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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 12, 2021 8:00pm-8:44pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the headlines. negotiations go on past the official deadline at the climate summit in glasgow. with a draft deal, but no final agreement to tackle rising temperatures, the president of cop26 calls for one last push. we have come a long way over the past two weeks and now we need that final injection of that can—do
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more than two hours ago, but last minute haggling could see negotiations go on well into the night. the president of the summit, alok sharma, says delegates have come a long way in the last two weeks, and he now hopes there'll be a final injection of what he calls a "can—do spirit". greenpeace is urging delegates to agree something historic, but can there be a deal that satisfies everyone. well the aim of the summit was to try to reach agreement, among more than 190 countries, to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees celcius. but the sticking points that remain include finding tougher language, to secure commitments, to phase out coal and other fossil fuels.
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and finding more money, to help developing nations fight climate change, and make the switch to greener technology. with the very latest from the summit, here's our science editor, david shukman. siren wails. a warning from outside the conference about the state of progress inside. world leaders are singled out for failing to keep their promises, for allowing the planet to become dangerously overheated, on what is meant to be the last day, demonstrators lay down at the gate of cop26 to ram home the point that lives are being lost because of climate change. appeals for action came in the conference halls, as well. activists calling on governments
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not to water down key points in the agreement. a plea echoed by the most vulnerable nations. our safety, the safety of my children, and yours, hangs in the balance. as i said to the high ambition coalition this morning, it's time for us to level up. this will be the decade that determines the rest of human history. we cannot let it slip by. but some disputes are proving really difficult to settle over coal, and what to say about phasing it out. how often countries should update their climate plans. every year to reflect the urgency or less often? and how much climate aid to give the poorest nations notjust now but over the coming decades. the whole point of these talks is to try to limit the rise in global temperatures, so how's that going? well, compared to preindustrial times, we've warmed by at least 1.1 celsius and record heat waves
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are already becoming more frequent. above 1.5 degrees many coral reefs are expected to die off among a long list of other impacts. if everyone here keeps to the promises they have given, a big if, we are still on course for about 1.8, and that means even higher sea levels and even more people threatened by flooding. but being realistic, as things stand the more likely outcome is 2.4, which means even longer droughts affecting food production across vast areas of the planet. so, i asked america's veteran climate envoy, john kerry, would any of this slow down global warming? so, we are moving in the right direction, are we moving fast enough? no, but that is what this meeting is about. scientists never said,
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you guys have to have this done by the end of cop26. they said you have ten years. they said it is incredibly urgent. yes, it is incredibly urgent, and that's exactly why 65% of global gdp has said we are going to keep 1.5 degrees alive. meanwhile, as haggling continues, the conference chair made another plea for agreement. now, we need that final injection of that can—do spirit, which is present at this cop, so we get this shared endeavour over the line. but emotions are running high and many delegations are worried. for us, ambition 1.5 is notjust a statistic it is a matter of life and death. some among us are wasting precious time here in glasgow attempting to renegotiate what was already agreed. all we're asking you to do is to keep your and own your responsibilities on setting this crisis in motion. nothing less, nothing more.
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so, a long night of negotiations lies ahead. hopes of concluding on time are fading. david shukman, bbc news, glasgow. the doctor is the director of climate research what is your assessment of where we stand at this stage tonight? irate what is your assessment of where we stand at this stage tonight?— stand at this stage tonight? we have not 'ust stand at this stage tonight? we have not just concluded _ stand at this stage tonight? we have not just concluded the _ stand at this stage tonight? we have notjust concluded the summit, - stand at this stage tonight? we have notjust concluded the summit, if. notjust concluded the summit, if the past two decades of climate summits are anything to go by, it was expected they would go into the night and probably also even into tomorrow. the pressure is on to deliver and at this point, we should
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not forget what this was about and it was really to improve and strengthen and i'm 15 in paris. in the short term, the still fall short of what is needed to limit warming. and this was included in the paris agreement. and as you heard before, altogether, even the most ambitious in the most rosy interpretations of these pledges only limits it to a two and three chance. it is encouraging to see the country here at this stage, except the shortfall and ambition and actually in the draft of we are seeing. and there's some important reference to the signs that underpin the urgency of action. also the acknowledgement that current emission reductions or current promises are insufficient
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and there is the intention to have and there is the intention to have an accelerated process to improve on those ambitions that are currently on the table in the coming years. instead of five—year updates, we are looking at her one—year update cycle. in looking at her one-year update cle. , ., ., , ., cycle. in terms of that update, we were talking _ cycle. in terms of that update, we were talking to _ cycle. in terms of that update, we were talking to isabel _ cycle. in terms of that update, we were talking to isabel of - cycle. in terms of that update, we were talking to isabel of china - were talking to isabel of china dialogue in the last hour, which is to build understanding of the west of china's environmental challenges. china was certainly moved this week. but one of the problems is, its planning system, were not talking about building houses, over time of the planning of the whole economy is based on much longer timeframes and to china, everything is looked at in a much longer timeframe. getting a country like china to be adept enough and light footed enough to come back in the years' time, that might be a challenge to far.-
