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tv   Newsday  BBC News  November 11, 2021 1:00am-1:30am GMT

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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore. i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines: a surprise move as the world's biggest economies — china and the us — agree a joint approach to climate change. the united states and china have no shortage of differences but on climate, on climate, cooperation is the only way to get this job cooperation is the only way to get thisjob done. migrants on the belarus border continue to suffer as they try to enter poland. russia is accused of manipulating the situation for its own ends. a pandemic of the unvaccinated — germany warns its hospitals are close to being overwhelmed by record levels of covid infections.
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and we meet the teacher who's just won $1 million in a unesco—backed prize. this feels amazing and it really validates the work that teachers put in inside and outside of the classroom every day. live from our studio in singapore, this is is bbc news. it's newsday. hello and welcome to the programme. in an unexpected move, the world's two biggest producers of greenhouse gases — the us and china — have agreed to co—operate more closely on climate issues over the next decade. the countries issued a joint statement at the cop26 conference in glasgow — pledging to help keep alive the hope of limiting global temperature rises this century to 1.5 degrees celsius.
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you are but they didn't say whether they'd back a draft international agreement, calling on all nations to reconvene next year with tougher carbon cutting targets. you so our science editor david shukman has the latest. can the world agree to slow down the release of the gases heating the planet? can it do what it takes to reduce the melting of the polar ice? and will this be enough to limit the rise of the sea? with the conference now entering its final days, delegates are trying to find common ground, and the uk, as host, has come up with a draft of a possible agreement. seven pages of text, welcomed as a first step by some but criticised by many.
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the words are almost meek and mild in many places, and the world is on fire. we've seen the australian wildfires, koalas being burnt alive. we need to make sure that we have got power and proactive commitments on the table. any document like this is bound to be a compromise, so it calls for the first time for coal to be phased out — the dirtiest fossil fuel — but it doesn't give a date. it pushes for 1.5 celsius to be the limit of global warming, but currently, no one is on course to achieve that, and it urges countries to update their climate plans not in 2025, but far sooner, in fact next year, but there is no obligation. it needs to be really clear. there is no room for ambiguity and fudges. i see in this latest text, there's a lot of "urging" and "calling for", that kind of soft language, and it will need to be sharpened up, otherwise it will be very difficult to claim that this summit has succeeded. so the prime minister has
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stepped in, briefly, but, faced with an uphill struggle, he is now trying to manage expectations. the cop26 summit here in glasgow is not going to fix it in one go. we're not going to arrest climate change right here, right now, that isjust impossible, and i think everybody has got to be realistic about that, but there is the possibility that we will come away from this with the first genuine road map for a solution to anthropogenic climate change. and that possibility was given a boost when china's top negotiator made a surprise announcement of a joint climate plan with the united states. the world's two biggest polluters agreed to reduce methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas, a positive signal of cooperation. the united states and china have no
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shortage of differences, but on climate — on climate — cooperation is the only way to get this job done. we will soon see what that adds up to in this last phase of the talks, where china is among industrial giants worried about brakes on its development. and others, like madagascar, victims of climate change, are desperate for this conference to get them help. a core challenge to moving away from fossil fuels is how to fund the transition — in the united states congress has just passed an infrastructure spending package worth one trillion dollars, with hundreds of billions of dollars devoted to funding infrastructure upgrades and new energy projects. to find out how that money is spent in order to achieve america's climate goals, i've been speaking tojoseph kane from the brookings institute. i began by asking him if today's pledge from the us and china to collaborate on climate would help both countries reduce
