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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 14, 2021 9:30am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm victoria derbyshire. the headlines: in the last few minutes it's been announced the queen will not attend today's remembrance day service in london after spraining her back. a new global climate deal is struck in glasgow but pledges still aren't enough to limit warming to 1.5 degrees. but a previous commitment to phase out coal is watered down at the last—minute by india and china. and the netherlands becomes the first country in western europe to re—enter a partial coronavirus lockdown this autumn.
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let's have a look at the morning's papers. with me are the author and journalist, shyama perera, and the chief political correspondent at the times, henry zeffman. let's take a look at today's front pages. the sunday telegraph reports on the moment cop26 president alok sharma's emotional apology to delegates for how the talks ended. the paper leads on an article written by the foreign secretary liz truss — in which she warns vladimir putin to the end "shameful manufactured migrant crisis" on europe's eastern border. the observer says the climate deal falls far short of what's needed. it also has a story about us businesswomanjennifer arcuri — with the headline: "howjohnson pledged help for my business to win my love". the sunday mirror leads with another
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story about conservative mps having a second job. the mail on sunday claims the outgoing head of the uk border force has triggered a political row by using strong language to describe the country's borders. and in the sunday express, the prime minister vows to pledges £50 million to find a cure for motor neurone disease. so let's begin. the last minute drama at cop26. it was interesting to see a genuine apology from a member of the cabinet. mr sharma is quoted as saying i am deeply sorry. india financed us all with china alongside the changing everything at the last minute ——finessed. bringing
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fossil fuels down and not out which none of us know what that means but the truth is this is a really positive ending because we have got fossil fuels on the map for the first time and what was really evident was the wish of everybody there to try and find consensus. henry, what is your take on this? it is certainly quite positive for exactly _ is certainly quite positive for exactly the reasons just is certainly quite positive for exactly the reasonsjust mentioned but nowhere near as positive as some people _ but nowhere near as positive as some people and _ but nowhere near as positive as some people and government were hoping 'ust people and government were hoping just a _ people and government were hoping just a few— people and government were hoping just a few weeks ago, let alone the activists_ just a few weeks ago, let alone the activists and young people protesting outside in the summit. i can totally— protesting outside in the summit. i can totally understand why alok sharma — can totally understand why alok sharma who has been working on this for a year— sharma who has been working on this for a year and flying around the world _ for a year and flying around the world are — for a year and flying around the world are trying to get countries with whom the uk does not necessarily have great dramatic relations — necessarily have great dramatic relations on site, why has
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frustration poured out. phased down, you understand what phased out means but phased _ you understand what phased out means but phased down is unclear. there is one other— but phased down is unclear. there is one other element in which this package — one other element in which this package has been watered down, the commitment of countries to come back with clear— commitment of countries to come back with clear plans how they will put these _ with clear plans how they will put these pledges into action at the summit— these pledges into action at the summit next year in egypt will now take into _ summit next year in egypt will now take into account national circumstances which could mean all sorts— circumstances which could mean all sorts of— circumstances which could mean all sorts of things to all sorts of polluters _ sorts of things to all sorts of polluters so it is quite a mix and that is— polluters so it is quite a mix and that is why— polluters so it is quite a mix and that is why i understand why alok sharma _ that is why i understand why alok sharma look pretty distraught yesterday. sharma look pretty distraught esterda . sharma look pretty distraught esterda. , ., , , sharma look pretty distraught esterda. , , , ., yesterday. the promises they have made at the _ yesterday. the promises they have made at the moment _ yesterday. the promises they have made at the moment means - yesterday. the promises they have made at the moment means in - yesterday. the promises they have made at the moment means in the yesterday. the promises they have - made at the moment means in the next decade there will be global warming of around 2.4 celsius according to climate action tracker, says the sunday telegraph which everyone around the world knows will lead to people losing their lives and
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livelihoods it people losing their lives and livelihood— people losing their lives and livelihood , ., , ., livelihoods it is a sign of quite how dire the _ livelihoods it is a sign of quite how dire the situation - livelihoods it is a sign of quite how dire the situation is - livelihoods it is a sign of quite how dire the situation is and l livelihoods it is a sign of quite how dire the situation is and i | how dire the situation is and i think everyone _ how dire the situation is and i think everyone admits - how dire the situation is and i think everyone admits that. l how dire the situation is and i think everyone admits that. i | how dire the situation is and i - think everyone admits that. i think the summit— think everyone admits that. i think the summit is a question of mitigating the impact of really serious — mitigating the impact of really serious climate change rather than reversing _ serious climate change rather than reversing it, we are far too far down — reversing it, we are far too far down the _ reversing it, we are far too far down the path for that. it explains why chiha — down the path for that. it explains why china and india in particular watering — why china and india in particular watering down the package at the last minute and that was met by such a furious _ last minute and that was met by such a furious response by all sorts of countries — a furious response by all sorts of countries ranging from mexico right down _ countries ranging from mexico right down to— countries ranging from mexico right down to some of those tiny animations for whom this is really tangible — animations for whom this is really tanuible. a, ,, ._ animations for whom this is really tanuible. ,, ,, ., tangible. mail on sunday, shyama uk border boss — tangible. mail on sunday, shyama uk border boss. border— tangible. mail on sunday, shyama uk border boss. border such _ tangible. mail on sunday, shyama uk border boss. border such pain - tangible. mail on sunday, shyama uk border boss. border such pain in - border boss. border such pain in the, he uses at cruiser word for backside. .