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might be a challenge to far. there is indeed a — might be a challenge to far. there is indeed a challenge _ might be a challenge to far. there is indeed a challenge of— might be a challenge to far. ii—ii” is indeed a challenge of planning but also we are living in a world where the urgency of action is ever increasing and dedan ever so high level and also the implications of the impact on climate change also felt in china. at the same time, the costs of doing something about it are coming down rapidly. five years ago, renewables were still higher than fossilfuels. ago, renewables were still higher than fossil fuels. today, ago, renewables were still higher than fossilfuels. today, they ago, renewables were still higher than fossil fuels. today, they are not. and i'm very short time scales, even the assumptions that went into planning, can be changed and may be with that the plants that have already been made can also be overachieved. fist already been made can also be overachieved.— overachieved. at the risk of sounding — overachieved. at the risk of sounding like _ overachieved. at the risk of sounding like an _ overachieved. at the risk of sounding like an campus i overachieved. at the risk of sounding like an campus in | overachieved. at the risk of - sounding like an campus in your opinion for a polling organisation. the scale of one to ten, with one being very disappointing in ten
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being very disappointing in ten being very disappointing in ten being very pleasing. one figure which you give this cop26 summit as you see it tonight? figs which you give this cop26 summit as you see it tonight?— you see it tonight? as we have seen toniuht, i you see it tonight? as we have seen tonight. i still— you see it tonight? as we have seen tonight, i still give _ you see it tonight? as we have seen tonight, i still give it _ you see it tonight? as we have seen tonight, i still give it a _ you see it tonight? as we have seen tonight, i still give it a five. - tonight, i still give it a five. there's very hopeful discussions going on, but the key issues, the crunch issues there still being discussed behind me, we start to see how this decision will be made. and whether or not this outcome ensures the environmental integrity and the ambition that we need to get to the bottom of this challenge.— ambition that we need to get to the bottom of this challenge. thank you ve much bottom of this challenge. thank you very much for— bottom of this challenge. thank you very much for being _ bottom of this challenge. thank you very much for being with _ bottom of this challenge. thank you very much for being with us - bottom of this challenge. thank you very much for being with us on - bottom of this challenge. thank you very much for being with us on bbcl very much for being with us on bbc news. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers — our guestsjoining me tonight
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are broadcaster penny smith and martin bentham, home affairs editor of the evening standard around 1200 people crossed the channel by boat yesterday to reach the uk — it's a new record for migant crossings in a single day. more than 23 thousand people have made the crossing from france to the uk by boat so far this year — nearly three times the number crossing in 2020. with more here's our home editor mark easton. it was a day the uk lost control of its border, of what they call tug haven in dover, and into a hired marquee for processing. but the home office won't expecting numbers anything like that, and the borderforce. officers just couldn't cope. conditions in the tent last night were described by one official as a humanitarian crisis with 1000 people traumatised, vulnerable, and desperate, including, i am told, at least one pregnant woman,
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forced to sleep on the floor. cooking, washing, and toilet facilities have proved totally inadequate for the demand over the last week. these migrants appear to be complaining they haven't had enough to eat. we have hundreds of people sleeping on a concrete floor overnight. there is limited sanitary facilities. there is no way to get them hot food. it was never designed to be used in the way it is now, but there is no way to move these folk onto their next destination. the entire system is broken from end to end. the home office had expected the numbers making the perilous journey across the channel would fall in the autumn, but calm and mild conditions have actually seen record numbers attempt to reach the kent coast in small vessels. yesterday, french authorities stopped seven boats but 33 reached uk waters despite a government commitment last year to make the route unviable. we've been working very hard with france over the last few years, and the french have stopped over 18,000 attempted crosses so far this year. but the numbers speak for themselves, it is disappointing
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and shocking just how many migrants have managed to cross the channel this week alone. data obtained by the refugee council shows that in the 17 months to may this year, 70% of the 12,000 people arriving in small boats came from five countries. over 3000 from iran, 2000 from iraq, and around 1000 each from sudan, syria, and vietnam. full details will be published in a report next week. but analysis of people crossing the channel suggests more than 60% will be given refugee status by the home office after their initial assessment. our analysis shows they are people fleeing war, persecution, and terror. they want to come to the uk because they are able to speak some english, they might have a connection through their networks to the uk through family, and they simply want to get on, rebuild their lives, and make a contribution to our economy and our society in the future. the weather has been worse today,
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with few migrants crossing a relief to the border force who have been working around the clock to clear the backlog of hundreds of exhausted and desperate people. mark easton, bbc news — dover. they're sink it is unacceptable to instrumental his migrants and endorse the activities of criminal groups and perhaps most interestingly, they say that although the number of crossing the thames is increased, the failure rate of this attempts, they successfully for them is around 60% since the start of the year compared to 56% in 2020. that is very much the french heading back at british criticism of their performance in the channel. the headlines on bbc news. the cop26 climate summit in glasgow has run into overtime, with still no final agreement on what measures should be adopted to limit global warming as coronavirus cases rise across much of europe, a three week partial lockdown is announced in the netherlands following record infections
