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tv   Newsday  BBC News  November 4, 2021 11:00pm-11:30pm GMT

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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm mariko oi. the headlines. consigning coal to history. more than a0 countries pledge to end its use — but major producers — including the us, india and china are not signed up. but could china also be the key to getting green technologies into less developed countries, quickly and cheaply? in britain, a conservative mp who broke lobbying rules resigns — following an angry backlash after the government sought to change the disciplinary system. owen paterson announced he was leaving what he called the "cruel world of politics". also on the programme.
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a year on from the start of the war in ethiopia, the government claims to be on the brink of victory — but tigrayan fighters are advancing towards the capital. there are concerns by the expansion of the conflict, by the expansion of the fighting from tigray and into surrounding areas. and... yorkshire cricket club is suspended from hosting england matches amid a row over racism. it's 7am in singapore and ”pm in glasgow, at the cop26 climate conference, where the british government says �*the end of coal is in sight�*. that's after more than a0 countries
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promised to phase out the fossil fuel in the coming decades. poland, vietnam and chile are among the fast—growing economies, that now say they'll reduce their coal use. but as our science correspondent rebecca morelle reports, other big users of coal such china and america haven't signed up to the deal. a dinosaur on the loose at the united nations, but with a message for humanity. listen up, people, i know a thing or two about extinction. going extinct is a bad thing... if we want to save our planet and ourselves, we'll need to stop climate change, but to do that fossil fuels will have to become a thing of the past. today at the climate conference, the talk is all about energy and top of the list is phasing out coal. this fossil fuel is the biggest
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single contributor to climate change and more than a0 countries have now committed to move away from it. i do believe that the end of coal is in sight. i do believe we are getting to a point where we consign coal power to history. the agreement includes coal—reliant countries like poland and south korea, but missing the us, india and most significantly china, where half of the world's coal is burned. it has the biggest transition, - the biggest challenges and needs to really drive a structural change in its energy system. - today's precedent and movement really increases the _ pressure for them to come up with |those solutions sooner than later. | moving away from coal is the future aim, but what's happening to greenhouse gas emissions now? since the 1990s, carbon dioxide levels have been mainly rising, but during the pandemic, when the world shut down, they fell sharply.
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this year though they have increased rapidly again to almost the same amount. behind those numbers is really a big rebound in coal in particular, so probably what is happening here is that the stimulus packages to come out of covid, they have stimulated the current economy, which is a fossil fuel economy. but if we are to get to net zero emissions, what do we do about oil and gas? they have been filling some of the gaps behind coal, but some countries like costa rica and denmark are setting a date to end their use and other nations at cop26 are expected to do the same. but the clock is ticking for decisions about our energy future. scientists are clear — our reliance on fossil fuels needs to end fast. rebecca morelle, bbc news, glasgow. while china did not sign up to the pledge to drop coal, it has become a linchpin in getting green technologies to less developed countries quickly and cheaply,
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or at least at lower cost than offered by many developed countries. for more, we'rejoined by sam geall. he's ceo of china dialogue and an associate fellow at chatham house. he joins us from glasgow. thank you so much forjoining us. china does make a lot of the renewable energy technologies, but when it faced the energy crisis in recent months it had to fall back on coal, so in your view it can china actually quit coal ever? i coal, so in your view it can china actually quit coal ever?- coal, so in your view it can china actually quit coal ever? i think the lonu-term actually quit coal ever? i think the long-term trajectory _ actually quit coal ever? i think the long-term trajectory for _ actually quit coal ever? i think the long-term trajectory for china's i long—term trajectory for china's energy— long—term trajectory for china's energy mix is definitely away from coal, _ energy mix is definitely away from coal. but_ energy mix is definitely away from coal, but short term they are still reliant_ coal, but short term they are still reliant on— coal, but short term they are still reliant on it — coal, but short term they are still reliant on it and it's a difficult juggernaut to turn around as the report— juggernaut to turn around as the report correctly said. they are still _ report correctly said. they are still really _ report correctly said. they are still really falling back on coal in those _ still really falling back on coal in those cases where, for example, after _ those cases where, for example, after the — those cases where, for example, after the pandemic there was a
