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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 13, 2021 2:00am-2:31am GMT

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welcome to bbc news. i'm alice baxter. our top stories: a last push for a meaningful agreement: cop26 continues talks into saturday. the man in charge calls for a can—do spirit. we have come a long way over the past two weeks and now, we need that final injection of that can—do spirit which is present at this cop, so that we get this shared endeavour over the line. trump ally steve bannon indicted on two counts of contempt of congress over the investigation into the attack on the capitol. hundreds of migrants trapped on the belarus border in the middle of a political stand—off.
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welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. the official deadline for an agreement at cop26 in glasgow has passed, but delegates and negotiators are now working through the night to try to sign off undertakings that can be agreed across the board. experts recognise that the agreements made at the summit will not limit global warming to under 1.5 degrees — a key threshold which would avoid the worst effects of climate change. david shukman has the latest. world leaders are singled out for failing to keep their promises, for allowing the planet to become dangerously overheated.
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on what is meant to be the last day, demonstrators laid down at the gates of cop26 to ram home the gates of cop26 to ram home the point that lives are being lost because of climate change. appeals for action came in the conference halls as well, activists calling on governments not to water down key points in the agreement — a plea echoed by the most vulnerable nations. our safety, the safety of my children, and yours, hangs in the balance. as i said to the high ambition coalition this morning, it's time for us to level up. this will be the decade that determines the rest of human history. we cannot let it slip by. but some disputes are proving really difficult to settle. over coal, and what to say about phasing it out. how often countries should update their climate plans — every year, to reflect the urgency, or less often? and how much climate aid to give the poorest nations,
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notjust now but over the coming decades? the whole point of these talks is to try to limit the rise in global temperatures, so how is that going? well, compared to pre—industrial times, we have warmed by at least 1.1 celsius and record heat waves are already becoming more frequent. above 1.5 degrees, many coral reefs are expected to die off, among a long list of other impacts. now, if everyone here keeps to the promises they have given — a big if — we are still on course for about 1.8, and that means even higher sea levels and even more people threatened by flooding. but being realistic, as things stand, a more likely outcome is 2.4, which means even longer droughts, affecting food production across vast areas of the planet. so i asked america's veteran climate envoyjohn kerry, would any of this slow down global warming?
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so, we are moving in the right direction. are we moving fast enough? no. but that is what this meeting is about. you know, scientists never said, "hey, you guys have to have this done by the end of the cop". they said "you have ten years". well, they said it was incredibly urgent. no, yeah, it is incredibly urgent and that is exactly why 65% of global gdp has said we're going to keep 1.5 degrees alive. meanwhile, as haggling continues, the conference chair made another plea for agreement. now we need that final injection of that can—do spirit which is present at this cop, so that we get this shared endeavour over the line. but emotions are running high and many delegations are worried. so for us, ambition of 1.5 is notjust a statistic, it is a matter of life and death. some among us are wasting precious time here in glasgow attempting to renegotiate
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what was already agreed. all we're asking you to do is to keep _ all we're asking you to do is to keep your— all we're asking you to do is to keep your and _ all we're asking you to do is to keep your and own - all we're asking you to do is to keep your and own your. to keep your and own your responsibilities— to keep your and own your responsibilities on- to keep your and own your responsibilities on setting | responsibilities on setting this— responsibilities on setting this crisis_ responsibilities on setting this crisis in— responsibilities on setting this crisis in motion. - responsibilities on setting. this crisis in motion. nothing less. — this crisis in motion. nothing less. nothing— this crisis in motion. nothing less, nothing more. - so a long night of negotiations lies ahead. hopes of concluding in time are fading. david shukman, bbc news, in glasgow. david sandalow is a professor at colombia university and a former senior state department and white house —— white house official. he was a climate change negotiator in the clinton and obama administrations, including the very first cop. he just returned from glasgow on thursday. hejoins me now from washington. many thanks for joining many thanks forjoining me here. that expected scheduled finishing deadline on friday, that's been and gone. should be we borrowed about that?- we borrowed about that? --be worried? _ we borrowed about that? --be
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worried? no — we borrowed about that? --be worried? no surprise _ we borrowed about that? --be worried? no surprise that - we borrowed about that? --be| worried? no surprise that these negotiations are going past the deadline, it happens in almost every one of these meetings. the last one in 2019, i think the friday deadline was missed and the negotiations ended on sunday afternoon. but some good news, i think the conference had already produced some important successes, not enough to solve the global warming problem that is the work of many years— but even during the first week of the conference we saw important announcements on producing methane emissions, or methane as we say in the states, cutting back coal use, on deforestation, on a number of other topics, so if the standard is whether progress is being made, ithink standard is whether progress is being made, i think we've already seen it. but we're not going to see a solution to the crisis at this meeting alone. you say that you are energised and positive about some of the progress that's already been made at this cop but the sticking point still includes big issues like subsidies for colds and otherfossil