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and rising numbers in intensive care there. a new record for the number of migrants crossing the channel, as almost 1,200 people made the journey on thursday. the dutch prime minister hasjust announced that new tough covid restrictions are being brought back in after a surge of cases in the netherlands. social distancing is back. for the next 3 weeks atleast, bars, restaurants must close at 8pm, people are being told to work from home. and people who aren't vaccinated are being told they'll be restricted in where they can go. a number of other european countries are also seeing a sharp rise in cases as our health editor, hugh pym reports. people in the netherlands enjoying what might be their last evening out
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out before restrictions being put in place. intensive care unit in austria are also under strain. the government is set to announce restrictions on those who haven't been vaccinated with one of the lowest vaccination rates in europe. uk covid cases relative to the population have fallen back but the netherlands, austria, and some other european countries have seen steep increases. germany is particularly concerning. the number of cases has gone through the roof. it is major. and the vaccination rate aren't fantastic. the prime minister sounded a cautionary note about the implications of case increases across europe. i am seeing the storm clouds gathering over parts of the european continent. i've got to be absolutely frank with people, we've been here before, we remember what happens when the wave starts rolling in. ministers are pushing hard the message that people should get booster jabs as soon as they are eligible, the hope is that will help slow the spread of covid. the latest ons survey suggests last
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week in the uk nearly 1.1 million people had the virus. that was down on the previous week. in england it was one in 60 people and in wales won in 45 and both in england it was one in 60 people and in wales one in 45 and both case rates were falling. in northern ireland, with one in 75, and scotland one in 85, the trend was less clear. infections among 11 to 16—year—olds had been rising the fastest, but in england last week they fell back as they did amongst younger children. in other age groups, there wasn't much change. the school half term could have been a factor, and the prime minister said it wasn't clear the drift downwards would continue. hugh pym, bbc news. i'm joined by professor francois balloux, epidemiologist and chair of university college london's genetics institute. thank you for being with us. what is happening on this? because it didn't
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look like very long ago it didn't seem like we were the ones with sustained plateau of high case rates and continental europe looked, and many countries, as though he was doing pretty well. many countries, as though he was doing pretty well-— doing pretty well. yes, i believe there is an _ doing pretty well. yes, i believe there is an ebb _ doing pretty well. yes, i believe there is an ebb and _ doing pretty well. yes, i believe there is an ebb and flow - doing pretty well. yes, i believe there is an ebb and flow and - there is an ebb and flow and generally, we tried to find the right policies and exchange. i'm not entirely surprised about the rising cases in continental europe. i think it could have been anticipated as partly seasonal and also the conditions are, kind of, kind of made it unavoidable that case would go made it unavoidable that case would 9° up made it unavoidable that case would go up the most in continental europe. and i think the really important thing now is how many of these cases will translated the
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hospitalisation and death and also we will find more in the taxing coverage of the population. i5 we will find more in the taxing coverage of the population. is there a sense that — coverage of the population. is there a sense that the _ coverage of the population. is there a sense that the vaccinations - coverage of the population. is there a sense that the vaccinations which | a sense that the vaccinations which may have been received earlier in the year are starting to lose their effectiveness and none of people are taking the boosterjobs made available? it’s taking the booster “obs made available? �* , ., taking the booster “obs made mugfi taking the booster “obs made available? �*, ., , ., ., available? it's not been for that lona the available? it's not been for that long the people _ available? it's not been for that long the people have _ available? it's not been for that long the people have been - available? it's not been for that i long the people have been offered boosters. i think it's to talk about small doses because the vaccine was initially offered to the population and very successful programmes, it wasn't clear actually what it was and through this fixings. so, maybe we should move away from this booster idea. there are a few people across europe that have had the booster and it's been quite successful in the uk and 25% have the third dose this is probably one
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of the best things we can do at this stage to reduce hospitalizations or mortality. if stage to reduce hospitalizations or mortali . ., stage to reduce hospitalizations or mortali . . , , ., , mortality. if we are, sense, at this stare, mortality. if we are, sense, at this stage. the — mortality. if we are, sense, at this stage, the dutch _ mortality. if we are, sense, at this stage, the dutch prime _ mortality. if we are, sense, at this stage, the dutch prime minister i mortality. if we are, sense, at this stage, the dutch prime minister is| stage, the dutch prime minister is announcement of new restrictions of the lease for the next three weeks that took us to early december and that took us to early december and thatis that took us to early december and that is on this and it's very interesting to see the reaction i wonder if that's something that worries you now. we have a report tonight, unconfirmed from one agency sink dutch police are forced to use tear gas, not tear gas, water cannons and protesters were angry about these extra restrictions. there is a danger that people who think they've sacrificed so much will end up saying to themselves look, stuff it. i've done this are not prepared to accept restrictions again. i think i've given up so much of my freedom of the past 18 months.
