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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  November 11, 2021 7:00pm-8:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm christian fraser live from cop26 in glasgow. as the climate summit enters its final hours — leaders warn more needs to be done to calls to accelerate talks on key issues. the announcements here in glasgow are encouraging, but they the announcements here in glasgow are encouraging, but they are the announcements here in glasgow are encouraging, but they are far from enough. the emissions remain a devastating threat. alok sharma said progress had been made, but a lot more needed to be done on most of the central issue. we are urging ambition and i have held meetings at quite a number of
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the negotiating groups and have been told by— the negotiating groups and have been told by groups and individual parties — told by groups and individual parties that they want to see ambition_ parties that they want to see ambition for the outcome of cop26. also in_ ambition for the outcome of cop26. also in the — ambition for the outcome of cop26. also in the programme... we are turning to south africa. fw deklerk, the last president to rule south africa under white minority rule — has died aged 85. he left this message for south africa hours before his death i. i, without qualification, apologise for it that pain and the hurt, and the indignity, and the damage that apartheid has done. the eu threatens to sanction airlines trafficking migrants to belarus. we'll have the latest from misnk. people waiting for taxis to travel to the border with poland. in our weekly in—depth look in one of the main stories in the news, we have taken on the case of mrs radcliffe and herfight forfreedom.
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hello and welcome to glasgow. it's the penultimate day of cop26. some of the decisions that have been made over the past few days have just been formally adopted. but negotiations will continue through the night, into tomorrow and possibly the weekend as 195 countries try to find compromise on some of the most contentious outstanding issues. unlike the last major climate conference, in paris in 2015, what emerges here will not be a new treaty, but a series of decisions and resolutions that build on the paris accord. the first draught of those agreed decisions was published yesterday but we won't get an updated version until friday. what we're waiting for is an update on the cover agreement — the endgame of the conference, urgent consultations with governments back home, checking the agreement line by line,
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assessing every word. the warnings about rising temperatures are clear, but national interests are at stake, so the talks go on. we are not there yet on the most critical issues. there is still a lot more work to be done. and cop26 is scheduled to close at the end of tomorrow. so, time is running out. we still have a monumental challenge ahead of us. there's been a boost from china, the world's biggest polluter, and america — the second biggest — that they will work together, the latest in a flurry of initiatives here, a plan to cut methane, a potent greenhouse gas, though some important countries aren't taking part. a promise to end deforestation by 2030. but we have heard this kind of thing before. and a call to end the use of coal — the dirtiest fossil fuel — but what matters is getting agreements that governments can't wriggle out of.
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so, in this final stretch, what are the big arguments that still need to be settled? well, the first is how often countries should update their plans for going green. some say that's needed every year. others say that's too often. then there is the fundamental question of cutting the gases that are heating the planet. they are still heading up, when the science couldn't be clearer that they've got to be falling fast. and then aid for the poorest nations. they were promised it more than a decade ago. it still hasn't been delivered. it's a relief that people are recognising that we need to help communities on the front lines of the climate crisis, but it's a frustration that rich governments aren't yet doing what it takes to help them out. even now? even now, they hear the sounds, they are putting fine words on paper, but no real mechanism to address this crisis. and as a reminder of what this is all about, torrential rain struck the indian city of chennai. floods spilling into a hospital.
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scientists have long warned that even more violent extremes are possible, but acting now could head them off. so some countries want to move away from fossil fuels entirely. the uk and many others say it's not the right time. another example of different perspectives in these last hours. david shukman, bbc news. asi as i said there, a lot has been decided, but there is more to discuss. we will take you into the key issues we heard about. but, here is the shadow business secretary and former leader of the labour party here in the uk. and inevitably at these cops you have these events. you have lots of hard negotiation at the end. i think taking a step back, we know what that task was for glasgow, which was to halve global emissions by 2030 to keep that critical 1.5 degrees alive,
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and we know we are miles short of that. so the question now is what can we salvage from this summit? and those areas are incredibly important. i'd add one other area to this, which is we are going to mandate countries to come back next year to do what they didn't do this year. the question is, on what basis are we mandating them to come back? are we urging them, which seems pretty weak to me, are we giving them a let out about whether they are aiming for 2 degrees or 1.5 degrees? or are we sending them a much clearer message, there's a big gap to 1.5 degrees, but you have got to come back and do better in a year's time. world leaders, you might recall agreed great idea that aims to halt and reverse global deforestation in the next decade. it's part of a multibillion—dollar package. the leaders of china, united states and crucially brazil committed to that declaration. but there has been criticism. isabella is the co—chair
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of the international resource panel and she is the former brazilian environment minister. here is her reaction to the plan that was announced.— reaction to the plan that was announced. , , . announced. during my term, i have the lowest — announced. during my term, i have the lowest rate _ announced. during my term, i have the lowest rate of— announced. during my term, i have the lowest rate of deforestation. i the lowest rate of deforestation. brazil knows how to tackle break neck deforestation from it doesn't make any sense that they can have deforestation back in brazil. brazil's population is around 90%, 90% of the society supports the end of deforestation. not only in the amazon region but in brazil. brazil doesn't need to draught date neck deforestation to have a powerful culture. it still doesn't need deforestation to promote regional development or national development. so this is an issue that must stay in the past. we meet to be organised. in the past. we meet to be organised-— in the past. we meet to be oruanised. �* , , ., , , ., organised. but they signed appear the other day. _ organised. but they signed appear the other day, brazil, _ organised. but they signed appear the other day, brazil, to _ organised. but they signed appear the other day, brazil, to its - the other day, brazil, to its agreement to be varies deforestation by 2030. that is $19 billion behind that plan. the very next day, brazilian senators came here and
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said, "that only applies to illegal logging, not legal logging." they were already unpacking the deal they signed the day before. the were already unpacking the deal they signed the day before.— signed the day before. the president of brazil is not _ signed the day before. the president of brazil is not willing _ signed the day before. the president of brazil is not willing to _ signed the day before. the president of brazil is not willing to address - of brazil is not willing to address the solutions on this. the proposed plan, based on the linear phasing out, that is not the dynamics of deforestation, how to tackle deforestation. we deforestation, how to tackle deforestation.— deforestation, how to tackle deforestation. ~ ., ~ ., deforestation. we will talk more about the lip _ deforestation. we will talk more about the lip service _ deforestation. we will talk more about the lip service leaders - deforestation. we will talk more about the lip service leaders are | about the lip service leaders are paying to some of these things that have been adopted in a second, but another key area in the discussions is finance. money to help reduce the emissions and adaptation to help countries cope with climate change. this could mean more solar panels in countries that depend on energy from coal, as well as flood defence systems. the second is loss and damage. 0ne one of the people involved in these talks we spoke with earlier about the wrangling of finance.
