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tv   Newsday  BBC News  November 9, 2021 11:00pm-11:31pm GMT

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�*welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. scientists warn that even with the cop summit pledges, temperatures will rise beyond global targets. we cannot kick this can down the road. it is not something we can do in 2030, 2050. we have to do it in 2021 in 2022. trying to reach europe, we report on thousands of migrants trapped in belarus hoping to get into poland. few cases, but brutal lockdowns — is china's covid strategy really sustainable? and from glitz — to the guillotine— just how much did marie antoinette�*s diamonds fetch at auction?
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it's seven in the morning in singapore, and ”pm at the glasgow climate summit where global leaders have been warned the world is still heading for dangerously high temperatures by the end of the century. that's even if countries stick to their promises. the aim is to keep global temperature rises below one—point five degrees celsius — but researchers say it will be impossible to reach that goal based on the pledges that have been made so far. new analysis suggests plans by countries to cut greenhouse gas emissions before the conference put the world on track for two point seven degrees of warming.
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the climate action tracker warns that even if pledges are kept, a big if, temperatures will still rise by 1.8 degrees — that's above the target. from glasgow here's our science editor david shukman. this is what the talks are all about — keeping the planet safe to live on. and when astronaut tim peake filmed this view, he was really struck by what we keep adding to the air and what that is doing to the climate, so he's come to the conference in glasgow to spell out the dangers. every sunrise and sunset, we see earth's atmosphere, just 16 kilometres thick, and you realise that's it, that's what protects all life down here on the planet. and if we put things into that atmosphere, for example, wildfires, you see them covering entire continents, and the smoke disperses, and that's when you really appreciate that it doesn't have anywhere else to go. you know, we're all on this one planet together. but the challenge here at this massive gathering is to get
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delegates from nearly 200 countries to agree on what to do, to try to slow down the pace of climate change. so, after ten days of talking, what's actually been achieved in terms of heading off the risk of the planet getting hotter? well, just before the conference started, we were on course for an increase of 2.7 degrees celsius, a really dangerous prospect. now, if everyone keeps the promises they've made in recent days, that's come down to something like 1.8 degrees celsius, but it all depends on everyone keeping their word, and even if they do, that's still above the target of 1.5 degrees, so the problem is far from sorted. we don't have much time. we want to stay under 1.5, and we already see the climate changing, so now we need to invest, we need to protect, we cannot kick this can down the road. it is not something we can do in 2030, 2050, we need to do it in 2021 and 2022. new extremes of temperature
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are proving hazardous in many regions already, and a study by met office scientists warns that a billion people could be affected by a combination of rising heat and humidity. working outdoors could become almost impossible. so, for some, climate change is about survival, including the tiny island nations of the pacific. the realities of climate change... this government minister in tuvalu recorded a video appeal for help. we cannot wait for speeches when the sea is rising - around us all the time. he's banking on the next few days of negotiations coming up with a way to make the world less threatening. david shukman, bbc news, in glasgow. michael mann is a distinguished professor of atmospheric science and director of the earth system science center at penn state university, he joins me from state college, pennsylvania, based on the pledges made so far at cop26, is enough being done to avert
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a climate catastrophe? thank you. it is good to be with you and you are right. we are not going to get the sort of progress that many of us hoped for. but there has been a fair amount of progress that is artie been made in the correspondence booked about that earlier if you take all the pledges that have been made at this point, and the totality of those pledges and the totality of those pledges and you plug them into a computer model. would you find is that it likely now comes in at below two celsius. we have likely kicked the planet less than two celsius warmer relative to the preindustrial. that is roughly half of where we were headed just a decade ago towards four celsius. four degrees would've been a catastrophic future. two
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celsius is going to be a tough future. we want to get it down below one half degrees celsius there was a lot of work that needs to be done to get there. but it is not the end. glasgow isn't the end of the process. in some sense, it is the beginning ofan process. in some sense, it is the beginning of an era where we are starting to make some real progress starting to make some real progress starting to make some real progress starting to bend that admissions curve downwards which we need to do. you say that it is not the end. i remember the paris agreement are supposed to be the point at which we really solve climate change and yet here we are at cop26 and further down the road, but what else needs to be done?— down the road, but what else needs to be done? ~ ., , ., ~ to be done? make no mistake. there has been some _ to be done? make no mistake. there has been some progress _ to be done? make no mistake. there has been some progress since - to be done? make no mistake. there has been some progress since paris. | has been some progress since paris. he flattened the curve in paris. basically carbon emissions stopped raising. that's the first step we have to bring them down and bring them down about 50% globally within them down about 50% globally within
