Skip to main content

tv   BBC News at Ten  BBC News  November 2, 2021 10:00pm-10:31pm GMT

10:00 pm
tonight at ten... leaders at the climate summit in glasgow make some progress in the race to limit global warming. methane emissions — a majorfactor in global warming are meant to be cut by a third by the end of the decade — the initiative led by the eu and the us. and brazil, where the amazon rainforest has been devastated, is backing the call from the uk and others to stop deforestation by 2030. there is still a very long way to go. but all that being said, i am cautiously optimistic. as he prepared to leave glasgow, president biden was heavily critical of the chinese president for not attending, though beijing has sent a team of negotiators. i think it's been a big
10:01 pm
mistake, quite frankly, for china not showing up. the rest of the world is going to look to china and say, what value have they provided? also on the programme tonight: two police officers plead guilty to taking and sharing photographs of the bodies of two sisters, who were stabbed to death in a park in london. at least 25 people are killed in kabul in an attack on afghanistan's biggest military hospital — the islamic state group claims responsibility. bruno fernandez. cristiano ronaldo! brilliant goal. absolutely outstanding. and can manchester united defy their critics? tonight's champions league action coming up. and coming up in the sport on the bbc news channel... antonio conte is back in town — the italian takes over at tottenham 2a hours after the former manager was sacked.
10:02 pm
good evening once again, from the global climate summit in glasgow, where world leaders have reached agreement today on two major areas affecting the future of the planet. within the past couple of hours, president biden, who's returning to the us tonight, said that much had been achieved in just two days but he was heavily critical of president xi of china and president putin of russia for refusing to attend. during the day, more than 100 countries launched a far—reaching initiative to cut emissions of methane — a gas that's a major cause of global warming. the pledge is to cut emissions by 30% by the end of the decade, which would play a big part in limiting the rise in global warming to 1.5 degrees. there was another significant pledge to stop and reverse the process of deforestation by 2030. the real breakthrough here is that brazil, where vast areas of the amazon rainforest have been cut down,
10:03 pm
is among the 100 countries backing the pledge. and there's a separate initiative to cut carbon emissions by boosting the use of clean technologies in industries such as steel, road transport and agriculture. the summit in glasgow is widely seen as the last big opportunity to tackle further climate change and its devastating consequences. 0ur political editor laura kuenssberg has been following the day's events. when cultures clash can they still agree? when there is so much difference, there can be dissent. there are so many faces in glasgow, so many facets of what could be done. are you pleased with what has happened this week? hollywood stars might campaign but less developed countries may complain. the united nations fee as there is not enough
10:04 pm
trust to bridge the gaps, but deals are being made. more than 100 leaders signed a promise to stop the destruction of forests in nine years�* time. the american president displayed a real sense of progress. we are preparing to wrap in another busy day in scotland. i think we got a lot done. but busy day in scotland. i think we got a lot done. �* . busy day in scotland. i think we got alotdone. �* ., , a lot done. but there are obstacles. he was less — a lot done. but there are obstacles. he was less than _ a lot done. but there are obstacles. he was less than impressed - a lot done. but there are obstacles. he was less than impressed that. a lot done. but there are obstacles. | he was less than impressed that not every country is willing to be part of the journey. the every country is willing to be part of the journey-— every country is willing to be part of the journey. of the “ourney. the fact that china, t in: of the journey. the fact that china, t in: to of the journey. the fact that china, trying to assert _ of the journey. the fact that china, trying to assert a — of the journey. the fact that china, trying to assert a new— of the journey. the fact that china, trying to assert a new role - of the journey. the fact that china, trying to assert a new role in - of the journey. the fact that china, trying to assert a new role in the i trying to assert a new role in the world as a world leader, not showing up? come on. the single most important intention of the world is climate, everywhere. from iceland to australia. it is a gigantic issue. they have walked away. how do you do that and claim to be able to have any leadership now? the same with
10:05 pm
