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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 3, 2021 2:00am-2:31am GMT

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welcome to bbc news. i'm david eades. our top stories: leaders at the climate change summit in glasgow make progress in the race to limit global warming. the cop26 host says it's time to deliver on the promises. the eyes of the population of the world are on you and the eyes of the british government and all the other governments that care about these are on negotiators and we have your numbers. relief in australia, as a four—year—old girl, who was taken from a campsite more than two weeks ago, is found alive and well. at least 25 people are killed in kabul, in an attack on afghanistan's biggest military hospital. the islamic state group says they did it. and as the race to be the next governor of virginia hots up, what the outcome could
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tell us about the us a year after president biden�*s victory. hello. thanks very much for joining us. two days of conference. two significant agreements. the leaders gathered at the cop26 climate change summit have made bold commitments to end deforestation by 2030 and to reduce emissions of methane, one of the most potent greenhouse gases, by some 30%. it's enough for the british prime minister and host of the cop, borisjohnson, to say he is cautiously optimistic about the progress being made. but as heads of government leave their national delegations to focus on more detailed discussion, mrjohnson also warned against false hope. our political editor laura kuenssberg has been following
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the day's events. when cultures clash can they still agree? when there is so much difference, there can be dissent. shouting there are so many faces in glasgow, so many facets of what could be done. mr dicaprio, are you pleased with what has happened this week? hollywood stars might campaign but less developed countries may well complain. the united nations fears as there is not enough trust to bridge the gaps, but deals are being made. more than 100 leaders signed a promise to stop the destruction of forests in nine years�* time. the american president displayed a real sense of progress. we are preparing to wrap on another busy day in scotland. i think we got a lot done. but there are obstacles. he was less than impressed that not every country is willing to be part of the journey. the fact that china,
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trying to assert a new role in the world as a world leader, not showing up? come on. the single most important thing that has the attention of the world is climate, everywhere. away from the main stage, down a quiet corridor in a tiny office is big resistance. instead of president xi, one of the most powerful people you probably have never heard of in his place — china's climate negotiator. he criticised developed countries for not coming up with cash to help the less wealthy go green and warned focusing too much on limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees, as borisjohnson wants, could destroy the consensus. but his attention was cast across as many foreign leaders as possible today but they have departed now, leaving instructions for their negotiators.
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around 100 countries have already signed up to cut the potent greenhouse gas methane by nearly a third by the end of the decade. the prime minister can bank progress on clean technology, as well as those promises on methane and forests but, remember, there are good reasons why only a day ago he was warning, overall, these talks could fail. china's climate negotiator, xie zhenhua. , i am cautiously optimistic in the sense that on the way to the g20 in rome i said to somebody on the plane, that if this was a football match then the current score would be 5—1 down in the match between humanity and climate change. i think today after two days of talks with around 120 world leaders is that we have pulled back a goal or perhaps even two. and i think we are going to be able to take this thing to extra time, because there is no doubt that some progress has been made.
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the first 48 hours here have been frantic and today there has been a flurry of promises that should hypothetically make a difference but it is now the hard bargaining really starts. remember, borisjohnson wants a deal that keeps global warming within safe limits but here in glasgow right now, it is far too early to be sure if that is in reach. there will be clashes and arguments, different voices and different views. but borisjohnson cannot be sure what may greet him in glasgow if, at the end of this vast summit, he returns. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, glasgow. i think what is clear is a lot of discussion will be about brass tacks, about money, who gets what and who is prepared to put what into the pot. mark carney is boris johnson's finance advisor for the conference, and he's been speaking to the bbc�*s christian fraser. we are increasingly going to see as government policy
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toughens up, fills in, about what is needed to get us to 1.5 degrees is companies will have to say notjust degrees is companies will have to say not just theoretically this is what is going to happen, but actually they will have to write off some of those. we saw a tiny bit of that earlier last year, about a year ago, with some of the oil companies who wrote off some of those access reserves that just don't make sense in a 1—.5 degree world. but it's a drop in the bucket, so far.- in the bucket, so far. one of the problems _ in the bucket, so far. one of the problems at _ in the bucket, so far. one of the problems at the - in the bucket, so far. one of| the problems at the moment in the bucket, so far. one of i the problems at the moment is what we call carbon leakage. so you get a territory like the eu that puts up the price of carbon, carbon taxes, it becomes more expensive for companies and companies relocate to another part of the world where it is cheaper. do you think there needs to be thought about a global carbon price? i thought about a global carbon rice? ., , ., thought about a global carbon rice? ., ,, ~' thought about a global carbon rice? ., y., 4' price? i do you think... look, first we _ price? i do you think... look, first we would _ price? i do you think... look, first we would have _ price? i do you think... look, first we would have a - price? i do you think... look, first we would have a global. first we would have a global carbon price. it wouldn't exactly match the level of the price would be higher, maybe, in the uk vanities in some