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is that something that worries you? big implications to allow the virus to spread? big implications to allow the virus to sread? , ., big implications to allow the virus to sread? , . ., to spread? yes, and i have some understanding — to spread? yes, and i have some understanding of _ to spread? yes, and i have some understanding of frustration - to spread? yes, and i have some understanding of frustration and | understanding of frustration and it's the benefit of hindsight that this could've been better in the sense that, there have been promises that had been empty at this issue, stay at home and if you get vaccinated for a while and you get back to normal life and to some extent, i'm not saying we are back to last year and i also put things in perspective, cases are rising and it's not as traumatic as last year. but still, i have some sympathy and understanding of people were frustrated because they think they participated as good citizens and
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did what was expected of them and they didn't give back the life that they didn't give back the life that they wanted and it is a very difficult situation for public health and how to get these messages across and ideally, we would like to have as many people vaccinated as possible. and also those were really helpful to everyone or at least people at risk but how essentially to be avoid these empty promises? as you get back your life and really ensuring that you get it all back. the reasonably confident that the spreading will be over a difficult situation
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the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk, show there were 40,375 new infections recorded, in the latest 24—hour period. so an average of 35,507 cases were reported per day, in the last week. 8,652 people were in hospital with covid yesterday. there were 145 deaths, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive test, which meaning the average number of deaths over the past seven days was 156. the total number of people who've died with covid, now stands at at 142,678. on vaccinations, 87.8 percent of people aged 12 and over, have now received a first dose. and 79.9 percent have been double jabbed. and more than 11.8 million people have received their boosterjab.
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we will continue trying to find the figures for you as it is quite important to compare like with like. breaking news. one of the businessman who flew in jeff businessman who flew in jeff business company and his spacecraft, which went up into the very edge of space, just last month. glenn has died in a small plane crash on thursday. he was 39 in sussex county newjerseyjust before three o'clock on thursday. the duchess of sussex texted a former aide saying that prince harry faced "constant berating" from the royal family over her strained relationship with her estranged father. that's what has been revealed in text messages released this
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afternoon at the high court. our correspondent david sillito explained the background to the story: it's all about a letter written in 2018 between her and her estranged father. and it was very upset when extracts of it were published in those with the case is about. it also reveals why that letter was written in the background behind it and it has pulled back the curtain on the royal household to see what was going on very soon after the wedding. these are text messages between her and her press secretary and she talks about the difficult tees that there were in the weeks leading up to writing this letter. she said there'd been criticism from interviews, criticising the royal family and the royal family were concerned about it. and they were constantly having to explain why she couldn't simply go and visit her
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father and said they're constantly asked by the royalfamily, can she just going to do this and she said the catalyst was seeing how much pain this was causing henry in her words. and i protect my husband from the constant parading and also while unlikely, it will give my father a moment of pause. today, owain wyn evans, the bbc north west tonight weather presenter is taking on an incredible children in need challenge: to drum, constantly for 24 hours, raising money for children in need. bbc children in need is currently supporting over 2,500 local charities and projects in communities across the uk that are helping children and young people facing a range it is going ok. i cannot believe that we are nearly 12 hours into it
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now. and i have been drumming since 25 to nine this morning on bbc practice from we kicked it off, we stream this live on the iplayer and it's just been incredible. stream this live on the iplayer and it'sjust been incredible. find stream this live on the iplayer and it'sjust been incredible.— it'sjust been incredible. and half ast three it'sjust been incredible. and half past three tomorrow _ it'sjust been incredible. and half past three tomorrow morning, i it'sjust been incredible. and half. past three tomorrow morning, some it'sjust been incredible. and half- past three tomorrow morning, some of our clubbing viewers out and about, they will be watching this before they will be watching this before the guard in the big night and will be tuning in again on that feed to check if you're still there, you're still going in to cheer you along. absolutely, sean. it's great to watch on iplayer. we had britney spears and if you are way to go out tonight, get on the iplayer, we are playing some bankers, sean. i should be listening- — playing some bankers, sean. i should be listening. we _ playing some bankers, sean. i should be listening. we love _ playing some bankers, sean. i should be listening. we love what _ playing some bankers, sean. i should be listening. we love what you're - be listening. we love what you're doing. your is fantastic. and can i ask you, it is a personal question, of course it is a personal question.