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big issues like subsidies for colds and other fossil fuels, financial help for poorer nations and of course, you mentioned the agreement on coal. key coal uses and produces did not sign up to that agreement so how useful, really, is it? i that agreement so how useful, really. is it?— really, is it? ithink it is a useful start. _ really, is it? ithink it is a useful start. it— really, is it? ithink it is a useful start. it is- really, is it? ithink it is a useful start. it is not - really, is it? i think it is a l useful start. it is not nearly enough. not where we need to be. and the statement by the delegate from tuvalu in the past day, incredibly powerful about the importance for his country. the only way that that country. the only way that that country survives, and others avoid terrible damage, is if we dramatically scale back coal use. that process is only starting. we need to move much faster on that.— faster on that. you also mentioned _ faster on that. you also mentioned other - faster on that. you also mentioned other areas | faster on that. you also i mentioned other areas of progress reached at this cop26 but where had you hoped to see more and what do you think those in the room could have done to perhaps push for a little bit more?— done to perhaps push for a little bit more? you know, i think probably _ little bit more? you know, i think probably the - little bit more? you know, i think probably the single i little bit more? you know, i. think probably the single most
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important area is coal that we were just discussing. important area is coal that we werejust discussing. i important area is coal that we were just discussing. i think and hope there will be more on that and i hope there will be more by way of mobilising capital of this problem and their ability to make parts of that, one is public money but even more important is private capital. and in the past year we have seen the beginnings of major mobilisation, on private capital to help solve this problem but, that needs to be multiplied several times. we need significantly more to really get a handle on the global warming problem. you globalwarming problem. you were a climate _ global warming problem. you were a climate change negotiator in the clinton and obama administrations. those two presidents are credited with making great strides on the environmental issue. to what degree do you think president biden should also be given credit on that front? i given credit on that front? i think president biden deserves enormous credit. he has started ijy enormous credit. he has started by appointing an all star team,
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secretary kerry has decades of experience on this issue and brings enormous stature to the role of presidential climate envoy and that is the beginning. you go down the list of his national climate advisor, his secretaries, they are extraordinary. then he has made very serious commitments on the part of the united states to significantly reduce emissions. it is developing regulations to address these issues, pulling policies in congress and has already accomplished a lot and i think president biden is doing a greatjob. president biden is doing a greatjob— president biden is doing a ureat 'ob. , , , great 'ob. very briefly, you were great job. very briefly, you were at the _ great job. very briefly, you were at the first _ great job. very briefly, you were at the first ever- great job. very briefly, you were at the first ever cop. | great job. very briefly, you - were at the first ever cop. how did this one compare? {line were at the first ever cop. how did this one compare? one ma'or difference. — did this one compare? one ma'or difference, alice, d did this one compare? one ma'or difference, alice, isd did this one compare? one ma'or difference, alice, is the i difference, alice, is the difference, alice, is the difference in profile. 25 years ago, this issue did not bring heads of state to meetings in the same way that we saw at this cop at the beginning. he did not get the media attention that this meeting did and attention from major financial players. we still do not have enough attention on this issue globally but it's so much more thanit
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globally but it's so much more than it was 25 years ago and i think that is progress. fascinating. interesting to get your insights. david sandalow. good to speak to you. thank you for having _ good to speak to you. thank you for having me. _ one of donald trump's former aides, steve bannon, has been indicted by a federal grand jury. he's charged with two counts of contempt of congress in connection with his failure to comply with a summons issued by a house select committee which is investigating the storming of the capitol in january. our north america correspondent peter bowes told us more about the charges. well, he has been charged with two counts. so the first count is refusing to hand over documents that the committee had requested — documents that the committee believes are relevant to their investigation. the second count is for refusing to appear in person to give a deposition to the committee. he steadfastly refused. he is claiming executive
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privilege, which is really stems from something that the former president donald trump has said some time ago — almost an instruction to some of his closest allies — that executive privilege could be used. this is the confidentiality that often is applied to white house documents, conversations in the white house. but there is a tremendous amount of legal debate over whether a former president — not least his workers, his advisers, whether they could actually use that kind of rule to stop them being called before a congressional committee. that is going to be at the heart of the matter when this is decided. as you say, peter, this has really brought the whole issue of executive privilege to the forefront. what has donald trump had to say about all of this? well, donald trump has not, as far as we know, responded to today's developments. he has been actually