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their emissions. the magnitude and scale of this is enormous, goes beyond just the us and the two biggest players in the world dealing with this, notjust in terms of future pollution and climate challenges but in terms of current impact. we think of flooding, fires, other risks that are hitting communities all over the world. the us and china have a big role to play in the us, at least the barden administration, has made pretty bold ledges by 2030 to have more than 50% reduction in emissions by 2050 to have a net zero economy, steps toward that are important but these are just steps, it's a long way to 90, just steps, it's a long way to go, and action and investment is what's needed.— go, and action and investment is what's needed. joseph, a lot ofthe is what's needed. joseph, a lot of the early — is what's needed. joseph, a lot of the early financing _ is what's needed. joseph, a lot of the early financing for - is what's needed. joseph, a lot of the early financing for this i of the early financing for this will come from that
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infrastructure bill we were talking about that the us has just got past but the devil is in the detail, right? how does the money get put to work to achieve the barden administration's goals? the bill that was _ administration's goals? the bill that was just _ administration's goals? the: bill that wasjust past, administration's goals? the bill that wasjust past, $1.2 bill that was just past, $1.2 trillion over five years, $550 billion of that, is almost new funding. the politics may be over on capitol hill and in washington, but now begins the crucial implementation phase. 0urfederal crucial implementation phase. 0ur federal agencies like the department of transportation, the department of energy and others going to co—ordinate with state and local leaders who are the primary infrastructure owners and operators across the us, think of transit agencies, water utilities, other local entities, how they going to implement all this funding? is the key because traditionally in the us relied on a 20th—century teamwork, building more roads, in testing in the same climate destructive practices that have resulted clearly in more costs so the
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potential for this money to change plans, to change the types of projects we are pursuing is ultimately going to rest on state and local leaders to take that action and actually lead to improvements on the ground.— actually lead to improvements on the ground. when you look at the kind of— on the ground. when you look at the kind of projects _ on the ground. when you look at the kind of projects that - on the ground. when you look at the kind of projects that the - the kind of projects that the us is typically hard, is this a big enough current to get a sort of seachange in the transition, to focus on climate friendly infrastructure projects? friendly infrastructure injects?— friendly infrastructure ro'ects? ., projects? it's a down payment. it's not going — projects? it's a down payment. it's not going to _ projects? it's a down payment. it's not going to solve - it's not going to solve everything. we're talking about generational challenges and generational challenges and generational opportunities which ultimately have to start somewhere. in the scale and fragmentation for infrastructure needs across the country, when we think of transportation, water, energy, broadband, buildings and housing, it is enormous. we have more than 50,000 water
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utilities for example across the country, but have so many different concerns on their plates, whether it's replacing pipes or cleaning rivers and streams. this legislation provides needed fiscal certainty and capacity for a lot of those state and local entities but they are the ones who are going to have to ultimately cultivate and harness this funding to lead to long—term structural change. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines. the us plane maker, boeing, has admitted liablity for the deadly crash two years ago in ethiopia of one of its seven—three—seven max aircraft. all 157 people on board were killed. in a submission to a court in chicago, boeing acknowledged that the plane was unsafe. the firm said it was committed to ensuring that the families of those who died were compensated. the un security council has expressed deep concern at the latest violence in myanmar between the ruling military and opposition groups. in a rare statement agreed
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by all its members, the security council called for an immediate end to fighting and urged the military authorities to exercise utmost restraint. a french court has sentenced a man who killed a us teenager charged with shooting three people during civil unrest on the streets of wisconsin last year has taken the stand in his own defence. kyle rittenhouse broke down in tears, forcing a brief recess, as he described how he was cornered by several men and acted in self—defence. the teen has pleaded not guilty to all charges against him. in cricket, new zealand have beaten england to make it through to the final of the t20 world cup. the dramatic semi—final in abu dhabi saw new zealand smash their way to victory with a powerful batting display, winning by five wickets with an over to spare. they will now face either australia or pakistan who play on thursday.