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what is aching the most? mr; of course it is a personal question. what is aching the most?- of course it is a personal question. what is aching the most? my arms are the achin: , what is aching the most? my arms are the aching. i — what is aching the most? my arms are the aching, i don't _ what is aching the most? my arms are the aching, i don't know— what is aching the most? my arms are the aching, i don't know if— what is aching the most? my arms are the aching, i don't know if you - what is aching the most? my arms are the aching, i don't know if you can - the aching, i don't know if you can see on this one, i've got a bruise that has appeared on this arm and it's going to be taped up and so, the arms are definitely straighter heard now, sean. my back hurts i'm starting to feel tired because only have three hours' sleep last night because i was just excited, you know? but we're doing it for bbc children in need. i have met some amazing tremors of the day. abc. the place to go in for more information, pick on drumathon. bud place to go in for more information, pick on drumathon.— pick on drumathon. and donations. have ou pick on drumathon. and donations. have you set _ pick on drumathon. and donations. have you set yourself— pick on drumathon. and donations. have you set yourself up _ pick on drumathon. and donations. have you set yourself up a - pick on drumathon. and donations. have you set yourself up a target? | have you set yourself up a target? or do you just i want to go there? you hit the nail on the head there. we learned early that we've raised over half a million already and i can't believe that. i absolutely can't believe that. i absolutely can't believe that. but every penny counts and i've learned that the work that the children need does
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helps children and young people across the uk and every postcode and without it, a load of projects that do so many amazing things wouldn't exist so that's overdoing this. hagar exist so that's overdoing this. how lona have exist so that's overdoing this. how long have you _ exist so that's overdoing this. how long have you been _ exist so that's overdoing this. how long have you been doing this? what's the story behind it? i started playing at age six or seven. my started playing at age six or seven. my parents got me a cardboard trim kit and a set of trash that after a while and then, i'm not a professional drummer in any capacity, this is something i like doing, which is why this challenge is even more of a challenge for somebody like me. so, it's been incredible and i love drumming and i want to know what the health benefits of drumming or and anyone can play the drums, you know it is an incredible instrument it helps everything from your fitness to mental health, which is really important to me. mr; mental health, which is really important to me.— mental health, which is really important to me. my cousin will be cheerin: important to me. my cousin will be cheering you _ important to me. my cousin will be cheering you on — important to me. my cousin will be cheering you on from _ important to me. my cousin will be
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cheering you on from there to - important to me. my cousin will be cheering you on from there to the l cheering you on from there to the rafters. she is a big fan of you. i hope someone is having a quiet word with bbc breakfast tomorrow morning to make sure that they've got not only some very nice fresh food and drink and foryou, only some very nice fresh food and drink and for you, good strong coffee and the rest of it, but someone to move solution your shoulders, back and arms because you're going to need it. greg works in many of — you're going to need it. greg works in many of the _ you're going to need it. greg works in many of the challenges - you're going to need it. greg works in many of the challenges and - you're going to need it. greg works in many of the challenges and greg is looking after me and making sure that when i am aching, but i'm kind of rubbed down on the right way, sean, ., ,., ., i. of rubbed down on the right way, sean, ., ., i. , sean, more power to your elbows wrists and — sean, more power to your elbows wrists and everything. _ sean, more power to your elbows wrists and everything. lovely - sean, more power to your elbows wrists and everything. lovely to l wrists and everything. lovely to seak wrists and everything. lovely to s - eak to wrists and everything. lovely to speak to you- — wrists and everything. lovely to speak to you. don't _ wrists and everything. lovely to speak to you. don't give - wrists and everything. lovely to speak to you. don't give a - wrists and everything. lovely to| speak to you. don't give a small child of the _ speak to you. don't give a small child of the drum, _ speak to you. don't give a small child of the drum, my _ speak to you. don't give a small child of the drum, my brother . child of the drum, my brother was given when he was very little, discovered it was just tall enough to climb on below the bed warm door and wake them up. about five o'clock in the morning. good evening.
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friday brought us a fairly breezy, cloudy sort of day with some outbreaks of rain at times for many of us. but the weather is now quietening down as we head to the weekend. the mild theme continues, and things are looking mainly dry on both saturday and sunday, too. still a few spots of rain around through this evening and overnight, particularly for some eastern parts of england and eastern scotland, too. clearest skies will be across southern and western scotland down into the northwest of england — so we're likely to see temperatures mid—single figures here, but for most places, actually, temperatures remaining in double figures overnight. a frost—free, fairly cloudy start to your saturday morning. we'll have still quite a breeze blowing around the east coast, could be a few spots of rain for east anglia and the southeast, and a little bit cloudier skies working into the southwest of england, wales, and into northern ireland. but, in between these two areas, some sunshine through the central slice of the uk, and 10—15 celsius should feel quite pleasant. and then, for remembrance sunday, the dry and settled theme continues. still mild for the time of year.
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hello this is bbc news with shawn ley. the headlines. negotiations go on past the official deadline at cop26 in glasgow. with a draught deal, but no final agreement to tackle rising temperatures, the summit president calls for one last push. we have come a long way over the past two weeks. and now we need that final injection of that can—do spirit which is present at this cop so that we get this shared endeavour over the line. delegates from some of the most vulnerable island nations say success at this summit is a matter of life and death. our safety, the safety of my children and yours hangs in the balance. this will be the decade that determines the rest of human history, we cannot let it slip by.
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and we report from one town in california, that was engulfed in flames during devastating climate change fuelled wildfires this summer. elsewhere — as much of europe faces a surge in coronavirus cases a three week partial lockdown is announced in the netherlands, on people who haven't been vaccinated in where they can go. almost 1,200 people crossed the english channel on thursday, a new record for migrant crossings in a single day. and coming up — how a library of tree samples stored at kew gardens in london could be used to identify illegal logging and tackle deforestation around the world. one of the clearest results of climate change are intense and long—lasting wildfires, caused by drought, heat and poor land management. the dixie fire in california this summer razed some communities to the ground. our climate editorjustin rowlatt is in the town of greenville in california.
