan h asking if this is a case of fan stepping back from the brink, this agreement to have talks. the threat of sanctions. _ agreement to have talks. the threat of sanctions, retaliation, _ agreement to have talks. the threat of sanctions, retaliation, it - agreement to have talks. the threat of sanctions, retaliation, it has - of sanctions, retaliation, it has not disappeared but it has been delayed, so there was a deadline set by france at midnight last night for these potential retaliatory measures over the dispute on the fishing licences. the french president said that because talks were ongoing he was not going to opt for sanctions
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right now, so what we have got is more talks are going to happen. they happened yesterday between the european commission, the uk government, thejersey government, the french as well, we understand those talks are going to continue. this is a numbers game. we are looking at dozens of licenses, individuals, small boats, looking to face close to the shore of the jersey or united kingdom and whether enough evidence can be presented to help those numbers keep up as far as the french are concerned and be enough for the french government and communities like i am on here today to be satisfied but bigotry has been adamant it has applied the thirdly, it is open to more evidence —— the uk has been a tenant. it is open to more evidence -- the uk has been a tenant.— it is open to more evidence -- the uk has been a tenant. thank you very much. britain has said that france had freed a british scallop dredger that was seized last week in french waters near le havre.
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speaking to bbc news, the environment secretary george eustice said he appreciated paris' decision to step back from a row over fishing. we very much welcome that france has declared it will not implement some of the threats that it made last wednesday. we had constructive talks yesterday where we made clear that if there are additional vessels that have got evidence and they can put that new evidence forward we will obviously consider it and there will be further discussions on thursday. so it is a de—escalation of this and we very much welcome the fact that france has decided not to go ahead with its threats and we will continue to have those constructive discussions. a staggering 11 billion wet wipes are used in the uk every year — and they cause more than 90% of the blockages in our sewers. that's because the vast majority of them contain plastic, which doesn't break down or decompose. now there's a new campaign to change
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the way they're produced, as lone wells reports. we use wet wipes all the time, don't we? to wipe our surfaces, to take our make—up off, to clean up after kids. they're pretty sturdy things. but a lot of them end up on our river banks. the thames river bank near battersea bridge looks like a normal river bank, but peel at the surface of the ground and it's covered in wet wipes that have overflowed from our drains. so, it's notjust sand, it's held together by wipes. chris works for the charity thames 21, that clean up the thames river bed. so the problem we've got is that an awful lot of the wipes that are flushed down the toilet shouldn't be. obviously, a lot of material like make—up wipes, cleaning wipes, are much tougher and have plastic fibres in them which make them much stronger, and that means they don't break down and they get into the sewage system in the same way, theyjust fall apart slowly, but
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they are still very tough and you can see they are almost bound together like string. they change the shape of the river bed, they break down into pieces, smaller pieces that animals can eat. the wet wipes that don't end up on our river banks and in our rivers end up here in our sewage system and that can lead to all kinds of other problems, like blocking the sewers themselves. this footage shows wet wipes being pulled from one sewer by thames water. they merge with oil and grease to form blockages. so what we are seeing here is the end point of what happens when wet wipes and other unflushables get put into our water network. as you can see, they have been through quite a rigorous treatment process at this point, and even now you can see that they are quite visibly still wet wipes. you can pick those out quite easily. the system is not designed to take plastics of this nature. it is three ps only down the toilet,
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pee, poo and paper. thames water are working with the labour mp for putney, fleur anderson, who is trying to change the law to ban plastics from wet wipes. so, 90% of wet wipes have actually got plastic in, i think a lot of people don't realise they are a single use plastic. those wet wipes can clog up our sewers and drains and we have been here seeing the result of that, so that puts more money on our water bills as well. if only the wet wipe companies would just change the way that they make wet wipes, and it's very easy to do. then that would be a huge environmental benefit but also a financial benefit to us all. the government say they are looking at the effects of wet wipes with plastics on sewers to try and find solutions. in general, they prefer to help people and companies make better choices rather than banning items. so they are trying to raise awareness about how to dispose of them properly. but fleur anderson says if plastics in wet wipes are not banned the build—ups we have seen in these sewers will not go away any time soon. lone wells, bbc news.