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relatively quiet — although his lawyers have actually been very busy this week because, using the same argument, executive privilege, he is trying to stop the release of some other documents from the white house and telephone records and visitor logs, and they will be the subject of an appeal court hearing in a couple of weeks' time, and donald is fighting to keep those items secret, so it all goes in to essentially the same issue, as to whether that defence can be used to hinder the work of this committee. much of europe is facing a surge in coronavirus cases and measures are being reimposed across the continent. the netherlands will begin a 3—week partial lockdown on saturday night. non—essential shops, cafes, bars and nightclubs will have to close early, there will be no audiences at football matches, and social distancing will be enforced. courtney bembridge reports.
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fury on the streets of the hague after the announcement that restrictions are back for another three weeks. protesters through fireworks and smoke bombs and were met with water cannon. others spent the night soaking up the nightlife while they could. cases have been steadily rising over the past two months and hospitals are once again under pressure. that's despite the country's relatively high vaccination rate. authorities say more than two—thirds of the patients in intensive care are unvaccinated at the waning effectiveness of vaccines over time is also playing a part, particularly in the elderly population. dutch government plans to startjabs next month. in the meantime,
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prime minister mark rutte says urgent action is needed. translation:— urgent action is needed. translation: this is a hard blow for a — translation: this is a hard blow for a few _ translation: this is a hard blow for a few weeks - translation: this is a hard | blow for a few weeks because the virus is everywhere throughout the country, in all sectors and in all ages. the measures _ sectors and in all ages. the measures will _ sectors and in all ages. the measures will be _ sectors and in all ages. the measures will be western europe's first partial lockdown this winter but other countries will soon follow suit. germany is considering restrictions and austria plans to lockdown the unvaccinated with spot checks and hefty fines for those caught flouting the rules. translation: i caught flouting the rules. translation:— caught flouting the rules. translation: ., , . translation: i would very much su ort translation: i would very much support nationwide _ translation: i would very much support nationwide regulations. l support nationwide regulations. it just support nationwide regulations. itjust has support nationwide regulations. it just has to support nationwide regulations. itjust has to be clear what is meant by a lockdown for the unvaccinated. in my opinion, there are still the number of open questions that need to be clarified because we must not unsettle the public by making different claims.— different claims. around one third of australians - different claims. around one third of australians have - different claims. around one third of australians have yet| third of australians have yet to have their first dose and the country has one of the lowest vaccination rates in the eu -- lowest vaccination rates in the eu —— austrians. the world health organization has warned
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that europe is heading towards another 500,000 deaths by february and it says vaccinations alone will not be enough to bring the outbreak under control. courtney bembridge, bbc news. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: �*stronger�* — britney spears back in charge of her life. the bombastic establishment outsider donald trump has defied the pollsters to take the keys to the oval office. i feel great about the election results. i voted for him because i genuinely believe that he cares about the country. it's keeping the candidate's name always in the public. eye that counts. success or failure depends not only on public display, - but on the local campaign l headquarters and the heavy routine work of their women volunteers. i berliners from both east and west linked hands and danced around their liberated territory. and with nobody to stop them, it wasn't long before the first attempts were made to destroy
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the structure itself. yasser arafat, who dominated the palestinian cause for so long, has died. palestinian authority has declared a state of mourning. after 17 years of discussion, the result was greeted with an outburst ofjoy, leaving ministers who long felt only grudgingly accepted among the ranks of clergy suddenly felt welcome. this is bbc news. with me, alice baxter. the latest headlines: negotiations continue into the night at the cop26 summit in glasgow. delegates are now working on a third draft of a climate deal. the man in charge calls for one last push to get the deal over the line, but it's still not clear where compromises will be made. the humanitarian crisis along the border
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between belarus and poland is worsening, as more migrants continue to head to the border, only to be caught in a political limbo between the two nations. alexander lukashenko, the belarusian president, is accused of deliberately orchestrating the crisis to challenge sanctions imposed on his country last year. our correspondent steve rosenberg sent this report from belarus. by day, the scale of this migrant crisis becomes clear. belarus' border with poland transformed into a camp for those desperate to get to europe. tonight, for the first time, belarusian border guards agreed to take us into the camp, right up to the border. behind the barbed wire, the european union, just metres away. many here are kurds from the middle east. the eu believes that belarus
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helped them get here, that the country is facilitating illegal migration into europe — revenge for sanctions. but poland won't let them in. we are, like, homeless. we don't have any place to stay there. it's about whether it's too cold — we just collect fire and burning our trees to make our bodies heat. and but still, we hope. we never give up. we've been told there are more than 2000 people in this camp, living in pretty basic conditions. this story is a very human drama, but the backdrop, that's geopolitics. the migrant crisis is ratcheting up east—west tension. near the border, paratroopers from belarus and russia held joint exercises, signalling whose side the kremlin�*s on. increasing, too, is alexander lukashenko's rhetoric.