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stjppty— after the pandemic there was a supply crunch because of a need for quick— supply crunch because of a need for quick demands to re—stability economy— quick demands to re—stability economy and it fell back on coal. the hope — economy and it fell back on coal. the hope is — economy and it fell back on coal. the hope is really that that transition is one that can take place — transition is one that can take place more rapidly. it needs to accelerate around the world by some five times— accelerate around the world by some five times the next decade. china has invested in renewables more than anywhere _ has invested in renewables more than anywhere in _ has invested in renewables more than anywhere in the world, they are the worlds _ anywhere in the world, they are the worlds largest installer, investor, deployer— worlds largest installer, investor, deployer and worlds largest installer, investor, deployerand in worlds largest installer, investor, deployer and in most markets exporter — deployer and in most markets exporter of renewable energy technologies.— exporter of renewable energy technolo . ies. . ., exporter of renewable energy technolouies. . ., , technologies. indeed, and china is offerin: technologies. indeed, and china is offering green _ technologies. indeed, and china is offering green technologies - technologies. indeed, and china is offering green technologies as - technologies. indeed, and china is| offering green technologies as part offering green technologies as part of its one belt one road initiative. some critics say is try to use it for commercial and global influences well what would you say to that? i well what would you say to that? i would say that we need to see how the competition in the markets that urgently— the competition in the markets that urgently need to new technologies, and need _ urgently need to new technologies, and need the infrastructure that
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will power our carbon constrained future _ will power our carbon constrained future and — will power our carbon constrained future. and i would welcome competition between china and other nations— competition between china and other nations given that that willjust continue — nations given that that willjust continue to bring down the cost and bring _ continue to bring down the cost and bring up _ continue to bring down the cost and bring up the opportunities for countries _ bring up the opportunities for countries to install the kind of infrastructure they need. it's one of the _ infrastructure they need. it's one of the things that makes glasgow possible. — of the things that makes glasgow possible, what are the things that made _ possible, what are the things that made the — possible, what are the things that made the paris agreement possible was the _ made the paris agreement possible was the falling cost of these technologies and the fact that it actually — technologies and the fact that it actually makes the transition viable in places— actually makes the transition viable in places that urgently need investment, in particular after the pandemic— investment, in particular after the pandemic which for many places has notjust_ pandemic which for many places has notjust been a public health crisis but a _ notjust been a public health crisis but a fiscal— notjust been a public health crisis but a fiscal crisis and a debt crisis — but a fiscal crisis and a debt crisis it— but a fiscal crisis and a debt crisis it is— but a fiscal crisis and a debt crisis. it is an urgent need for new investment— crisis. it is an urgent need for new investment and there's billions of not trillions of dollars that are needed — not trillions of dollars that are needed to urgently bring about that transition — needed to urgently bring about that transition. ., ~' , ., needed to urgently bring about that transition. ., ,, , ., . ., transition. thank you so much for “oininu us transition. thank you so much for joining us on _ transition. thank you so much for joining us on newsday _ transition. thank you so much for joining us on newsday today. -
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a british mp from the ruling conservative party — at the centre of a row over lobbying rules — has resigned saying he will remain a public servant, outside the cruel world of politics. 0wen paterson's decision came after the government was forced into a major u—turn — following a furious backlash — over proposed changes to the way mps are reprimanded for breaking the rules. laura kuenssberg reports can you take a step back? a different kind of protest. a different kind of attack to green activists busy in westminster today. come down here. sleaze is the accusation against the government, corruption the claim. a former minister has now quit as an mp after he was found to have lobbied the government more than a dozen times for companies who paid him thousands of pounds. standing down, 0wen paterson said...
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the ayes to the right, 250... but downing street had tried to save him. ..232. tories last night voted to tear up the rules he broke. but listen to the atmosphere in the air. jeering. order. what have you done to this place? dozens of conservatives, outraged, stayed away. but number ten had backed to overhaul the system that monitors behaviour that would have saved him. the immediate backlash was bruising. nearly all of the front pages damning. the internet alive with claims of sleaze, political immediately sharpening attacks. many tories, too, were appalled. so by mid—morning, ministers were back in the commons ditching the idea, and in effect ditching owen patterson too.