president putin from russia. this any leadership now? the same with president putin from russia.- president putin from russia. this is how tou . h president putin from russia. this is how tough it _ president putin from russia. this is how tough it will _ president putin from russia. this is how tough it will be. _ president putin from russia. this is how tough it will be. away - president putin from russia. this is how tough it will be. away from - president putin from russia. this is how tough it will be. away from the main stage, down a quiet corridor in a tiny office is big resistance. instead of president xi, one of the most powerful people you have never heard of in his place. china�*s climate negotiator. mt; heard of in his place. china's climate negotiator. my discussions with john climate negotiator. my discussions with john kerry _ climate negotiator. my discussions with john kerry and _ climate negotiator. my discussions with john kerry and alok _ climate negotiator. my discussions with john kerry and alok sharma i climate negotiator. my discussions i with john kerry and alok sharma were withjohn kerry and alok sharma were highly constructive. we found there were still huge gaps. he highly constructive. we found there were still huge gaps.— were still huge gaps. he criticised develo ed were still huge gaps. he criticised developed countries _ were still huge gaps. he criticised developed countries for _ were still huge gaps. he criticised developed countries for not - were still huge gaps. he criticised l developed countries for not coming up developed countries for not coming up with cash to help the less wealthy go green and won�*t focusing too much on limiting global warming too much on limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees, as borisjohnson wants, could destroy the consensus. but his attention was cast across as many foreign leaders as possible today. but they have departed now, leaving instructions for their negotiators. around 100 countries
10:06 pm
have already signed up to cut the potent greenhouse gas methane, by nearly a third by the end of the decade. the prime minister can bank progress on clean technology, as well as those promises on methane and forest. but remember, there are good reasons why only a day ago he was warning overall, these talks could fail. i was warning overall, these talks could fail. ., was warning overall, these talks could fail. . ., , , could fail. i am cautiously optimistic _ could fail. i am cautiously optimistic in _ could fail. i am cautiously optimistic in the - could fail. i am cautiously optimistic in the sense i could fail. i am cautiously i optimistic in the sense that could fail. i am cautiously - optimistic in the sense that on the way to the g20 in rome i said to somebody on the plane, that if this was a football match then the current score would be 5—1 down between humanity and climate change. i think today after talks with around 120 world leaders is that we have pulled back a goal or perhaps even two. and i think we are going to be able to take this thing to extra time, because there is no
10:07 pm
doubt that some progress has been made. ~ ., ., ., , ., ., made. what, or who is going to score the extra two — made. what, or who is going to score the extra two or _ made. what, or who is going to score the extra two or three _ made. what, or who is going to score the extra two or three goals - made. what, or who is going to score the extra two or three goals you - the extra two or three goals you need? if the extra two or three goals you need? ,. the extra two or three goals you need? , ., ., need? if there is one thing that aives me need? if there is one thing that gives me confidence, _ need? if there is one thing that gives me confidence, optimismj gives me confidence, optimism anyway, is that we are starting to create for the countries that find it most difficult to transition away from fossil fuels, we are starting to create those coalitions of support. to help them to move on. the first 48—hour is here have been frantic and today there has been a flurry of promises that should hypothetically make a difference. but it is now the hard bargaining really starts. remember, boris johnson once a deal that keeps global warming within safe limits. but in glasgow right now, it is far too early to be sure if that is in reach. there will be clashes and arguments, different voices and different views. do not underestimate how hard this is. but borisjohnson cannot be sure what
10:08 pm
may greet him in glasgow if, at the end of the summit, he returns. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, glasgow. one of the significant deals approved today by more than 100 countries is a pledge to cut emissions of methane gas — a major contributor to global warming. the plan is to cut emissions by nearly a third by 2030. less encouraging is that three of the countries responsible for the highest level of emissions — russia, china and india — are not part of this agreement. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle has the details. from emissions from cows to rubbish rotting in landfill sites and flares from oil and gas, methane is escaping into the atmosphere. but today, more than 100 countries agreed to cut the gas by 30% in a deal brokered by the united states and the eu. we have to cut emissions fast. and methane is one of the glasses
10:09 pm
we can cut fastest. and methane is one of the gasses we can cut fastest. doing that will immediately slow down climate change. methane is an important greenhouse gas, making up about 20% of global emissions. it�*s extremely potent and has caused about 50% of current global warming. cutting all methane by a third by 2030 would reduce global temperatures by about 0.3 degrees by 2040. tackling methane from the oil and gas industry will be a priority. the easiest way to reduce emissions is to plug any leaks. you can�*t see methane unless you use a special camera like this one. it�*s a colourless, odourless gas. but because it doesn�*t last for very long in the atmosphere, if you cut methane emissions now, you make a big difference fast. it�*s why reducing methane is seen as one of the easier climate fixes. but there will be challenges.
