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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 12, 2021 9:00pm-9:31pm GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. climate activists pile on the pressure for world leaders to reach a deal, at the cop26 summit in glasgow. as cop26 summit heads into extra time, we have come a long way over the past two weeks. and now we need that final injection of that can—do spirit, which is present at this micro once we get this shared endeavour over the line. i'm christian fraser in glasgow, where the cop presidency has just confirmed the negotiations will go into tomorrow with a third draft text expected saturday morning, protests in the netherlands,
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as the government announces a new partial lockdown, starting on saturday. and — with thousands of migrants stranded on the border between belarus and poland — we look at the dangers they face, caught in freezing conditions and a burning political row. welcome to the programme. the official deadline for an agreement at cop 26 in glasgow has passed — but delegates and negotiators are now working into the night to try and sign off undertakings that can be agreed across the board. a 3rd draft is being worked on to replace the last one — where some of the language had been strengthened — but also weakened elsewhere, for example on the requirements for governments to reduce the use of carbon—emitting fossil fuels. experts recognise that the agreements made at the summit
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will not limit warming to under 1.5 degrees — a key threshold which would avoid the worst effects of climate change. let's cross live to the conference in glasgow now and my colleague christian fraser. welcome to glasgow and our continuing coverage of cop26 — we are well past the 6pm deadline here in glasgow and i can tell you there will be no agreeent tonight. in the last few hours the cop presidency has told us a third draft of the text will not be published until 8am saturday morning, which will then be followed by a further plenary session, to flush out any remaining opposition to what is in that text. the negotiations will continue long into the night. remember that document then has to be translated into the un's six different languages and circulated among all the different groupings. so prepare youselves for a late finish tomorrow. my colleague david
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shukman has the latest. world leaders are singled out for failing to keep their promises, for allowing the planet to become dangerously overheated, on what is meant to be the last day, demonstrators lay down at the gate of cop26 to ram home the point that lives are being lost because of climate change. appeals for action came in the conference halls, as well. activists calling on governments not to water down key points in the agreement. a plea echoed by the most vulnerable nations. our safety, the safety of my children, and yours, hangs in the balance. as i said to the high ambition coalition this morning, it's time for us to level up. this will be the decade that determines the rest of human history. we cannot let it slip by. but some disputes are proving really difficult to settle over coal, and what to say about phasing it out.
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how often countries should update their climate plans. every year to reflect the urgency or less often? and how much climate aid to give the poorest nations notjust now but over the coming decades. the whole point of these talks is to try to limit the rise in global temperatures, so how's that going? well, compared to preindustrial times, we've warmed by at least 1.1 celsius and record heat waves are already becoming more frequent. above 1.5 degrees many coral reefs are expected to die off among a long list of other impacts. if everyone here keeps to the promises they have given, a big if, we are still on course for about 1.8, and that means even higher sea levels and even more people threatened by flooding. but being realistic, as things stand the more likely outcome is 2.4, which means even longer droughts affecting food production across vast areas of the planet. so, i asked america's veteran climate envoy, john kerry, would any of this slow
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down global warming? so, we are moving in the right direction, are we moving fast enough? no, but that is what this meeting is about. scientists never said, you guys have to have this done by the end of cop26. they said you have ten years. they said it is incredibly urgent. yes, it is incredibly urgent, and that's exactly why 65% of global gdp has said we are going to keep 1.5 degrees alive. meanwhile, as haggling continues, the conference chair made another plea for agreement. now, we need that final injection of that can—do spirit, which is present at this cop, so we get this shared endeavour over the line. but emotions are running high and many delegations are worried. for us, ambition 1.5 is notjust a statistic
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it is a matter of life and death. some among us are wasting precious time here in glasgow attempting to renegotiate what was already agreed. all we're asking you to do is to keep your and own your responsibilities on setting this crisis in motion. nothing less, nothing more. so, a long night of negotiations lies ahead. hopes of concluding on time are fading. david shukman, bbc news, glasgow. the us claimant and boy with his opposite number this evening walking the hallways. clearly those discussions still ongoing. with me is james murray — the editor of business green what do you make of the new timeline? it's to be expected. this
