Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 2, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

5:00 pm
this is bbc news with christian fraser live at the glasgow summit. there is a deal to/ emissions of methane. , , ., there is a deal to/ emissions of methane-— there is a deal to/ emissions of methane. , , ., ., , methane. this is one of the gases we can cut fastest. _ methane. this is one of the gases we can cut fastest. doing _ methane. this is one of the gases we can cut fastest. doing that will- can cut fastest. doing that will immediately slow down climate change. immediately slow down climate chance. ~ ., . immediately slow down climate chance. ., ':: :: , immediately slow down climate chance. ., ':::: change. more than 100 countries are -a~ledin to change. more than 100 countries are pledging to halt _ change. more than 100 countries are pledging to halt and _ change. more than 100 countries are pledging to halt and reverse - change. more than 100 countries are pledging to halt and reverse this - pledging to halt and reverse this for station by the end of the decade. i've been speaking to the president of costa rica about that pledge. this is a live shot from another part of the venue where the host of the conference, boris
5:01 pm
johnson, is about to hold a press conference. we will take you to that live. hello and a warm welcome back to glasgow. we're seeing world leaders roll out the actual plans to tackle the challenges in front of them. i'm seeing a message from the eu commission president ursula von der leyen, who thinks they have achieved the $100 billion a year fund to help developing nations. they thought they would only meet that target which they set in 2009 by 2023, but in fact, there's been a donation from japan today. 0ther in fact, there's been a donation from japan today. other money coming into the fund such that they might meet their 100 billion target by the end of the summit. we will wait to see if borisjohnson mentions that when he comes to his press conference shortly. there are three other deals being put forward to
5:02 pm
address the climate emergency, all three short—term plans focusing on 2030. lots of action to make them in nine years. there's a partnership to cut emissions of me thing by at least 30% —— methane. it's been signed now by 103 countries, so countries signing onto this all the time. the only problem is the big emitters like china, russia and india aren't part of the pledge. there is an agreement to reverse deforestation by 2030. more than 100 world leaders have signed on. there is an international plan for clean tech everywhere by 2030. that's backed by over a0 world leaders. let's focus a little more on that
5:03 pm
methane pledge and look at why it's important. it is a greenhouse gas is second to carbon dioxide in driving global warming. second to carbon dioxide in driving globalwarming. it's second to carbon dioxide in driving global warming. it's a for 25% of it. it's stronger than c02 in the short term but only lingers in the atmosphere for a relatively short space of atmosphere for a relatively short space of time. atmosphere for a relatively short space of time. curbing atmosphere for a relatively short space of time. curbing it atmosphere for a relatively short space of time. curbing it could deliver immediate effects. you are about to meet methane, the gas that fires your stove, seeps from rotting organic material and bubbles from our stomachs and those of cows and sheep. butjust look what happens when you add a little bit of pure oxygen. methane is a much more potent greenhouse gas than carbon dioxide. each molecule has 120 times the effect. the real difference between methane and carbon dioxide is that methane breaks down after about a decade, but carbon dioxide will be with us for thousands of years.
5:04 pm
methane concentrations in the atmosphere have been steadily increasing, but because it breaks down so quickly in the air, the un says if we can cut emissions we can rapidly get rid of this powerful warming gas. that means urgently tackling the methane produced by the oil and gas industry, by agriculture and in our waste. technology can help. a new network of high resolution satellites can identify methane emissions from space, like the methane plume from this rubbish dump in the indonesian capital, jakarta. it's spewing methane equivalent to the c02 from three—quarters of a million cars. methane is also linked to air pollution that causes tens of thousands of deaths a year worldwide. the eu and us plan contains measures
5:05 pm
to stop millions of tonnes of methane. here isjoe biden and then you will hearfrom methane. here isjoe biden and then you will hear from ursula von der leyen. you will hear from ursula von der le en. ~ �* , you will hear from ursula von der leen. �* ., leyen. we're proposing two new rules. leyen. we're proposing two new rules- one — leyen. we're proposing two new rules. one through _ leyen. we're proposing two new rules. one through our - leyen. we're proposing two new rules. one through our inner - rules. one through our inner environmental agency from new and existing gas pipelines. to reduce waste and dangerous leaks from natural gas. we are also launching an initiative to work with our farmers and our ranchers to reduce agriculture practices that reduce methane on farm, which is a significant source as well. this is all part of our new methane strategy which focuses on reducing the largest source of methane emissions while putting thousands of skilled
5:06 pm
workers on the job all across the united states. i expect in other countries as well.— united states. i expect in other countries as well. because if we deliver on _ countries as well. because if we deliver on this _ countries as well. because if we deliver on this pledge, - countries as well. because if we deliver on this pledge, we - countries as well. because if we deliver on this pledge, we can l deliver on this pledge, we can prevent— deliver on this pledge, we can prevent over 200,000 premature deaths. — prevent over 200,000 premature deaths. we can prevent hundreds of thousands_ deaths. we can prevent hundreds of thousands of asthma related emergency rooms visits. and over 20 million _ emergency rooms visits. and over 20 million tonnes of crop losses a yeah _ million tonnes of crop losses a yeah by— million tonnes of crop losses a year. by reducing ground—level ozone pollution _ year. by reducing ground—level ozone pollution i_ year. by reducing ground—level ozone pollution. i want to thank all those countries _ pollution. i want to thank all those countries that have signed up to the global methane pledge. with this global— global methane pledge. with this global pledge, we are making cop26 the moment when the world moves from aspiration _ the moment when the world moves from aspiration to _ the moment when the world moves from aspiration to action.— aspiration to action. ursula von der le en aspiration to action. ursula von der leyen there- _ aspiration to action. ursula von der leyen there. with _ aspiration to action. ursula von der leyen there. with me _ aspiration to action. ursula von der leyen there. with me as _ aspiration to action. ursula von der leyen there. with me as an - leyen there. with me as an environmental physicist and the director of international nitrogen management system. we're going to talk first of all about methane. why
5:07 pm
is methane more dangerous to the climate than carbon dioxide? basically, it's to do with the... methane is absorbing it more quickly. that means it's essentially something like a 15—20 times more powerful than carbon dioxide. haifa powerful than carbon dioxide. how sirnificant powerful than carbon dioxide. how significant do _ powerful than carbon dioxide. how significant do you think this deal they signed today is? i significant do you think this deal they signed today is?— they signed today is? i haven't seen they signed today is? i haven't seen the methane _ they signed today is? i haven't seen the methane deal, _ they signed today is? i haven't seen the methane deal, you're _ they signed today is? i haven't seen the methane deal, you're ahead - they signed today is? i haven't seen the methane deal, you're ahead of. the methane deal, you're ahead of me! ., , . ., the methane deal, you're ahead of me! ., , ., ., . _ me! countries agreed to cut it by 2030. me! countries agreed to cut it by 2030- that's _ me! countries agreed to cut it by 2030. that's really _ me! countries agreed to cut it by 2030. that's really great. - me! countries agreed to cut it by i 2030. that's really great. methane is cominu 2030. that's really great. methane is coming from _ 2030. that's really great. methane is coming from cattle, _ 2030. that's really great. methane is coming from cattle, sheep, - is coming from cattle, sheep, livestock, all sorts of sources, and if you thing about energy sources, every molecule of methane lost is something that could have been burned for energy. inc. about bio biofuel surfaces. you burn it and turnit biofuel surfaces. you burn it and turn it into carbon dioxide, so you get the heat and you reduce its
5:08 pm