10:10 pm
agriculture, including rice production, is one of the biggest emitters of methane. solving that will be much harder. the countries who�*ve signed up to this deal account for about half of global methane emissions. but there are some notable absences — namely china, russia and india — who haven�*t come on board. to achieve this 30% global target, we will need them to step up. but having more than 100 countries on board, including some of the largest emitters, and covering the vast majority of globally traded natural gas is a very big deal. this shows methane emissions around our planet. now, for the first time, there�*s a target to cut the greenhouse gas. this is a significant step for the world. rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. the first deal reached today was on stopping and reversing the process of deforestation by the end of the decade. borisjohnson says protecting the rainforests in particular is essential if global warming
10:11 pm
is to be limited to 1.5 degrees. trees are vital to life on earth, and they absorb around a third of all carbon dioxide or c02 emitted annually. but according to the united nations, an estimated 28,000 square miles of forest are lost every year. that�*s equivalent to 36 football pitches every minute. brazil, where vast areas of the amazon rainforest have been cut down, is among the countries backing the new pledge. in recent years, the problem has been getting much worse — over 4,000 square miles of brazilian rainforest were destroyed injust 12 months. 0ur correspondent 0rla guerin has travelled to brazil to see at first hand the threat to one of the world�*s great ecological treasures. the amazon dream — a forest haven combating climate change. but the reality can look like this.
10:12 pm
no more tree canopy, the land stripped bare for planting crops. we were shown how easy it is to plunder the amazon, just one man and a chainsaw. campaigners say illegal loggers have a green light from president jair bolsonaro. they accuse him of carving up environmental protections and fuelling climate change. miguel isn�*t worried about the planet, he�*s worried about his family. his handiwork, seen from above. every tree that falls here releases carbon dioxide back into the atmosphere,
10:13 pm
contributing to global warming. by night, specialist police are on the lookout for crimes against the forest. illegal logging is big business, there�*s a rainforest mafia. the timber can wind up in europe or the us. this load is legal, but sergeant robertson says he is fighting a losing battle. and about an hour�*s drive away, ritual destruction. every year, vast areas are cleared by slashing and burning. the heat is building now,
10:14 pm
and there�*s ash falling in the air. no attempt has been made to hide this. it�*s at the side of a busy road. and when fires like this happen here, it�*s not the work of nature, it�*s the work of man. in the global fight against climate change, this is one more loss. and here too, lost ground. more wild west than wild amazon. cattle farming is driven by global demand for brazilian beef and backed by presidentjair bolsonaro. henato hammos is a second—generation rancher. he says the forest is a living, not a fairy tale.
10:15 pm
but we got a very different perspective from this activist. she�*s spent her life defending the rainforest and its indigenous peoples — or trying to.
10:16 pm
this rich but fragile ecosystem is changing its colours. deforestation means the rainforest in brazil now emits more carbon than it stores. the message from here is a distress signal. 0rla guerin, bbc news, in the amazon rainforest. one other development today — boris johnson has formally apologised to the israeli energy minister after she was unable to gain access to the conference in her wheelchair. karine elharrar, who has muscular dystrophy, was forced to return to her accommodation yesterday after waiting for two hours outside the main venue. the prime minister said he was sorry for the confusion.