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sub—saharan in developing, or an island state, given the resources. everyone should have a price on carbon. they don't think it will happen overnight. i'm not nave about it. one of the object gives that we talked about yesterday was to get the coverage of a carbon price up to about two—thirds of global emissions by the end of this decade —— objectives. we emissions by the end of this decade -- objectives. decade -- ob'ectives. we will look at that _ decade -- objectives. we will look at that in _ decade -- objectives. we will look at that in more - decade -- objectives. we will look at that in more depth . decade -- objectives. we will look at that in more depth in | decade -- objectives. we will| look at that in more depth in a moment. let's take a closer look at one of the promises made today. more than a0 world leaders say they will work together to turbo—charge the uptake of clean technologies. let's take a look at what that means. five high—carbon sectors will be targeted at first, including agriculture and electricity. the plan aims to encourage global private investment in low—carbon technologies such as clean electricity, electric vehicles, and sustainable farming. the goal is to make these green technologies affordable and available to all nations by 2030 and create 20 million newjobs.
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chad laurent is a principal consultant with the cadmus group, who focuses on supporting clients globally on a broad range of decarbonisation policy efforts. hejoins us from he joins us from boston. hejoins us from boston. thank you very much for your time. it is interesting, isn't it, when we look at the role of technology and looking at a low carbon or noncarbon world, isn't itjust carbon or noncarbon world, isn't it just a carbon or noncarbon world, isn't itjust a fact now that we have the renewables, we have solar, we have wind, we have electric vehicles, it is happening anyway. electric vehicles, it is haueninuan a. , ., happening anyway. yes, you are riuht. happening anyway. yes, you are right- thanks — happening anyway. yes, you are right. thanks for— happening anyway. yes, you are right. thanks for having - happening anyway. yes, you are right. thanks for having me. - right. thanks for having me. it's true. and i think the actions that have been proposed can make a real meaningful difference and, as you mention,
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they are attacking both sectors where we have those technologies in place, like solar and wind and electric vehicle technology and really it's about policies and changes in the regulatory framework to enable those policies to be developed and implemented at scale and getting the incentives right. but the technology is, again, on the renewables site, they are there, theyjust need to be deployed in an accelerated fashion. what also excited me about this pledge was looking at sectors that are more challenging, such as steel and hydrogen and agriculture. perhaps a long long way to go on the road for those. let me just ask you about hydrogen, are you a fan, do you think thatis are you a fan, do you think that is a big part of the solution? i that is a big part of the solution?— that is a big part of the solution?
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which exists and can get us a lot of the way there, if we get the policies and the regulations right, then you have the supply there in order to make the hydrogen that can then be stored and transmitted and deployed and used, especially in some of those, sort of, industrial settings that require high heat and more intense energy use, hydrogen as a solution there. you intense energy use, hydrogen as a solution there.— a solution there. you talk about the _ a solution there. you talk about the policies - a solution there. you talk about the policies and i a solution there. you talk| about the policies and the regulatory frameworks, is that what is required, do you think, to get the... there are already huge amounts of money, but we're talking about the mega, trillions, fact, invested into our new world.— trillions, fact, invested into our new world. yes. because each state. _ our new world. yes. because each state, each _ our new world. yes. because each state, each country, i our new world. yes. because i each state, each country, each even city and local government has different rules and regulations in place about where you can put this stuff and how you get permits and where can it go and how much does it cost and how you interconnect those technologies interconnect those technologies in the interplay in that adds costs and adds headaches across
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the world, even when the technology makes sense from a financial perspective. so it's demonstrating how do we get these technologies deployed at scale and what of those changes that need to happen in order to enable it to happen on a rapid basis? this financing, and especially the commitments from governments and also corporations, that creates a market and that helps move policy and helps move regulations in order to, again, accelerate these technologies. so really good that those players are creating a real market that's their that then spurs that innovation, because you know you will have someone to sell to. we you know you will have someone to sell to. ~ you know you will have someone to sell te— to sell to. we will see the ace to sell to. we will see the pace at — to sell to. we will see the pace at which _ to sell to. we will see the pace at which that - to sell to. we will see the pace at which that can i to sell to. we will see the pace at which that can be | pace at which that can be achieved. thank you very much. chad laurentjoining me from boston. a four—year—old girl, who went missing from a campsite in the australian outback more than two weeks ago,
