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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 9, 2021 11:30pm-12:00am GMT

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an international group of scientists says the world is heading for disastrous levels of global warming even if the short—term goals agreed at the climate summit in glasgow are met. the eu says it will impose new sanctions on belarus over its treatment of migrants — as thousands camp at the border seeking entry into poland. neighbouring lithuania has declared a state of emergency on its border. the united nations says at least 16 of its staff members have been detained in the ethiopian capital addis ababa. a un spokesperson said ethiopia's ministry of foreign affairs had been asked to release them immediately. the british government has said that all front—line staff working for the national health service in england will have to be fully vaccinated against coronavirus. the deadline will be next spring.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are natalie fahy, the senior editor of the nottingham post, derby telegraph and lincolnshire echo and rachel watson, the deputy political editor of the scottish daily mail. tomorrow's front pages, starting with. we've pages, starting with. had a few more in the last hour. we've had a few more in the last hour. the metro focusses on the work the mp geoffrey cox has been doing away from parliament. the paper reports labour are calling for an offical inquiry. the times has the same focus. it claims to have an image showing mr cox using his parliamentary office for legal work. the care sector is facing
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an acute shortfall in workers, according the i. it's partly down to rules over vaccinations kicking in. that's partly because of vaccination kicking and particularly nottingham. malala on her wedding day on the telegraph. nine years after the taliban tried to murder her. according to the education secretary... who says oxford university owes jewish students an explanation over the cash it received from the mosleys. the money was apparently set up in trust by his late father sir oswald mosley who of course was the leader of the british fascist movement between the wars. the ft has an image from poland's border with belarus. further troops have been deployed
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there, after migrants began to gather in large numbers. there's a similar image on the guardian — it's top story though is the warning that global temperatures will rise by 2.4 degrees, even with cop 26 climate pledges taken into account. and the star refers to what it calls "eco—hypocrites", over cop delegates taking short haul flights up to glasgow. i wonder if it might be including the prime minister and that number choosing to fly back tomorrow morning rather than getting the train. just as he flew back from glasgow last week. and didn't get the train. let's begin with you if we may natalie on this question of the metro front page, jeff in paradise. the metro front page, jeff in aradise. ~ the metro front page, jeff in paradise-— the metro front page, jeff in aradise. ~ ., ., ., ., , , paradise. well, the more notoriously is on the front _ paradise. well, the more notoriously is on the front of— paradise. well, the more notoriously is on the front of the _ paradise. well, the more notoriously is on the front of the paper _ is on the front of the paper tomorrow. in the line the metro has
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is that labour is demanding boris johnson launches an inquiry into the work that sir geoffrey cox has been doing. he was representing some companies in the british virgin islands and his role as a qc and in antifraud investigation with the going to burn it. he's earning lots of money and we met money from this. he hasn't broken rules but it doesn't good on him. why was he out there when he should have been representing working for his constituents? it doesn't really add up. how did he have enough time to do it all? being a qc is a really demanding job. and the sheer amount of money he was bringing in. it's like you to go down well with people despite the fact that he hasn't officially broken any rules. it's just doesn't sit right with people, does a? he just doesn't sit right with people, does a? ., , ., just doesn't sit right with people, does a? ., ,, ._ just doesn't sit right with people, does a? ., , does a? he might not you may be able to ianore does a? he might not you may be able to ignore the — does a? he might not you may be able to ignore the metro. _ does a? he might not you may be able to ignore the metro. he _