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last time we spoke you were in alaska. ., ., last time we spoke you were in alaska. . ., ., ., ,., last time we spoke you were in alaska. . ., ., ., ., alaska. yeah, we are doing a sort of an american — alaska. yeah, we are doing a sort of an american road _ alaska. yeah, we are doing a sort of an american road trip _ alaska. yeah, we are doing a sort of an american road trip looking - alaska. yeah, we are doing a sort of an american road trip looking at the | an american road trip looking at the impact of climate change. where in california to look at the impact. i want to look at the devastation behind me and imagine a gold rush era town with clapboard houses. that building over there is the bank. this was a classic kind of western town, stood for about 150 years, completely obliterated by fire in just two hours. it's evidence that the fires are just getting bigger and bigger here in california. they've moved from calling the magnifiers, magnifiers covering how the 200s of acres was that not to talk about giga fires. the dixie fire was almost1 million acres talk about giga fires. the dixie fire was almost 1 million acres was up fire was almost 1 million acres was up i've been looking at the impact of fire on communities like greenville but also on the natural world as well. here is my report.
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these trees are restricted to 70 groves on the western slope of the sierra nevada. that's all that's left? yes, very narrow patches of the remaining habitat. it is left? yes, very narrow patches of the remaining habitat.— the remaining habitat. it is a habitat that _ the remaining habitat. it is a habitat that has _ the remaining habitat. it is a habitat that has always - the remaining habitat. it is a i habitat that has always included fire. so these trees are exquisitely adapted to cope with fire. listen to this. the bark is full of tiny air pockets. it's about a metre thick. so that insulated from the heat of the fire. if you look up at the canopy, the first branches start about 30 metres out. so they are lifted clear of all but the very biggest fires. but fire has now become their greatest threat. years of climate induced droughts of left vegetation tinder dry. and in a
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policy of suppressing smaller fires which allow deadwood to build up and fires are now ripping through california's forests faster and harder than ever before. it’s california's forests faster and harder than ever before. it's a huge challenue. harder than ever before. it's a huge challenge- i — harder than ever before. it's a huge challenge. ifeel_ harder than ever before. it's a huge challenge. i feel obviously - harder than ever before. it's a huge challenge. i feel obviously were i harder than ever before. it's a huge challenge. i feel obviously were not winning _ challenge. i feel obviously were not winning this battle right now. the fires are — winning this battle right now. the fires are too active. and winning this battle right now. the fires are too active.— fires are too active. and what is it make you — fires are too active. and what is it make you think— fires are too active. and what is it make you think about _ fires are too active. and what is it make you think about the - fires are too active. and what is it make you think about the future i fires are too active. and what is it l make you think about the future for these far as?— these far as? well, a little for the best but if — these far as? well, a little for the best but if we _ these far as? well, a little for the best but if we keep _ these far as? well, a little for the best but if we keep having - these far as? well, a little for the best but if we keep having fires i best but if we keep having fires the way that _ best but if we keep having fires the way that we have been for the last few years. — way that we have been for the last few years, it does look good. general— few years, it does look good. general sherman escape unhinged. but others weren't so lucky.— others weren't so lucky. before 2050 new orleans — others weren't so lucky. before 2050 new orleans are _ others weren't so lucky. before 2050 new orleans are a _ others weren't so lucky. before 2050 new orleans are a sukhoi _ others weren't so lucky. before 2050 new orleans are a sukhoi of- others weren't so lucky. before 2050 new orleans are a sukhoi of that i new orleans are a sukhoi of that look like this. you nevus archery torch like this become a candle and burn up in this way before climate change and fire suppression. there's nothing i can do about these trees.