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last night's vote has created a certain amount of controversy. it is important that standards in this house are done on a cross party basis. while there is a very strong feeling on both sides of the house that there is a need for an appeals process, there is equally a strong feeling that this should not be based on a single case or applied retrospectively. in other words, changing the rules that mr patterson broke is off for now. but the opposition says it is a wider pattern. corrupt, i mean there is no other word for it, i'm afraid. and often in a situation like this you have a prime minister who is trying to lead on public standards. what you have got with this prime minister is a prime minister who is leading his troops through the sewer. and so it is a complete mess of their own making. it's a very strong accusation to say this is corrupt. well, it is corrupt because there was a clear finding after due process. the attempt to protect
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owen patterson has backfired spectacularly so. it has stirred questions again about the prime minister's attitude to obeying the rules, doubts about downing street's politicaljudgement, and it has done the reputation of this place no favours at all. borisjohnson says he's sorry to see mr patterson go, but outraged at how the prime minister tried to use parliament will take time to fade. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, westminster. let's take a look at some of the other stories making headlines in the uk. a 67—year—old man has admitted murdering two women in kent, southeast england, almost 35 years ago and then decades later sexually abusing at least 100 corpses in hospital mortuaries. for more than 30 years david fuller was a maintenance worker at two hospitals, until police finally tracked him down last december —
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thanks to advances in dna testing. detectives say they may never know the full extent of his crimes. veteran entertainer, tv presenter and dancer lionel blair has died aged 92. his stage and screen career spanned eight decades, and he was best known as a team captain on game show give us a clue. in recent years he acted in ricky gervais's extras and also appeared on celebrity big brother. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme... increasing signs that north korea can no longer properly feed itself — with warnings that climate change will only make shortages worse.
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the israeli prime minister yitzhak rabin, the architect of the middle east peace process has been assassinated. a 27—year—old jewish man has been arrested, and an extremistjewish organisation has claimed responsibility for the killing. at polling booths throughout the country, they voted on a historic day for australia. as the results came in, it was clear. the monarchy would survive. of the american hostages there was no sign, they are being held somewhere inside the compound, and student leaders are threatened, that should the americans attempt rescue, they will all die. this mission has surpassed all expectations. _ voyager one is now the most distant man—made object - anywhere in the universe, - and itjust seems to keep on going. tonight we proved once more that the true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals.
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this is newsday on the bbc. i'm mariko oi in singapore. our headlines. at the cop26 climate summit, more than a0 countries have pledged to end the use of coal — but major producers — including the us, india and china are not signed up. in britain, a conservative mp who broke lobbying rules has resigned — it follows an angry backlash after the government sought to review the disciplinary system. tigray�*s rebel forces currently have the upper hand in the war that erupted a year ago in northern ethiopia. as rebels advance towards the capital, the government has asked residents of addis ababa to mobilize and protect their neighbourhoods. rebels have seized two key towns in recent days. speaking to the bbc,
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a spokesman for the tigray people's liberation front denied that the group wanted power. he said the tplf was defending the tigrayan people from the forces of ethiopian prime minister abiy ahmed. we are not interested in territorial admissions. our interest and our only objective is to make sure that abiy does not continue to threaten our people anymore. if marching on addis is what it takes to make sure that threats from abiy is neutralised then we will. washington is urging all parties to negotiate a peaceful resolution. we are concerned by the expansion of the conflict, by the expansion of the fighting from tigray and into surrounding areas of course. public accounts has spoken to the advance of the tplf and the ola and their allies including towards the capital city. it's also why we have
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underscored the need and the imperative for all parties to the conflict, the tplf, the ethiopian government, the ola and others to engage in negotiations towards a cease—fire immediately and without preconditions. i'm joined now by samual getachew an independent journalist in addis ababa. what is the mood in the capital? what does it feel like to be in addis ababa right now? well, many ethiopians are concerned, are worried but, you know, there are many information that are forthcoming to them. but they are just confused with all this information coming, there was a report that the tplf was just outside of the outskirts of ideas