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does a? he might not you may be able to ignore the metro. he may be - does a? he might not you may be able to ignore the metro. he may be more | to ignore the metro. he may be more worried by the story on the front of the times. which is brazen cox is accused of flouting commons rules was up can you explain what appears to be going on near?— to be going on near? leadtime story is that labour _ to be going on near? leadtime story is that labour have _ to be going on near? leadtime story is that labour have a _ to be going on near? leadtime story is that labour have a call— to be going on near? leadtime story is that labour have a call for a - is that labour have a call for a standards_ is that labour have a call for a standards investigation into sir geoffrey— standards investigation into sir geoffrey cox now. they believe and claim _ geoffrey cox now. they believe and claim that _ geoffrey cox now. they believe and claim that they have an image of him carrying _ claim that they have an image of him carrying out — claim that they have an image of him carrying out his work for the companies that he is representing in the virgin— companies that he is representing in the virgin islands but doing that from _ the virgin islands but doing that from parliament. and there are claims — from parliament. and there are claims there is a picture showing him in _ claims there is a picture showing him in his— claims there is a picture showing him in his office in the commons which _ him in his office in the commons which these offices are to be used, the rules_ which these offices are to be used, the rules state that mps can only use these — the rules state that mps can only use these for parliamentary business was up _ use these for parliamentary business was up there are allegations that he may have _ was up there are allegations that he may have used this office to conduct his second _ may have used this office to conduct his second job. and that's where the time _ his second job. and that's where the time story— his second job. and that's where the time story comes in. but this is all part of— time story comes in. but this is all part of this — time story comes in. but this is all part of this pressure building now around _ part of this pressure building now around the conservatives, particularly on sir geoffrey cox. i
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think— particularly on sir geoffrey cox. i think the — particularly on sir geoffrey cox. i think the daily mail we have more revelations about this again tomorrow. i think when you open up the papers _ tomorrow. i think when you open up the papers it— tomorrow. i think when you open up the papers it might not be and a lot of the _ the papers it might not be and a lot of the front— the papers it might not be and a lot of the front pages but there will be multiple _ of the front pages but there will be multiple pages on the insides of the papers _ multiple pages on the insides of the papers tomorrow on theirs. it was a week_ papers tomorrow on theirs. it was a week ago— papers tomorrow on theirs. it was a week ago today that this story broke and the _ week ago today that this story broke and the scandal around what the government was trying to do there and the _ government was trying to do there and the probe into having the sanctions _ and the probe into having the sanctions to be brought onto him. since _ sanctions to be brought onto him. since then— sanctions to be brought onto him. since then the stories kind of slipped — since then the stories kind of slipped a _ since then the stories kind of slipped a little bit. without talking _ slipped a little bit. without talking a little bit more about jobs — talking a little bit more about jobs at — talking a little bit more about jobs. at the end of the day it all comes— jobs. at the end of the day it all comes down this kind of tory sleeves _ comes down this kind of tory sleeves. stories that everyone may not have _ sleeves. stories that everyone may not have done anything wrong here but these _ not have done anything wrong here but these storiesjust not have done anything wrong here but these stories just don't sit well— but these stories just don't sit well with— but these stories just don't sit well with the public when they see their representatives who have huge caseioads— their representatives who have huge caseloads at the moment. the pandemic, if you talk to any mp they will say— pandemic, if you talk to any mp they will say their caseload is absolutely surge during this pandemic. i can't fathom where anyone — pandemic. i can't fathom where anyone finds the time to be able to be a anyone finds the time to be able to he a 0c—
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anyone finds the time to be able to he a qc iet — anyone finds the time to be able to be a qc let alone jet off to the british— be a qc let alone jet off to the british virgin islands to do that. i said it _ british virgin islands to do that. i said it earlier, i think the conservatives might've thought that this is— conservatives might've thought that this is something that the end of last week— this is something that the end of last week with owen patterson the changes— last week with owen patterson the changes made around they are in the government back and outcome of those u-turns _ government back and outcome of those u-turns but— government back and outcome of those u—turns. but really this is something that the public are talking — something that the public are talking about, the public health grasp— talking about, the public health grasp and therefore the papers are grasping _ grasp and therefore the papers are grasping at. and they are actively looking _ grasping at. and they are actively looking for stories and continue to pile up— looking for stories and continue to pile up pressure on the conservatives i think this is in the end of— conservatives i think this is in the end of it — conservatives i think this is in the end of it either. i'd be very surprised _ end of it