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has been found alive and well, according to police. police on wednesday morning broke into a home 100 kilometres from the campsite, and found cleo smith in one of the rooms. shaimaa khalil is following the story for us from sydney. no doubt a collective australian sigh of relief at a story that has been plaguing everyone, i guess? tell you, david, everyone, i guess? tell you, david. we — everyone, i guess? tell you, david, we don't _ everyone, i guess? tell you, david, we don't get - everyone, i guess? tell you, david, we don't get a - everyone, i guess? tell you, david, we don't get a chancej everyone, i guess? tell you, i david, we don't get a chance to report on good news stories and, you know, happy endings often, do we? and what a story to wake up to. literally in the morning we all got that alerted that cleo smith has been found alive and, as you say, this is alive and, as you say, this is a story that has gripped australia. the whole country was following this from the day it was announced she mysteriously disappeared from her family's tent at a campsite on the western australian coastline. as the days went by everybody was expecting the worst. the family, of course, didn't give up hope. the police were searching, it was one of
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the biggest search operations for western australian police, on the theory that she was abducted, and today the police came out and said she was alive, she was well, she was found in a locked house. they went to that locked house after a tipoff, that is what they told us, they found her in one of the rooms in the western australian town of carnarvon. 0ne australian town of carnarvon. one of the police officers are to what his/her name and she answered "my name is cleo". and thatis answered "my name is cleo". and that is when they realise they had found her. we had from the mother, she expressed her relief on social media saying that the family was whole again. the ordeal lasted more than two weeks. we also had from the prime minister, scott morrison, who is in the uk who said the country's press have been answered.— been answered. that is good news. clearly _ been answered. that is good news. clearly questions i been answered. that is good news. clearly questions to i been answered. that is good | news. clearly questions to be answered as to what happened there. for now, thank you very much. and thank you for being with us on bbc news. stay with us on bbc news. still to come:
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the us centers for disease control gives the go—ahead for children to receive the coronavirus vaccine. the israeli prime minister, yitzhak rabin, the architect of the middle east peace process, has been assassinated. a 27—year—old jewish man has been arrested and an extremistjewish organisation has claimed responsibility for the killing. at polling booths throughout the country, they voted on a historic day for australia. as the results came in, it was clear — the monarchy would survive. of the american hostages, there was no sign — - they are being held somewhere inside the compound — - and student leaders have threatened that, should i the americans attempt. rescue, they will all die. this mission has surpassed all expectations. voyager one is now the most distant man—made object anywhere in the universe, and itjust seems to keep on going. tonight, we prove once more that the true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth,
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but from the enduring power of our ideals. this is bbc news, the latest headlines: leaders at the climate change summit in glasgow, make progress in the race to limit global warming. the cop26 host, borisjohnson says it's time to deliver on the promises. there's relief in australia — as a four—year—old girl who's been missing for more than two weeks, is found alive and well. at least 25 people have been killed and dozens injured in an attack on afghanistan's biggest military hospital in kabul. a taliban spokesman said there had been two explosions outside the building before gunmen entered. the islamic state group has claimed it carried out the attack. from kabul, our correspondent
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secunder kermani reports. across the road from the attack, families at another hospital watch on in horror. outside, a man tries to crawl to safety. inside, mothers and young children terrified. afghans had hoped scenes like this would come to an end now that the taliban are in power. instead, the fighters were amongst the victims of this attack, carried out by the local branch of the islamic state group, or daesh. the assault began with a suicide bombing, before gunmen tried to fight their way inside the military hospital. helicopters were used to drop taliban special forces into the site, according to the group. but outside this hospital, taliban members were anxiously
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awaiting news of injured colleagues — former insurgents now facing an insurgency themselves. "after the explosion, me and some of the other taliban were helping carry injured people into the hospital," says this member of the group, who was at the scene of the attack. "a daesh fighter pretended to help us too, but when we got inside, he took a pistol out and shot a talib who was next to me in the head." "the rest of us tried to escape." the taliban are insistent on playing down the threat from is. it's true they don't control any territory, but this is the fifth major attack they're suspected of carrying out since the taliban took power. is are challenging the taliban's core narrative that they're finally bringing security to afghanistan. is accuse the taliban of not being hardline enough, and the two are fierce rivals.