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how what we can ensure that the climate financing is enough. so the developed countries have assured that the 100 billion euros will be distributed to the climate finance every year, and now it's crucial whether it is really this promise can be kept in the next five years. of course, the distribution between adaptation and mitigation, and even adaptation i would say has the biggest emphasis at the conference this year than it has been before. let's dig into some more of this. katerina is head of research at carbon tracker. i noticed today you have a new database notes, actually, which is going to tell us more about the fossilfuel which is going to tell us more about the fossil fuel inventions that every country has. what do you hope comes from that?— comes from that? that's a pass appeal registry _ comes from that? that's a pass appeal registry and _ comes from that? that's a pass appeal registry and we - comes from that? that's a pass appeal registry and we think i comes from that? that's a pass | appeal registry and we think it's very, very important. it has almost a parallel like preparation treaty, but the important element of this is
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that as its own nest, the government and public need to know who owns which fossil fuel assets and ultimately where are they situated. we also then have the data, what are the economics of this? that will allow people to make a choice and a risk assessment of these assets, and when to go and leave the marketplace. in when to go and leave the marketplace.— when to go and leave the marketlace. , marketplace. in this document, there is a line which — marketplace. in this document, there is a line which says _ marketplace. in this document, there is a line which says we _ marketplace. in this document, there is a line which says we must - is a line which says we must urgently wind down and call of energy and also fossil fuel energy. in the last hour, we have just read that the european commission has signed 13 billion file areas of gas exploration projects which will be fast tracked and funded by the taxpayer, and yet they are in the air talking about reducing fossil fuel production.— air talking about reducing fossil fuel production. clearly, that is a contradiction. _ fuel production. clearly, that is a contradiction. gas _ fuel production. clearly, that is a contradiction. gas is _ fuel production. clearly, that is a contradiction. gas is no - fuel production. clearly, that is a contradiction. gas is no better. fuel production. clearly, that is a l contradiction. gas is no better than coal. you cannot substitute one fossil fuel with another. we as
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carbon tracker c gas as very risky. if you now go and explore and build up, you just build up new risk further down the line. [30 up, you just build up new risk further down the line.- further down the line. do we need $13 billion of new— further down the line. do we need $13 billion of new gas exploration | $13 billion of new gas exploration in europe? we $13 billion of new gas exploration in euroe? ~ . ., , in europe? we feel particularly euroe is in europe? we feel particularly europe is very _ in europe? we feel particularly europe is very well _ in europe? we feel particularly europe is very well ahead, - in europe? we feel particularly europe is very well ahead, and | in europe? we feel particularly i europe is very well ahead, and if in europe? we feel particularly - europe is very well ahead, and if we look at the comparison to renewables, renewables are now cheaper than gas. so clearly you can get by with renewables. we are basking by there are some system issues where you need some reliability, some back—up, well, that's a transitory and very marginal in its role. so that clearly seems overstated. there is a new alliance — clearly seems overstated. there is a new alliance such _ clearly seems overstated. there is a new alliance such as _ clearly seems overstated. there is a new alliance such as farm _ clearly seems overstated. there is a new alliance such as farm today - new alliance such as farm today beyond oil and gas alliance, denmark costa rica are driving at. then make the biggest oil producer in europe, and the uk hasn't signed up to it. the uk presidency hasn't signed up to it. how does that undermine what they are trying to get in the negotiating room? it is
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they are trying to get in the negotiating room?- they are trying to get in the negotiating room? it is a big count , negotiating room? it is a big country. quite _ negotiating room? it is a big country, quite clearly - negotiating room? it is a big country, quite clearly and i negotiating room? it is a big| country, quite clearly and it's negotiating room? it is a big i country, quite clearly and it's a big producing nation. that being said, quite often, we have seen similar things that the powering past call alliance. it started with other countries and other signed up later. so the hope would clearly be that the uk would join, and it acquires a similar dimension to the powering past call alliance, because it's a question of credibility as well. , ., ~ ., it's a question of credibility as well. ,., ~ ., ., ,., it's a question of credibility as well. ,., ~ ., ., ., �*, well. let you know about what's auoin on well. let you know about what's going on in _ well. let you know about what's going on in the _ well. let you know about what's going on in the negotiating - well. let you know about what's | going on in the negotiating room well. let you know about what's i going on in the negotiating room at the moment? 0ne going on in the negotiating room at the moment? one of the lines that stood out for me from that press conference was that there was one country leading a smaller group of countries that wanted to take out the entire section i bowed to mitigation, the entire section of everything that we have been doing here for the last two weeks. how big a fight as the uk presidency have here? . , ., ., ., , here? clearly there are various factions in _ here? clearly there are various factions in various _ here? clearly there are various factions in various things i here? clearly there are various factions in various things that i here? clearly there are various l factions in various things that we need to look at. if we look at article six and the entire space of carbon trading, it is very sensitive because on the one hand you don't
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want to flood the markets with new allowances, and the other hand to me want to allow the financing to come into the marketplace to allow developing countries to d carbon nice but the funds from rich countries.— nice but the funds from rich countries. . ., ., ., ,, ., countries. katerina, get to talk to ou. countries. katerina, get to talk to you- thank _ countries. katerina, get to talk to you- thank you — countries. katerina, get to talk to you. thank you very _ countries. katerina, get to talk to you. thank you very much for i you. thank you very much forjoining us. just looking at some pictures, but they are from the room just behind me here. this is the start of the closing ceremony for cop26, and yet there is so much still to do. but they are actually doing according to the uk presidency is formally announcing those easier things that have been negotiated, the non—contentious parts of the agreement, but, of course, so much more to agree before the hammer comes down tomorrow night. and we are still waiting and will be waiting to the early hours of the morning for that draught communique, an updated communique to see what is in there. south africa has been making ——
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south africa has been marking the death of fw deklerk, the last president to rule south africa under apartheid. for years as a minister in the national party he supported and defended the system of apartheid which stripped the majority black population of their rights. but as president — he ended it. this was 1992. fw deklerk being awarded the nobel peace prize, jointly with nelson mandela. they were recognised for one of the greatest political achievements of the 20th century — the largely peaceful transition in south africa from white rule, to a democracy everyone could vote. this was today. fw de klerk�*s body was taken by hearse from his home in a suburb of cape town. he had been diagnosed in march with cancer. here's the bbc�*s pumza philani on how news of his death has been greeted. this speaks to the heart of what is considered his legacy here. you have people that recognise the huge role that he played in the transition from apartheid to ushering in south africa's democracy when he agreed to participate in those really difficult negotiations with nelson mandela to help and apartheid. to help end apartheid.