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the german chancellor angela merkel has told president putin that russia must stop what she called the inhumane exploitation of the migrant crisis on the border between poland and belarus. thousands of people have massed in the area wanting to cross into poland and enter the european union. poland's prime minister has accused belarus of state terrorism in its handling of the crisis. 0ur correspondent nick beake sent this report. for those who'd hoped to find a new life safe in the european union, there is a grim realisation that this could now be home. trapped between belarus and poland. the bbc was sent these pictures as journalists and, crucially, aid agencies are being kept away. it is very, very bad. we managed to contact ilias,
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who was a scientist in iraq. he wants eu member poland to let them through. my message is, i want open the border to poland. why should poland open the border to you? one day, two day, three day, after, have died. you fear that people will die? yes. poland has been accused of pushing back migrants illegally. but it wants to highlight this — belarussian troops appearing to force migrants along the border, the polish accusing belarus of terrorism, masterminded by russia. and tonight, angela merkel appealed directly to moscow. translation: you are all following these - disturbing images. i had russian president vladimir putin on the phone today and i asked him to take action with president lukashenko because
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people are being used here. but, russia has hit back, claiming the eu is provoking belarus. moscow released this footage which, it said, showed two bombers being sent to patrol its ally�*s airspace in a show of solidarity and strength, as international tensions rise from this border chaos. this huge forest, called bialowieza, is one of europe's oldest woodlands, but it's now the epicentre of the continent�*s newest migrant crisis. thousands have been trying to make their way from belarus, through these trees, to here in poland. and many more are set to follow, determined to take their chances in this wilderness, if it means reaching eu soil. because, in belarus's capital, minsk, more families were preparing to head to the border after being welcomed by president lukashenko's regime.
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undeterred by the spiralling misery tonight in the makeshift camps that soon awaits them. nick beake, bbc news, on the poland—belarus border. eye that counts. success or failure depends not only on public display - but on the local campaign l headquarters and the heavy routine work of their
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women volunteers. i berliners from both east and west linked hands and danced around their liberated territory. and with nobody to stop them, it wasn't long before the first attempts were made to destroy the structure itself. yasser arafat, who dominated the palestinian cause for so long, has died. palestinian authority has declared a state of mourning. after 17 years of discussion, the result was greeted with an outburst ofjoy, leaving ministers who long felt only grudgingly accepted among the ranks of clergy suddenly felt welcome. this is newsday on the bbc. i'm karishma vaswani in singapore. 0ur headlines: a surprise move as the world's biggest economies, china and the us, agree to a joint approach to climate change.
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migrants on the belarus border continue to suffer as they try to enter poland. russia is accused of manipulating the situation for its own ends. authorities in parts of germany have banned unvaccinated people from bars, restaurants, and leisure facilities. as the country battles a fourth wave of covid there are fears it could be the worst yet. the bbc�*sjenny hill has been to the state of saxony which has the lowest vaccine take up in the country and the highest rate of infection. the relentless struggle against a persistent and brutal reality. this is intensive care at leipzig hospital, where the covid ward is filling up fast. the young woman in this bed had just given birth. her baby's fine,
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but doctors weren't sure if she would survive. there are 18 covid patients here — only four of them vaccinated. it's very difficult to get staff motivated to treat patients now in this fourth wave. a large part of the population still underestimate the problem, and everybody should have a friend, someone in their family who had covid infection in the past and therefore should realise what the problem could be for themselves, but nevertheless, we are still seeing so many patients that are not vaccinated. germany's anti—vaxxers are on furious form. 16 million germans over the age of 12 are still unvaccinated. this region, saxony, has the lowest vaccine uptake in the country and the highest rate of infection. the authorities here now restrict unvaccinated people. they're banned from restaurants,
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cinemas, football matches. this is discrimination, and we want to say vehemently we do not accept this in our society. they say the vaccination is ok, i should give it to my children. never! i have a feeling it should never go to my body, and i will fight all i can to prevent it coming into my body! the german government admits it's unlikely now to persuade these people to accept a vaccine, but it has a bigger problem — how to stop the voice of dissent growing into real social division. because what many fear is another lockdown. nadine's bar barely survived the last one. even before the authorities required it, she banned unvaccinated drinkers. my business is dying. my dreams came true, and now they suffer from people who do not do the logical thing to prevent others from getting ill or dying, and i am so angry!