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the next decade and even the conservative international energy agency which is been no cheerleader for renewable energy has been very blunt and we have to end on the fossil fuel infrastructure and that means the united states, the uk, the eu, we cannot continue to bring new oil and gas pipelines and coal mines. that'sjust oil and gas pipelines and coal mines. that's just not consistent with the pathway that keeps going below catastrophic levels. bare with the pathway that keeps going below catastrophic levels. are using that political— below catastrophic levels. are using that political will— below catastrophic levels. are using that political will at _ below catastrophic levels. are using that political will at com - below catastrophic levels. are using that political will at com to - below catastrophic levels. are using that political will at cop26 to make | that political will at cop26 to make what you are describing a reality? i am seeing it and i'm seeing it in so many children in the streets because thatis many children in the streets because that is with the pressure is coming. and a change in the dialogue and talking the talk, we need to walk the walk. and in the overall framing, that is because the
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pressure that youth climate protesters of penumbral leaders and they need to keep that pressure on and it is making a real difference. thank you so much forjoining us on newsday. the european union says it will impose additional sanctions on belarus because of what it describes as president lukashenko's �*gangster—style approach�* to the migrants gathering at the polish border. his regime has been accused of attracting migrants to belarus —— from the middle east, in order to send them across the polish border, in retaliation for european sanctions. at least two thousand migrants are now gathered in freezing temperatures in belarus from where our correspondent nick beake reports. 0n the edge of the european union, a new, desperate migrant camp has just emerged. 0n the left, those who have come to belarus and now made their way to the border with poland. 0n the right, barbed wire
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and lines of troops, stopping them from crossing. throughout the day we watched reinforcements race towards the village of kuznica. poland already has a force of 12,000 guarding its eastern border and is keeping aid agencies and journalists away. but we managed to make contact with some of those trapped in the freezing forest. we feel so bad because nobody help us in here and we are so hungry and thirsty, no water, no food, no help. like most here, aziz is kurdish, and from iraq. that's all poland police, they don't let us get inside. big tension here. and so many family here and little children. what did the belarus police say to you? nothing, just go, and you can't turn back. did they help you get
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to the border at all? yes, they help us. but getting any nearer to where this crisis has erupted is not possible, as we soon found out. can we go further in? are we allowed to go further towards the border today? no, no. poland, like neighbouring lithuania, is maintaining a state of emergency here. this is as close as we can get to the poland—belarus border today because beyond this checkpoint lies a part of the european union that the polish authorities do not want us to see for ourselves. they are dealing with this growing migrant crisis, out of sight and on their own terms. poland has the support of the eu and nato, which accused belarus of using civilians as weapons in retaliation for sanctions. and warsaw says moscow is pulling the strings. something the lukashenko regime denies. translation: this attack, - which lukashenko is conducting,
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has its mastermind in moscow. the mastermind is president putin. moscow denies this. tonight, belarus's president said he didn't want an armed confrontation, but warned that any escalation would bring in its ally, russia. translation: it will immediately . drag russia into this whirlpool. and it's the largest nuclear armed power. i'm not a madman. i understand very well where this could lead to. the united nations is calling for calm, but the politics are bitter and the situation on the ground, increasingly desperate. nick beake, bbc news, on the polish—belarussian border. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines. the united nations says sixteen of its staff members have been detained in the ethiopian capital addis ababa. a un spokesperson said six others had been released. it's not yet clear why the staff were picked up but human rights
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groups have raised the alarm about the increasing number of arrests of ethnic tigrayans. the us congressional committee probing the assault on the capitol onjanuary 6th says it has issued subpoenas seeking documents and testimony from more associates of former president donald trump. they include senior adviser stephen miller, ex—press secretary kayleigh mcenany and other white house aides. here in singapore, people who choose not to be vaccinated for covid will have to pay for their own treatment from next month, if they're infected. the government says it's an important signal to those still refusing to be jabbed. eighty—five percent of people in singapore are fully vaccinated. the unvaccinated account for the majority of people in intensive care with covid. all front—line national health staff in england will have to be fully vaccinated against covid to protect patients and the health service.
