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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 12, 2021 7:00pm-7:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 7pm... negotiations go into overtime at the cop26 climate summit in glasgow, with a draught deal but no final agreement on how countries will tackle rising global temperatures. climate activists pile on the pressure, while the president of the summit calls for one last push to reach a deal. we have come a long way over the past two weeks. and now, we need that final injection of that can—do spirit which is present at this cop so that we get this shared endeavour over the line. delegates from the most vulnerable island nations say success in glasgow is a matter of life and death. our safety, the safety-
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of my children and yours, hangs in the balance. this will be the decade i that determines the rest of human history. we cannot let it slip by. the wildfires blamed on climate change that raged this summer in california. we report from one town that was engulfed in flames. and coming up in half an hour — foreign correspondents based in london give an outsider�*s view of events in the uk in dateline. good evening. let's cross to my colleague christian fraser.
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a warm welcome to glasgow, i'm continuing coverage of cop26, it is 7pm here and the gavel should have come down on the summit an hour ago but it hasn't, because we don't yet have an agreement. in the last few hours, the presidency told us that a third draught of the text will be published this evening followed by a further stock take among the parties to see where we are. with the expectation that the negotiations will continue long into the night. that said, the closing sermon he has resumed, it started in part yesterday to formally accept those parts of the text on which there is consensus. david shackman has the latest. on was meant to be the last day, demonstrators lay down at the gates of cop26 to ram home the point that lives are being lost because of climate change. appeals for action came in the conference halls as well. activists calling on
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governments not to water down key points in the agreement. a plea echoed by the most vulnerable nations. , , ., nations. our safety, the safety of my children. _ nations. our safety, the safety of my children, and _ nations. our safety, the safety of my children, and yours _ nations. our safety, the safety of my children, and yours hangs - nations. our safety, the safety of my children, and yours hangs in i nations. our safety, the safety of i my children, and yours hangs in the balance. as i said to the high ambition coalition this morning, it's time for us to level up. this will be the decade that determines the rest of human history. we cannot let it slip by. but the rest of human history. we cannot let it slip bar-— let it slip by. but some disputes are proving _ let it slip by. but some disputes are proving really _ let it slip by. but some disputes are proving really difficult - let it slip by. but some disputes are proving really difficult to - are proving really difficult to settle. over coal, and what to say about phasing it out. how often countries should update their climate plans? every year, to reflect the urgency, or less often? and how much climate aid to give the poorest nations notjust now, but over the coming decades? the whole point of these talks was to try to limit the rising global temperatures — so how's that going? compared to preindustrial times, we've warmed by
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at least 1.1 celsius, and record heat waves are already becoming more frequent. above 1.5 celsius, many coral reefs are expected to die off among a long list of other impacts. if everybody here keeps to the promises they've given, a big if, we are still on course for about 1.8 celsius — that means even higher sea levels and even more people threatened by flooding. but being realistic, as things stand, the more likely outcome is 2.4 celsius — which means even longer droughts, affected food production across vast areas of the planet. so i asked america's veteran climate envoyjohn kerry, would any of this slow down global warming? 50 kerry, would any of this slow down global warming?— kerry, would any of this slow down global warming? globalwarming? so we are moving in the riaht globalwarming? so we are moving in the right direction, _ globalwarming? so we are moving in the right direction, but _ globalwarming? so we are moving in the right direction, but are _ globalwarming? so we are moving in the right direction, but are we - the right direction, but are we moving fast enough? no — but that's what this meeting is about. scientist never said, "you have to have this done by the end of cop."