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this week, he threatened to block the flow of russian gas to europe if the eu imposes more sanctions on belarus. but those who see belarus as a stepping stone to the eu, they couldn't care less about sanctions or geopolitics — they just want a betterfuture. many of them have paid thousands of dollars for package tours that bring them to belarus and deliver them to the border with europe, but no further. for most, the journey stops here. and so, they have to wait, in the cold, while governments argue, waiting and hoping to be let through. steve rosenberg, bbc news, belarus. nearly 1,200 people crossed the english channel by boat to reach the uk on thursday — a new record for migrant crossings in a single day. more than 23,000 people have arrived from france
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in small boats so far this year — nearly three times the number in 2020. mark easton reports from dover. it was a day the uk lost control of its border. 1200 arrivals in 2a hours up the gangplank at dover's tug haven and into a hired marquee for processing, but the border force just couldn't cope. there's limited sanitary facilities. there's no way to get them hot food. it was never designed to be used in the way it is now. but there's no way to move these folk on to their next destination. the entire system is broken from end to end. conditions in the tent last night were described by one official as a humanitarian crisis, with 1,000 people traumatised, vulnerable and desperate — including, i'm told, at least one pregnant woman forced to sleep on the floor. the home office had expected migrant crossings to fall in the autumn but calm and mild conditions have actually seen record numbers attempt to reach the kent coast, despite a government commitment last year to make the route unviable.
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and the french have stopped over 18,000 attempted crossings so far this year, but the numbers speak for themselves. it is disappointing and shocking just how many migrants have managed to cross the channel. data obtained by the refugee council shows that in the 17 months to may this year, 70% of the 12,000 people arriving in small boats came from five countries — over 3,000 from iran, 2,000 from iraq and around 1,000 each from sudan, syria and vietnam. they're people fleeing war, persecution and terror. they want to come to the uk because they're able to speak some english. they might have a connection through their networks to the uk through family and they simply want to get on, rebuild their lives and make a contribution to our economy.
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the weather has been worse today with few migrants crossing — a relief to the border force, who have been working around the clock to clear the backlog of hundreds of exhausted and desperate people. mark easton, bbc news, dover. an entrepreneur who flew to space last month onjeff bezos' blue origin flight, has died in a plane crash. 49—year—old glen de vries, seen here on the right, went into orbit for ten minutes, alongside actor william shatner. another person is also reported to have died, and the crash is currently being investigated by the federal aviation authority. ajudge in los angeles has terminated britney spears' conservatorship, which means the 39—year—old will regain control of her personal life and finances for the first time in 13 years. the conservatorship was first imposed on the pop star amid concerns over her mental health, and gave her father control over britney spears' finances, career decisions, and personal affairs. the bbc�*s david willis told us how the free britney movement
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reacted to the news. three hours ago outside this courtroom when the decision was announced, came out on a tweet from somebody inside the court, apparently, those fans went absolutely berserk. they were so ecstatic, there were cheers and chanting, people were dancing in the street here. because this is what they had been hoping for for such a long time. britney spears basically following this decision is free not only to have control, complete control over her own financial dealings, but she is also free to do more arcane things like drive her own car, for example, have more children if she chooses to do so, get married, for example, to her fiance. as far as performing and recording to the studio is
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concerned, she was not able to do that all the time her father jamie was in control of her estate. just a month or so ago jamie spears was relieved of his control over her life and now the conservatorship, as a whole, has gone away and that begs the question will we see britney spears back on to, is some sort of com —— come back just around the corner for her? of just around the corner for her? of course the hordes of jubilant fans, pictures of them now, they will be yes. some of the details you pick out about this conservatorship are extraordinary for example the control over whether or not she can have more children or not. is it fair to say that what's happened to britney spears has really raised a national debate within america over the legitimacy over the conservatorship tool as a whole? , .