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long queues at this vaccine centre — evidence perhaps that some have changed their minds, though germany is rolling out the boosterjab as well, nervous about waning protection. but on the ward, they fear the damage is done. 0perations have been cancelled, procedures postponed to make way for covid patients. doctors here warn the fourth wave could be the worst yet. they told us nearly half of the people who end up here will die, and for the country which invented one of the world's first covid vaccines, that is a source of great shame. jenny hill, bbc news. chinese president xijinping appears on his way to a third term under a vision of common prosperity and reducing inequality in china. this is the likely outcome of a gathering of the chinese communist party's central committee that ends on thursday with a "historical resolution" likely to be issued, only the third such time this has happened since the party was founded.
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for a look at what this may mean for governance in china over the next decade or so, i've been speaking to mattie bekink, head of the economist's corporate network's china strategy, to understand why this is a momentous event in china's political history. i asked her if a third resolution is likely to happen and what it will mean to xijinping and the party? well, to xijinping and the party? they think well, to xi jinping and the party? they think it's very likely well, they think it's very likely we will get the third resolution. it is the only public agenda item on the central committee meeting. we have had 370 members of china's political and military elite meeting in beijing since monday. we believe the resolution on history will suggest that xijinping resolution on history will suggest that xi jinping is indispensable, essentially a transformative leader on par tra nsformative leader on par with transformative leader on par with mao zedong and done shopping who has turned china into a global power by building
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on their legacies. although the content of the resolution will not be made public until it concludes, we expect they will be presented as essential preliminary phrases —— phases. mal represented as having help the chinese people to stand up after a century of humiliation by foreign powers, done shopping on a path to get wrench after centuries of poverty. now mr xi help them get strong. we think this will help thejudicious get strong. we think this will help the judicious leadership in managing social, economic, national security challenges and also meet this suggestion for the continuing need for his wisdom. as you noted, this is the third resolution in the party's 100 the third resolution in the party's100 year existence... (crosstalk). the ones in 1945 and 1985 word triumphs. so the ability of mr xi to secure one of his own suggest he has quelled any meaningful opposition to
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extending his role at a party congress that is slated to take lace in later 2022. it certainly _ lace in later 2022. it certainly seems that xi jinping is trying to make china great again, but how popular a leader is he, can we really say, given the tight control of media in china? it the tight control of media in china? , ., , china? it is an interesting question- _ china? it is an interesting question- i _ china? it is an interesting question. ithink- china? it is an interesting question. i think overall, | china? it is an interesting l question. ithink overall, if question. i think overall, if you look at some of the achievements that will surely be highlighted in the resolution of the party and in particular under mr xi's raw, the elimination and eradication of poverty, for example, i think there is a lot of support for that. think there is a lot of support forthat. i think there is a lot of support for that. i think there is a lot of pride in china having watched its remarkable growth from an agrarian economy to a global superpower in a couple of deckers. the party rightly takes credit for that. at the same time, we are seeing in the speed of regulatory and policy announcements of the past few months that china is shaping
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the society and economy wants having forward into this new era. it seems clear that the growth at all costs mentality of the get rich phase is over and policies will now be guided ijy and policies will now be guided by intervals of social fairness and national security, both of those are welcome, in particular, i believe the common prosperity campaign that you alluded to and also its focus on fostering china from within, thejewel focus on fostering china from within, the jewel circulation strategy, to make china's economy more resilient to shocks like the pandemic and trade disputes with america. you know, we don't have kind of public policy's and say whether people really love make china great again as opposed to make america great again, but overall china has been experiencing a lot of positive development under mr xi's leadership. development under mr xi's leadership-— development under mr xi's leadershi. ~ ,, ., leadership. mattie bekink there beains leadership. mattie bekink there begins with _ leadership. mattie bekink there begins with a — leadership. mattie bekink there begins with a little _ leadership. mattie bekink there begins with a little earlier. - begins with a little earlier. they want to bring you story now. toxic foam has covered parts