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some people see that moment as a man who had foresight at a time where many people within his party, the national party, still wanted to hold on, believed that south africa still firmly belonged to the national party, and that black people should continue to live under the apartheid regime. and then on the other hand, you have people who say that he has at times been seen as somebody who is trying to reversion his role, that he was a product of the system. he was in parliament for many of those years that that the apartheid state brutally assaulted black south africans here, and that even towards the end, he continued to reign over that regime and did not take kindly to what they say with him not being accountable for what was done under his watch, even as he later said he rejected what was happening. that idea of a mixed legacy has been a thread throughout the tributes today. this is the president
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of south africa — cyril rampahosa. he was a leader of a party that was largely discredited in relation to the role that the national party played in enforcing apartheid. but he had the courage to step away from the path that his party that he led had embarked upon from 1948. and we will remember him for that. the uk prime minister borisjohson said... mangosuthu buthelezi, a key figure in the anti—apartheid struggle said... here's a different view from a commentator on twitter...
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the actress pearl thusi tweeted... this was the reaction of some people on the streets of johannesburg today. i thought he tried to do a lot of good, and he succeeded in helping to bring down apartheid. which was a good thing. and i think that's how he should be remembered. honestly, i feel no remorse he should be remembered. honestly, i feel no remors— feel no remorse even though a politician died, _ feel no remorse even though a politician died, i feel— feel no remorse even though a politician died, i feel like i feel no remorse even though a politician died, i feel like he i feel no remorse even though a politician died, i feel like he is| politician died, ifeel like he is gone — politician died, ifeel like he is gone and _ politician died, ifeel like he is gone and we can move forward in a way _ gone and we can move forward in a wa . ~ . ~' gone and we can move forward in a wa , ~ ., " ., gone and we can move forward in a wa. ., ~ ., ,, way. when inane like that comes up, we still think— way. when inane like that comes up, we still think about _ way. when inane like that comes up, we still think about how— way. when inane like that comes up, we still think about how it _ way. when inane like that comes up, we still think about how it was i way. when inane like that comes up, we still think about how it was when | we still think about how it was when apartheid _ we still think about how it was when apartheid was — we still think about how it was when apartheid was heavy— we still think about how it was when apartheid was heavy on _ we still think about how it was when apartheid was heavy on a _ we still think about how it was when apartheid was heavy on a black i we still think about how it was whenl apartheid was heavy on a black south africans so — apartheid was heavy on a black south africans. so those _
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apartheid was heavy on a black south africans. so those memories - apartheid was heavy on a black south africans. so those memories they i africans. so those memories they don't _ africans. so those memories they don't fade — africans. so those memories they don't fade away— africans. so those memories they don't fade away so _ africans. so those memories they don't fade away so easily. - after leaving office mr de klerk apologised repeatedly for apartheid. but some south africans thought those apologies fell short, in one instance at least. here's pumza philani again. what has again created a dot around that was an utterance that he made in an interview he had to the private broadcaster late last year where he refused to acknowledge that apartheid was a crime against humanity, even as the un had said that it counted under that category. he said that there were a far fewer deaths under the apartheid regime and felt that it would be inappropriate to equate it to things that would be looked at as genocide or criminal activity against humanity. after a bit of an uproar, he later apologised for what he described as "quibbling over the issue." the former president left a video message which was released as the news of his death was announced which referenced that controversy. in the video he said he wanted to apologise for apartheid again, as clearly as he could, for what he said was a "morally unjustifiable" system.
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i, without qualification, apologise for the pain, and the hurt, and the indignity and the damage that apartheid has done. allow me in this last message to share with you the fact that since the early '805, my views changed completely. it was as if i had a conversion. and in my heart of hearts, i realise that apartheid was wrong. let's turn to the latest in the conflict in ethiopia — between the government, and forces from tigray, an area in the north of the country. the ethiopian has said that ethiopian staff working for the united nations
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or the african union in the country will be punished for any lawbreaking. the current numbers that i have is at least nine un staff members are currently detained. we continue to work and engage with the government to secure their release. they've also, as we have also received reports that at least 70 people who had been contracted by the un to drive trucks have also been detained. they've been contracted by both the un and a number of international ngos. the security situation in the capital adis abeba continues to worsen. there's a state of emergency in the capital and the government ——the security situation in the capital adis abeba continues to worsen. there's a state of emergency in the capital and the government continues to round up tigrayans living there. but the bbc has heard more accounts of tigrayans who accuse the government of deliberately targeting and abducting them.