powers or —— think about it. the powers or -- think about it. the reason you _ powers or -- think about it. the reason you haven't _ powers or —— think about it. the reason you haven't heard about this announcement is because you're running around, educating governments about these gases in the air. i saw yesterday at the t bar, and you said have you talked about nitrous oxide? why don't you explain it? ., , ., , ., ., , it? nitrous oxide is laughing gas. it's what it? nitrous oxide is laughing gas. it's what the _ it? nitrous oxide is laughing gas. it's what the dentist _ it? nitrous oxide is laughing gas. it's what the dentist used - it? nitrous oxide is laughing gas. it's what the dentist used to - it? nitrous oxide is laughing gas. it's what the dentist used to give | it's what the dentist used to give you in the old days when you had your teeth out. it's a really powerful greenhouse gas. there's a tiny amount in the atmosphere, and we need to address it because it's one of greenhouse gases but it's almost entirely been forgotten. and we always talk about c02 equivalents and that means you're forgetting about the nitrogen part. we have to and embrace the whole cycle to
5:09 pm
transform, betterways and embrace the whole cycle to transform, better ways for recycling, less emissions from combustion sources. what that means is when we trampled on the entire cycle, we're saying you've got to do nitrogen as well. it means better air quality, better water quality, biodiversity, health, stratifying the ozone layer, and in the colombo declaration, they set out the ambition to half nitrogen weights by 2030. if you look at the fertiliser value, that's a saving of $100 billion a year.— value, that's a saving of $100 billion a year. you're scurrying around and — billion a year. you're scurrying around and educating - billion a year. you're scurrying around and educating leaders, billion a year. you're scurrying i around and educating leaders, do billion a year. you're scurrying - around and educating leaders, do you think you will get a deal? i around and educating leaders, do you think you will get a deal?— think you will get a deal? i would sa so. think you will get a deal? i would say so. tomorrow— think you will get a deal? i would say so. tomorrow morning - think you will get a deal? i would say so. tomorrow morning at - think you will get a deal? i would i say so. tomorrow morning at 11:30 a.m., the programme is putting on the table something called nitrogen for net zero. that is basically saying for the nitrogen discussion has to be part of the negotiations, it will be quantitative goals at this point. getting on the table to
5:10 pm
say you got to look at nitrogen, that's going to be making the difference. that's going to be making the difference-— that's going to be making the difference. some of it's really simle. difference. some of it's really simple- for — difference. some of it's really simple. for methane, - difference. some of it's really simple. for methane, its - difference. some of it's really i simple. for methane, its landfill and how we put landfill away. it's about how we feed our cows, it's about how we feed our cows, it's about how we flare oil and gas and there are a lot of oil wells in america that produce an awful lot of methane. so, what is it with nitrous oxide? ., ., methane. so, what is it with nitrous oxide? . . . oxide? there are a few technical sources, oxide? there are a few technical sources. but _ oxide? there are a few technical sources, but those _ oxide? there are a few technical sources, but those are - oxide? there are a few technical sources, but those are small. i oxide? there are a few technical. sources, but those are small. the big sectors are agriculture and waste water. we have to reinvent the nitrogen side. think about a sewage treatment plant. it's actually converting resources into pure atmospheric nitrogen gas. 78% is every breath we take is pure nitrogen. but will we convert into
5:11 pm
those nitrogen compounds and they degrade, they form nitrous oxide. instead of letting them degrade and waste water, we should be recovering, recycling it, turning it back into fertiliser resources to go back into fertiliser resources to go back into fertiliser resources to go back into farming. that's where we can see the saving. just back into farming. that's where we can see the saving.— can see the saving. just talking about the pictures _ can see the saving. just talking about the pictures we're - can see the saving. just talking | about the pictures we're looking can see the saving. just talking - about the pictures we're looking at. the room is filling up behind me. the room is filling up behind me. the journalists the room is filling up behind me. thejournalists are the room is filling up behind me. the journalists are about to get borisjohnson, who is going to give us an update on where they got to with the first a8 hours. many of the leaders leaving their delegations in place to carry on negotiations. when you're going around a summit like this, do you get a feel for whether it's going well or badly?— it's going well or badly? i don't know about _ it's going well or badly? i don't know about your _ it's going well or badly? i don't know about your big _ it's going well or badly? i don't know about your big deal - it's going well or badly? i don't know about your big deal on i it's going well or badly? i don't - know about your big deal on carbon, but i can tell you that nitrogen is coming forward. we had it mentioned in the head of state speech from the president of sri lanka, this is
5:12 pm
going places. tomorrow morning, we have eight countries working together, saying, "we, the south, are going to be the world leaders." the north has to listen. uk ri have given us as a scientist £20 million to work with all the countries of south asia, and that's a... that is, getting all those scientists working together, getting all those eight countries working together, and let's say the countries don't always get on well. they do get on well working towards this common goal. just getting colloquial for the minute, because the prime minister has put an awful lot of money to science to up our game and compete with europe. do you feel as a uk scientist that things are getting better, that your expertise that you've brought to a summit like this is being recognised ways elbow i'd like to think so. i think the
5:13 pm
is being recognised ways elbow i'd like to think so. i think— like to think so. i think the uk has the potential— like to think so. i think the uk has the potential to _ like to think so. i think the uk has the potential to become _ like to think so. i think the uk has the potentialto become a partner| the potential to become a partner with big project. there was 20 years of experience of big projects, and now we have to learn that our self. professor, lovely to talk to you. here's borisjohnson. it’s professor, lovely to talk to you. here's boris johnson.— professor, lovely to talk to you. here's boris johnson. it's all too eas to here's boris johnson. it's all too easy to come — here's boris johnson. it's all too easy to come to _ here's boris johnson. it's all too easy to come to a _ here's boris johnson. it's all too easy to come to a summit - here's boris johnson. it's all too easy to come to a summit like l here's boris johnson. it's all too i easy to come to a summit like this and get caught up in a mood of exaggerated enthusiasm simply because of the very nature of diplomacy and the instinct to be polite. so, as this first stage of the cop26 draws to a close — and don't forget, there are still two weeks of detail negotiation to come — we must take care to guard against false hope and not to think in any way that thejob false hope and not to think in any way that the job is done. because it is not. there is still a very long way to go. but all that being said, i am cautiously optimistic in the sense that on the way to the g20 in
5:14 pm
rome, i said to some of you on the plane that if this was a football match, the current score would be 5-1 match, the current score would be 5—1 down in the match between humanity and climate change. i think what you can say today after two days of talks with around 120 world leaders is that we fold back a goal, or perhaps even two. i think it will take extra time because there's no doubt that some progress has been made. we're ending the great chainsaw massacre with more than 85% of the world's forest protected and under precedented agreement by 122 countries backed by the biggest ever commitment of public funds for forest conservation. we have much more still to come from the private sector. we have 90% of the world's
5:15 pm
economy working towards net zero. including india, keeping1 economy working towards net zero. including india, keeping 1 billion tonnes of carbon out of the atmosphere by switching half its power grid to renewable sources. more than 100 countries havejust signed up to cut their methane emissions by 2030. when we were selected as hosts of cop26, just 1% of the world's economy had met the post paris obligation to improve on their emission targets. the day that figure stands at at 80% —— today. it's notjust we're putting forward better targets. the world has been putting forward the plans to reach those targets. billions of dollars have been committed to supporting developing and vulnerable countries, big business has stepped up with the launch of the glasgow rate for the.