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the deadline is expected to be the 1st april next year. the health secretary sajid javid told mps more than one hundred thousand nhs workers in england had yet to be jabbed. 0ur medical editor fergus walsh has the latest. do you want to roll up your sleeve for me? nojab, nojob — that appears to be the stark reality facing nhs workers in england. those with face—to—face contact with patients have until the 1st of april to have two doses of vaccine. speaker: sajid javid. the health secretary said the move would protect both patients and staff from infection. no—one in the nhs or care that is currently unvaccinated should be scapegoated, singled out or shamed. that would be totally unacceptable. this is about supporting them to make a positive choice, to protect vulnerable people, to protect their colleagues, and of course, to protect themselves. the nhs staff we spoke to in london
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were broadly in favour. i'm all for it. yeah? yeah. if people want to work here then they should be prepared to have whatever vaccinations they need. i think everyone needs to have the vaccine. i but this trainee gp says she's recently had covid and believes she is now protected, and so doesn't want to be vaccinated. it is unethical to force anyone to have a medical procedure. and if i've decided, for various reasons, to not have this medical procedure, it shouldn't be up to the government to force me to, or to say i'm going to lose myjob. in england 90% of nhs staff have had two doses of covid vaccine. but 103,000 are completely unvaccinated. among care home workers in england, 88,000 were unvaccinated just a few months ago. that's now down to 32,000. but the deadline for them to be fullyjabbed is this thursday. there are over 90,000 job
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vacancies in the nhs, and employers are concerned that could rise even further. if we lose significant numbers of staff as a result of mandatory vaccination, then that's going to put very, very significant pressure on the nhs. so what we're saying to the government today is, yeah, absolutely see the logic of why you would want to do this, but please help us manage the risk of losing nhs staff. several european countries already have compulsory vaccination for health workers. it prompted protests in france but the government there says take up among staff soared from just 60% injuly to 99% now. ministers here will be hoping for a big boost in immunisation rates. but there is a risk that this may alienate some staff who choose to leave the nhs rather than being taken off the wards and redeployed.
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you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme. few cases, but brutal lockdowns — is china's covid strategy really sustainable? we'll get the view from shanghai the bombastic establishment outside as donald trump has taken the keys to the oval office. i as donald trump has taken the keys to the oval office.— to the oval office. i feel great about the _ to the oval office. i feel great about the elections. _ to the oval office. i feel great about the elections. i - to the oval office. i feel great i about the elections. i genuinely believe that _ about the elections. i genuinely believe that he _ about the elections. i genuinely believe that he cares _ about the elections. i genuinely believe that he cares about - about the elections. i genuinely believe that he cares about the | believe that he cares about the country — believe that he cares about the count . , , , . country. keeping them in the public e e that country. keeping them in the public eye that counts. _ country. keeping them in the public eye that counts. success _ country. keeping them in the public eye that counts. success or- country. keeping them in the public eye that counts. success or failure l eye that counts. success or failure depends not only on public display but on the local campaign headquarters and the heavy routine work of their women volunteers. berliners from east and west link hands and dance around her liberated territory and with no one to stop them, it was not long before the first attempts were made to destroy
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the structure itself. he first attempts were made to destroy the structure itself.— the structure itself. he dominated the structure itself. he dominated the palestinian _ the structure itself. he dominated the palestinian cause _ the structure itself. he dominated the palestinian cause for- the structure itself. he dominated the palestinian cause for so - the structure itself. he dominated the palestinian cause for so long l the palestinian cause for so long has died~ — the palestinian cause for so long has died. palestinian authority has declared _ has died. palestinian authority has declared a — has died. palestinian authority has declared a state of morning. after 17 ears declared a state of morning. after 17 years of — declared a state of morning. after 17 years of discussion, _ declared a state of morning. after 17 years of discussion, the - declared a state of morning. after 17 years of discussion, the result was dated — 17 years of discussion, the result was dated with _ 17 years of discussion, the result was gated with an _ 17 years of discussion, the result was gated with an outburst - 17 years of discussion, the result was gated with an outburst of i 17 years of discussion, the result. was gated with an outburst ofjoy. many— was gated with an outburst ofjoy. many thought _ was gated with an outburst ofjoy. many thouqht only— was gated with an outburst ofjoy. many thought only begrudginglyl many thought only begrudgingly accepted — many thought only begrudgingly accepted among _ many thought only begrudgingly accepted among the _ many thought only begrudgingly accepted among the clergy - many thought only begrudgingly- accepted among the clergy suddenly felt welcome — this is newsday on the bbc. 0ur headlines. a tough challenge for the climate summit — scientists warn that even with the pledges in glasgow, temperatures will rise beyond global targets. a migrant crisis at belarus's border with poland — thousands are stuck at the border in freezing conditions. china is struggling to stamp out a fresh outbreak of covid—19 with 20 of the country s 31