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for its part, the ethiopian government says it's carrying out the detentions that it suspects because it targets to supporting the process from the tigre region. let's speak to the international crisis group senior analyst for ethiopia who is live with us from nairobi. thank you very much for your time. what do you think the ethiopian government's motivation is that is a high—profile detentions of un staff? that is difficult to say, and if it's a broader pattern of sweeping arrests, particularly of people all
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of tigre and ethnicity here. we've seen state of emergency enacted last week that allowed the authorities to arrest anyone they suspected of any form of support, perceived support form of support, perceived support for the tigre process, also for another rebel group. so perhaps these arrests at the un start to fit in that pattern, but there's also been a pattern of bureaucratic impairments to the delivery of aid to tigre, which is creating incredibly serious humanitarian situation there, so perhaps it's also related to that.— situation there, so perhaps it's also related to that. how do you assess the _ also related to that. how do you assess the ethiopian's _ also related to that. how do you i assess the ethiopian's government use of the state of emergency? it seems to be a sweeping piece of legislation? it’s seems to be a sweeping piece of legislation?— legislation? it's hard to imagine somethin: legislation? it's hard to imagine something more _ legislation? it's hard to imagine something more sweeping i legislation? it's hard to imagine something more sweeping in i legislation? it's hard to imagine i something more sweeping in many ways, and indeed, it does seem to have had an effect, a real—life impact in terms of, as we head in your report, just simply arresting, detaining in a sin to grey and
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civilians at any real pretext, apparentlyjust because they are tigre and. so incredibly braying piece of legislation. i think the real uptake in anti—tigrayan speech. and directed towards tigrayan civilians as potential collaborators as the warehouse got closer and as the tigre forces have advanced. at the tigre forces have advanced. at the tigre forces have advanced. at the tigre process set to advance further, are we going to see increasing pressure against tigrayans and increasing violence as well. ., , ., ,, tigrayans and increasing violence as well. ., ,, ., tigrayans and increasing violence as well. ., ~ ., ., tigrayans and increasing violence as well. ., , ,, well. speaking about that pressure on the capital. _ well. speaking about that pressure on the capital, but _ well. speaking about that pressure on the capital, but is _ well. speaking about that pressure on the capital, but is your- on the capital, but is your assessment of how realistic it is for these rebels to push all the way to the capital? this for these rebels to push all the way to the capital?— to the capital? this is a grinding wire. i to the capital? this is a grinding wire- i don't _ to the capital? this is a grinding wire. i don't expect, _ to the capital? this is a grinding wire. i don't expect, the - to the capital? this is a grinding wire. i don't expect, the idea i to the capital? this is a grinding i wire. i don't expect, the idea that the rebels on the outskirts of the capital was fanciful. i don't think those —— i think those are liberation army fighters in rural
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areas, 50— 100 commoners from the capital. the tigrayan price as their last major advances to capture cities about 400 km from the capital. i think they are not really focusing on trying to take control of ethiopia's main trade routes that would allow them to exert significant economic pressure on the president, thus increasing their leverage. if we don't see any concessions from the federal government and the allies, then perhaps these allied rebel forces will keep pushing towards the capital. that would be the quickest in a matter of weeks, not days. william, thank you forjoining us. if you want more background on that conflict, you can of course get through the bbc news website. also if you follow bbc news on youtube, you will find a long sequence that we get an outside source about the background to that conflict between the tigre and forces forces and ethiopia. if you search for bbc news, ethiopia on youtube, you will easily find it. we
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will take a break for a couple of minutes. we will be looking at the fight for freedom fire miss ratcliff. hello. it's been a quiet day on the weather front today. cloudy and mild, little bits and pieces of rain here and there, but nothing more than that. how about tomorrow? a blustery day on the way, thanks to an area of low pressure that's approaching us right now, and you can see the low pressure here just to the west of our neighbourhood — and these orange colours indicate the warmth that's coming in from the south, so these low pressures often bring mild air from the southern climes, and the mild air is here to stay for the next few days. so here's the weather map for this evening — the lows just to the northwest of us, the rain's already approaching ireland, northern ireland, western scotland, you can see it here. and this is where most of the rain will fall over the next 24 hours. in the south, yes, some rain around through the course of the night, but really not an awful lot.
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now the temperatures first thing in the morning will be around 11 celsius across the west of the country, maybe 8—9 further east, so it's a mild start to friday. so the low pressure is around about here early in the morning and, basically, it'll cross the uk through the course of the morning and into the afternoon, bringing a spell of rain that will last maybe 2—3 hours in any one location — i think in the south, it's just a showery sort of day and not much rainfall at all. a few sunny spells, but generally a lot of cloud and again, that blustery wind, gusts of around 40—50 mph around some western areas, and you'll notice that wind further inland, as well. so that's friday evening — friday night, the low pressure moves across the uk out into the north sea, and then basically disintegrates — and in its place, a high pressure builds in from the south which is here to stay for the weekend. so the weekend's actually not looking bad at all. for most of us, not clear blue skies, there will be some cloud around, but let's call it sunny spells — a bit of a breeze
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on the north sea coast here out of the north, so that doesn't mean it might feel chilly on the north coast of norfolk there, around lincolnshire. but generally speaking, i think a mild day with temperatures above the average for the time of year. and not much change is expected into remembrance sunday — you can see from the weather icons, it's more or less the same across the board, so often cloudy with a few sunny spells. the really unsettled weather won't arrive until later on next week. bye— bye.