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they said it was incredibly urgent. it is incredibly urgent, and that's exactly why exactly 65% of global gdp have said we are going to keep 1.5 celsius alive.— 1.5 celsius alive. meanwhile as ha: calin 1.5 celsius alive. meanwhile as haggling continues, _ 1.5 celsius alive. meanwhile as haggling continues, the - 1.5 celsius alive. meanwhile as - haggling continues, the conference chair made another plea for agreement. chair made another plea for agreement-— chair made another plea for aareement. ., ., ., agreement. now we need that final in'ection of agreement. now we need that final injection of that _ agreement. now we need that final injection of that can _ agreement. now we need that final injection of that can do _ agreement. now we need that final injection of that can do spirit - injection of that can do spirit which — injection of that can do spirit which is _ injection of that can do spirit which is present at this cop so that we get _ which is present at this cop so that we get this— which is present at this cop so that we get this shared endeavour over the line _ we get this shared endeavour over the line. but we get this shared endeavour over the line. �* ., ., , ., hih, the line. but emotions are running hiuh, and the line. but emotions are running high. and many — the line. but emotions are running high, and many delegations - the line. but emotions are running high, and many delegations are i high, and many delegations are worried. so high, and many delegations are worried. ., , ' , ., , worried. so for us, 1.5 is not 'ust a statistic. — worried. so for us, 1.5 is not 'ust a statistic. it fl worried. so for us, 1.5 is not 'ust a statistic. it is i worried. so for us, 1.5 is not 'ust a statistic. it is a i worried. so for us, 1.5 is not 'ust a statistic. it is a matter i worried. so for us, 1.5 is not 'ust a statistic. it is a matter of h worried. so for us, 1.5 is notjust a statistic. it is a matter of life i a statistic. it is a matter of life and death _ a statistic. it is a matter of life and death-— a statistic. it is a matter of life and death. ., ., , , ., and death. some amongst us are wastint and death. some amongst us are wasting precious _ and death. some amongst us are wasting precious time _ and death. some amongst us are wasting precious time in - and death. some amongst us are wasting precious time in glasgow attempting to renegotiate what was already agreed. mil attempting to renegotiate what was already agreed-— attempting to renegotiate what was already agreed. all we're asking you to do is to keep _ already agreed. all we're asking you to do is to keep your _ already agreed. all we're asking you to do is to keep your promises - already agreed. all we're asking you to do is to keep your promises all i to do is to keep your promises all your— to do is to keep your promises all your responsibilities in setting this crisis— your responsibilities in setting this crisis in motion. nothing less, nothing _ this crisis in motion. nothing less, nothing more. a this crisis in motion. nothing less, nothing more-— nothing more. a long night of negotiations _ nothing more. a long night of negotiations lies _ nothing more. a long night of
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negotiations lies ahead. - nothing more. a long night of. negotiations lies ahead. hopes nothing more. a long night of- negotiations lies ahead. hopes of concluding on time are fading. with me is the co—founder and ceo of e3 g. those closest to alok sharma said on wednesday that he'd set the bar quite high, expecting that things would be taken out of it. but as it turns out, looking at what's come later today, turns out, looking at what's come latertoday, i'm turns out, looking at what's come later today, i'm not sure it was the ceiling, maybe it was the floor? that's actually why we haven't finished, it's not because things are going badly, but because things are going badly, but because things are going badly, but because things are going much better—than—expected. we've seen a bit of what people would call the paris magic, or the cop magic, where delegates start to play off the mood of the room, off the protesters in the middle of the conference, and start to say that this is a really important problem, let's build up ambition and the text. and those who want to stop it just don't feel they can in the room. f just don't feel they can in the room. j , ., ., room. they'll steam-roll it? steam-roll _ room. they'll steam-roll it? steam-roll it _ room. they'll steam-roll it? steam-roll it in _ room. they'll steam-roll it? steam-roll it in a _ room. they'll steam-roll it? steam-roll it in a lovely - room. they'll steam-roll it? | steam-roll it in a lovely way.