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they're gone and we will plant new ones but it takes a thousand years. and it for hundreds of years? iriate and it for hundreds of years? note will be this — and it for hundreds of years? note will be this for _ and it for hundreds of years? note will be this for a _ and it for hundreds of years? note will be this for a long, _ and it for hundreds of years? iirvite: will be this for a long, long time. and it isn'tjust trees that are burning, communities are too. it took all the colour out of my life. look_ took all the colour out of my life. look at _ took all the colour out of my life. look at everything is just a shade of grey _ look at everything is 'ust a shade of re . ., ., of grey. the entire town of greenville _ of grey. the entire town of greenville was _ of grey. the entire town of greenville was raised i of grey. the entire town of greenville was raised to i of grey. the entire town ofl greenville was raised to the of grey. the entire town of- greenville was raised to the ground in just two hours. greenville was raised to the ground injust two hours. and the greenville was raised to the ground in just two hours. and the goals forever home went with it. but nicole believes something good could rise from the ashes.— rise from the ashes. greenville can actually be — rise from the ashes. greenville can actually be a _ rise from the ashes. greenville can actually be a lighthouse _ rise from the ashes. greenville can | actually be a lighthouse community of sustainability and climate adaptation. and how do we live in our new_ adaptation. and how do we live in our new normal? because big fires and now— our new normal? because big fires and now the new normal. you our new normal? because big fires and now the new normal.— our new normal? because big fires and now the new normal. you can see the crown is — and now the new normal. you can see the crown is totally _ and now the new normal. you can see the crown is totally intact. _ and now the new normal. you can see the crown is totally intact. there's i the crown is totally intact. there's living mark under this chart. look at this. living mark under this chart. look at this- and _ living mark under this chart. look at this. and in _ living mark under this chart. look at this. and in the _ living mark under this chart. look at this. and in the forest - living mark under this chart. look at this. and in the forest christie hasn't given up hope either. so this
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is black on the _ hasn't given up hope either. so this is black on the outside, _ hasn't given up hope either. so this is black on the outside, this - hasn't given up hope either. so this is black on the outside, this will i is black on the outside, this will all come off in the bark will continue to grow and this tree is completely fine. she continue to grow and this tree is completely fine.— completely fine. she says the resilience _ completely fine. she says the resilience of _ completely fine. she says the resilience of the _ completely fine. she says the resilience of the tree - completely fine. she says the resilience of the tree you i completely fine. she says the i resilience of the tree you should inspire us. we resilience of the tree you should inspire us— inspire us. we need to act on climate change _ inspire us. we need to act on climate change now. - inspire us. we need to act on climate change now. and i inspire us. we need to act on i climate change now. and every little bit counts. it climate change now. and every little bit counts. , �* ., , says, not yet. i think it's really interesting the messages coming out that sense that it is all over, that we can build that better, we can respond to the challenge of climate change was that were here and also from christie in the sequoia groves saying we can replant and at the trees are resilient. i think that's an important message but also what nicole was saying about the new normal. these fires are now the new normal. these fires are now the new normal and they certainly seem to be here in california. in fear when you go into the woods is that the fires are now burning clear so destroying all the trees and a whole area of forest. you probably on the hill behind me great black scars with the
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fires have ripped through destroying everything. the fear is now the brush will come back and colonise that space and then you won't have a forest ecosystem any more. that is the key lesson from here. as you see changes the way the fires changing his behaviour in california you will see that around the world as the temperature rises. places is getting drier and harder, temperature rises. places is getting drierand harder, more temperature rises. places is getting drier and harder, more vulnerable to fire, ecosystems giving way to perhaps less productive ecosystems. that's the real danger, that is the aim and the agenda in glasgow is to aim and the agenda in glasgow is to aim for 1.5 aim and the agenda in glasgow is to aim for1.5 degrees. aim and the agenda in glasgow is to aim for 1.5 degrees. because if we go above that the consequences will be awful for communities like this but in fact communities all over the world. justin rowlett and california thank you very much for that. if you're interested in this impact of fires very good programme on radio four this weekend at a panel dateline called a summer of fire and flood. you'll see find that on bbc
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flood. you'll see find that on bbc flood. about the terrible devastation in greece this summer. about the terrible devastation in greece this summer. a key aim of leaders at cop26 in glasgow has been to cut back on illegal logging and deforestation, which is the second leading cause of carbon emissions. more than 100 key logging nations have agreed in glasgow to end deforestation by 2030. a draught agreement at the un climate conference has emphasised the critical importance of safeguarding forests to protect bio—diversity and help achieve the net—zero goal. kew gardens in west london is where tree samples are stored as part of a project — along with four other partners — which identifies illegal logging in an attempt to halt deforestation, which as we've heard is one of the main aims of cop26. well, we can now speak to victor deklerck, who's part of the world forest id programme at kew gardens. ina in a sense is a sort of library of trees. .. , ~ , in a sense is a sort of library of trees. .. , . , ., in a sense is a sort of library of trees. , . , ., . in a sense is a sort of library of trees. , . , . trees. exactly. we try to collect as many trees — trees. exactly. we try to collect as many trees as _ trees. exactly. we try to collect as many trees as we _ trees. exactly. we try to collect as many trees as we can _ trees. exactly. we try to collect as many trees as we can worldwide . trees. exactly. we try to collect as | many trees as we can worldwide to build up reference databases. when we get a case of can you identify