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i'm christian fraser. as the summit nears its end, everyone is warranted... nears its end, everyone is warranted. . ._ nears its end, everyone is warranted... ., ., . , warranted... the announcements here in glasaow warranted... the announcements here in glasgow are — warranted... the announcements here in glasgow are encouraging. _ warranted... the announcements here in glasgow are encouraging. but i warranted... the announcements here in glasgow are encouraging. but they l in glasgow are encouraging. but they are from enough. the mission remains are from enough. the mission remains a devastating threat. talks are from enough. the mission remains a devastating threat.— a devastating threat. talks in schedule to _ a devastating threat. talks in schedule to wrap _ a devastating threat. talks in schedule to wrap up - a devastating threat. talks in schedule to wrap up by i a devastating threat. talks in i schedule to wrap up by friday, the president warns negotiators face a monumental challenge to achieve success by them. we monumental challenge to achieve success by them.— success by them. we are urging ambition, _ success by them. we are urging ambition, and _ success by them. we are urging ambition, and i've _ success by them. we are urging ambition, and i've held - success by them. we are urging l ambition, and i've held meetings with quite — ambition, and i've held meetings with quite a number of the negotiating groups, and i have been told try—
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negotiating groups, and i have been told by groups, by individual parties — told by groups, by individual parties that they want to see ambition— parties that they want to see ambition in the outcome of cop26 support— ambition in the outcome of cop26 support on— ambition in the outcome of cop26 support on ros atkins here and be be seen _ support on ros atkins here and be be seen fw_ support on ros atkins here and be be seen fwto— support on ros atkins here and be be seen... fw to kirk has died at the a-e seen... fw to kirk has died at the age of— seen... fw to kirk has died at the age of 85~ — seen... fw to kirk has died at the age of 85. your south africa's last president— age of 85. your south africa's last president to rule under apartheid, and left _ president to rule under apartheid, and left this message after his death — and left this message after his death i; — and left this message after his death. ., ., .. ., death. i, without qualification, a oloaise death. i, without qualification, apologise for— death. i, without qualification, apologise for the _ death. i, without qualification, apologise for the pain - death. i, without qualification, apologise for the pain and i death. i, without qualification, j apologise for the pain and hurt death. i, without qualification, i apologise for the pain and hurt and the indignity, and the damage of apartheid. the the indignity, and the damage of a artheid. .,, ., the indignity, and the damage of a artheid. ., , ., ., the indignity, and the damage of aartheid. .,, ., ., , apartheid. the european union is threatening _ apartheid. the european union is threatening to _ apartheid. the european union is threatening to blacklist _ apartheid. the european union is threatening to blacklist airlines i apartheid. the european union is threatening to blacklist airlines itj threatening to blacklist airlines it says are trafficking migrants to belarus. as the bbc films queues of people waiting at minks to travel to the border in poland. and will take a in—depth look at the case of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, and her fight forfreedom.
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the row over the surge of migrants at the belarus—poland border is escalating. the european union is threatening to blacklist airlines it believes are trafficking migrants to misnk. while the belarussian president is threatening to cut off gas supplies to europe. about 2,000 migrants are stuck in freezing conditions in a forest between the two countries. we start with germany's acting foreign minister. translation: we will continue to fight against illegal human i trafficking by belarus. no one involved in this human trafficking should go unpunished. this is a message to transit countries, the countries of origin, and the airlines taking migrants to belarus. they must know that the european union is no longer willing to accept that. the migrants are stuck here on europe's eastern frontier — between poland, which is in the european union, and belarus — which isn't an eu member. there are also migrants at belarus' border with lithuania and latvia, two other eu countries. conditions on the polish border are dire. temperatures are freezing and many
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migrants are running out of food and water. 0vernight, poland said it found the bodies of seven migrants were found on its side of the border. belarus also reported deaths on its side. nick beake is on the border. well, this is one of many police checkpoints you see right along the poland—belarus border, where cars are being searched. just in the distance there, that is belarus, so people coming through are being subject to checks. in this exact spot — or specifically, just in the distance — is the place where polish authorities say in the past 24 hours, the biggest attempt to cross the border took place. apparently they detained 150 people — and we are hearing that between 2—4,000 people are still stuck in the area between the two countries, and lots of different places, it would seem.
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for months, tens of thousands of migrants have been trying to cross into this polish border town from belarus. the crisis reached a new level on monday, when videos showed hundreds of migrants heading there from another border town in belarus. he didn't mince his words, he said... that was made, injuly and august, lithuania saw 50 times more asylum—seekers in the whole of 2020, while in october poland record to make 17,000 attempts to illegally cross. in october, this bbc investigation uncovered a network of travel firms organising visas as a package deal. they used social media is a promise easy travel to belarus and a promise of health insurance and a promise of health insurance and a promise of health insurance and a hotel. alexander lukashenko denies claims he's sending people over the border in revenge for eu sanctions. and he's hit back at the eu with this threat. translation: we have increased the volumes of natural— gas pumped via belarus. the yamal—europe pipeline is full.
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we are heating europe, and they are threatening that they will close the border. and what if we block the supply of natural gas there? if they impose additional sanctions on us, indigestible and unacceptable for us, we must respond. well, the eu is now considering sanctions against airlines transporting migrants to minsk. one of the targets is aeroflot, russia's state airline. here's the kremlin on that prospect. translation: such hoaxes about possible sanctions. i let's consider suchl crazy ideas hoaxes. we've already seen the statement i by the company that it does notl provide migrant trafficking, - and minsk does not take part in it. moreover, even if some. flight companies do that, it does not violate any norms of international law. - waiting for taxis to take them to the polish border. will vernon is in
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the polish border. will vernon is in the city. we the polish border. will vernon is in the ci . ~ the polish border. will vernon is in theci .~ ., ., ,, the city. we saw large groups of mirrants the city. we saw large groups of migrants gather _ the city. we saw large groups of migrants gather here _ the city. we saw large groups of migrants gather here today i the city. we saw large groups of migrants gather here today in i the city. we saw large groups of. migrants gather here today in the centre of minks, waiting for transportation to the polish border. they want to go to europe, they want to cross in the poland, but they don't want to stay in poland, they want to go further into europe, they mentioned that the uk and france, the netherlands, many of them said they have relatives in europe. of course it's not clear what fate awaits them when they get to the border with poland, because as we know, there are several thousand migrants stuck on the belarussian side of the border with poland trying to cross polish forces not letting them through. but in spite of that, many of the migrants here were determined to push on and try to cross into europe. imilli. were determined to push on and try to cross into europe.— to cross into europe. will, did the miurants to cross into europe. will, did the migrants you _ to cross into europe. will, did the migrants you spoke _ to cross into europe. will, did the migrants you spoke to _ to cross into europe. will, did the migrants you spoke to have - to cross into europe. will, did the migrants you spoke to have an . migrants you spoke to have an explanation as to why they have flown to minks, or why they've come
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there? ~ ,~' flown to minks, or why they've come there? ~ , ., there? -- minsk? many mention ackaue there? -- minsk? many mention package deals. _ there? -- minsk? many mention package deals, the _ there? -- minsk? many mention package deals, the vast - there? -- minsk? many mention package deals, the vast majority\ there? -- minsk? many mention i package deals, the vast majority we spoke to were from a rask —— erect, they were sold a package deal for $3— they were sold a package deal for $3- 400, they were sold a package deal for $3— 400, they mentioned they were going through turkey, going through syria, and they said that once they got here they were told that they can make their way to europe and the border would be open and on guarded dash unguarded. in border would be open and on guarded dash unguarded.— dash unguarded. in the last couple da s, dash unguarded. in the last couple days. we've _ dash unguarded. in the last couple days, we've been _ dash unguarded. in the last couple days, we've been hearing - dash unguarded. in the last couple days, we've been hearing a - dash unguarded. in the last couple days, we've been hearing a lot - dash unguarded. in the last couple| days, we've been hearing a lot from the polish authorities saying they're using things like sms messages to try to communicate with migrants and say, do not come to our border, you won't come across. presumably the people you've been speaking to are aware of those messages — why are they not listening to them? messages - why are they not listening to them?— messages - why are they not listening to them? messages - why are they not listenin: to them? , ., ., ., ., listening to them? they are aware of the difficulties _ listening to them? they are aware of the difficulties they _ listening to them? they are aware of the difficulties they might _
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listening to them? they are aware of the difficulties they might face - listening to them? they are aware of the difficulties they might face at - the difficulties they might face at the difficulties they might face at the polish border, but these people they say are desperate and can't stay in belarus, none of them want to stay here and they say they can't go back to their home countries. so many were saying they have no choice. it's bitterly cold here now, many of them were not prepared for winter and did not have appropriate clothing, many with small children. but there is a real sense of hopelessness amongst them, and they still feel that even going and attempting what may seem like a hopeless endeavour is still better than the alternative. now, everyday of the conference has had a different theme — and today it is cities, regions and the built environment. it's a crucial part of this challenge we face. by 2050, 68% of us will live in a city.