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room. they'll steam-roll it? - steam-roll it in a lovely way. when steam—roll it in a lovely way. when we look at the tax, the vast majority of comments were about strengthening it, including more elements. it'll take a longer time to pull together and there are serious areas of disagreement, but if you'd given the uk this outcome at this .2 weeks ago, they'll have bitten your hand off for it.- bitten your hand off for it. that's really interesting, _ bitten your hand off for it. that's really interesting, i— bitten your hand off for it. that's really interesting, i know- bitten your hand off for it. that's really interesting, i know you're | really interesting, i know you're the pragmatist in the room, but we've been asking the question today whether the text has been watered down, the references to coal and fossil fuels are strong enough you think there's been a real movement in this text?— in this text? there's been real movement _ in this text? there's been real movement from _ in this text? there's been real movement from what - in this text? there's been real| movement from what everyone inspected coming in. we are arguing over the next stage of the journey anyway, there's lots more to do in mitigation but we will come back and, as an emergency, we will keep on going till we get there. but now we are talking about lots of damage, how do we help people who are damaged by climate change whatever we do on medication? that was a taboo subject only a few years ago,
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now it's the centrepiece. poorer countries say their suffering this damage today, what will you do to help us? damage today, what will you do to hel- us? ~ �* , damage today, what will you do to hel- us? . �* , ., . damage today, what will you do to hel-us? �* , g , help us? we've been watching justin re ttortin help us? we've been watching justin reporting from _ help us? we've been watching justin reporting from california _ help us? we've been watching justin reporting from california where - help us? we've been watching justin reporting from california where it. reporting from california where it looks like armageddon in greenville, california, similar pictures in china with the flooding, germany have had similar scenes — do you think coming into this summit there was a fairwind think coming into this summit there was a fair wind behind the leaders because they experienced this? do they look at what they'll have to spendin they look at what they'll have to spend in their own countries and think maybe there's a cheaper and better solution?— better solution? yes, and that talkint better solution? yes, and that talking the _ better solution? yes, and that talking the diplomats - better solution? yes, and that talking the diplomats has - better solution? yes, and that l talking the diplomats has really come across. i was under a german diplomat who is saying they're spending 30 billion on one flood eventin spending 30 billion on one flood event in germany, and it makes what we are spending here in proportion to the huge damages people are facing, it's made them realise to tie the mitigation, but we really can't hold out from helping out the poorest countries. again, this is more the beginning of the journey,
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not the end, the americans still have big problems, the japanese have bigger problems, to a lesser extent the europeans. that's what they're fighting about — but nobody says these are life and death issues for these are life and death issues for the summit, but they are tough issues that welds defined the next 5-10 issues that welds defined the next 5—10 years of work. do issues that welds defined the next 5-10 years of work.— 5-10 years of work. do you think that was behind _ 5-10 years of work. do you think that was behind the _ 5-10 years of work. do you think that was behind the declaration | 5-10 years of work. do you think- that was behind the declaration that the us and china signed earlier in the us and china signed earlier in the week, which titled declaration of enhancement of climate change in 0f enhancement of climate change in the 20 twenties? is there some working out in china that forces them to the table? i working out in china that forces them to the table?— them to the table? i think the chinese realise _ them to the table? i think the chinese realise they _ them to the table? i think the chinese realise they are - them to the table? i think the - chinese realise they are massively at risk of climate change, they are at risk of climate change, they are a desolate country. haifa at risk of climate change, they are a desolate country. how vulnerable? one of those — a desolate country. how vulnerable? one of those areas... _ a desolate country. how vulnerable? one of those areas... we _ a desolate country. how vulnerable? one of those areas... we are - a desolate country. how vulnerable? one of those areas... we are talking j one of those areas... we are talking in the multiple trillions of a very large economy. but something that makes the economic managers of that
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country very worried. and looking at the lack of resilience they've got on their own and restructure, they built a whole country in 20 years, none of it is climate resilient but it's all brand—new. that's why they are vulnerable. these are the things underlying the changes of position, also geopolitics, but also the fact that you can't stay or another country in the face and say "i won't support your existence, i won't deal with the damage." that's why we always said face—to—face talks are important, leaderto always said face—to—face talks are important, leader to leader talks are important, because people think this is some sort of arcane, faceless bureaucrats. it's very human, very a notional —— emotional. it's all about making people not think of them as countries or civil servants, but humans, because only as humans together will be get out of this mess which we inadvertently put ourselves in, but how to think