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provinces recording recent infections. whilst other countries have abandoned a covid zero approach, china has kept up its strategy of keeping cases to a minimum with international borders remaining closed. on monday, china reported just 62 cases in a country of1.1l billion people. and officially at least, there were no reported deaths from coronavirus. the country looks set to maintain the strict approach until the winter olympics early next year, but there are questions how about how long it can be sustained. we can cross live to shanghai and speak to frank tsai who s the founder of consultancy firm china crossroads. we are seeing so many countries abandoned that approach but china is persisting. why? i
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abandoned that approach but china is persisting- why?— persisting. why? i actually, the [arc est persisting. why? i actually, the largest platform _ persisting. why? i actually, the largest platform for _ persisting. why? i actually, the largest platform for this - persisting. why? i actually, the largest platform for this among j largest platform for this among expatriates and i started this event in the middle of the pandemic last spring and many of us have benefited from the covid—19 policy, but it is very hard for the people and in some cases, it's part of the reason why the government is having a hard time with this. and more generally, some capabilities that have this ball other countries have struggled, its economy has done well and it's tied up economy has done well and it's tied up in this credibility and it relinquishes zero covid—19 and it seems. relinquishes zero covid-19 and it seems. , ,. , ., , seems. just described to us were left is like _ seems. just described to us were left is like there _ seems. just described to us were left is like there when _ seems. just described to us were left is like there when there - seems. just described to us were left is like there when there is i seems. just described to us were
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left is like there when there is an j left is like there when there is an outbreak. it left is like there when there is an outbreak. . , left is like there when there is an outbreak. ., , ., , ., , outbreak. it may not be as anxiety inducin: outbreak. it may not be as anxiety inducing as _ outbreak. it may not be as anxiety inducing as you — outbreak. it may not be as anxiety inducing as you might _ outbreak. it may not be as anxiety inducing as you might think- outbreak. it may not be as anxiety inducing as you might think and i inducing as you might think and there's a couple of restrictions we could make. certainly, china is severe when there is an upgrade, you are restricted from travelling to those areas, there mass testing and we had a case for thousand people were tested but, since late february, the movement has never been restricted and everything is been restricted and everything is been open. there is some misunderstanding that there is the lockdown in china but i've never had a problem with that. i lockdown in china but i've never had a problem with that.— a problem with that. i think this certainly is _ a problem with that. i think this certainly is a — a problem with that. i think this certainly is a misconception - a problem with that. i think this i certainly is a misconception given what you have just described but when do you think we might see china moving away from this policy? i think there may be a false herring to predict and in a more transparent
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society, we don't have as many sources to figure out what their thinking but if you were to ask me, i would be more biased towards the idea that it will be later rather than sooner, so in the after the winter olympics. simply for the reasons ijust winter olympics. simply for the reasons i just stated. winter olympics. simply for the reasons ijust stated. so much of the governments credibility and legitimacy is trying to amid zero cases. ., . .,,, , cases. finder of the crossroads. thank you _ cases. finder of the crossroads. thank you with _ cases. finder of the crossroads. thank you with your _ cases. finder of the crossroads. thank you with your view - cases. finder of the crossroads. thank you with your view from | thank you with your view from shanghai. let's take a look at some of the stories in the headlines in the uk. the uk's opposition labour party has called on prime minister borisjohnson to launch an investigation into one of his conservative mps, who was paid almost 900—thousand pounds for work outside parliament. the former attorney general, sir geoffrey cox, earned the money as a lawyer, but he hasn't broken any parliamentary rules. andrew gale, the head coach
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of yorkshire county cricket club, in england, has been suspended as part of an investigation into a tweet he sent in 2010. thejewish news reported that he published a post containing an anti—semitic slur. gale told the newspaper that he was "completely unaware" of the offensive nature of the term and deleted the post as soon let's return to the cop summit now, and scientists exploring the seabed have found that its capacity for absorbing carbon emissions is decreasing because of climate change. the latest discovery by the international i—atlantic project has revealed that if global temperatures increase to predicted levels, the ocean will no longer act as the earth's largest carbon store. our science correspondent victoria gill reports. diving to ocean depths of up to 3.5 miles. this is the abyssal zone,