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building and construction is responsible for 40% of global carbon emmissions. here's cristina gamboa is ceo of the world green building council. how we operate the current building stock. so from the operations of our current building stock, 28% of the emissions come from the energy use of our buildings. we use it very inefficiently, and we continue as the growth of the stock increases, we will continue to have more and more demand and energy, so that has to change. and the other is how we construct, how we don't care about carbon, everything about the process and materials going into buildings, that must change. we have to electrify buildings and our operation and d carbonised the whole. . ., . , operation and d carbonised the whole. _, . , , operation and d carbonised the whole. . , , whole. the concrete we use is carbon intensive, whole. the concrete we use is carbon intensive. and _ whole. the concrete we use is carbon intensive, and action _ whole. the concrete we use is carbon intensive, and action has _ whole. the concrete we use is carbon intensive, and action has a _ whole. the concrete we use is carbon intensive, and action has a lot - whole. the concrete we use is carbon intensive, and action has a lot of - intensive, and action has a lot of carbon in it. intensive, and action has a lot of carbon in it— carbon in it. exactly, and a lot of materials too. _ carbon in it. exactly, and a lot of materials too. in _ carbon in it. exactly, and a lot of materials too. in the _ carbon in it. exactly, and a lot of| materials too. in the performance carbon in it. exactly, and a lot of - materials too. in the performance of the building, we are not designing
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right and not future proofing our portfolios, and we are not accounting for carbon as we do with our financial sheets, and that needs to change. now, let's turn to south korea. it's one of the top ten emitters of carbon dioxide in the world. ahead of the conference, the country raised its greenhouse gas reduction goal from 26.3% to a0%, but it also wants to achieve carbon neutrality by 2030. professor yun sun—jin is the co—chairperson, south korean 2050 carbon neutrality commission. nice to have you with us. i was just looking, you've got i think does not coal plants that have just been finished, anotherfive coal plants that have just been finished, another five that are in the pipeline so to speak. how quickly can south korea diversify away from coal?— quickly can south korea diversify away from coal? quickly can south korea diversify awa from coal? �* . ., , ., ., away from coal? actually we have not determined it — away from coal? actually we have not determined it yet, _ away from coal? actually we have not determined it yet, but _ away from coal? actually we have not determined it yet, but may _ away from coal? actually we have not determined it yet, but may be - away from coal? actually we have not determined it yet, but may be our- determined it yet, but may be our president allows us, by 2050, we will close all coal—fired plants. as
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you mentioned, the differences from other developed countries, we have seven new coal—fired power plants. more than one gigawatt — we do not have a basis to close those coal plants, so our national assembly should prepare to close those coal plants as much as possible, and we need to have some social consensus on compensation. but we do not have that. , , w' on compensation. but we do not have that. , , ., ., on compensation. but we do not have that. ,, ., ., ., that. lets pick some of that apart. there is a recognition _ that. lets pick some of that apart. there is a recognition in _ that. lets pick some of that apart. there is a recognition in south - there is a recognition in south korea that you need to go faster and further. clearly the country is dependent on coal, but what you're saying is that people in south korea internally don't think it's realistic to transition that quickly without some form of compensation. is that what you are saying? yes. is that what you are saying? yes, but currently _ is that what you are saying? yes, but currently we _
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is that what you are saying? yes, but currently we have _ is that what you are saying? yes, but currently we have some - is that what you are saying? ia: but currently we have some social consensus — the importance and necessity of carbon neutrality by 2050. and if we have some legal basis, we can speed it up. our commission recommended the national assembly to have some laws... iulrich assembly to have some laws... which would mandate _ assembly to have some laws... which would mandate away _ assembly to have some laws... which would mandate away from _ assembly to have some laws... which would mandate away from coal? - assembly to have some laws... which would mandate away from coal? south korea is an enormous technological hub. i would korea is an enormous technological hub. iwould hope korea is an enormous technological hub. i would hope that south korea is leading in green technology, what are companies doing a man's dash doing in south korea? we are companies doing a man's dash doing in south korea?— are companies doing a man's dash doing in south korea? we have energy electricity storage _ doing in south korea? we have energy electricity storage systems _ doing in south korea? we have energy electricity storage systems - _ doing in south korea? we have energy electricity storage systems - three - electricity storage systems — three companies, such as samsung, lg and sk innovation, they are the top companies... 50 sk innovation, they are the top companies- - -— companies... so this is battery technology. — companies... so this is battery technology, batteries - companies... so this is battery technology, batteries that - companies... so this is battery| technology, batteries that each companies... so this is battery i technology, batteries that each of us might have in our homes going forward that store the electricity that comes from the grid? yes. what
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is the attitude _ that comes from the grid? iezs what is the attitude of people that comes from the grid? i23 what is the attitude of people in south korea? there is some interesting research here in britain today that 70% of people see climate change as the biggest issue now. how does it register with people and south korea? in register with people and south korea? ., ., , ~ korea? in south korea, people think climate change _ korea? in south korea, people think climate change is _ korea? in south korea, people think climate change is very _ korea? in south korea, people think climate change is very serious. - korea? in south korea, people think| climate change is very serious. when you have opinion polls, more than 90% of answers say that climate change is very serious. so we should respond to it. of the problem is, in my opinion, if they compare climate change issues with other social issues, the priority is not top. it goes down. so that is a problem. professor, thank you very much for being with us. it's very interesting, when you look at polling around the world, clearly there is an enormous enthusiasm to move quickly on the climate change issue, but you don't see that
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reflected here at the cop26 summit. there's a massive gulf between the tangible. there was more analysis done today that said if you put all the commitments that have been made so far together on methane, coal, and transport, you get 9% further on the pathway to keeping 1.5 celsius alive. just 9%. that's how much more we have to do. if you look at what the scientists are saying, what's being promised at the moment does not meet their expectations. but still, a few hours to go at cop26. in a few minutes will bring you our weekly in—depth analysis of one of the big stories in the news, this case it's nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and herfight case it's nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and her fight for case it's nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and herfight forfreedom.