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their way out of.— put ourselves in, but how to think l their way out of._ deal their way out of. deal tonight? deal earl in their way out of. deal tonight? deal early in the — their way out of. deal tonight? deal early in the morning, _ their way out of. deal tonight? deal early in the morning, text _ their way out of. deal tonight? deal early in the morning, text by - early in the morning, text by midday, i'd say.— early in the morning, text by midday, i'd say. early in the morning, text by midda , i'd sa . �* ., midday, i'd say. always good to get our midday, i'd say. always good to get your thoughts. _ midday, i'd say. always good to get your thoughts, thank _ midday, i'd say. always good to get your thoughts, thank you _ midday, i'd say. always good to get your thoughts, thank you for - midday, i'd say. always good to get your thoughts, thank you for that. l your thoughts, thank you for that. tina stages the climate envoy for the marshall islands, one of the countries most vulnerable to climate change. this interview will give you an impression of what's going on in the back room. we an impression of what's going on in the back room.— an impression of what's going on in the back room. we are a very small but very focused _ the back room. we are a very small but very focused team, _ the back room. we are a very small but very focused team, we - the back room. we are a very small but very focused team, we had - but very focused team, we had our plans in place. it was wonderful that my minister was leading our delegation up until yesterday when he had to leave with a few other members of the delegation to start quarantining before going back home to the islands. but he left us here, he put some wind in our sales and we just have to finish the race. 50 just have to finish the race. so this morning, on the outstanding issues of the text, the high ambition coalition came together which the marshall islands chairs — did you tear it? i which the marshall islands chairs -
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did you tear it?— did you tear it? i chaired the meeting- — did you tear it? i chaired the meeting. with _ did you tear it? i chaired the meeting. with john - did you tear it? i chaired the meeting. with john kerry . did you tear it? i chaired the | meeting. with john kerry and did you tear it? i chaired the - meeting. with john kerry and ursula of underlying? _ meeting. with john kerry and ursula of underlying? how _ meeting. with john kerry and ursula of underlying? how was _ meeting. with john kerry and ursula of underlying? how was that? - meeting. with john kerry and ursula of underlying? how was that? it - meeting. with john kerry and ursula of underlying? how was that? it was a bit of underlying? how was that? it was a big meeting- _ of underlying? how was that? it was a big meeting. we _ of underlying? how was that? it was a big meeting. we had _ of underlying? how was that? it was a big meeting. we had a _ of underlying? how was that? it was a big meeting. we had a lot - of underlying? how was that? it was a big meeting. we had a lot of - of underlying? how was that? it was a big meeting. we had a lot of our i a big meeting. we had a lot of our members, all those who signed on to the members to make a leaders statement we signed last week. we had great representation from my island brothers and sisters, palau was there, micronesia. we had the chairs of the ldc group, costa rica and others. it is a very diverse group of countries, small countries, big countries, wealthy countries, poor countries— but the line that connects us all together is that we are for ambition and an ambitious outcome at this cop. so are for ambition and an ambitious outcome at this cop.— are for ambition and an ambitious outcome at this cop. so where did outcome at this cop. so where did ou start outcome at this cop. so where did you start this _ outcome at this cop. so where did you start this process _ outcome at this cop. so where did you start this process when - outcome at this cop. so where did you start this process when he - outcome at this cop. so where did l you start this process when he went to the meeting, and where do you think you are now when it comes to finance, which i know is crucialfor the island states? finance, which i know is crucial for the island states?—
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the island states? well, we really started this _ the island states? well, we really started this process _ the island states? well, we really started this process back - the island states? well, we really started this process back in - the island states? well, we really started this process back in july. | started this process back injuly. we've been meeting with partners in that group since then at various ministerial meetings, and now it's the crunch time. we put out this leaders statement signed by presidentjoe biden, the president of palau and other leaders that set the bar last week for what ambition needs to look like at this cop, how it needs to cover all pillars of the paris agreement, mitigation, adaptation and finance, including language on loss and damage. it's now a matter of building on that statement. we see much of that reflected in the current text. we talked about areas that it needs to be strengthened further. mar; talked about areas that it needs to be strengthened further.— talked about areas that it needs to l be strengthened further.- it be strengthened further. way or? it definitely needs _ be strengthened further. way or? it definitely needs to _ be strengthened further. way or? it definitely needs to be _ be strengthened further. way or? it definitely needs to be strengthenedj definitely needs to be strengthened on loss and damage. 50 definitely needs to be strengthened on loss and damage.— on loss and damage. so what is the lanttuae on loss and damage. so what is the language of— on loss and damage. so what is the language of the _ on loss and damage. so what is the language of the moment? - on loss and damage. so what is the language of the moment? at - on loss and damage. so what is the language of the moment? at the i language of the moment? at the moment there _