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where robotic explorers are taking samples from places no—one has ever touched. a third of the carbon dioxide in our atmosphere dissolves in the surface of the ocean. when tiny marine plants and animals feed on that carbon it becomes part of a cycle that's made the deep ocean and its muddy floor earth's largest carbon store. in an aquarium like this, you get a snippet of the life in the shallower parts of the ocean, but in the deep ocean floor there are single—celled organisms that we can't even see, and it's those that are responsible for locking away carbon in the deep. in experiments carried out in the equatorial atlantic, about 500 miles off the coast of west africa, researchers brought tubes of sea floor mud into their ocean laboratories to test what happens to the carbon that's contained in the sediments as the ocean temperature rises. so, we have to understand how this part of our planet
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will work in the future. in this abyssal ocean, that covers 60% of the planet, we find that under higher temperatures, we can store less carbon in these places. the ecosystems are turning over the carbon faster. they're running at a higher temperature more quickly, and they're going to release more carbon in the future, and that's really worrying. we know more about the surface of the moon than we do about life at these extreme depths, and researchers say this latest finding isjust a glimpse of how our greenhouse gas emissions are transforming this huge and misunderstood habitat. working out how the deep ocean will be affected by climate change and how it could help us to solve this very human—made problem will require much deeper exploration. victoria gill, bbc news. now to some truly extraordinary historic jewellery that�* sjust sold at auction in geneva. these diamond bracelets once belonged to france s last queen, marie antoinette — who went
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to the guillotine with her husband king louis the sixteenth. the jewels have stayed in what was left of france s royalfamily ever since. here's the moment they went under the hammer. at 6,200,000 four maria intimates diamonds. sold! the sale price, a suitably extraordinary six million, two hundred thousand swiss francs — thats just shy of six million eight hundred thousand dollars. finally, the nobel laureate malala yousafzai has announced she has got married in the uk. the pakistani activist, who was shot in the head by a taliban gunman in 2012, revealed on twitter she had tied the knot with partner asser malik. she wrote: "today marks a precious day in my life. asser and i tied the knot to be partners for life. "please send us your prayers. we are excited to walk together for the journey ahead." that's all for now —
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stay with bbc world news. hello there. it was nearly 18 celsius yesterday, temperatures which are well above what weather should be for the time of year should be for the time of year should be for the time of year should be mild again for the day ahead because he got that south—westerly wind of the atlantic but with that, some rain and that rand is all tied in with this weather front here which is pulsing, if you like, bring some further outbreaks of rain through the small hours and to the start of the date and will be on and off throughout the day. coming into high pressure and weakening it to the north of it, showers fitting back to the coast with one or two around but with clear skies turning chilli with a touch of frost and rural areas while further south, temperatures are where they should be during the day but misty, murky and some patchy fog
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and the southern and eastern areas, there will be some coastal fog which as you can see, will bring some rain, not too heavy but rather dank, misty and great conditions through the day but mild, 11l misty and great conditions through the day but mild, 1a and 15 whilst should start to break up the cloud tojoin with should start to break up the cloud to join with northern should start to break up the cloud tojoin with northern ireland should start to break up the cloud to join with northern ireland and scotland with the odd shower and some sunshine. still some brisk wind to the northwest of scotland. indeed, through the overnight tonight, there will be showering rain turning into the weekend but a bit more cloud and the frost a bit more patchy by the time to get a thursday morning in the clouds during the break for the south because those weather fronts a rather weak and coming this area of high pressure and we will have a few fog issues on thursday morning. once those clear away at this time a year, tomorrow morning, it would take its time to linger through the rush hour and once it does, some sunny spells in the rain gathering on the southerly wind picking up further west.
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on the southerly wind picking up furtherwest. in on the southerly wind picking up further west. in this mess of rain behind me, that will be with a developing area of low pressure and a bit? as to where the wet and windy weather will be and i'll bring in jails and quite a bit of rain to and the week. and it is when they were watching and will be fine—tuning the details but looks as if you will be a relatively mild into the week because those wins coming in off the atlantic. but it should be moving out of the way in time for the weekend and a weakening feature which will see quite a bit of dry weather but still quite a bit of cloud into the weekend. goodbye for now.
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this is bbc news, the headlines. an international group of scientists says the world is heading for disastrous levels of global warming even if the short—term goals agreed at the climate summit in glasgow are met. the eu says it will impose new sanctions on belarus over its treatment of migrants — as thousands camp at the border seeking entry into poland. neighbouring lithuania has declared a state of emergency on its border. the united nations says at least 16 of its staff members have been detained in the ethiopian capital addis ababa. a un spokesperson said ethiopia's ministry of foreign affairs had been asked to release them immediately. the british government has said that all front—line staff working for the national health service in england will have to be fully vaccinated against coronavirus. the deadline will be next spring.

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