5:16 pm
catching on and taking the green industrial revolution worldwide. for example, we are working with south africa's president to bring his ambitious vision for greener growth, and i would say we've been asked king for action, as we know. cole, cars, cache entries. can certainly begin to take three of those boxes. and that's all happened because we were able to come together in person in glasgow and make this happen at cop26. it's only part of the story. although the uk has this week committed a further billion dollars of international climate finance, taking our total to £12.6 billion by
5:17 pm
2025, that were committing to climate funds, japan announced a few hours ago another $10 billion over the next five years. a big commitment from japan. the reality is that the developed world will still be linked in meeting the target, and it's really in that so many countries have embraced net zero this week, but we will keep working with all the leaders around the world to get them there sooner, to accelerate their timetable. we've now predicted 85%. we've got measures to protect 85% of the world's forest. those commitments will be 100% useless if the promise is made here are not followed up
5:18 pm
with real action. as prime minister motley of barbados so passionately warned us of yesterday, climate change is not some parochial, political issue. for tens of millions of people, it is literally a matter of life and death. they need those and they need one point fight to survive. we will be watching proceedings very closely to make sure we keep moving forward and there are no u—turns, no sliding back from where we got to. i think we can be confident about one thing in the days ahead, the couple of weeks we've got. the clock on the doomsday device that i talked about is still ticking, but we've got a disposal team on site and they're starting to snip the wires. i hope some of the right wires. and my
5:19 pm
message to them, to the negotiators, is very simple. the leaders of the world may have left or are leaving cop now, but i can tell you that the eyes of the world, the eyes of the populations of the world are on you and the eyes of the british government and all the other governments that care about this are on art negotiators and we have your numbers. thank you all very much. i'm going to go to the media now and we will begin with laura kuenssberg of the bbc. ., ~ we will begin with laura kuenssberg of the bbc. ., ,, , we will begin with laura kuenssberg of the bbc. ., ~' ,, , . of the bbc. thank you very much. the chinese have — of the bbc. thank you very much. the chinese have said _ of the bbc. thank you very much. the chinese have said today _ of the bbc. thank you very much. the chinese have said today that - of the bbc. thank you very much. the chinese have said today that there - chinese have said today that there are still— chinese have said today that there are still significant gaps. there isn't _ are still significant gaps. there isn't enough trust between developing countries to be able to -et developing countries to be able to get a _ developing countries to be able to get a deal— developing countries to be able to get a deal over the line. but what or who _ get a deal over the line. but what or who is — get a deal over the line. but what or who is going to score the extra
5:20 pm
two or— or who is going to score the extra two or three _ or who is going to score the extra two or three goals we still need? thank— two or three goals we still need? thank you. — two or three goals we still need? thank you, laura. i think that's entirely right in the sense that the issues remain very difficult. we've seen some big moves on tackling deforestation. i think i talked about the indian move on decarbonising they power system in the way they're pledging to do is huge —— their power system. i think the commitment that japan huge —— their power system. i think the commitment thatjapan made on cash, the $10 billion overfive years, that's big money and that will make a big difference in engendering that confidence. but i think the crucial thing that is really happening, if there's one thing that starts to give me confidence are often ? my optimism, we are starting to create for the countries that find it visible to
5:21 pm
translate away from fossil fuels. we are trying to start those coalitions of support to help them to move on. —— find it difficult. in his vision, several countries, including the uk, are now working to supply eight and are now working to supply eight and a half billion dollars to help accelerate that transition away from coal. in a major way. you're starting to see that kind of approach taken around the world and some of the countries i find it most difficult. i've told you i was at paris, and i remember it what was like. we agreed we were going to try and cut c02 together, but it was also a slightly floaty feeling because we didn't know how on earth we would do it. there was no clear sense of how you could do it. a
5:22 pm
sense of how you could do it. a sense of how actually you can deliver those cuts in co2, but i'm not going to disagree with you. there is a long way to go. thank ou. i'm there is a long way to go. thank you i'm not _ there is a long way to go. thank you. i'm not sure _ there is a long way to go. thank you. i'm not sure if _ there is a long way to go. thank you. i'm not sure if the - you. i'm not sure if the prime minister— you. i'm not sure if the prime minister believes— you. i'm not sure if the prime minister believes would - you. i'm not sure if the prime minister believes would —— i you. i'm not sure if the prime minister believes would —— of| minister believes would —— of belize would _ minister believes would —— of belize would share — minister believes would —— of belize would share your— minister believes would —— of belize would share your optimism. - minister believes would —— of belize would share your optimism. he i minister believes would —— of belize would share your optimism. he said developed _ would share your optimism. he said developed countries _ would share your optimism. he said developed countries are _ would share your optimism. he said developed countries are not - would share your optimism. he said developed countries are not doing l developed countries are not doing enough _ developed countries are not doing enough he — developed countries are not doing enough he said _ developed countries are not doing enough. he said the _ developed countries are not doing enough. he said the rich- developed countries are not doing enough. he said the rich got- developed countries are not doing enough. he said the rich got lives| enough. he said the rich got lives lavished — enough. he said the rich got lives lavished lifestyles— enough. he said the rich got lives lavished lifestyles and _ enough. he said the rich got lives lavished lifestyles and if- enough. he said the rich got lives lavished lifestyles and if that i enough. he said the rich got lives lavished lifestyles and if that is i lavished lifestyles and if that is your message, _ lavished lifestyles and if that is your message, then— lavished lifestyles and if that is your message, then they i lavished lifestyles and if that is your message, then they need | lavished lifestyles and if that is i your message, then they need much more _ your message, then they need much more money— your message, then they need much more money and _ your message, then they need much more money and much _ your message, then they need much more money and much more - your message, then they need much more money and much more action. | more money and much more action. let me ask- _ more money and much more action. let me ask- do— more money and much more action. let me ask- do you — more money and much more action. let me ask— do you understand _ more money and much more action. let me ask— do you understand the - more money and much more action. let me ask— do you understand the anger. me ask— do you understand the anger of the _ me ask— do you understand the anger of the prime — me ask— do you understand the anger of the prime minister— me ask— do you understand the anger of the prime minister of _ me ask— do you understand the anger of the prime minister of belize? i of the prime minister of belize? also, _ of the prime minister of belize? also, you — of the prime minister of belize? also. you won't _ of the prime minister of belize? also, you won't get _ of the prime minister of belize? also, you won't get a _ of the prime minister of belize? also, you won't get a deal- of the prime minister of belize? | also, you won't get a deal that's good _ also, you won't get a deal that's good enough _ also, you won't get a deal that's good enough on _ also, you won't get a deal that's good enough on coal, _ also, you won't get a deal that's good enough on coal, are - also, you won't get a deal that's good enough on coal, are you i also, you won't get a deal that's l good enough on coal, are you quiz willow— good enough on coal, are you quiz willow i _ good enough on coal, are you quiz willow i think— good enough on coal, are you quiz willow i think you're _ good enough on coal, are you quiz willow i think you're—