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the company behind facebook and instagram has removed more than a thousand fake accounts in nicaragua which investigators say were part of a government disinformation campaign. the newly named meta company said those who ran the accounts included staff at the telecomms regulator and the supreme court. president daniel ortega is standing for a fourth consecutive term in elections on sunday. the value of a cryptocurrency inspired by the popular netflix series squid game collapsed on monday less than two weeks after investors could start buying tokens. the tokens had by then gained more than 310000% in value. suranjana tewari in our asia business hub is following the story. the token was called squid and the reason it really attracted attention was because the price soared in recent days,
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surging as high as $2861, but within a few hours it crashed to $0. it's thought that the creators cashed out, effectively stealing around $2.1 million from investors, but the technology website gizmodo actually says it could be closer to $3.38 million. so what was it? squid, as it was named, was built as a token to be used in a new online game that was expected to go live this month and, as you mentioned, it was inspired by the popular korean series which is based on a deadly tournament comprising of children's games, but experts do say there were a number of signs that this was a scam from the very beginning. gizmodo and coinmarketcap said that potential investors should be warned mainly because the now—defunct website was filled with spelling errors, social media accounts promoting the digital asset have now disappeared and another big red flag
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was that investors could only buy but not sell squid. this is being called something called a rug pill, which means cryptocurrency creators cash out coins in exchange for real money quickly and that devalues the cryptocurrency�*s value. one expert that the bbc spoke to said this can be quite common in the crypto world especially, where there is little regulation. squid game, of course, is netflix's viral sensation but netflix says it is not affiliated with this digital asset at all. two metropolitan police officers have pleaded guilty at the old bailey to misconduct in a public office after they shared photographs office after they shared photographs of the bodies of the murdered sisters bibaa henry and nicole
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smallman on whatsapp. two police officers have pleaded guilty at the old bailey to misconduct in a public office for sharing those pictures. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. today we are looking at the day of sunshine and showers. not all of us will catch one but if you do it has the potential to be notjust heavy but also have hail and thunder and lightning and it is going to feel pretty chilly. scherer across northern scotland have been prolific this morning and will continue on and off across the day but we also have showers in western and southern areas and they will be frequent across the channel islands. in between a fair bit of sunshine and not as windy as it was yesterday although it will be busy across north—west scotland and eventually the north coast of northern ireland. more cloud across the northern half of scotland with showers in the
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southern half. for northern ireland and northern england sunshine and showers although a lot of the showers although a lot of the showers will be in the west, if few of them might get over towards the east but the east saying that they dry with temperatures nine to about 12 degrees. this evening and overnight the week where the front will continue to bridge some showers thinking southwards. still windy across western areas and increasingly those showers will be wintry on the tops of the scottish mountains. these are the overnight lows. in rural areas they will be lower so we will see a touch of frost and patching a stand felt more likely across the midlands and the south—east of england. but she had left quite readily and tomorrow we are looking at sunshine and showers. a week where the front continuing to think southwards and a stiff northerly breeze blowing in the showers to exposed areas with if you of them making it in mind. feeling
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chilly in the breeze with temperatures eight to 12 degrees. in the northern half of the country in the northern half of the country in the mountains it is likely to be wintry once again. high pressure starts to build on thursday but with the northerly flow we will see some showers with exposure here and there but there will be a lot of dry weather. a weather front coming in across the north west will introduce thicker cloud and spots of rain and temperatures seven to about 11 degrees. freddie high pressure still very much with us but it will be a cloudy day. we can see how we have patchy rain across western scotland and northern ireland at times. temperature rise we are looking at nine in the north about 13 hours be pushed down towards the south.
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this is bbc news ? these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. i'm ben brown. world leaders at the un climate summit in glasgow have agreed their first major deal — a pledge to halt and reverse deforestation by 2030. we have to stop the devastating love of our forests, these great, teaming ecosystems, trillion pillared cathedrals of nature. —— the devastating loss of our forests. brazil is one of the signatories to the deal, but the bbc has seen evidence of the growing deforestation of the amazon rainforest. we're being led to an area where illegal logging is taking place. and here we are at the edge of a national park, an area that is supposed to be protected.

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