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this new taliban government is beginning to face many of the same problems as the government theyjust overthrew — a dismal economy and now rising security concerns. secunder kermani, bbc news, kabul. president biden is on his way back home now after his trip to glasgow — and he's flying straight into a political drama — it's the election for governor taking place in virginia. that's where democrat terry mcaullife, on the left, is trying to fend off a challenge from republican glenn youngkin, who's on the right. joe biden won virginia by ten points a year ago, so this race is being seen as a referendum on the first year of his presidency — and a preview of next year's mid term elections. let's talk to our north america correspondent david willis with the latest.
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there are actually a raft of elections at city and a few state level as well but tell me about, a, where we are we with virginia and why does it feel like it matters so much? the votes are still being counted there but the local media is giving glenn youngkin, the republican arrival of considerable lead at the moment over terry mcauliffe, the democratic candidate. this is significant because, as you said, it is seen as a referendum, a virginian gubernatorial election on the first year ofjoe biden in office and for the democrats to lose and they have run the gubernatorial offices in virginia for over a decade, then there will be quite a bit of soul—searching not only in democratic national headquarters but in the white house itself. glenn youngkin
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had the support of donald trump but sought to distance himself from the former president, preferring to focus instead on issues such as culture war issues, if you like, abortion, mask mandates, the teaching of racial inequality in schools and the democrats have been hoping for a suburban swing that we saw last year, as you mentioned, joe biden won the presidential race in virginia and that that would repeat itself. the indications are that it has not.— itself. the indications are that it has not. , , that it has not. some suggested also, that it has not. some suggested also. possibly. _ that it has not. some suggested also, possibly, that _ that it has not. some suggested also, possibly, that his - also, possibly, that his decision on afghanistan has not helped in certain sections as well. just as a sense as to how damaging this would be, david, we're looking at, you know, a significant plummet in support. you would expect something of the year after a presidential election but this would hurt, wouldn't it, to lose this?
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absolutely. and as i say it is a state that a stranded democrat for over a decade. of course there is a feeling that there is a dissatisfaction. you mentioned afghanistan and the chaotic withdrawal from there, the patchy economic recovery here in the united states is a factor as well plus, of course, the faltering legislative agenda ofjoe biden who has failed to get through those essential parts of his policy to do with infrastructure and social spending. that is still gummed up in congress and terry mcauliffe had very much been hoping that he could boast about that on the campaign trail. president biden �*s popularity ratings are the lowest of his presidency so far in all of this, as i say, it must be ringing alarm bells among the democrats. taste must be ringing alarm bells among the democrats. we shall wait to see _ among the democrats. we shall wait to see what _ among the democrats. we shall wait to see what the _ among the democrats. we shall wait to see what the results i wait to see what the results actually are. and a quick postscript, eric adams appears
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to have been elected mayor of new york. the democrat, eric adams. children between the ages of five and 11 in the united states will begin receiving coronavirus vaccinations as early as wednesday. the move comes after the us health regulator the centers for disease control — cdc — signed off on the measure on tuesday. but there is a challenge regarding takeup — polls are showing a large proportion parents aren't prepared to let their child have the vaccine. well let's talk all of this through with dr ashistha, dean of the school of public health at brown university, on rhode island. thank you very much forjoining us. the polls tell it all, don't they? and it is a familiar picture. farfrom, far from overwhelming support for the jaber. ., , from overwhelming support for the jaber. . , , the jaber. that is right. first and foremost _ the jaber. that is right. first and foremost it _ the jaber. that is right. first and foremost it is _ the jaber. that is right. first and foremost it is great i the jaber. that is right. first and foremost it is great to l the jaber. that is right. first l and foremost it is great to see the fda and the cdc advisers
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voted unanimously so there is not much controversy about whether these vaccines are worth it for children. the poll suggests about one third of american parents will get their children vaccinated immediately and that includes me, it includes most doctors, by the way. my suspicion is that another 40— 50% are going to go another 40— 50% are going to go a little more slowly, they will talk to their doctors and paediatricians and over time i think they will be persuaded that the evidence here is that kids are much better off getting the vaccine. when you are confronted _ getting the vaccine. when you are confronted with _ getting the vaccine. when you are confronted with those i getting the vaccine. when you j are confronted with those who say i really don't not want my child having something like that, how do you persuade them? i begin by telling them my own story. as i said, i am a father and i look at the data and i am and i look at the data and i am a physician but i'm also a father and i'm getting my own child vaccinated. i think that is important. people value that. but what i talk about is the alternative to a vaccine is getting covid. the virus will