either. i'd be very surprised if over the next few days we don't _ surprised if over the next few days we don't see more digging from the papers _ we don't see more digging from the papers and — we don't see more digging from the papers and a pressure really building _ papers and a pressure really buildinu, , , w' papers and a pressure really buildinu, , , w , papers and a pressure really buildinu. , , , ., , building. just picking up on this, it all hinges _ building. just picking up on this, it all hinges on _ building. just picking up on this, it all hinges on whether - building. just picking up on this, it all hinges on whether what - building. just picking up on this, it all hinges on whether what we building. just picking up on this, - it all hinges on whether what we see behind sir geoffrey cox and a screen grab. because of course the whole inquiry from the virgin islands is available online for people to watch it. whether that is his office, i
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suppose that is where they have standard blinds or an office somewhere in the virgin islands. search geoffrey cox will be able to answer that. this is in a story for the times is careful to say appearing to uses a parliamentary office. nobody actually knows what he may want to get in touch with the bbc or point out a statement or he might want to get his lawyers to put out a statement if lawyers have lawyers about this. i understand angela rayner has already said she's going to refer geoffrey cox to the parliamentary standards commissioner who obviously did a report on owen patterson. one of the owen pattersons report i think it's fair to say is the use of your parliamentary offices was one of the criticisms that was made of owen patterson in herfinal report. it's only three or two geoffrey cox to say he hasn't given his response yet to the story. but it is interesting for the picking up on what rachel is saying that there is a quote on the front of the ft which is from an
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unnamed tory mp saying, "there's a media narrative about sleeves now people are really angry with boris. i guess mps people are really angry with boris. iguess mps in your people are really angry with boris. i guess mps in your patches well know that local paperjournalist know that local paper journalist will know that local paperjournalist will be digging fresh into the stuff they declared in the registered members interest to see if there might be a good story behind it. yes, that's right we've already been looking _ yes, that's right we've already been looking at— yes, that's right we've already been looking at what mps are doing. relatively new mp taken over for kent clark and £60,000 a year, were this is— kent clark and £60,000 a year, were this is not— kent clark and £60,000 a year, were this is not geoffrey cox territory at all _ this is not geoffrey cox territory at all £60 _ this is not geoffrey cox territory at all. £60 a year doing it some extra consultancy work which is the only man _ extra consultancy work which is the only man that has declared extra work _ only man that has declared extra work we — only man that has declared extra work. we got quite a lot of mps and there's— work. we got quite a lot of mps and there's been a lot in the papers on there's been a lot in the papers on the radio— there's been a lot in the papers on the radio today about the kind of division, — the radio today about the kind of division, this opening up between this red _ division, this opening up between this red wall mps and old cards if you like — this red wall mps and old cards if you like i— this red wall mps and old cards if you like. i think some of those red
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while _ you like. i think some of those red while mps — you like. i think some of those red while mps are feeling a bit grieved try while mps are feeling a bit grieved hy theirs — while mps are feeling a bit grieved by theirs i— while mps are feeling a bit grieved by theirs. i think they came into it to get— by theirs. i think they came into it to get yes, — by theirs. i think they came into it to get yes, this is a new era from us and _ to get yes, this is a new era from us and were _ to get yes, this is a new era from us and were really get to get yes, this is— us and were really get to get yes, this is a _ us and were really get to get yes, this is a new era from us and were really— this is a new era from us and were really you — this is a new era from us and were really you work hard. he has got two jobs to— really you work hard. he has got two jobs to carry — really you work hard. he has got two jobs to carry out there. it�*s jobs to carry out there. it's very difficult. it's— jobs to carry out there. it's very difficult. it's a _ jobs to carry out there. it's very difficult. it's a generational - jobs to carry out there. it's very. difficult. it's a generational thing is quite interesting. there was a sole idea that a lot of the mps that got criticised for expenses in there was a big clear out under david cameron. then various claims of course david cameron himself has hit a bit of problems over complaints of his outside interest but is no longer an mp. he is a private citizen. that's the argument about him. serving mps is a different matter. we will see how this unfolds in the course of the next day or so. natalie, do you want to take us to the front of the ria? typically one of your cities, one of the patches you cover not to mention on the front of it. concerns about care homes will now have enough staff particularly with the vaccine requirement coming in. it’s