5:23 pm
willow i think you're absolutely riaht to willow i think you're absolutely right to highlight _ willow i think you're absolutely right to highlight the _ willow i think you're absolutely right to highlight the feeling i willow i think you're absolutely right to highlight the feeling of| right to highlight the feeling of people in belize and vulnerable states around the world. that are in the front line in the fight against climate change. it's been very humbling to sit here and to listen over the last weeks, months, to colleagues. say the same thing, why should they suffer this immediate impact because of emissions that we in our country began to produce 250 years ago? we can say for the vast majority of that period, we had no idea that the c02 majority of that period, we had no idea that the co2 emissions we were producing were doing that damage. it's only been in the last few decades that we started to understand the whole greenhouse effect. but we owe a special duty to those countries, and that's why the prime minister of belize is right to
5:24 pm
point to the need for cash. that's why the 100 billion is so important, and it's good that japan has stepped up. other countries are going to have to do more. you're absolutely right. what we need is to see more cash, more movement on cars. we haven't even discussed cars yet. that's for later on. that's for the next few days. we must see progress on that, too. i think we've made some good progress on trees, but when it comes to helping countries to transition, a huge effort is needed. what i think we have is the tools to do it, and we certainly have in theory, the finance to do it. mark carney, running the global finance and should do it, i would
5:25 pm
say there are hundreds of trillions of dollars. it's still a huge amount of dollars. it's still a huge amount of money, and that money could be leveraged in buying the public sector and by our investment? i'm not going to disagree with what the prime minister of belize has said, or indeed, anybody who says the world in the remaining days that we have in this mac cop, this world has a lot to do. mesa hall of the express. a lot to do. mesa hall of the express-_ a lot to do. mesa hall of the exress. ., ,, i. , . express. thank you very much, prime minister. express. thank you very much, prime minister- a — express. thank you very much, prime minister. a couple _ express. thank you very much, prime minister. a couple days _ express. thank you very much, prime minister. a couple days ago, - express. thank you very much, prime minister. a couple days ago, you i express. thank you very much, prime minister. a couple days ago, you put| minister. a couple days ago, you put the chances — minister. a couple days ago, you put the chances of success here to at about _ the chances of success here to at about six — the chances of success here to at about six in— the chances of success here to at about six in ten. i wondered if you had a _ about six in ten. i wondered if you had a new— about six in ten. i wondered if you had a new figure for that after the talks— had a new figure for that after the talks today. and outside of the enthusiasm you've talked about in this summit, and the country, a lot of people _ this summit, and the country, a lot of people are concerned about the cost indications of the ? 20. about
5:26 pm
a week_ cost indications of the ? 20. about a week ago. — cost indications of the ? 20. about a week ago, a poll suggested that a majority— a week ago, a poll suggested that a majority of— a week ago, a poll suggested that a majority of people would like to see a referendum on the idea of net zero _ a referendum on the idea of net zero. would you think about that? thank— zero. would you think about that? thank you — zero. would you think about that? thank you i— zero. would you think about that? thank you. ijust want to say one thank you. i just want to say one thing about the overall economics. first of all, if we don't do this, if we don't fix our climate, it will be an economic catastrophe as well as an environmental catastrophe. i think we need to understand that as point number one. this is the only way to fix this is to reduce c02 and click tackle climate change. i also having to think that there is a great wisdom in the british people, and i think they can see this is an issue that needs to be fixed. and they may not listen to me, but they certainly listen to sir david attenborough and they look at what's
5:27 pm
actually happening around the world, they look at the fires and the floods and the hurricanes and the increased incidence of all three, and they think something is happening here. they look at that graph. you see that graph yesterday morning? incredibly powerful graph that sir david attenborough produced that sir david attenborough produced that the increase in co2 emissions over the last few thousand years, or the graph of c02 over the last few thousand years, or the graph of co2 emissions and the temperatures. how temperatures track c02 temperatures. how temperatures track co2 emissions. then that spike in co2 emissions. then that spike in co2 emissions. then that spike in co2 emissions. that anthropogenic spike upwards and a company now. they're not dumb, they can see that this is something that needs to be tackled. we will tackle it by creating many, many hundreds of thousands of high skilled jobs in
5:28 pm
green technology. in the green industrial revolution plan alone, there are plans of thousands more jobs in all sorts of things from battery technology to wind farms and many other things. so the economy is going this way. i think it's a good thing, and we can use this moment to trigger a greater growth and greater prosperity, but do it in a green way. i do think people get that. as for your brilliant suggestion of a referendum, i think this country has probably had enough referendums to be going on with for a while. that's my general view on the matter. anyway, beth. thank you, prime minister. it's been a really— thank you, prime minister. it's been a really intense _ thank you, prime minister. it's been a really intense few— thank you, prime minister. it's been a really intense few days, _ thank you, prime minister. it's been a really intense few days, both i thank you, prime minister. it's been a really intense few days, both here |
5:29 pm