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whole? very much so. and there are those — whole? very much so. and there are those in _ whole? very much so. and there are those in congress _ whole? very much so. and there are those in congress who - whole? very much so. and there are those in congress who are i are those in congress who are advancing that particular argument. they are saying that in many cases these are sort of guardianship restrictions are outdated and, in many cases, the proceedings are conducted in secret, as they were, indeed, in this particular case such a long time. but the thought is really bad for something like this to go on for so long legs are so many different questions, not least because any time in which this conservatorship has been in place, britney spears has replaced four albums, two of which went platinum. she has had a four year residency in las vegas which brought in millions of dollars, and she served as a judge of shows such as american idol, and the x factor, begging the question how much support in her life did you really need ms makin that was at the heart, of course, of the #freebritney campaign, who maintained all along that essentially britney
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spears was being held hostage ijy spears was being held hostage by her father. david willis there. you can reach me on twitter. i'm @bbcbaxter. we would love to hear from you. do stay with us. hello. well, the weather's quiet out there right now, and that's how it's going to stay through the course of the weekend. we have some sunny spells in the forecast, but, generally speaking, i think a fair amount of cloud on the way. and it is going to be mild and a particularly mild morning, way above the average for the time of the year. now, this cloud is a low pressure which swept across the country during the course of friday. here is early hours of saturday out in the north sea. and in its legacy, this high pressure here, this ridge of high pressure, builds in. but it's also a fairly cloudy area of high pressure. some breaks in the cloud through the night, around scotland, maybe the lake district, into lancashire, but further south pretty overcast. and look at those temperatures — 11 degrees in the south, seven degrees in the north. it should be closer to between three and six degrees, really, this time of the year. so here's the weather for saturday, sunshine developing across central areas of the uk.
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in fact, some areas could end up being quite sunny, but either side of that, in the east and the west, i think a fair bit of cloud. really mild, 1a degrees in the south, around 12 or 13 in the north. so high pressure stays in charge of the weather through the course of the weekend, but this weather front starts to nudge in during the course of sunday, so there will be some rain around in the western isles, but the vast majority of us a dry day. and again, sunny spells possible almost anywhere on remembrance sunday. and again, look at the temperatures — 1a in london, 1a in belfast, a little bit fresher there in scotland, 11 degrees. the average is closer to around ten, 12 this time of the year, so we're not massively above the average during the day. again, it's the nights that are really, really mild. here's monday's weather forecast. bit of a change. some rain getting in, light, though, into perhaps northern parts of england, maybe wales too, but generally speaking, it stays on the mild side and dry for most of us, at least. so i think a cloudier day at least on the way for monday. and then tuesday, perhaps a little bit of rain getting into scotland as well, but from around wednesday onwards, that's when the weather is expected to turn a little bit more unsettled. but on the whole, looking at the picture, it could be a lot worse this
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time of the year. it is a spell of relatively quiet weather upon us right now. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news.
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the headlines: as the un climate summit in glasgow runs into extra time, delegates are considering a third draft of an agreement to try to put a limit on global warming. the conference president, alok sharma, has called for a final injection of "can—do spirit." an ally of former president trump, steve bannon, has been indicted by a federal grand jury, charged with two counts of contempt of congress. mr bannon refused to give a deposition or supply documents to the committee investigating the attack on the us capitol last january. more than a thousand migrants are spending what for many is a fifth night trapped at the border between belarus and poland amid a continuing stand—off between the two countries. us presidentjoe biden has expressed his concern about the situation on the border.
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the prime minister has made a plea for people

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