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been only one that is ever ended on time but the sweepstake in the media room runs from sunday lunchtime through to late saturday evening. it was at the landing zone, currently. very different takes on where it is a stance. and, just a short time ago, they said if you told me in copenhagen in ago, they said if you told me in cepenhagen_ ago, they said if you told me in co enhauen :: ::' , ., ~ copenhagen in 2009, will be talking about getting _ copenhagen in 2009, will be talking about getting rid — copenhagen in 2009, will be talking about getting rid of _ copenhagen in 2009, will be talking about getting rid of the _ about getting rid of the internal combustion engine, getting rid of coal, ending subsidies for fossil fuels, i'd say you are mad. is really positive take of what is been happening over the last couple of years we've got from this position going into the paris agreement where you looking for degrees of this the century. elsa tracked the world was on and are the best estimates are around 2.4. so, things have improved drastically, the road is more engaged in the public is more
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engaged in the public is more engaged than ever before. this is investors and you've got this clean tech revolution is driving down costs, driving deployment and the problem is there's massive but at the end of the positive story because relative to where we were, we made massive strides but the problems we need to get to in order to avoid very severe and catastrophic impacts in the coming days and we have to come further still. both sides of the spin argument when this thing is finished as to whether or not it's been a success or failure, as to whether or not it's been a success orfailure, we as to whether or not it's been a success or failure, we will both be read by using different metrics to see if they've made that success of that failure. see if they've made that success of that failure-— that failure. great, we are burning at 1.1. that failure. great, we are burning at1.1. on that failure. great, we are burning at 1-1- on the _ that failure. great, we are burning at 1.1. on the flip— that failure. great, we are burning at 1.1. on the flip side, _ that failure. great, we are burning at 1.1. on the flip side, that - that failure. great, we are burning at 1.1. on the flip side, that is - at 1.1. on the flip side, that is why you are here, i want to talk about how they capitalised what was going there in the real economy. what we fixate on here as journalists with the texts in the
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politics. even looking at the rest of the summit, what do you see? these summits are for decarbonization the global economy and to do that, they're sending signals and business investors about the changes that need to happen to get there. and ever since paris, it's been quite a positive story to tell. you have seen revolution businesses with targets to get the net zero as quickly as possible by 2050, which is what will say is before somebody under the age of 40 has retired and it's a single career span revolution in our industry in businesses that is going to take place. we have seen lots of signals of that being advanced and so, their big commitments for tackling emissions from different stations, both from armenian oil and gas and we have seen lots of talk about vehicles and how we can categorise the shift happening in the market
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area and go faster still and is still a lot of emerging technologies.- still a lot of emerging technologies. still a lot of emerging technolouies. ., h . , technologies. that's the really important _ technologies. that's the really important bit _ technologies. that's the really important bit that _ technologies. that's the really important bit that i _ technologies. that's the really important bit that i want - technologies. that's the really important bit that i want to i technologies. that's the really| important bit that i want to get across to peoples at home. if you're creating green steel or hydrogen or cement that is that is carbon intensive, concrete as is carbon intensive, concrete as is carbon intensive, a lot of this has never been backed. at the summit with the change in attitude, do you get a sense of those green technologies are getting a real shot in the arm? that absolutely are because they're getting the signal that governments will start to support them and indeed already are starting to support them. they are also getting a signalfrom the support them. they are also getting a signal from the corporate world. there was an initiative where some of the biggest corporations, multibillion—dollar procurement budgets and said if you can deliver this and green steel, we will buy it. we want to buy it, we want the demand there and so these very
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markets are getting the signals and therefore entrepreneurs and developers who have developed and built them and they'll get support from policy makers and also get support from the market. people will buy this technologies. in that happen in the uk already. still early days we should be going faster in his eyes that caveat. of the net zero strategy does publish this before before the summit. , carbon capture, storage and other technologies, they will try to get faster and offshore winds and renewables and they're when the face of the internal combustion engine on vehicles and shifting towards electric vehicles, keep bombs and all of these vast array of technologies, most of which will make our lives better and reduce costs and beat of the benefit of all, they're coming and they're going to come live faster than people expect. going to come live faster than people expect-_ going to come live faster than people expect. billeted and we will bu it, that people expect. billeted and we will buy it. that is _ people expect. billeted and we will buy it, that is the _ people expect. billeted and we will buy it, that is the important - buy it, that is the important message that is being sent off at the summit. ? build it.