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language of the moment? at the moment there is _ language of the moment? at the moment there is a _ language of the moment? at the moment there is a reference - language of the moment? at the moment there is a reference to l language of the moment? at thej moment there is a reference to a workshop — that's just simply not enough. we need a process, a programme, something that consistently allows development of this issue. she consistently allows development of this issue. ,, ., ., this issue. she told me that the negotiation _ this issue. she told me that the negotiation changes _ this issue. she told me that the negotiation changes minute - this issue. she told me that the negotiation changes minute to l this issue. she told me that the - negotiation changes minute to minute and she doesn't know what she's doing from one minute to the next, really. the interesting thing she told me before she left was that it's notjust a hard deadline tonight, which passed at six p.m., it's also the fact that many of them have strict quarantine rules at home and a lot of them have to leave tomorrow. so there's also a real—life deadline as well, which comes some way through the period tomorrow. and if they have to leave, there isn't a quorum, all 195 countries you have to agree to the text, they have to all agree. that's the pressure this evening and why it will go long into the night. you're watching bbc news. christian fraser and his team there live for us at
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cop26, they'll be with us again during the course of tonight. around 1,200 people crossed the channel by boat yesterday to reach the uk. it's a new record for migant crossings in a single day. more than 23,000 people have made the crossing from france to the uk by boat so far this year — nearly three times the number crossing in 2020. with more, here's our home editor mark easton. it was a day the uk lost control of its border, 1,200 arrivals in 24 hours up the gang plank of what they call tug haven in dover, and into a hired marquee for processing. but the home office won't expecting numbers anything like that, and the border force. officers just couldn't cope. conditions in the tent last night were described by one official as a humanitarian crisis with 1000 people traumatised, vulnerable, and desperate, including, i am told, at least one pregnant woman, forced to sleep on the floor. cooking, washing, and toilet facilities have proved totally inadequate for the demand over the last week. these migrants appear to be complaining they haven't
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had enough to eat. we have hundreds of people sleeping on a concrete floor overnight. there is limited sanitary facilities. there is no way to get them hot food. it was never designed to be used in the way it is now, but there is no way to move these folk onto their next destination. the entire system is broken from end to end. the home office had expected the numbers making the perilous journey across the channel would fall in the autumn, but calm and mild conditions have actually seen record numbers attempt to reach the kent coast in small vessels. yesterday, french authorities stopped seven boats but 33 reached uk waters despite a government commitment last year to make the route unviable. we've been working very hard with france over the last few years, and the french have stopped over 18,000 attempted crosses so far this year. but the numbers speak for themselves, it is disappointing and shocking just how many migrants have managed to cross the channel this week alone. data obtained by the refugee council
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shows that in the 17 months to may this year, 70% of the 12,000 people arriving in small boats came from five countries. over 3000 from iran, 2000 from iraq, and around 1000 each from sudan, syria, and vietnam. full details will be published in a report next week. but analysis of people crossing the channel suggests more than 60% will be given refugee status by the home office after their initial assessment. our analysis shows they are people fleeing war, persecution, and terror. they want to come to the uk because they are able to speak some english, they might have a connection through their networks to the uk through family, and they simply want to get on, rebuild their lives, and make a contribution to our economy and our society in the future. the weather has been worse today, with few migrants crossing a relief to the border force who have been working around the clock to clear the backlog of hundreds of exhausted and desperate people. mark easton, bbc news, dover.
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there has been a surge of new coronavirus infections we seem to have frozen, so i'll move to the story. there has been a surge of new coronavirus infections across some parts europe. tonight, the netherlands has announced it's bringing back some tough restrictions. 0ur health editor hugh pym reports. people in the netherlands enjoying what might be their last evening out before restrictions being put in place. the dutch government's response to rising qovu infections and pressure on hospitals. intensive care unit in austria are also under strain. the government is set to announce restrictions on those who haven't been jabbed with one of the lowest vaccination rates in europe. uk covid cases relative to the population have fallen back but the netherlands, austria, and some other european countries have seen steep increases. germany is particularly concerning. the number of cases has gone through the roof. it is major.