a really intense few days, both here and in _ a really intense few days, both here and in rome — a really intense few days, both here and in rome. just _ a really intense few days, both here and in rome. just to— a really intense few days, both here and in rome. just to use _ a really intense few days, both here and in rome. just to use your- and in rome. just to use your football— and in rome. just to use your football analogy. _ and in rome. just to use your football analogy. you - and in rome. just to use your football analogy. you talked i and in rome. just to use your- football analogy. you talked about being _ football analogy. you talked about being able — football analogy. you talked about being able to — football analogy. you talked about being able to equalise _ football analogy. you talked about being able to equalise in _ football analogy. you talked about being able to equalise in extra i being able to equalise in extra time, — being able to equalise in extra time, but _ being able to equalise in extra time, but isn't _ being able to equalise in extra time, but isn't the _ being able to equalise in extra time, but isn't the sad - being able to equalise in extra time, but isn't the sad realityl being able to equalise in extra i time, but isn't the sad reality of all of— time, but isn't the sad reality of all of this— time, but isn't the sad reality of all of this that _ time, but isn't the sad reality of all of this that if _ time, but isn't the sad reality of all of this that if china _ time, but isn't the sad reality of all of this that if china is - time, but isn't the sad reality of all of this that if china is not i time, but isn't the sad reality of all of this that if china is not on| all of this that if china is not on the pitch. — all of this that if china is not on the pitch, team _ all of this that if china is not on the pitch, team world - all of this that if china is not on the pitch, team world is- all of this that if china is not on the pitch, team world is not. the pitch, team world is not going to be _ the pitch, team world is not going to be able — the pitch, team world is not going to be able to _ the pitch, team world is not going to be able to equalise? _ the pitch, team world is not going to be able to equalise? that i the pitch, team world is not going to be able to equalise? that is- to be able to equalise? that is the elephant— to be able to equalise? that is the elephant in— to be able to equalise? that is the elephant in the _ to be able to equalise? that is the elephant in the room, _ to be able to equalise? that is the elephant in the room, is— to be able to equalise? that is the elephant in the room, is that i to be able to equalise? that is the elephant in the room, is that it? l to be able to equalise? that is the. elephant in the room, is that it? on forests. sky— elephant in the room, is that it? on forests, sky news _ elephant in the room, is that it? on forests, sky news is— elephant in the room, is that it? on forests, sky news is on— elephant in the room, is that it? on forests, sky news is on the - elephant in the room, is that it? on forests, sky news is on the ground i forests, sky news is on the ground in brazil. _ forests, sky news is on the ground in brazil, where _ forests, sky news is on the ground in brazil, where authorities- forests, sky news is on the ground in brazil, where authorities don't. in brazil, where authorities don't seem _ in brazil, where authorities don't seem to — in brazil, where authorities don't seem to care _ in brazil, where authorities don't seem to care at— in brazil, where authorities don't seem to care at all— in brazil, where authorities don't seem to care at all about - in brazil, where authorities don't seem to care at all about mass l seem to care at all about mass deforestation. _ seem to care at all about mass deforestation. do _ seem to care at all about mass deforestation. do you - seem to care at all about mass deforestation. do you really. seem to care at all about mass i deforestation. do you really believe that the _ deforestation. do you really believe that the president _ deforestation. do you really believe that the president of _ deforestation. do you really believe that the president of brazil - deforestation. do you really believe that the president of brazil will i that the president of brazil will follow— that the president of brazil will follow through— that the president of brazil will follow through on _ that the president of brazil will follow through on the - that the president of brazil will follow through on the pledgesl that the president of brazil will . follow through on the pledges he made? _ follow through on the pledges he made? as — follow through on the pledges he made? as he _ follow through on the pledges he made? as he taking _ follow through on the pledges he made? as he taking it _ follow through on the pledges he made? as he taking it seriously? thank— made? as he taking it seriously? thank you — made? as he taking it seriously? thank yon-— made? as he taking it seriously? thank you. thank you very much. reau thank you. thank you very much. really good _ thank you. thank you very much. really good questions. _ thank you. thank you very much. really good questions. first i thank you. thank you very much. really good questions. first of i thank you. thank you very much. i really good questions. first of all, on china, it's true that president she is that here, but the chinese team is very high level —— president xi. he didn't want to come because
5:30 pm
of the pandemic, and you've got to respect that, same with vladimir putin. but that doesn't mean the chinese are not engaging. they've made the commitment on net zero by 2060 or earlier, and the key thing china is saying is that they want to get to a peak in their carbon emissions by 2030 or before. and when you listen to what president xi says, the the question is how much? than that's the issue. that's what we're discussing with china because there is still a world difference between peaking in 2030 and your emissions and peaking in 2025. that's where the conversation is. that's where the conversation is. that's where the conversation is. that's where we're keeping the pressure up. on your point about
5:31 pm
forests, and we're continuing to engage with china and we're seeing some signs of progress. do we want more? that's absolutely true. we want more from everybody. do you want more from everybody. do you want to go to forest? i think that we need china to make commitments, china has already made a substantial commitment to move to net zero by the middle of the century, 2060 or before, as xi jinping says. let's see where we get to with china and peeking by pre—2030, let's see what that adds up pre—2030, let's see what that adds up to. but china has fantastic power to make change in the way it runs its economy, they are committed to
5:32 pm
no new financing of overseas coal, a big change— you're starting to see the impact of that chinese decision to stop financing coal overseas and the whole asia—pacific region already, you can see people moving away, just in the last couple days you'll have seen the pledges that follow from that chinese action. so i'm grateful to that. do we need more progress? you bet we need more progress from china. and from everybody here at this gathering. on deforestation and the point about your reporter in brazil not finding any evidence on the ground that there is any willingness to stop cutting down trees — it's notjust world leaders who are saying this. what we're doing saying that companies who invest in commodities or by commodities that result in
5:33 pm
deforestation, whatever they may be, will not be invested in. and there's been an agreement by companies around the world that they will no longer support or invest in commodities like palm oil or whatever that result in deforestation. you've heard what a big commodity producers have had to say about others. that's a massive step forward, a big change, and secondly the world financial institution have stepped up and said they won't finance companies that get involved in deforestation. so financial institutions worth trillions of pounds will not be supporting deforestation. and the pressure that comes from consumers around the world who will say to those banks, whether it's aviva or barclays, or anyone else — if they break that pledge, there will be a
5:34 pm
democratic consumer price to pay. in the same goes for the companies that break that pledge. so there's been a big shift in the balance of power over forests towards consumers, towards people who care about it and want to stop the forests being chopped down, whatever governments, evenif chopped down, whatever governments, even if they do break the pledges they're making. do you see what i'm saying? i think that's been the important thing. let's go to liz piper of reuters. hi. important thing. let's go to liz piper of reuters.— piper of reuters. hi, prime minister- — piper of reuters. hi, prime minister. the _ piper of reuters. hi, prime minister. the developed i piper of reuters. hi, prime i minister. the developed world promised in 2020 to deliver the 100 billion— promised in 2020 to deliver the 100 billion - _ promised in 2020 to deliver the 100 billion — they still haven't done that, _ billion — they still haven't done that, what's the likelihood of that actually _ that, what's the likelihood of that actually coming next year and surely the price _ actually coming next year and surely the price tag should be a little bit higher? _ the price tag should be a little bit higher? also, what was your reaction to india's _ higher? also, what was your reaction to india's net— higher? also, what was your reaction to india's net zero target being at 2070? _ to india's net zero target being at 2070? ., ~ ., ':: i:
5:35 pm
2070? thanks, liz. i think that 100 billion is still— 2070? thanks, liz. i think that 100 billion is still something _ 2070? thanks, liz. i think that 100 billion is still something that i 2070? thanks, liz. i think that 100 billion is still something that we i billion is still something that we are pushing for earlier, we will get it by 2023 but we need to see more. i thought what japan had to say was great, but this ain't over, we need further action from countries around the world. and we will certainly keep the pressure up. sorry liz, remind me, what was your second question? india! on india, ithink the most important thing that they've said is that they want to de—carbonized so much of their power system by 2030, that's a massive commitment moving up from 175—a50 gigawatts of clean energy, that's a huge commitment. and if they put that in there mpc, even more
5:36 pm
powerful. that in there mpc, even more powerful-— that in there mpc, even more owerful. ., ,, , ., , . powerful. thank you very much, prime minister. powerful. thank you very much, prime minister- you — powerful. thank you very much, prime minister. you say _ powerful. thank you very much, prime minister. you say the _ powerful. thank you very much, prime minister. you say the score _ powerful. thank you very much, prime minister. you say the score is - powerful. thank you very much, prime minister. you say the score is now- minister. you say the score is now 5-5... _ minister. you say the score is now 5-3.~~ 5-2 — minister. you say the score is now 5-3.~~ 5-2 l— minister. you say the score is now 5-3,"- 5-2-— minister. you say the score is now 5-3,... 5-2. i said it could be even 5-3. 5-3,... 5-2. i said it could be even 5-3- who's — 5-3,... 5-2. i said it could be even 5-3- who's got _ 5-3,... 5-2. i said it could be even 5-3. who's got the _ 5-3,... 5-2. i said it could be even 5-3. who's got the goals? - 5-3,... 5-2. i said it could be even 5-3. who's got the goals? was i 5-3,... 5-2. i said it could be even i 5-3. who's got the goals? was at the queen, 5-3. who's got the goals? was at the queen. biden. _ 5-3. who's got the goals? was at the queen, biden, greta, _ 5-3. who's got the goals? was at the queen, biden, greta, you? _ 5-3. who's got the goals? was at the queen, biden, greta, you? and i 5-3. who's got the goals? was at the queen, biden, greta, you? and if- queen, biden, greta, you? and if! may, _ queen, biden, greta, you? and if! may, it _ queen, biden, greta, you? and if! may, it seems _ queen, biden, greta, you? and if! may, it seems that _ queen, biden, greta, you? and if! may, it seems that president i queen, biden, greta, you? and if i l may, it seems that president macron is already— may, it seems that president macron is already back — may, it seems that president macron is already back in _ may, it seems that president macron is already back in paris _ may, it seems that president macron is already back in paris tonight, i is already back in paris tonight, having — is already back in paris tonight, having seemingly— is already back in paris tonight, having seemingly left _ is already back in paris tonight, having seemingly left early - is already back in paris tonight, having seemingly left early — i is already back in paris tonight, i having seemingly left early — was is already back in paris tonight, - having seemingly left early — was at a snub _ having seemingly left early — was at a snub after— having seemingly left early — was at a snub afteryour_ having seemingly left early — was at a snub after your fall— having seemingly left early — was at a snub after your fall out? - having seemingly left early — was at a snub after your fall out? and - a snub after your fall out? and could — a snub after your fall out? and could you _ a snub after your fall out? and could you clear— a snub after your fall out? and could you clear up _ a snub after your fall out? and could you clear up whether - a snub after your fall out? and| could you clear up whether you a snub after your fall out? and - could you clear up whether you did offer _ could you clear up whether you did offer him _ could you clear up whether you did offer him more _ could you clear up whether you did offer him more generous- could you clear up whether you did offer him more generous offers . could you clear up whether you did offer him more generous offers oni offer him more generous offers on fishing _ offer him more generous offers on fishing boats — offer him more generous offers on fishing boats in _ offer him more generous offers on fishing boats in order— offer him more generous offers on fishing boats in order to _ offer him more generous offers on fishing boats in order to keep- offer him more generous offers on| fishing boats in order to keep talks alive? _ fishing boats in order to keep talks alive? , ~ fishing boats in order to keep talks alive? ,, ~ �*, g, g, alive? thanks. i think it's a team came, alive? thanks. i think it's a team game. this _ alive? thanks. i think it's a team game, this thing, _ alive? thanks. i think it's a team game, this thing, harry. - alive? thanks. i think it's a team game, this thing, harry. and - alive? thanks. i think it's a team game, this thing, harry. and i i alive? thanks. i think it's a team i game, this thing, harry. and i think everybody is working very hard together to keep 1.5 alive, and i think a lot of — i would pay tribute to all the individuals that you've
5:37 pm
mentioned, with the possible exception of myself, but i pay tribute to everybody for the big effort. and that effort will continue, we will keep going right to the wire. and on our relations with france, i really renew what i've said before — we are working very, very closely with our french friends and partners on the things that matter most to the people of the world, and that is tackling climate change, reducing c02 and, by comparison with that hugely important issue, the ones you man it semi—convention are vanishingly unimportant. but since you ask whether the uk has changed its position, let me put it that way, on the fishing issue, the answer is no. i hope that will do so far, thank you for all your attention. prime
5:38 pm
minister boris _ you for all your attention. prime minister boris johnson - you for all your attention. prime minister boris johnson bringing l you for all your attention. prime i minister boris johnson bringing to minister borisjohnson bringing to an end his press conference at the end of two days with 120 world leaders here in glasgow. not really trying to sugar—coat the situation, the promises here say they'll be 100% useless if they aren't backed up 100% useless if they aren't backed up by real action. it was very humbling thing faced with the prime minister —— ministers of developing countries affected by climate change. but he said we have the tools and finance to bring about real change, huge amounts of money available for private finance. the big take he said it was 90% of the world economy now working towards net zero by the middle of the century, up from when the uk took over the chair of the cop summit. " the world has an awful lot more to do," and i think those leaders that have been with us through the course of the day would certainly agree with him. there's been any more coming from glasgow through the course of the evening, i do hope
5:39 pm