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particularly with the vaccine requirement coming in. it's about the mandatory — requirement coming in. it's about the mandatory vaccines _ requirement coming in. it's about the mandatory vaccines for - requirement coming in. it's about the mandatory vaccines for care l requirement coming in. it's about - the mandatory vaccines for care home workers which is coming into force on thursday. they've highlighted a number of cities on the front here, there is no surprise to see that nottingham is apparently one of the worst affected. by caring workers losing theirjobs. they have not have the covid vaccine. not surprised to see that it all. nottingham has consistently come top of those tables for low percentage of those tables for low percentage of adults have in the vaccine was up in particular in the city centre where it's in the 30% of range of adults who have had the vaccination. do we know why that is, is there any explanation for the?— explanation for the? not really. nottingham _ explanation for the? not really. nottingham seems _ explanation for the? not really. nottingham seems to _ explanation for the? not really. nottingham seems to be - explanation for the? not really. nottingham seems to be the i explanation for the? not really. i nottingham seems to be the kind explanation for the? not really. - nottingham seems to be the kind of place where people are particularly resistant to having the covid vaccine. they tried a number of things, they had a bus going around going into communities, a small
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market town in nottingham. it is not any particular community itjust any particular community it just seems any particular community itjust seems to be a sort of eight nottingham city thing. nothing is really work so far. that coupled together with the vacancies of care workers is going to be a bit of a crisis i think looming. the experience _ crisis i think looming. the experience in _ crisis i think looming. the experience in scotland is different at the moment there is an as we speak a requirement for medical staff there or in care homes to be vaccinated. what is the examination for that? this vaccinated. what is the examination for that? �* . vaccinated. what is the examination for that? �* , ., ., vaccinated. what is the examination forthat? a ., ., ., for that? as the health and social care to evolve _ for that? as the health and social care to evolve this _ for that? as the health and social care to evolve this doesn't - for that? as the health and social| care to evolve this doesn't impact scotland it all. there is no requirement and there's no suggestion in scotland that there will be a requirement for working in the health sector or social care sector to get vaccinated. that is because experts and the people guiding the public policy on this believe that vaccination rates are actually fairly high in scotland. so when the vaccine first came out the
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roll—out went really well and really quickly. and they got really high numbers of people coming forward to get there first and second jobs. there's obviously a slight concern over boosterjobs and how quickly they getting into peoples arms at they getting into peoples arms at the moment. i don't think that you need to scotland. the problem is column again this is not unique, was the number of people in the 18 to 29—year—old group were not getting vaccinated and that seemed to slow down a little bit. so in scotland we introduce vaccine passports. to go to a nightclub, a large sports game, other large events, concerts things like that you will have to prove that you have been fully vaccinated. so you download the app or show a vaccine certificate. that was supposed to be a way to encourage young people to get vaccinated. scottish were very open about vaccine passports weren't related to
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stem the spread of the virus but to encourage people to get vaccinated. and that seems to be something that they continue to consider how that is used in the coming months. on the flip side of that in care homes we have seen a number of care home buses who are looking at their contracts for their workers. they can't force their current workers and their employees to get vaccinated if they don't want to, there's a lot of encouragement, they want to educate people why they should get vaccinated. but for a new care home workers, new employees that they are taking on they are requiring in their new contracts for anybody to be fully vaccinated or to agree to be fully vaccinated as they start their newjob. i think that really interesting in a way that care homes are trying to take that on themselves rather than wait. they don't really want the government to force their workers to do that because they have employees that they want to keep. they don't want