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tina stege is the climate envoy for the marshall islands, one of the countries most vulnerable to climate change. i spoke to her earlier. we are very small but very focused team and we had our plans in place. it was wonderful to my minister was leading a delegation up until yesterday when he had to leave the few other members to start quarantine before going back home to the islands. but he left us here, he put some wind in ourselves and we just have to finish the race. this mornin: , just have to finish the race. this morning. on _ just have to finish the race. this morning, on the _ just have to finish the race. this morning, on the outstanding issues, the high ambition coalition to be together which the island shared. i changed the meaning. you - together which the island shared. i changed the meaning. you chair. together which the island shared. i l changed the meaning. you chair the meetin: changed the meaning. you chair the meeting with _ changed the meaning. you chair the meeting with john _ changed the meaning. you chair the meeting with john kerry, _ changed the meaning. you chair the meeting with john kerry, the - meeting withjohn kerry, the
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european embassy in the room? it meeting with john kerry, the european embassy in the room? it was a big meeting- — european embassy in the room? it was a big meeting- we _ european embassy in the room? it was a big meeting. we had _ european embassy in the room? it was a big meeting. we had a _ european embassy in the room? it was a big meeting. we had a lot _ european embassy in the room? it was a big meeting. we had a lot of - european embassy in the room? it w; a big meeting. we had a lot of our numbers who came, a lot of us who had signed on to the statement so they were all in the room and we had great representation from my island brothers and sisters, and we had the chairs of the groups ever represented by costa rica and others. it is a very diverse group of countries, small countries, big countries, one countries poor countries. but the that connects us all together is that we are for ambition and an ambitious outcome at this cop26. , , ,, this cop26. registered the process and where do _ this cop26. registered the process and where do you _ this cop26. registered the process and where do you think _ this cop26. registered the process and where do you think you - this cop26. registered the process and where do you think you are - this cop26. registered the process l and where do you think you are now. when it comes to finance which is crucial for this? when it comes to finance which is crucialfor this? we when it comes to finance which is crucial for this?— crucial for this? we started this rocess crucial for this? we started this process back — crucial for this? we started this process back in _ crucial for this? we started this process back in july. _ crucial for this? we started this process back in july. we - crucial for this? we started this process back in july. we have l crucial for this? we started this - process back in july. we have been process back injuly. we have been
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meeting with partners in that group since then at various ministerial meetings and notice the crunch time. we put out this leaders statement signed by presidentjoe biden, the president and many other leaders that really set the bar last week what ambition needs to look like at this cop26, how it needs to cover all pillars of the paris agreement. adaptation and finance, including language on loss and damage and it's really a matter of building on that statement we see much of that reflected in the current text. we talked about areas where it needs to be strengthened further.— talked about areas where it needs to be strengthened further. where does it need to be — be strengthened further. where does it need to be strengthened? - be strengthened further. where does it need to be strengthened? needs i be strengthened further. where does| it need to be strengthened? needs to be strengthened _ it need to be strengthened? needs to be strengthened on _ it need to be strengthened? needs to be strengthened on loss _ it need to be strengthened? needs to be strengthened on loss and - it need to be strengthened? needs toj be strengthened on loss and damage. what is the language of the moment and where do you need to be? there is a reference _ and where do you need to be? there is a reference to _ and where do you need to be? there is a reference to a _ and where do you need to be? there is a reference to a workshop - and where do you need to be? turf is a reference to a workshop and it is a reference to a workshop and it is simply not enough. we need a
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process, we need a programme. we need something that consistently allows development of this issue and actual addressing of this issue. it really distracts me when i listen to that. it is probably the only summit in the world we get the really small list for the face with the very biggest. there she is facing john kerry demanding a change in the text. it doesn't happen in any other summit and that is why cop26 holds the biggest to account and that is what is going on right now in the back rooms. with me is james murray — the editor of business green you're telling me earlier by one supermarket, tesco, here in glasgow, they are not driving electric vehicles and that is part of the signal that is going out to the rest of the industry.— signal that is going out to the rest of the industry. tesco during cop26 was talkin: of the industry. tesco during cop26 was talking about _ of the industry. tesco during cop26 was talking about a _ of the industry. tesco during cop26 was talking about a legacy, - of the industry. tesco during cop26 was talking about a legacy, glasco i was talking about a legacy, glasco has been the city were the delivery
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vehicles or electronic. and now in the industry, they're doing the logistics industry, the other markets are doing some of the shifts. the thing is to get cleaner air, lower running costs for those companies. and also your string to chip away at oil demand. you're going to see these fossil fuel investments become stranded because the demand that has been built to meet, isn't going to be there if we do shift of two electric vehicles as quickly as we potentially might. looking at the oil field here in the uk for instance and the billions that that is going to take to get deep down to the oil that is there. is there a point we look at the spectrum of temperatures ever at worsening actually, that is not a sensible investment any more. is probably the most compelling argument against these new fossil fuel projects and carbon have been doing a lot of work over the years. reporting this week saying that this is likely to be uneconomic if you're