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this or can you tell this is coming from we at least have the tools to combat it. , ., ., ., combat it. trees grow a lot of laces, combat it. trees grow a lot of places. how _ combat it. trees grow a lot of places, how could _ combat it. trees grow a lot of places, how could it - combat it. trees grow a lot of places, how could it be i places, how could it be that specific was back it depends on the technique you're using. aha, specific was back it depends on the technique you're using. b. lat specific was back it depends on the technique you're using.— specific was back it depends on the technique you're using. a lot of our techniques — technique you're using. a lot of our techniques use _ technique you're using. a lot of our techniques use chemistry _ technique you're using. a lot of our techniques use chemistry and i technique you're using. a lot of our| techniques use chemistry and based on the tree and its environment you can identify its exact location where that to regroup. it’s can identify its exact location where that to regroup. it's possible to do it that — where that to regroup. it's possible to do it that directly, _ where that to regroup. it's possible to do it that directly, to _ where that to regroup. it's possible to do it that directly, to make i to do it that directly, to make a very direct link between a product and the source and therefore whether the source was legitimate. you would know to use a phrase, it's almost like greenwashing, is in a? product stirred up, were told they are all environmentally friendly, from and violent mentally sustainable sources and yet actually if you are ever able to prove it they come from a legalforestation. even if some able to prove it they come from a legal forestation. even if some way along the way they've been cleaned up along the way they've been cleaned up so the people who produce the product think they've bought something legitimate it's actually turned out to be illegal activity. this is definitely the tricky part of what were doing. it's a very
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complex question. because you can have trees mixed up into a product and travel all over the world to end “p and travel all over the world to end up in the uk and then we have to identify it. we do have the paperwork to match it against it if we can show that it doesn't match the signature on the paperwork over it's coming from on the paperwork thatis it's coming from on the paperwork that is already enough probable cause to do a full investigation. this is already being used in prosecutions? we this is already being used in prosecutions?— this is already being used in prosecutions? this is already being used in rosecutions? ~ . . , ., prosecutions? we are currently on the way of — prosecutions? we are currently on the way of being — prosecutions? we are currently on the way of being used _ prosecutions? we are currently on the way of being used in _ prosecutions? we are currently on the way of being used in a - prosecutions? we are currently on the way of being used in a couplel prosecutions? we are currently on | the way of being used in a couple of cases. the goal is to get this data out to talk to enforcement and they can use this and we hope to see an increase in cases soon. you can use this and we hope to see an increase in cases soon.— can use this and we hope to see an increase in cases soon. you must be uuite increase in cases soon. you must be quite excited — increase in cases soon. you must be quite excited about _ increase in cases soon. you must be quite excited about this. _ increase in cases soon. you must be quite excited about this. this i increase in cases soon. you must be quite excited about this. this is i quite excited about this. this is amazin: , quite excited about this. this is amazing. very _ quite excited about this. this is amazing. very happy _ quite excited about this. this is amazing, very happy we i quite excited about this. this is amazing, very happy we can i quite excited about this. this is amazing, very happy we can be| quite excited about this. this is l amazing, very happy we can be a quite excited about this. this is i amazing, very happy we can be a part of this. we have a very powerful group and we try to do our best to stop this. group and we try to do our best to sto this. ~ , ., group and we try to do our best to sto this. ~ i. ., ., ~' group and we try to do our best to sto this. ~ i. ., ., ~ ., stop this. when you look at all that's going — stop this. when you look at all that's going on _ stop this. when you look at all that's going on at _ stop this. when you look at all that's going on at the - stop this. when you look at all that's going on at the momenti stop this. when you look at all i that's going on at the moment at the clopp summit and the importance of keeping ? caught up. and the invaluable role that forest play and
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matt, do you feel you're part of something bigger in the work you're doing? it something bigger in the work you're doinu ? , , ~ doing? it definitely feels like that. doing? it definitely feels like that- also — doing? it definitely feels like that. also feels _ doing? it definitely feels like that. also feels like - doing? it definitely feels like that. also feels like this i doing? it definitely feels like i that. also feels like this project came at the right time there's a heavy focus on halting deforestation, checking out supply chains to make sure everything everything is sustainable and i feel this is the right time to be a part of this. it's great that we can do that right now.— that right now. this might be a difficult question _ that right now. this might be a difficult question but _ that right now. this might be a difficult question but when i that right now. this might be a difficult question but when you i that right now. this might be a i difficult question but when you buy things, when you buy products do you kind of worry about the fact that you don't really know, you can ask of the right questions but you don't really know if that level each year something you may have already two always wanted is a product of the sustainable piece of work or whether it's contributed in some small way to the deforestation of the planet was up as a consumer is incredibly difficult to know something is sustainable.— difficult to know something is sustainable. , , ., .,~' sustainable. that's why try to work with companies _ sustainable. that's why try to work with companies and _ sustainable. that's why try to work with companies and help _ sustainable. that's why try to work with companies and help them i sustainable. that's why try to work with companies and help them and figure out how can we stop illegal
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products entering the train and then we could see we wouldn't have to worry about it at all.— we could see we wouldn't have to worry about it at all. thank you so much for the _ worry about it at all. thank you so much for the work _ you're doing for telling us about it. in the next few hours the pop star britney spears could regain control of her personal life and finances — when a court in los angeles decides whether to overturn an order which originally put her father and lawyers in charge. the singer has been fighting to revoke the so—called conservatorship, which was imposed 13 years ago amid concerns for her mental health. and this is the scene at the court in los angeles where in the next hour or so the judge is to begin dismantling that conservatorship arrangement. pretty much everybody there is supporting her cause. even attribute abandoned the right of passage time while you're waiting for hearing. nice to see so many supporters of britney doing their bit there. stay
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