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to we've heard a lot about england and wales and how this could lead to and wales and how this could lead to a staffing crisis in some care homes. the sector is already facing problems in some areas. i think the same applies in scotland that care home buses will be really concerned that they would lose huge numbers of staff potentially.— staff potentially. yes, it's a big roblem. staff potentially. yes, it's a big problem. rachel, _ staff potentially. yes, it's a big problem. rachel, do _ staff potentially. yes, it's a big problem. rachel, do you - staff potentially. yes, it's a big problem. rachel, do you wantl staff potentially. yes, it's a big i problem. rachel, do you want to staff potentially. yes, it's a big - problem. rachel, do you want to take us on... cop26 mountain to climb. is that the impression you formed on your recent visit?— your recent visit? yes, these are the words _ your recent visit? yes, these are the words of _ your recent visit? yes, these are the words of the _ your recent visit? yes, these are the words of the cop26 - your recent visit? yes, these are i the words of the cop26 president. your recent visit? yes, these are - the words of the cop26 president. he has admitted there is a bit of a mountain to climb as we reached the last few days of negotiations. we are i believe the next few hours that we are going to get some sort of document that will show us what the negotiators have been working
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on, what agreements have been made and they are hoping to make in last days. at the end of the day cop26, there's been a lot of fanfare about who's appeared there and what celebrities are there, there's a lot of excitement around that. at the end of the day there's hundreds and thousands of negotiators who they are to ensure that we reach this target of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees. if you read some of the papers today there are concerns that by the end of the century this will actually reach 2.4. which is well over the target. i think last week i got a real sense of optimism. we went to the conference and there was a lot of comments from borisjohnson who was trying not to get you ahead of himself. issuing a bit of caution about what could really come from cop26. but last week there was real excitement in the venue and you got there and when you got in there really was excitement. i spoke with
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john kerry who spoke about how this is good to be a moment in history and he was very optimistic about what would come from this. nicola sturgeon saying the same thing, borisjohnson was being a bit up to mystic. i went back to cop26 yesterday and today and it did feel a little bit more flat. i had been there since thursday so felt a little bit flat and the energy had gone. they are not in the room with the negotiators, they are all from the negotiators, they are all from the public or the main area having their discussions. but i do wonder if that's part of the reason boris johnson may be coming back up to try and get a rally. it feels like there's a lot of weight on the uk government to try and rally those people in these rooms, making these decisions, reaching agreements. i think we've got a couple of days. there's still a couple of days left. from what i hear it doesn'tjust end on 5p them. people go well into
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saturday morning. these things never run to time. but i think there's a lot of pressure on these people. we've got to try and keep optimistic. if we've got to try and keep optimistic.— we've got to try and keep 0 timistic. . ., . optimistic. if we want a cheerful view of this _ optimistic. if we want a cheerful view of this story _ optimistic. if we want a cheerful view of this story we _ optimistic. if we want a cheerful view of this story we should - optimistic. if we want a cheerful- view of this story we should perhaps bearin view of this story we should perhaps bear in mind thatjohn prescott is about to return to the fray after a long period of ill health. apparentlyjohn prescott has given up apparentlyjohn prescott has given up the jackson is given in environmentally friendly version of fish and chip in favour of more locally sourced potatoes from a restaurant. he put not good for lord prescott. it would be nice to have you back in the political fray lord prescott if you are watching. we missed your contributions and i think it's fair to say that he will come back and he will make an impact. i want to end with two things, theguardian front page, powerful photograph on the border
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with belarus and poland. that powerful photograph on the border with belarus and poland.