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be endemic and with us for a very long time and all of the evidence says that it is much worse for kids who get covid thanit worse for kids who get covid than it is for them to have any of the side—effects that we have seen with vaccines. it is really not a close call. i find that many parents are open to hearing about that. it that many parents are open to hearing about that.— that many parents are open to hearing about that. it sounds a bit like a broken _ hearing about that. it sounds a bit like a broken record, i hearing about that. it sounds a bit like a broken record, this, i bit like a broken record, this, but many americans feel they have sort of moved on from covid and the dark dark days. you have a bit of a battle in terms of that persuasive power of yours, don't you? ihla terms of that persuasive power of yours, don't you?— of yours, don't you? no doubt about it- _ of yours, don't you? no doubt about it- i— of yours, don't you? no doubt about it. i do _ of yours, don't you? no doubt about it. i do think _ of yours, don't you? no doubt about it. i do think many i about it. i do think many americans feel as if they want the pandemic to be over in one of the things we know about pandemics is that the virus decides when the pandemic is over, not us. certainly not until we get many more americans vaccinated. so i am hopeful that more and more americans will take up the vaccine. we saw e— 30% of adults were not yet fully vaccinated who are eligible and we need to do a betterjob
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getting people vaccinated. thank you very much indeed. and before we go tonight, we want to wish a happy birthday — to ourselves. bbc tv is 85 years old. at 3pm local time on 2 november 1936, the bbc launched its first regular tv service from north london. there was a newsreel, a variety show, music, including the first—ever performance by the bbc tv 0rchestra. viewers were called �*lookers in�*, and there weren't many of them. only about 400 on the first day. then — as now — our mission was to inform, educate and entertain. great pictures there.
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you can reach me on twitter — i'm @bbcdavideades hello there. it's staying pretty cold now for the rest of this week. there will be quite a bit of sunshine around by day, but it will be chilly at night with frosts and fog in places. now, through the day there will be quite a bit of sunshine in central and southern areas, but also some showers. this mainly affecting coastal areas. got low pressure to the north of the uk, this is where we are seeing the strongest of the winds today and weather fronts enhancing the shower activity. although most of them will be affecting coastal areas all around the country down into west wales and the southwest, northern parts of northern ireland and much of the eastern side of the country. some of the showers across the northeast, east of england will push into the midlands. so a bit cloudy here, more than we have had the last few days. some of the showers heavy with some hail and thunder mixed in, and they will be wintry over the high ground, particularly across northern scotland with the strongest of the winds. further south the winds will be lighter.
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it's going to be a chilly day wherever you are, highs of six to eight in the north, nine to 11 further south. through wednesday night it stays quite blustery in the north, further coastal showers and many central areas will turn dry with lengthy clear skies again. winds will be lighter here. but stronger winds across the eastern side of england, more cloud. not quite as cold here as what it will be further west, and across the north we will have some frost and also some patches of fog. now as we move towards thursday into friday we start to see a change to the weather. this area of high pressure begins to build in from the west. it kills off lots of the showers, but what it is also going to do is cut off the arctic air supply as our wind begins to veer more west and southwesterly direction. so that will bring milder air back to our shores as you can see here from the orange and yellow colours. thursday, then, another cold start with frost and fog around. and then it is bright. plenty of sunshine around, more sunshine around on thursday. still a few showers across the eastern coasts again down into the far southwest. later in the day, thicker cloudy, patchy rain pushing into the northwest of the uk as we start to pick up westerly winds.
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temperature slowly rising here, otherwise for most again it is a chilly day. as we move out from thursday into friday we start to see an area of high pressure toppling down towards the south of the country, and that will allow this area of low pressure to move in across the north at the start of the weekend. so it will be turning milder towards the end of the week, particularly as we head on into the weekend. low pressure will start to bring wetter and windier weather to northern areas, and will tend to stay drier and brighter the further south and east you are.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: leaders at the climate change summit in glasgow, make progress in the race to limit global warming. the cop26 host, borisjohnson, says it's time to deliver on the promises. there are commitments to reduce methane. a four—year—old girl who disappeared from a campsite in australia more than two weeks ago has been found alive inside a locked house. cleo smith vanished from her family's tent near the town of carnarvon in october. a man is being questioned. islamic state jihadists in afghanistan say they carried out the attack on a military hospital in kabul in which 25 people died. gunmen broke into the grounds of the hospital on tuesday after a suicide bomber blew himself up at the entrance.

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