you'lljoin us for some of the reaction here, but i'll hand you ' life in the studio. christian, thanks very much indeed. world leaders have agreed to major deals to combat rising global temperatures. the first covers methane emissions in the second is on deforestation. the agreement on methane, led by america and the eu, aims to cut commissions of the gas by 20% by at least 2030 — this despite some of the world has like biggest polluting countries not being involved in this. here's victoria gill. the visible flare of methane release. scientists say this potent greenhouse gas has been responsible for about half the human—induced warming of the planet we've experienced so far. now a global partnership to tackle emissions by plugging leaks
5:40 pm
and covering landfill sites is being announced at the cop26 climate conference in glasgow. the initiative, led by the us and eu, pledges to cut emissions of the gas by at least 30% by 2030. china, russia and india, some of the world's top methane emitters, have not signed up. some of the big emitters need to join the pledge. 50 china, russia, for example. if we are going to achieve those big reductions that we need, then they need to come on board as well. the loss of forests around the world, estimated to be responsible for about 15% of greenhouse gas emissions, has been the subject of this crucial climate summit�*s first major deal. countries who signed the agreement, including brazil, russia, china and indonesia, represented 85% of china and indonesia, represent 85% of the world's forests. the pledge, and the £15 billion behind it, has been broadly welcomed. but deforestation has actually increased since a similar pledge was launched in 2014, and it is not yet clear exactly how those who cut down forests to make
5:41 pm
money would be provided with the financial incentive to protect these vital carbon storing ecosystems instead. this is a hugely ambitious pledge from world leaders because of the sheer scale of it. we have destroyed over 50% of land—based ecosystems, and this announcement is notjust about protecting forests to keep them standing, it's actually about starting to restore and put so much of our wild landscapes back. some scientists remain sceptical of the progress here. a survey of climate scientists suggests many are not confident that global emissions can be cut quickly enough to avoid a climate catastrophe. it is a mixture of promise and pessimism here in glasgow. while there has been some early steps forward and key agreements on issues like methane emissions and deforestation, those are voluntary agreements and they are going to be put to the test at the same time that scientists say we are running out of time to slash emissions. in the gulf between words and action, the global
5:42 pm
temperature continues to rise, but as the leaders conclude their speeches and the negotiators take over, there is much more talking to do. victoria gill, bbc news, glasgow. our science and environment correspondent, victoria gill, told me more about these pledges — and what the missing signatures from some of the world's biggest polluters means. i think we'll be hearing repeatedly about the absence of agreements from russia, india and china because they are such important players here, and the absence of the russian and chinese leader to make her leaders at these talks, laying the foundation for maybe not the consensus we were hoping for. but is really important agreement because it buys us time to get onto this deadline of hitting the admission cut by 2030. scientists are this critical decade because the latest science shows us that we really need
5:43 pm
to be slashing emissions in half by 2030 to startjust to bend that curve closer to that critical 1.5 celsius target, that threshold. and really the important thing about methane is the new science from the intergovernmental... these government—sponsored scientists who give us the latest and best assessments of the impact of climate change, it democrat is showing us how potent these greenhouse gases are, and also that it's an easier cut than carbon dioxide. so it buys us that time more swiftly and easily. there's not much in the world of fixing climate change, but methane is one of those low hanging fruits. i methane is one of those low hanging fruits. h, methane is one of those low hanging fruits. ., ., , ., fruits. i said at the top of a programme _ fruits. i said at the top of a programme that _ fruits. i said at the top of a programme that we've - fruits. i said at the top of a programme that we've had j fruits. i said at the top of a i programme that we've had a fruits. i said at the top of a - programme that we've had a flurry of announcements today, and i'm struggling to keep up with every thing that's being announced. it seems to me that given they can't get china and russia on board with some of these bigger initiatives, there to steaming ahead anyway so they're building together the coalition of the willing, if you
5:44 pm
will, in a series of many deals. would that be a good description of it is a lot i think that's fair to say, yes, it's a mixture of a flurry of promises and positivity, and also scepticism and pessimism at the beginning of this conference. has scepticism and pessimism at the beginning of this conference. as we said at the beginning _ beginning of this conference. as we said at the beginning of _ beginning of this conference. as we said at the beginning of our - said at the beginning of our chapter, there's some noticeable absences, but it's about kick—starting these agreements. but from the scientists i've spoken to who are experts in the realm of what impact this will actually have, there is concern about how deliverable this is on the ground. so we had a big deforestation announcement about methane — how do police and enforce that? these are voluntary agreements and, with the deforestation announcement, that failed back in 2014 to make any difference, deforestation has increased since that first announcement was made. and this is announcement was made. and this is an update on the 2014 agreement. so there is some scepticism about how you enforce, police and deal with us
5:45 pm
on the ground because we are running out of time to do that, we need to be making these emissions cuts so we need to make sure this works in short order. brazil is among the countries to sign up to that deal out of glasgow, the pledge on deforestation. last year, the felling of woodland in brazil's amazon rainforest, reached a 12—year high. the amazon contains around a third of all the tropical rainforests left on earth, and crucially, helps capture vast amounts of carbon dioxide, a major contributor, to global warming. but illegal, as well as legal logging, is a huge problem. from hondoniya state, in the brazilian amazon, our international correspondent, 0rla guerin has more details. the amazon dream, a forest haven combating climate change. but the reality can look like this. no more tree canopy, the land
5:46 pm
stripped bare for planting crops. we were shown how easy it is to plunder the amazon, just one man and a chainsaw. well, we are making our way now deeper into the forest. we're being led to an area where illegal logging is taking place. and here we are at the edge of a national park, an area that's supposed to be protected. but campaigners say illegal loggers have a green light from president jair bolsonaro. they accuse him of carving up environmental protections and fuelling climate change. miguel isn't worried about the planet, he's worried about his family.
5:47 pm
his handiwork, seen from above. every tree that falls here releases carbon dioxide back into the atmosphere, contributing to global warming. by night, specialist police are on the lookout for crimes against the forest. illegal logging is big business, there's a rainforest mafia. the timber can wind up in europe or the us. this load is legal, but sergeant robertson says he is fighting a losing battle.
5:48 pm
the heat is building and there is ash falling in the air. about an hour's drive away, ritual destruction. every year, vast areas are cleared away by slashing and burning. the heat is building and there is ash falling in the air. no attempt has been made to hide this. it is at the sight of a busy road. when fires like this happen here, it's not a work of nature. it's the work of man. in the global fight against climate change, this is one more loss. and here, too, lost ground. more wild west than wild amazon. cattle farming is driven by global demand for brazilian beef and backed by president bolsonaro.