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aiming for a is likely to be uneconomic if you're aiming fora 1.5 is likely to be uneconomic if you're aiming for a 1.5 for two degrees war because the demand is simply not going to be there as because the demand is simply not going to be ther— going to be there as we de-carbonates. - going to be there as we de-carbonates. in - going to be there as we | de-carbonates. in some going to be there as we - de-carbonates. in some fossil going to be there as we _ de-carbonates. in some fossil fuel de—carbonates. in some fossil fuel companies are betting on this process not working and that is facing quite terrifying temperature rises. but equally, they render more and more pressure to transition from this business models because people are starting to understand this didn't want to end up with assets that aren't worth what we thought they were. we don't want to be the betamax of the kodak, betting on industries that are changing. so, it is going to be a fascinating decade to play out as these market shifts take place. to play out as these market shifts take place-— take place. fascinating and it's a site that we _ take place. fascinating and it's a site that we haven't _ take place. fascinating and it's a site that we haven't talked - take place. fascinating and it's a| site that we haven't talked about over the last few days. so thank you for coming on and talking about that. just to remind you, there will be no agreement this evening and we have been told that there will be a new text coming out at 8am. and spare a thought for the presidency
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there. carrying the text from one room to the other, from one trip to the other to get the sign off because they will want to put off that this is the one text they hope will get them over the line. much more to come and we are staying on for a few hours to join us later. some breaking news to bring you — one of former us president donald trump's allies, stephen bannon, hasjust been indicted by a federal grand jury. he's been charged with two counts of contempt of congress, in connection with his failure to comply with a summons issued by a house select committee. announced by the usjustice department, bannon is indicted for refusing to appear for a deposition and refusing to supply documents to the committee. the panel is investigating the breach of the us capitol by protesters on the sixth of january.
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stay with us on news, still to come: the netherlands announces a partial lockdown from saturday, we'll be live in the hague the prime minister, borisjohnson is urging people in the uk to get their coronavirus boosterjabs, amid rising coronavirus case rates in europe. it comes as the dutch prime minister announced that new tough covid restrictions are being brought back — after a surge of cases in the netherlands. borisjohnson said that there was no room for complacency. we've got a situation now where there is no question that there is a wave of infections. eastern europe, central europe, using numbers rising and it's very steeply. and i am concerned about the concern of the delta variant between those who have been vaccinated and those of being
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double vaccinated. and it is absolutely vital that if we are going to be able to continue in the way that we are, that people get their boosters when they get they get called for nast to take him ? and asked to take them. this is news, the latest headlines. the dutch government has announced a three—week partial lockdown to try to control surging coronavirus infections. the restrictions which include only 4 visitors in homes per day were annouced by the dutch prime minister mark rutte. the netherlands is one of the european countries worst affected by a fourth wave of the virus, but the restrictions have sparked violents protests. our correspondent anna holliganjoins us now live from the hague. the first western european country to a vocal lockdown since the
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summer, what is gone wrong? let’s summer, what is gone wrong? let's make this very _ summer, what is gone wrong? let's make this very clear. _ summer, what is gone wrong? let's make this very clear. this _ summer, what is gone wrong? let's make this very clear. this is - summer, what is gone wrong? let�*s make this very clear. this is a partial evening locked and bars, restaurants, caf s and shops left to close by eight pm. it's really targeting social lives and actually, the netherlands was initially criticised for being relatively relaxed compared to other countries noticed the last country to introduce mandatory face masks and is the slowest in europe to get its vaccination programme but with the i see you intensive care unit reaching capacity and type of transferring patients over the border to germany, for treatment, this is the kind of short sharp shock that the government is hoping to bring it to the record—breaking fingers down. short and sharp, but there have been protests against these measures? the protests against these measures? tue: interesting thing protests against these measures? ti2 interesting thing here is how
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divided our society has become. there has been a process very close to where we are now in riot police use cannons to try and disperse the anti—lockdown, anti—vaccine protesters who are there in about 200 of them. but they are the minority. but this isjust 200 of them. but they are the minority. but this is just the side of the dutch parliament building and most of them say actually, we are resigned to the idea that this is necessary, given this up for a few weeks to try to bring those numbers down for the greater good and everyone here has the feeling that it is not over yet. but the question people are increasingly asking in the netherlands is when will it actually and?— the netherlands is when will it actually and? that is a question many people — actually and? that is a question many people are _ actually and? that is a question many people are asking - actually and? that is a question - many people are asking everywhere. thank you very much. an entrepreneur who flew to space last month onjeff bezos�* blue origin flight, has died in a plane crash.