10:17 pm
so let�*s speak to our science correspondent rebecca morelle in the conference centre tonight. i ,on , on the two principle agreements, on methane emissions and on deforestation, when you look at them, how significant do you assess them? ~ ., ~' ,., them, how significant do you assess them? ~ ., ~ ., , them? well, i do think both of these deals have given _ them? well, i do think both of these deals have given the _ them? well, i do think both of these deals have given the conference - them? well, i do think both of these deals have given the conference i . deals have given the conference i boast at its beginning. stopping deforestation is vital, trees suck up deforestation is vital, trees suck up and store carbon dioxide, if you cut them down and burn them, they release it again. getting countries like brazil and indonesia on body significant, but we had a pledge like this back in 2014, and nothing really happened. methane is really interesting, because it is only relatively recently that scientists realised what a big contribution it was making towards climate change and how relatively simple it is to stop some of the problems, like
10:18 pm
fixing leaks in the oil and gas industry. there are issues with some of the major methane it is not being on board with this, but this will make a difference. neither one of these will stop climate change but they will help chip away at the problem, and that is being cautiously welcomed here. rebecca, once again. — cautiously welcomed here. rebecca, once again. many — cautiously welcomed here. rebecca, once again, many thanks _ cautiously welcomed here. rebecca, once again, many thanks for- cautiously welcomed here. rebecca, once again, many thanks for those l once again, many thanks for those thoughts at the end of a rather busy day. that�*s all from glasgow tonight. for more details of today�*s agreements and background to the summit, go to bbc news online at www.bbc.co.uk/news, and you�*ll find lots of information there. time now for the day�*s other news, so let�*sjoin sophie. huw, thank you. two metropolitan police officers have pleaded guilty to taking and sharing photographs of the bodies of two sisters who were found stabbed to death in a park in london. pc denizjaffer and pcjamie lewis, who�*d been assigned to guarding the crime scene, distributed the images of bibaa henry and
10:19 pm
nicole smallman injune last year. helena wilkinson has this report from the old bailey. this is one of the last photos of bibaa henry, on the left, and nicole smallman. hours after it was taken, they were murdered. last week, mina smallman saw her daughters�* killer sentenced for his crimes. today, she was back again at the same court, having to endure yet more unimaginable pain. it may sound really ridiculous that this case has brought us to even more anxiety today. it�*s the most nervous i�*ve felt doing any interview, and i think because it was the final straw. these two officers were meant to be guarding the area where her daughters�* bodies were found. pc denizjaffer, on the left, and pcjamie lewis.
10:20 pm
but despite their orders, the two officers then breached the crime—scene cordon and took photographs of the bodies, which they then shared on whatsapp. one of the images was then edited by lewis, who superimposed his own face onto the picture with the victims in the background. today, they appeared together in the dock — guilty, they both said, to one count of misconduct in a public office. in a statement, the metropolitan police commissioner, cressida dick, said... 0utside court, the independent office for police conduct said there was no place in policing for this behaviour and it had to stop. a culture where some officers don�*t see anything wrong with
10:21 pm
sharing deeply offensive messages, and where others feel unable or unwilling to challenge, has to change, and it has to change now. the two officers who took and shared pictures of the sisters�* bodies will be sentenced next month. the judge told them to expect prison sentences. helen wilkinson, bbc news, at the old bailey. at least 25 people have been killed and dozens injured in an attack on afghanistan�*s biggest military hospital in kabul. a taliban spokesman said there had been two explosions outside the building before gunmen entered. tonight the islamic state group has claimed it carried out the attack. from kabul, our correspondent secunder kermani reports. across the road from the attack, families at another hospital watch on in horror. outside, a man tries
10:22 pm
to crawl to safety. inside, mothers and young children terrified. afghans had hoped scenes like this would come to an end now that the taliban are in power. instead, their fighters were amongst the victims of this attack, carried out by the local branch of the islamic state group, or daesh. the assault began with a suicide bombing, before gunmen tried to fight their way inside the military hospital. helicopters were used to drop taliban special forces into the site, according to the group. but outside this hospital, taliban members were anxiously awaiting news of injured colleagues — former insurgents now facing an insurgency themselves. "after the explosion, me and some of the other taliban were helping carry injured people into the hospital,"
10:23 pm
says this member of the group, who was at the scene of the attack. "a daesh fighter pretended to help us too, but when we got inside, he took a pistol out and shot a talib who was next to me in the head." "the rest of us tried to escape." the taliban are insistent on playing down the threat from is. it�*s true they don�*t control any territory, but this is the fifth major attack they�*re suspected of carrying out since the taliban took power. is are challenging the taliban�*s core narrative that they�*re finally bringing security to afghanistan. is accuse the taliban of not being hardline enough, and the two are fierce rivals. this new taliban government is beginning to face many of the same problems as the government they just overthrew — a dismal economy and now rising security concerns. secunder kermani, bbc news, kabul.