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above, that was proven to be untrue. in the area of social media and misinformation and so on people are just so confused about what is going on. r , ., , just so confused about what is going on, �* , ., , ., , just so confused about what is going on. , ., , ., on. and people are being asked to take u- on. and people are being asked to take on arms. _ on. and people are being asked to take up arms, facebook _ on. and people are being asked to take up arms, facebook has - on. and people are being asked to i take up arms, facebook has removed that post by the prime minister but are people actually picking up arms, what has been the reaction? from what has been the reaction? from what i what has been the reaction? from what i have _ what has been the reaction? from what i have heard, _ what has been the reaction? from what i have heard, there - what has been the reaction? from what i have heard, there has - what has been the reaction? i;";f7�*fl what i have heard, there has been lines of people heading to local government offices to register their weapons. they think that the government has told them that they need to protect themselves, if the tplf comes to number one and attacked them, abuse them than there has been all kinds of allegations going back and forth between the ethiopian government side and the tplf. so this has been a real
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conflict that can with no end in sight and with all kinds of information coming to the people. but you can't even verify them because much of the country you cannot even travel to them. and speaking to the people that need a voice, it it's been a tough year for ethiopia. voice, it it's been a tough year for ethioia. ., voice, it it's been a tough year for ethioia. . ., ethiopia. indeed, meanwhile what does it say about _ ethiopia. indeed, meanwhile what does it say about the _ ethiopia. indeed, meanwhile what does it say about the army - ethiopia. indeed, meanwhile what does it say about the army that i does it say about the army that can't defend their capital? well, the army has — can't defend their capital? well, the army has not _ can't defend their capital? well, the army has not been - can't defend their capital? well, the army has not been tested i can't defend their capital? in the army has not been tested yet. they have not come yet, but from what we have heard the government is ready to defend the capital. addis ababa is notjust the capital, it's also the diplomatic capital city of the continent. it has the most diplomatic emphases on the continent. so it's an important city and ethiopia, iwill echo
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continent. so it's an important city and ethiopia, i will echo what was said by the state department spokesperson in washington, dc, it's one of the most important nations in africa. it needs to be protected, and needs the protection that it deserves. but how much that protection is going to be intact is on open debate.— protection is going to be intact is on open debate. joining us live from addis ababa, _ on open debate. joining us live from addis ababa, thank _ on open debate. joining us live from addis ababa, thank you _ on open debate. joining us live from addis ababa, thank you so - on open debate. joining us live from addis ababa, thank you so much - addis ababa, thank you so much for joining us live on newsday. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines. the world health organization has described the current surge of coronavirus cases in europe as a warning shot for the entire world. europe saw almost 1.8 million new cases last week alone. the who blames insufficient vaccine uptake and a relaxation of restrictions. its secretary—general has also called for vaccine manufacturers to prioritise poorer countries which have received few vaccine doses so far
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through the covax scheme. no more vaccines to go to countries that have already vaccinated more than a0% of their population. until we have the vaccines to help other countries get thereto. no more boosters should be ministered except to immunocompromised people. scientists have identified a gene that doubles the risk of respiratory failure from coronavirus. it is especially common among people of south asian ancestry — about 60% of them carry the gene. the researchers say this partly explains the pandemic�*s impact on the subcontinent, and in communities of south asian origin in europe. there are warnings that the food crisis in north korea is becoming acute. as winter approaches, there's increasing concern that the most vulnerable will starve. the country is more isolated than ever, after closing its borders
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to its main trading partner china to prevent the spread of covidi9. climate change scientists say the food crisis in north korea will only get worse in the future. laura bicker reports from seoul. the applause is always loud. it is always fervent, but even as he accepts this adulation, kim jong—un admits his people are going hungry. the newsreader announces that the food situation is tense. mr kim has also reportedly said that this year every grain of rice counts. state tv follows the farmer came to show how he will carry out the leader's orders. what he doesn't say is that strict pandemic border closures have led to shortages of farming supplies needed to keep crops healthy. translation: it seems like the food
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shortage is worse than we think. - chairman kimjong—un gave a special order injune, but even after that we have been hearing that a lot of food is not being properly supplied by the state. the lower—class people especially have voiced their problems of food shortages and starvation. from a newly built vantage point in south korea, we get a view of north korea's vital harvest. four hours they bale rice, carrying it by hand to a tractor. within the last few months, we have heard that humanitarian aid has finally made it into north korea for the first time since january last year. some trade has also resumed with china, this will help north korea through its current crisis but the country is facing a much longer term problem — it's incredibly vulnerable to climate change. last year's typhoons and floods were disastrous, and has put north korea's food supply in a perilous state. but there are some studies
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which suggest things will only get worse. rice and maize yield failures will become more likely along the western coastline. which is north korea's historical breadbasket. in particular, north korea will struggle to supply historical quantities of rice. this will be caused by both increased droughts, and also significant intensification of extreme rainfall. this is what kim jong—un wants the world to see. a strong nuclear power, not a vulnerable population going hungry. but as temperatures rise and north korea feels the effects, it's being drawn into a much bigger global battle, and it cannot overcome this on its own. laura bicker, bbc news, seoul. the england and wales cricket board has suspended yorkshire county cricket club from hosting international and major matches