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of the yamuna river flowing through india's capital, delhi. the influx of toxic foam comes as hindu devotees bathe themselves in the yamuna to mark a religious festival to thank the sun for life on earth. the city government has blamed industrial waste and untreated pollutants from neighbouring haryana and uttar pradesh states for the pollution of the river. and now a very different story from what we typically have for you on newsday — away from the gloomy headlines — a heartwarming tale about a teacher who got a grand reward for good work. traditionally, an apple does the trick. but one teacher has picked up something more — a million dollar prize. this was the moment keishia thorpe found out she had just won the unesco—backed varkey foundation global teacher prize 2021 for her work teaching low—income immigrants. she gave her reaction to the bbc a little earlier. from the united states of america. (cheering). this was the moment she found out she had just one the unesco
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backed varkey foundation global teacher prize 2020 won her work teaching low income immigrants. she gave her reaction to bmc a little earlier. it she gave her reaction to bmc a little earlier.— little earlier. it feels amazing _ little earlier. it feels amazing and - little earlier. it feels amazing and it - little earlier. it feels - amazing and it validates the work that teachers put inside and outside the classroom every day. but students especially that a teacher, immigrants and refugee students are just like myself. i was an immigrant student as well in the us and i can see much of them, their stories really resemble my story. anai can relate to my student. because i'm able to relate to them and able to understand the struggles and understand the struggles and understand what their needs are, gives me an opportunity to work with them inside and outside the classroom and also with the community, the family, to create different opportunities for them and to make sure that they receive the resources they need to be successful individuals. what a
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lovely story — successful individuals. what a lovely story and _ successful individuals. what a lovely story and what - successful individuals. what a lovely story and what an - lovely story and what an inspirational teacher. that is all the time we have you on newsday at the sella. thanks for joining newsday at the sella. thanks forjoining us. from me and the team, stay with bbc news. hello. temperatures fell back closer to average again in scotland and northern ireland on wednesday. but milder air is coming back and the warm autumn continues because this week so far, 17 on monday was the high temperature. 17 again on tuesday. wednesday saw 16 degrees and there is another push of milder air approaching from the atlantic around an area of low pressure, which is also going to bring the chance of rain and some windier conditions for a day and a night, anyway. this how we start thursday morning. you will be quite chilly across parts of southern scotland, northern ireland in northern england. we will see some clear spells overnight, also the far north of scotland, so there is a touch of ground frost possible.
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this area of rain in scotland weakening with the cloud as it pushes its way northwards again. for england and wales that will be a lot of cloud, mist and murk to begin with, some fog patches, poor visibility, drizzly in places and we will see a spell of rain pushing through northern ireland, parts of wales, northwest england on toward self with scotland today is the day goes on with the fresh wind in the west. these are average speeds, some gusts of around 40 miles an hour developing on the western coasts by the end of the day. but with that, the milder air is coming back into belfast at 14 degrees. it will start to creep northwards across scotland once again with this area of rain. and as we go on through thursday night, there will be a few spells of rain running into northern ireland and scotland, northern england, wales and a few patches of rain just starting to push a little further east across england as a going to friday morning. it is a mild night, mild start to friday. let's take a look at that area of low pressure. looks to be working across scotland during friday but of course the weather from around it will be impacting all of the uk. doesn't mean to say we're all get to see a huge
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amount of rain. the further south you out to just be a few splashes here and there. closer to that low pressure system through northern ireland but especially central southern parts of scotland and england the chance of seeing the heavier dampers on friday for the early rain on the far north of mainland scotland the rest of the day looks dry. it's a blustery day across the uk again, it's another mild one of us up into the weekend this area of low pressure will move away quite quickly allowing high pressure to build in behind but that settles the weather down again. it will become mainly dry over the weekend, there will be a lot of cloud around, sunshine at a premium regardless though, we have a mild weekend on the way.
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this is bbc news. we will have the headlines and the main news stories for you at the top of the hour, straight after this programme.

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