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and the vaccination rate aren't fantastic. the prime minister sounded a cautionary note about the implications of case increases across europe. i am seeing the storm clouds gathering over parts of the european continent. i've got to be absolutely frank with people, we've been here before, we remember what happens when the wave starts rolling in. ministers are pushing hard the message that people should get booster jabs as soon as they are eligible, the hope is that will help slow the spread of covid. the latest 0ns survey suggests last week in the uk nearly 1.1 million people had the virus. that was down on the previous week. in england it was one in 60 people and in wales won in 45 and both case rates were falling. in northern ireland, with one in 75, and scotland won in 85, the trend was less clear.
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infections among 11—16—year—olds had been rising the fastest, but in england last week they fell back as they did amongst younger children. in other age groups, there wasn't much change. the school half term could have been a factor, and the prime minister said it wasn't clear the drift downwards would continue. hugh pym, bbc news. there were 40,375 new infections recorded in the latest 24—hour period, so an average of 35,507 cases reported per day in the last week. 8,652 people were in hospital with covid yesterday. there were 145 deaths, that's people who died within 28 days of a positive test, which means the average number of deaths over the past seven days was 156. the total number of people who have died with covid now stands at 142,678.
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87.8% of people aged 12 and over have now received a first dose and 79.9% have been double vaccinated. more than 11.8 million people have received their booster. it's interesting that governments are giving us that figure, and number, not a percentage, which i'd be interested to know what percentages have received the booster. we will pursue that and see if we can deliver an answer. 0ver her strained relationship with her father. that's what has been revealed in text messages released today at the high court, david cilento has been sifting through those text messages. what do we gather from this new material that's all part of the legal action that the duchess has been involved with? it is a long, ongoing case all about a letter written in april 2018 between the duchess of sussex and
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her estranged father, thomas markel. she was very upset, when pieces of it were posted. it is also revealed why that letter was written, the background of it — it has rather pulled back the curtain a little on the royal household, showing what happened in those months after the wedding. these are text messages between her and her press secretary — and she talks about the difficulties there were in the weeks leading up to writing this letter. she said there had been criticisms from thomas markel, criticising the royal family, from thomas markel, criticising the royalfamily, and the royalfamily were concerned about it. she said they were constantly having to explain why she couldn't simply go and visit herfather, explain why she couldn't simply go and visit her father, and she said they were constantly asking demographics by the royalfamily, couldn't you just go and do this? she said the catalyst was seeing how much this was causing h, and her
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words, and by taking this action, she was protecting her action from what she calls a constant parading and also, while unlikely, it'll perhaps give my father a bit of pause. perhaps give my father a bit of tause. , ., , ., pause. david, we should pause to reflect on that, _ pause. david, we should pause to reflect on that, this _ pause. david, we should pause to reflect on that, this case - pause. david, we should pause to reflect on that, this case will- pause. david, we should pause to reflect on that, this case will go l reflect on that, this case will go on for quite some time. let's join holly hamilton at the bbc sport centre. good evening. in the last hour, scotland have confirmed their place in the world cup play—offs with a 2—0 win away to moldova. the scots survived some early pressure from the moldovans but went ahead after half an hour with nathan patterson's first goal for his country. scotland dominated the second half, and che adams doubled their lead with an hour gone. moldova looked to be back in the match with a penalty but it was saved by craig gordon. victory seals second place in group f, and a play—off place in march to fight for a sport at next year's world cup in qatar.
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england kick off against albania in less than half an hour at wembley. boss gareth southgate has called on them to put in an improved performance as they look to qualify for next year's world cup. after a disappointing draw against hungary — england need four points from their last two games to guarantee their place at qatar 2022. they're away at san marino on monday. injuries and illness have affected england's preparations ahead of albania this evening — but the england manager says the players are enjoying the international break. so much going on in their lives, however many we started with and how many finished with, 23 stories, lots of club situations, and we spoke about just of club situations, and we spoke aboutjust being able to park that, enjoy time in england, come together as a group, focused on these two matches, and i think the groups have dashboard seven joist,
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matches, and i think the groups have dashboard sevenjoist, embraced of that, but we have to deliver a performance. the chair of essex county cricket clubjohn faragher has resigned following an allegation he used racist language in a board meeting in 2017. essex say they're looking into why the matter was not fully and independently investigated at the time. faragher stood down from his post following a board meeting yesterday evening and strongly denies the allegation. essex say "there's no place for discrimination of any kind at the club." this follows the racism scandal at yorkshire which led to a number of resignations. i think what it will show to many people is that this isn't an issue confined to yorkshire. and many people had suspected that over the last week that this was unlikely to be just an issue at yorkshire. yesterday, i spoke to the england captain, joe root, over in australia, and he said that every county needed to look at its processes, at its culture and work out if improvements needed to be made. of course, we know that the ecb is looking at this issue as well.