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amid a row over racism. it comes after an investigation found spin bowler azeem rafiq had been the victim of racial harassment at the club. the ecb said that it felt it was now at the point where it need to intervene. well, it has been clear that over the last few days the situation which has emanated from what's been going on at yorkshire has become a very significant issue for the wider game. and once the situation became one which was clear there was going to be significant reputational damage for the wider game, the ecb felt compelled to step in and take this supplementary action which we have done this evening. dan roan has the latest from headingley. well, today the ecb said yorkshire's handling of this situation had been wholly unacceptable, and that there were questions over its governance. headingley here was meant to, next summer, be hosting two big lucrative england matches, but they could now go elsewhere. costing the club potentially millions of pounds in lost ticket revenue on top of the huge financial hit it has already taken
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with yet more sponsors today deserting the club. the unprecedented nature of the ecb's punishment a reflection of the gravity now of this crisis which has engulfed yorkshire. their batsman, meanwhile, gary ballance, he's been handed an indefinite international ban by the ecb after he yesterday admitted using a racial slur against rafiq, and tonight a second former yorkshire player admitted they were named in the report. former england captain and prominent pundit michael vaughn saying that he had been accused by rafiq of come into thousand nine, that he had been accused by rafiq of in 2009, using and making a racist comment towards him and two other asian players. he categorically denies the allegation, he says. meanwhile, tomorrow, the board here at yorkshire will hold an emergency meeting and i have learned that a number of those board members are now preparing to announce the resignation as
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the fallout continues. that's all for now — stay with bbc world news. hello there. after the rather chilly conditions of the last few days, things are going to feel a little bit different as we head towards the weekend. some milder weather in the forecast, but with that quite a lot of cloud feeding and from the west. and for some of us through the weekend there is some wet and windy weather on the way. this one front has been working its way south and east and is introducing more in the way of cloud, but also introducing a westerly wind, so that is bringing a milder feel. a milder start to friday for many. so that is bringing a milder feel. the coldest conditions down towards the south and the east where the skies have remained clear. and that's where we will see the best of any sunshine through the morning. for many other places there is going to be a lot of cloud. that cloud, at times, producing some spots of light rain and drizzle. especially over high ground in western scotland.
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we will hold onto a little bit of brightness at times across eastern scotland, northeast england, parts of east wales, the midlands and down towards the southeast. and the temperatures a little higher than they have been. double digits for almost all of us. ten to 13 degrees at best. as we head through friday night bonfire night of course, expect mild conditions. a lot of cloud, some spots of rain and drizzle, and then through the early hours of saturday expect some heavier rain starting to push and towards the western side of scotland. it will be quite a mild start to the weekend. seven, eight, nine, 10 degrees. but for saturday, well high pressure will hold on down towards the south, low pressure is pushing close to the north of the uk and this frontal system here will bring some outbreaks of quite heavy rain southwards and eastwards across scotland, and northern ireland. some of that rain eventually getting down into northwest england and north wales. ahead of that southern and eastern parts of england largely dry, but quite cloudy. brightening up eventually towards the northwest where it
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will also be turning very windy. but we stick with that milder theme. 12 to ia degrees. now through saturday night as this area of low pressure passes close to northern scotland, notice the white lines, the isobars squeezing together. there will be a swathe of really strong winds. quite widely it will be windy, but wind gusts could get up to 70 mph. even a touch more in the most exposed spots in northern scotland. but for sunday, we can expect more in the way of sunshine. showers continuing in the far north where we keep a fairly brisk breeze. it will feel a little cooler by this stage, but still top temperatures of ten to 13 degrees.
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this is bbc news, the headlines more than a0 countries have promised to phase out coal power, at the cop26 glasgow climate conference. but china, india and the us — have not signed up. in britain, a conservative mp at the heart of a row over standards in public life has resigned. owen paterson was found to have broken lobbying rules. the government then tried to alter the disciplinary system, prompting a furious backlash. with millions trapped in an escalating conflict in ethiopia — a diplomatic effort is under way — to defuse the war. a us envoy is in the capital, and the us, eu and regional groups — have again called for a ceasefire. controversial rules to push tens of millions of american workers into getting vaccinated will come into effect from january. the mandates affect all healthcare workers and businesses with more than a— hundred employees.

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