— with belarus and poland. that is a really powerful — with belarus and poland. that is a really powerful photograph, - with belarus and poland. that is a really powerful photograph, is - with belarus and poland. that is a | really powerful photograph, isjust really powerful photograph, is just absolutely heartbreaking to see what's — absolutely heartbreaking to see what's happening there. it is a dispute — what's happening there. it is a dispute between belarus and poland was that— dispute between belarus and poland was that refugees moving through the country— was that refugees moving through the country to— was that refugees moving through the country to poland and being trapped at the _ country to poland and being trapped at the border there, they can't get through _ at the border there, they can't get through. it's absolutely awful, these — through. it's absolutely awful, these people are just being used in some _ these people are just being used in some kind — these people are just being used in some kind of political battle between the two countries. they are trapped _ between the two countries. they are trapped there in sub—zero temperatures, they've got the blankets — temperatures, they've got the blankets on, that's not going to make _ blankets on, that's not going to make much difference. apparently some _ make much difference. apparently some people have perished in these temperatures. it's really that bleak — temperatures. it's really that bleak. that photo doesn't show children — bleak. that photo doesn't show children but there are a lot of young — children but there are a lot of young children there as well. just an awful situation. it is. as you say, young children and babies, the red cross blankets are an attempt to protect them and they will be food parcels but is not a solution to the problem. i promise you rachel a chance to give your view on the photograph of the duke of cambridge and marcus rashford which is on the
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front of the independent. what you make of it? . front of the independent. what you make of it?— make of it? yes, he is the out to eiuht of make of it? yes, he is the out to eight of strafford. _ make of it? yes, he is the out to eight of strafford. you _ make of it? yes, he is the out to eight of strafford. you asked - eight of strafford. you asked earlier. i had to double check that. the email of sleep that early strength learn and marcus rashford who is marcus rashford and image of a part of the united kingdom he is photograph of i think he remains just as popular as well. i think we are saying earlier his campaign on free school meals, the work they are really cut through and he got to the politicians where so many people have not managed to get through. i think that was great. it's great to see that image with his mom in the background, is on a number of interviews and spoke about how close he is to his mom and how important she is in his life and career to this point. it's an uplifting picture to see on the front of the
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papers tomorrow.— papers tomorrow. yes, it is very uliftinu. papers tomorrow. yes, it is very uplifting. rachel— papers tomorrow. yes, it is very uplifting. rachel watson, - papers tomorrow. yes, it is very i uplifting. rachelwatson, scottish uplifting. rachel watson, scottish daily mail and natalie on the derby telegraph and we could share. thank you very, very much. thank you do for watching. that's up for the papers. we've got the sport back. you'll be delighted to know. that's up you'll be delighted to know. that's up next with that we had a few technical problems thank you for the bbc college for sorting that out. then we will have weather and then we are back to our colleagues in singapore for newsday. good evening i'm tulsen tollett with your sports news and we start with the latest in the yorkshire county cricket crisis as they look to deal with the allegations of institutional racism. tonight they've confirmed head coach andrew gale has been suspended pending a disciplinary hearing, over a historic social media post, and director of cricket martyn moxon is absent from work with a stress
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related illness. lord patel, the new chair at yorkshire says he hopes to have a process in place by the end of the week for whistleblowers to come forward, to share any instances of discrimination. tabassum bhatti who is now 37, signed a contract at yorkshire at the age of 14, he has told the bbc about his experience. it's become clear that it's been going on for a long time, and, yes, it has been brushed under the carpet. like i said, i was there in 1998. there were incidents prior to me being there, and there's been things happening in the last 20 years up to the present. so, i think that's pretty clear that it has been overlooked. staying with cricket and on the eve of their t20 world cup semifinal against new zealand, england captain eoin morgan says his side are looking forward to a repeat of the 50 over final they played at lords in 2019, that england won
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by the bearest of margins. but does he think they hold the advantage this time? i wouldn't say strong favourites. new zealand are full—strength squad. obviously hampered throughout this tournament but made me cricket in the guys are extremely excited about the guys are extremely excited about the challenge against new zealand. and potentially the opportunity that might follow that. we need to make two play really good cricket in order to beat them. to football and chelsea thrashed swiss champions servette 7—nil in the women's champions league — they're top of their group, two points ahead of wolfsburg who drew 2—2 atjuventus. the blues, who led 6—0 at half—time, showed the gulf in quality between the sides with some impressive attacking play. fran kirby scored twice and so did sam kerr. melanie leupolz, jessie fleming and guro reiten also got on the scoresheet. chelsea defender reece james