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of course, it will be of concern to the governing body that another county has now become engulfed in a racism issue. frank lampard has dropped out of the running to become the new norwich manager. the former chelsea boss had been in talks about succeeding daniel farke at carrow road but won't be taking charge. t�*s understood norwich have also spoken to former aston villa manager dean smith about the job but are yet to make a decision. lewis hamilton's hopes of closing the gap to title rival max verstappen at the brazilian grand prix have been hampered by a five—place grid penalty for exceeding the permitted number of engine parts. the mercedes driver was fastest in first practice in sao paolo this afternoon but can't start higher than sixth on the grid. that's all the sport for now.
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scotla nd scotland have confirmed their place in the t ., scotland have confirmed their place in the . ., , scotland have confirmed their place inthe in the world cup playoffs after beatint in the world cup playoffs after beating mulled _ in the world cup playoffs after beating mulled ova _ in the world cup playoffs after beating mulled ova 2-0 - in the world cup playoffs after. beating mulled ova 2-0 tonight. beating mulled ova 2—0 tonight. england are playing albania at 8:15pm. coming up, datelined london. at first, the weather. goodbye for me. good evening. it's been quite a breezy day out there today. outbreaks of rain for many of us, and also still mild for the time of year. but those stronger winds brought some big waves to the coast — this was aberystwyth a little bit earlier on. the winds are now tending to ease, and things look a bit quieter through the course of the weekend as low pressures clears away. still very mild for the time of year and mainly dry on both saturday and sunday, too. here's the low pressure that brought the showery rain at times today, and the breeze, as well, which is clearing off towards the east. as it does so, then higher pressure will start to build in from the west. so still a few splashes of rain overnight for eastern scotland, some central, southern and eastern parts of england, as well. but most places dry, some clearer spells for southwest scotland into northwest england —
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and it's here that temperatures will fall down into mid—single figures. but most of us remain in double figures — so a frost—free, mild, if somewhat cloudy start to your weekend. so saturday then, still quite a breeze around the east coast, perhaps a few spots of rain for the likes of aberdeenshire, east anglia, and the far southeast, too, and we've also got a bit more cloud working in for southwest england, wales, and northern ireland. but, in between these two areas of cloud, some sunshine through central scotland, northwest england, and the midlands right down towards the likes of the isle of wight. temperatures 10—15 celsius — so at least 3—4 degrees above average. so as we move through saturday night now and on into sunday, we've got high pressure not far away sitting both to the southwest and to the east of the uk. so this approaching weather front bumps into all that high pressure that's around. it doesn't make inroads too quickly for remembrance sunday, a lot of dry weather on sunday. a bit of sunshine breaking through the cloud, but generally a fairly cloudy picture for many of us, but light winds and very mild, as well, so quite a pleasant day with temperatures between 10—14 celsius. we have got that rain arriving in the northwest later on.
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so, as we head through remembrance sunday night and on into monday, that weather front pushes a bit further south, but it fizzles out as it does so. could bring a few splashes of rain monday morning to southern scotland, perhaps northern england, as well. a return to some sunshine for northern ireland and scotland, the north of that front stays a bit further cloudier south and east. still reasonably mild, 10—14 celsius as we head through monday afternoon. so certainly mild and settled for the next few days. things do turn a little bit cooler and more unsettled into the middle of this coming week. that's it for now, bye—bye.
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hello and welcome to the programme which brings together leading uk commentators, bbc specialists and the foreign correspondents who write, blog and broadcast to audiences at home from the dateline: london. this week, translating hot air into action to stop the air. getting hotter. migrants used as political pawns on the european union's border; and why sleaze a word that dogged british politics in the 1990s is making a comeback. in glasgow is isabel hilton from china dialogue, which helps the world understand china's own climate crisis.
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agnes poirier is uk editor of the french weekly, l'express.

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