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the ambulance service is coming under particular pressure. latest figures show the average response time for urgent calls like heart attacks and strokes is nearly defour minutes — the target is 18. sophie hutchinson reports. across the length and the breadth of the uk, ambulances are queueing, unable to hand over the sick and injured patients they have on board because hospitals have no room. and ambulances stuck in queues aren't available to attend other emergencies, leaving patients in need waiting at home. all 1a ambulance services in the uk have escalated to the highest level of alert and some have even gone beyond, like here at south central, which recently declared a critical incident when managers said the service had become unsafe. south central has now asked the government for military support. armed forces have helped ambulance
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services in other parts of england, wales and scotland, and have supported hospitals in northern ireland. we put extra funding income of £5.11 we put extra funding income of £5.4 billion— we put extra funding income of £5.4 billion for— we put extra funding income of £5.4 billion for this winter period, just to basically help of the processes, to basically help of the processes, to help _ to basically help of the processes, to help get extra staff in, and also to help get extra staff in, and also to help _ to help get extra staff in, and also to help more ambulance staff, but of course _ to help more ambulance staff, but of course of _ to help more ambulance staff, but of course of course it's difficult to do that — course of course it's difficult to do that at _ course of course it's difficult to do that at short notice. governments in all arts do that at short notice. governments in all parts of — do that at short notice. governments in all parts of the _ do that at short notice. governments in all parts of the uk _ do that at short notice. governments in all parts of the uk say _ do that at short notice. governments in all parts of the uk say they - do that at short notice. governments in all parts of the uk say they are - in all parts of the uk say they are aware of all the challenges and are doing their best to support ambulance services. but with winter coming, the pressure is likely to only get worse. sophie hutchinson, bbc news.
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this is outside source live from the bbc newsroom. 0ur lead story is... the work still goes on at cop26 in glasgow. this time we've looked at nazneen zagar a tehran and london are over 5,000 km apart. in tehran, the british—iranian aid worker nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has been detained since 2016. she's currently on parole and living with her parents, but a new prison term is looming. in london, her husband, richard, began a hunger strike in october and, camped outside the foreign office, he made these demands. she's held over some debt, money the british government owes the irradiance. dash owes the iranians.
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she won't come home until that gets paid, so that needs to be sorted. and they also need to be a lot tougher with iran on using innocent people as hostages. we will look at that debt, at iran's actions, too — which the us describe this way. it's a tool of statecraft. it's part of iran's foreign policy, to take people hostage who are innocent, and then trade them later for some objective that they think advances their own objectives. we'll assess the uk's actions, too. richard and nazanin's local mp wants more done. he has been promised over and over again that the government is doing everything they can. but he hasn't seen any sort of comprehensive plan, any sort of strategy to get his wife home. and he is getting increasingly frustrated. the uk government says it's doing all it can. what's not disputed is the personal cost that's been paid since march 2016. that's when nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe travel to iran. it was a holiday with her one—year—old daughter, gabriella, to visit family. but, as they went to leave, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was detained. gabriella was placed with her grandparents,
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and weeks later, richard ratcliffe described what happened next. so i had no contact for a very long time. she was kept in solitary confinement, but after 45 days, she was moved out of solitary confinement and was allowed to call her family. then prime minister, theresa may, called the iranian president to express concern at the detention of dual nationals, but iran doesn't recognise dual nationals. it sees them as iranians, and no one else's business. there were no releases. and a month after that call, this was the bbc headline: nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe had been jailed on secret charges to the outrage of her husband. why sent in someone for five years and then not say what you sentenced them for? you know, it'sjust crazy by any legal system. and it'sjust, you know, it's a punishment without a crime. no evidence had been presented, but iranian state tv reported nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe had been jailed for spying and a key figure in the uk's response to this was that then foreign secretary, borisjohnson, who said this at a parliamentary select committee in late 2017.