5:49 pm
this man is a second—generation rancher. he says the forest is a living, not a fairy tale. but we got a very different perspective from this activist. she's spent her life defending the rainforest and its indigenous peoples — or trying to.
5:50 pm
this rich but fragile ecosystem is changing its colours. deforestation means the rainforest in brazil now emits more carbon than it stores. the message from here is a distress signal. 0rla guerin, bbc news, in the amazon rainforest.
5:51 pm
johnson has apologised to an borisjohnson has apologised to an israeli minister who could not attend the cop26 summit yesterday because it was not wheelchair accessible. young neck i gather there was some confusion with the arrangements yesterday, and i'm very sorry. karine elharrar was forced to return to her hotel 50 miles away because the only access to the summit in glasgow was by shuttle or walking. earlier today, ms elharrar told the bbc her experience showed the need for better accessibility. i think it's a good experience to make sure that, for the next time, the un conference will be accessible. because, you know, we can talk about accessibility and the rights of people with disabilities. but in life, we need to implement
5:52 pm
all the conventions and regulations. and that was an experience that showed us that we need to pay attention to all the details everywhere. a recent poll suggests people supported the prime minister's bid to curb climate change, but weren't prepared to pay more than £5 extra a week in tax to fund the policies. another poll suggests only 7% of people in this country thought families like theirs should be funding green transformation. sima kotecha has been to dudley to test the public appetite for self sacrifice to save the planet. ian, how worried are you about the climate, from 1—10? i'd say about four. you're very worried, so how many out of ten? about nine. nine. i'm extremely worried. so ten? yes, definitely. going vegan, for example — are you more likely, less likely,
5:53 pm
or somewhere in the middle? i won't go vegan. so where does that go? very less likely. if you ate less meat, you would save a lot less carbon dioxide. yes, it's right there. but you're not prepared to do that? no. would you eat less meat, for example? no! i think sometimes, - if we had done that now, it would be more harm than good to us, like smoking. _ i ain't giving my- fags up for nobody. so you're not going to ditch a car, then, orare you? i wouldn't ditch it, but i would change... so you would go electric car — is that less likely, more likely, or somewhere in the middle? more likely. what about buying less? you've got some lovely clothes on there, if you're going out on a saturday night... less likely overall. so that's not going to happen. well, you have a very nice coat... laughter are you prepared to keep the same clothes for a lot longer — so buy less, perhaps recycle your clothing more? recycle my clothing more. i go to charity shops sometimes.
5:54 pm
you do? so buy less — more likely, less likely, or somewhere in the middle? somewhere in the middle. and what about plastic? plastic, i recycle. i live in a complex with 35 flats. all our rubbish goes down the chute, so there's no recycling. what about a heat pump? they cost between £6—18,000, but the government has said they'll give you a £5,000 subsidy. i never heard of that. well, i was reading about one of those in the paper yesterday. some couple had spent over thousands of pounds for the heat pumps throughout their entire house, and now they're sitting there with their coats on. insulate your home? already done. whosejob is it, margaret, to enforce some of these restrictions if people believe in them? is it up to the individual, or the government? it's both, really. i think there's a lot of people who don't recycle as much as they should.
5:55 pm
i'm in the black country, where it's industry with all the factories and that, and the smoke over the years. my husband used to work in the rolling mills and everything. so what difference will it make now? sampling the mood of some of the residents in dudley in the midlands. two days than with 120 world leaders in attendance in glasgow coming up with various deals to try to cut carbon emissions and try to deal with climate change. most leaders will actually be leaving tonight and on their way out, they'll be giving press conferences, borisjohnson was speaking earlier and made it clear that all the promises didn't amount to anything unless they were backed up to anything unless they were backed up with real action. a little bit later tonight, we are expecting a final press conference from the united states delegation— not entirely sure if president biden or
5:56 pm
his claimant envoyjohn kerry. but that's the latest from glasgow on the cop26 meeting. time for the weather with ben rich. good evening. for most of us, today turned into one of those bright but rather chilly autumn days with some spells of sunshine and 1—2 showers. you can see some shower clouds popping up there for a weather watcher in west wales. the satellite picture shows that many of those showers did focus in across northern and western areas, areas exposed to the breeze. and those showers, when they did crop up, gave some pretty impressive skyscapes, some nice rainbows out there. and some of those showers will continue through tonight, especially around the coasts — some of the showers wintry over the highest ground in northern scotland. not as many showers for inland spots, in fact, it'll turn really quite cold for some, down towards the south, temperatures as low as minus one celsius, allowing for a touch of frost and, for parts of england and wales, some fog patches to take us into tomorrow morning.
5:57 pm
tomorrow is another sunshine—and—showers day for most of us. again, the showers mainly around the coast, but i think we will see a few more drifting inland across parts of northeast england, down into the midlands and east anglia as we head through the afternoon. the wind, if anything, a little stronger than it was today and temperatures will struggle — highs between 8—12 celsius. now as we move through wednesday night into thursday, this area of high pressure will start to build its way in — and that will have the effect of killing off some of the showers, there won't be as many showers around on thursday. there will still be some across parts of pembrokeshire and cornwall, some to start off for east anglia and the southeast, they should tend to clear. and then, for many, especially across england and wales, we will see some spells of sunshine, but with more cloud toppling in towards northern ireland and scotland, certainly a chilly feel to the day, 7—12 celsius. now through thursday night into friday, our area of high pressure will drift a little further southwards, and we'll see a feed of cloud working its way in from the west. so generally speaking, quite a lot of cloud
5:58 pm
in the mix on friday, that cloud producing some outbreaks of patchy rain, especially in northwest scotland, and equally some breaks in that cloud, some sunny spells for eastern and southern parts. but it'll feel a little milder by this stage, 11—13 celsius. and that's the theme we take with us into the weekend — some milder weather with a lot of clout, and certainly across the northern half of the uk, the potentialfor some rain at times, it'll be quite windy, too. further south, the cloud should break here and there to give a little bit of sunshine and a milder weekend for all of us.
5:59 pm
6:00 pm
today at six. some progress is made at the climate summit in glasgow in the race to limit global warming. stopping and reversing the destruction of forests by 2030 is approved by over a hundred countries, including brazil, where vast areas of the amazon rainforest have been lost. and methane emissions — a majorfactor in global warming — are meant to be cut by a third by the end of the decade, but the overriding message is one of caution. we must take care to guard against false hope and not to think in any way that the job is done. because it is not. there is still a very long way to go. but much more is expected by campaigners outside the summit — with demands for the rapid phasing out of fossilfuels.

19 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on