10:24 pm
the government�*s latest coronavirus figures for the uk show there were 33,865 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period which means on average there were 40,068 new cases reported per day in the last week. there were 9,538 people in hospital with covid as of yesterday — the highest number since the first week of march. 293 deaths were recorded. that�*s of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—19 test. but that figure includes some deaths in england that were not reported yesterday. on average in the past week, 162 covid—related deaths were recorded every day. and more than 8.3 million people have received their boosterjab. this includes third doses for those with certain health conditions. a state of emergency has been declared in ethiopia as a year—long war between government
10:25 pm
and rebel forces intensifies. residents in the capital, addis ababa, have been ordered to arm themselves and defend their neighbourhoods, amid fears the rebels from the northern tigray region are advancing on the city. tonight, the head of the united nations has said he�*s extremeley concerned by the escalation of violence and called for an immediate ceasefire. 0ur correspondent catherine byaruhanga reports. ethiopia�*s government promised the war in the north would be swift. a year on, it threatens the very fabric of africa�*s second most populous nation. tigray�*s rebels have gained the upper hand against federalforces and their allies, who appear poorly trained and ill—equipped. prime minister abiy ahmed has led his country into a brutal civil war. his government believes declaring a state of emergency will help push back its opponents.
10:26 pm
translation: ethiopians should be committed to go to the extreme - to stop these traitors and their allied forces. but it�*s notjust a war in the north he�*s facing. further south is the 0romo liberation army. they want self—determination to for the 0romo people. this is a country of over 100 million people, divided into 80 ethnic groups. many of them are agitating for independence. this is an old armed struggle, but many of the people here that you can see were not born when the 0romo liberation army was first formed in the 19705. today, as ethiopia faces many conflicts and challenges, this group sees new opportunities. the 0la has agreed an alliance with the tigray rebels, and the two groups say their forces are moving closer to ethiopia�*s capital. translation: we are working |
10:27 pm
on a strategy to control the area without paying a heavy sacrifice, and we�*re succeeding — addis ababa is encircled. ethiopia�*s government forces appear to be struggling to hold territory, and in turn, struggling to hold this large country together. catherine byaruhanga, bbc news. in tonight�*s champions league football, chelsea and manchester united have been amongst those in action. joe wilson has been watching. so was it time for manchester united to relax? well, is it ever? 12th minute and atalanta shot at the goalkeeper, and in. and here we go again. varane�*s injury soon forced the manager into reorganisation. well, pass it fast, give and go, and mostly get it to ronaldo. that�*s an equaliser. but here comes duvan zapata. it�*s the replay that was studied for two minutes before, yeah, they decided onside. goal stood.
10:28 pm
how could united recover? not how — it�*s who. injury time, the repair man. ronaldo, 2—2, the last—gasp hero for all time. remember 1979? in malmo they do. european cup finalists then. success takes money these days, but pride still priceless. the swedish defence kept chelsea out for 55 minutes. no star strikers for chelsea, they�*re injured. so it needed this guy, hakim ziyech, to finish. 1—0 was enough. joe wilson, bbc news. that�*s it. good night.
10:29 pm
10:30 pm
this is bbc news, the headlines the host of the glasgow climate summit, borisjohnson, has said that so far he is cautiously optimistic about the progress made. but he said there�*s still "a long way to go". earlier world leaders agreed to a deal slashing emissions of methane — a highly potent greenhouse gas. 103 countries signed up to the deal aimed at reducing methane output 30 per cent by 2030. there was also an agreement to end deforestation by 2030. around 100 countries signed up to the pledge — including brazil, russia and indonesia — which will cover 85% of the world�*s forests. more than 20 people have been killed and at least 16 injured in a gun and bomb assault on a military hospital in the afghan capital kabul. an affiliate of the islamic state group said it did it.

24 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on