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forty—nine year old glen de vries — seen here on the right — went into orbit for ten minutes alongside actor william shatner. he expressed his hope that soon more people could have the same oppertunity. his plane crashed on thursday at around 3pm in sussex county, newjersey. another person is also reported to have died, and the crash is currently being investiagted by the federal aviation authority. space last month withjeff bezos�* company blue origin, turkey has stopped all citizens from iraq, syria and yemen from flying to belarus until further notice. the civil aviation authority in turkey said it was because of illegal migrant crossings from belarus into the european union. it's reported that, among the thousands of migrants and refugees trying to enter poland from belarus, many are of iraqi and kurdish heritage. the eu accuses belarus of engineering the current surge of migrants on the bloc�*s eastern borders. more than a thousand people are trapped between belarus and poland. our correspondentjenny hill is close to the poland—belarus border and gave us this update.
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continues on the external border you mentioned that exclusion in the polish authorities have imposed a three km exclusion zone and that means journalists, three km exclusion zone and that meansjournalists, aid agencies three km exclusion zone and that means journalists, aid agencies are unable to get any closer with a thousand men women and children have been trapped for most of the week and what are near freezing temperatures. in some did emerge from that camp and a little bit of movement, trucks arriving, breaking in what looks like wood, cut down trees that prompted polish authorities to claim that belarus is effectively preparing to create a large, more prominent migrant camp right up against the polish border and these authorities went on to say and these authorities went on to say and produce, delivering the materials to enable the people there to create that camp. they're saying,
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they do not want to let those people into their country into the eu. there telling them to go home and a british army team has been centred to aid in that. polish authorities have almost completed the construction of the fence along the border with belarus. and a british team helping them but that. my understanding is that they may be engineers. it certainly an interesting development in poland no longer an eu ally and certainly a nato partner. before we go — these are scenes outside the court in los angeles where in soon thejudge is expected to begin ending that conservatorship arrangement: the pop star britney spears could regain control of her personal life and finances — when the court in los angeles decides whether to overturn an order which originally put her father and lawyers in charge.
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good evening. it's been quite a breezy day out there today. outbreaks of rain for many of us, and also still mild for the time of year. but those stronger winds brought some big waves to the coast — this was aberystwyth a little bit earlier on. the winds are now tending to ease, and things look a bit quieter through the course of the weekend as low pressures clears away. still very mild for the time of year and mainly dry on both saturday and sunday, too. here's the low pressure that brought the showery rain at times today, and the breeze, as well, which is clearing off towards the east. as it does so, then higher pressure will start to build in from the west. so still a few splashes of rain overnight for eastern scotland, some central, southern and eastern parts of england, as well. but most places dry, some clearer spells for southwest scotland into northwest england —
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and it's here that temperatures will fall down into mid—single figures. but most of us remain in double figures — so a frost—free, mild, if somewhat cloudy start to your weekend. so saturday then, still quite a breeze around the east coast, perhaps a few spots of rain for the likes of aberdeenshire, east anglia, and the far southeast, too, and we've also got a bit more cloud working in for southwest england, wales, and northern ireland. but, in between these two areas of cloud, some sunshine through central scotland, northwest england, and the midlands right down towards the likes of the isle of wight. temperatures 10—15 celsius — so at least 3—4 degrees above average. so as we move through saturday night now and on into sunday, we've got high pressure not far away sitting both to the southwest and to the east of the uk. so this approaching weather front bumps into all that high pressure that's around. it doesn't make inroads too quickly for remembrance sunday, a lot of dry weather on sunday.
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a bit of sunshine breaking through the cloud, but generally a fairly cloudy picture for many of us, but light winds and very mild, as well, so quite a pleasant day with temperatures between 10—14 celsius. we have got that rain arriving in the northwest later on. so, as we head through remembrance sunday night and on into monday, that weather front pushes a bit further south, but it fizzles out as it does so. could bring a few splashes of rain monday morning to southern scotland, perhaps northern england, as well. a return to some sunshine for northern ireland and scotland, the north of that front stays a bit further cloudier south and east. still reasonably mild, 10—14 celsius as we head through monday afternoon. so certainly mild and settled for the next few days. things do turn a little bit cooler and more unsettled into the middle of this coming week. that's it for now, bye—bye.
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this is bbc world news, the headlines. as the un climate summit in glasgow runs into extra time, delegates are considering a third draft of an agreement to try to limit the effects of global warming. the conference president, alok sharma, has called for a final injection of "can—do spirit" the summit should have ended on friday evening, but it's now been extended to at least saturday afternoon, as delegates are due to consider a third draught of a climate deal. steve bannon, a former aide to donald trump, has been indicted by a federal grand jury. he's charged with contempt of congress, after refusing to give evidence to the committee investigating the january the sixth assault on the capitol. dutch police have used water canon on protestors, after a partial lockdown was announced by the government. for at least three weeks, shops and cafes will close early and sporting fixtures will be held behind closed doors. at ten o'clock... jane hill will be here with a full
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round up of the days news.

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