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believes he is in the best form of his career but is well aware of the challenge he faces in pinning down a permanent position in gareth southgate's england side. after some impressive perfomances for his club, he's vying with trent alexander—arnold and kyle walker for an starting spot. southgate is preparing his side for world cup qualifiers against albania and san marino — victories in both would secure their spot in at the world cup qatar next year. i think each one of us have a different style of play. trent has been at the top for quite of few years now, kyle as well. the competition is very tough. also, a very good level. i mean, i'm competing with very good players, so it's quite tough. we just have to keep pushing each other. good news for scotland — kieran tierney should be fit for their world cup qualifier
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in moldova on friday. the arsenal defender has missed four games for the gunners and was an unused substitute at the weekend as he recovers from an ankle problem. a win will wrap up a world cup play—off spot with one match to spare. wales play their last two qualifiers at home in cardiff, but it's really tight in their group. they need a big win against belarus to move above czech republic on goal diference into second. but then they will probably have to get something out of their game against belgium in theirfinal game, who they hope will have already qualified. manchester united midfielder paul pogba could be out for six to eight weeks after picking up a thigh injury whilst on internatioanl duty with france. that would take him to the end of the year, at which point he's able to sign pre contract terms with overseas clubs — his current deal expires injune. united paid a then world record 89 million pounds for the player back in 2016, but he's yet to commit his future to the club. steven gerrard remains high on the list of potential managers to replace dean smith at aston villa.
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the rangers boss has impressed the club's hierarchy in his first senior managerial position with the scottish club. villa hope to have someone in place for the next home game with brighton following the upcoming international break. on the day she confirmed a new coach, us open champion emma raducanu found herself bowing out in the round of 16 in austria. the top seed lost the first set 6—1 to china's wang xinyu before winning a tie break to level the match at a set apiece. the 18 year old briton required a medical timeout in the deciding set before she eventually fell to the world number 106 who won out 7—5 to progress, while raducanu will now look towards working with torben beltz in preparation for next season. andy murray is through to the second round of the stockholm open after being norwegian qualifier viktor durasovic in straight sets. he breezed through the first set 6—1
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and eventually took the second 7—6 murray now faces top seeded italianjannik sinner tomorrow. owen farrell has returned to england training following his false positive test for covid, which ruled him out of england's first autumn international. one man who will be missing from this weekend's match with australia isjoe marler after he tested positive for covid — he's been isolating since yesterday. the harelquins forward came on as a second half replacement in their victory over tonga and was expected to feature this weekend. and that's all the sport for now. hello there. the mild team will continue on with this proximity and some low level fog as halan coastal fog. to the
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north or that the cloud is more broken which means a chilly start on wednesday morning, a touch of frost and some of the glands was up but then some sunshine comes through walls further south we can see outbreaks of rain, there will be a low—level blog even in southern and eastern areas. the hazard for drivers and also over the hills and goesin drivers and also over the hills and goes in many areas under that blanket a cough it up but then some sunshine comes through walls further south we can see outbreaks of rain, there will be a low—level blog even in southern and eastern areas. the hazard for drivers and also over the hills and goes in many areas under that blanket a car. but rain and clouds are directed break to the decor so little brighter here but staying quite grey and damp for the south writer skies, sunny spells for scotland and northern ireland but the peppering of
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�*welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines. scientists warn that even with the cop summit pledges, temperatures will rise beyond global targets. we cannot kick this can down the road. it is not something we can do 2030, 2050, we have to do it in 20212022. trying to reach europe —— we report on thousands of migrants trapped in belarus — hoping to get into poland. how the seabed's vital capacity for absorbing carbon is being harmed by the process of climate change. and it's the video going viral across the world — so what really happened when the world's richest man's girlfriend met one of hollywood's biggest stars?
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we'll talk to a body language expert later.

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