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you look at what nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was doing, just, you know, she was simply teaching people journalism, as i understand. a furore followed. days later, we heard from mrjohnson again. the uk government has no doubt that she was on holiday in iran when she was arrested last year, and that was the sole purpose of her visits. but despite this clarification, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was summoned to a court hearing. mrjohnson's comments were cited as proof that she had produced propaganda against the regime. that was in november 2017. the next month, borisjohnson went to iran and met the president, and there were demands from the hosts, as my colleague reported. the iranians want britain to repay a long—standing debt of around £400 million. a way to do that without breaching sanctions also looks closer. both sides say these issues are not
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linked to prisoner releases. at this point, neither side made the debt central to nazanin's case — and that debt wasn't paid, nor was she released. though in 2018, the iranians insisted they were trying. we are doing our best, in fact, to talk to ourjudiciary committee to use some of the provisions as humanitarian grounds to help her. for the uk and nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe's family, though, their best was far from getting out. —— farfrom —— far from good —— farfrom good enough. and a month after that interview, the situation was to shift again, thanks to donald trump. he took the us out of the 2015 nuclear deal, signed by iran, the uk and other world powers. the already—fragile relationship between iran and the west deteriorated and dialogue on all subjects, including nazanin became harder. two months later, in the summer of 2018, we got a stark reminder of how global tensions have profoundly personal consequences during a temporary release from prison, nazanin and her daughter were reunited. three days later, they
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would say goodbye again. and in the 2018, the iranians where once more asked about the case. i cannot interfere in the work of the judiciary because in iranian law, she is recognised only as an iranian citizen, and the judiciary is independent from the executive. this hinted at how nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is now part of a power struggle inside iran, as this academic explain. thejudiciary is in the hands of conservative hardliners. the foreign ministry and the irani government are the ones who have really tried to especially patch up the relationship at the uk. and while iranian politics played out, so did the uk's. in 2019, borisjohnson re—signed over brexit disagreements. his replacement as foreign secretary was jeremy hunt. he adopted a new approach, giving nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe diplomatic protection, which made this a formal dispute
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between the countries. richard ratcliffe welcomed the move — but nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe was not released. and later that year, the family he faced another devastating moment. their daughter, gabriella, moved back to the uk to go to school. as you can see, she attended a press conference with her dad, and as she returned, nazanin wrote an open letter that was smuggled out of prison... the iranian authorities were unmoved. by early 2020, the pandemic arrived, and nazanin had been given an ankle tag and temporarily moved to her parents�* house. and then in september last year, iran made its next move. nazanin faced new charges. no details or evidence were offered, but the consequence was clear, and sure enough, another sentence was imposed to the anger of the british government. iran is the one responsible for putting mrs zaghari—ratcliffe through this cruel and inhumane ordeal over
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the last five years, and it remains and then to release her. dash and it remains on them to release her. and the uk was explicit about how it's obvious. by now, the foreign secretary was dominic raab. is she being held a hostage? look, i think it's very difficult to argue against that characterisation. later on that day, there was another significant moment. as if to confirm that she is indeed a hostage, state—run television i in iran this afternoon reported i that she would be freed if the uk paid that £400 million debt. and the money iran wants dates back to the 19705, when the shah of iran ordered british tanks, but was then overthrown and many of the tanks weren't delivered. an international court ruled in 2009 that the uk owes £400 million. more recently, the uk had raised expectations that it would pay. this is the guardian in 2019 reporting that...
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now, certainly sanctions do make paying iran harder, but the us settled a similar debt in 2016, and the uk government currently led by borisjohnson resists connecting nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and the money. the incarceration of british dual nationals, including nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe and others is a completely separate issue. the farmer foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, agrees with that, but argues that's precisely the reason to pay. but the uk has not paid in, and the government, while saying it's doing all it can, says responsibility for nazanin's release lies that iran alone. all of which brings us to the point which has been reached — with a mother facing prison again into iran, her daughter living thousands of miles away, a father not eating for weeks.
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in iran, there is a new, more hard—line president with his own agenda to pursue, and there are new efforts to revive the iran nuclear deal and to reset how iran and the west interact, which is why nazanin's fate is tangled up in iran's place in the world. the route out is complex, but diplomacy often is. and afterfive years, the uk hasn't found a way through this. and while these two countries manoeuvre around the world stage, years of family life are being lost. hello. it's been a quiet day on the weather front today. cloudy and mild, little bits and pieces of rain here and there, but nothing more than that. how about tomorrow? a blustery day on the way, thanks to an area of low pressure that's approaching us right now, and you can see the low pressure here just to the west of our neighbourhood — and these orange colours indicate the warmth that's coming in from the south, so these low pressures often bring mild air from the southern climes, and the mild air is here to stay for the next few days.
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so here's the weather map for this evening — the lows just to the northwest of us, the rain's already approaching ireland, northern ireland, western scotland, you can see it here. and this is where most of the rain will fall over the next 24 hours. in the south, yes, some rain around through the course of the night, but really not an awful lot. now the temperatures first thing in the morning will be around 11 celsius across the west of the country, maybe 8—9 further east, so it's a mild start to friday. so the low pressure is around about here early in the morning and, basically, it'll cross the uk through the course of the morning and into the afternoon, bringing a spell of rain that will last maybe 2—3 hours in any one location — i think in the south, it's just a showery sort of day and not much rainfall at all. a few sunny spells, but generally a lot of cloud and again, that blustery wind, gusts of around 40—50 mph around some western areas, and you'll notice that wind further inland, as well. so that's friday evening — friday night, the low pressure
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moves across the uk out into the north sea, and then basicallyjust disintegrates — and in its place, a high pressure builds in from the south, which is here to stay for the weekend. so the weekend's actually not looking bad at all. for most of us, not clear blue skies, there will be some cloud around, but let's call it sunny spells — a bit of a breeze on the north sea coast here out of the north, so that does mean it might feel chilly on the north coast of norfolk there, around lincolnshire. but, generally speaking, i think a mild day with temperatures above the average for the time of year. and not much change is expected into remembrance sunday — you can see from the weather icons, it's more or less the same across the board, so often cloudy with a few sunny spells. the really unsettled weather won't arrive until later on next week. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines. nhs leaders warn that the strain on the health service this winter is unsustainable with growing waits for ambulances. things are already very difficult in the health service, it is compromising patient safety, it is compromising quality of service. more turmoil at yorkshire cricket club over azeem rafiq's racism allegations england'sjoe root speaks out and another boss resigns. the head of the united nations describes tackling climate change as the world's most important fight, as he urges nations at the cop26 summit not to make hollow promises. the queen will attend a remembrance service at the cenotaph on sunday as the uk falls silent to mark armisitice day.

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