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the, he uses at cruiser word for backside-— the, he uses at cruiser word for backside. ., ., ., , , . backside. paul lincoln made a speech as he stepped — backside. paul lincoln made a speech as he stepped down _ backside. paul lincoln made a speech as he stepped down as _ backside. paul lincoln made a speech as he stepped down as chair - backside. paul lincoln made a speech as he stepped down as chair of - backside. paul lincoln made a speech as he stepped down as chair of the i as he stepped down as chair of the border force. the paper goes on to quote from the rest of the speech which includes lines like we are all human beings, all mammals, all rocks, plants and rivers. bloody rivers are such a pain in the bloody backside. it reads as if he doesn't believe in boarders and i think this is quite interesting with what henry has been saying about all those islands affected by global warming, this is a slight, tiny taste of displaced peoples. these people have been displaced by wars and by human tragedies, by climate tragedies. there will be far more people try to comment and we do need to perhaps rethink boarders. mr lincoln has been working on it, and presumably the knowledge she has gained during that time is far more detailed and granular than what you and i read in the newspapers. what has led him to
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this decision or view, i think is quite interesting. taste this decision or view, i think is quite interesting.— this decision or view, i think is quite interesting. we should make clear the sky _ quite interesting. we should make clear the sky is _ quite interesting. we should make clear the sky is not _ quite interesting. we should make clear the sky is not in _ quite interesting. we should make clear the sky is not in charge - quite interesting. we should make clear the sky is not in charge any l clear the sky is not in charge any more and is the outgoing head of the border force left last month as part of our shake—up by the home secretary. the paper asks if it helps explain why more than 23,500 people crossed the channel so far this year and it is a real issue with sokol read wall conservative mps, those newer mps ? might those so called conservative red wall mps. i was speaking to red wall mp last week he said his constituency could
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not be further from dover and the south coast where the migrants arrive this is the number one topic so certainly it is a real hot button issue for the conservative party and their voters. and for many who have come across from the labour party because they don't believe labour takes these issues seriously enough. 0n the main part of the report is quite hard to work out the context of this speech. it seems some of it is bought from shane macgowan of the ogues. it
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bought from shane macgowan of the ouues. ,., , bought from shane macgowan of the ouues. , ., , ogues. it sounds actually as if he is speaking _ ogues. it sounds actually as if he is speaking against _ ogues. it sounds actually as if he is speaking against orders. - is speaking against orders. ——pogues. it does not read as if he is complaining boarders are hard to enforce. _ is complaining boarders are hard to enforce, appears to be saying we shouldn't — enforce, appears to be saying we shouldn't have boarders.- enforce, appears to be saying we shouldn't have boarders. henry, you are back with — shouldn't have boarders. henry, you are back with us, _ shouldn't have boarders. henry, you are back with us, the _ shouldn't have boarders. henry, you are back with us, the screen - shouldn't have boarders. henry, you are back with us, the screen froze. l are back with us, the screen froze. you did not know if all lincoln was actually courting shane macgowan from the pogues. . the front page is liz truss telling vladimir putin to stop the shameful migrant row.
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belarus is being accused, it would appear with great and good reason of stoking hatred and stoking a deliberate refugee situation crisis that should not exist. what liz truss has said in the sunday telegraph as britain will not look away and not allow european allies to bear the brunt of a carefully crafted crisis which she says is distracting from a litany of abhorrent acts and human rights violations so it is quite our hard—hitting piece and probably very welcome by most people but what difference it makes, i don't know. you think vladimir putin will take any notice of liz truss? i
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you think vladimir putin will take any notice of liz truss?— you think vladimir putin will take any notice of liz truss? i think he will take notice _ any notice of liz truss? i think he will take notice of— any notice of liz truss? i think he will take notice of europe, - any notice of liz truss? i think he will take notice of europe, in - any notice of liz truss? i think he l will take notice of europe, in which i will take notice of europe, in which i included — will take notice of europe, in which i included the uk in this instance, trying _ i included the uk in this instance, trying to— i included the uk in this instance, trying to urge them to intervene on their behalf to stop belarus bringing these migrants to the polish — bringing these migrants to the polish border and intensifying the problem — polish border and intensifying the problem with migration on the border which _ problem with migration on the border which eventually culminate at calais and dover — which eventually culminate at calais and dover. i understand why liz truss _ and dover. i understand why liz truss it's — and dover. i understand why liz truss it's making this allegation and why— truss it's making this allegation and why the foreign office and government are concerned and confused — government are concerned and confused by the many provocations from vladimir putin. we have talked about— from vladimir putin. we have talked about cop26 and the russian border and a _ about cop26 and the russian border and a lot— about cop26 and the russian border and a lot of— about cop26 and the russian border and a lot of reports last few days
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of russian — and a lot of reports last few days of russian troops moved to the border— of russian troops moved to the border in — of russian troops moved to the border in ukraine, potentially giving — border in ukraine, potentially giving the capability to launch some sort of— giving the capability to launch some sort of invasion. i think we will hear— sort of invasion. i think we will hear a — sort of invasion. i think we will hear a lot— sort of invasion. i think we will hear a lot more from liz truss about vladimir— hear a lot more from liz truss about vladimir putin and what russian ntight— vladimir putin and what russian might be — vladimir putin and what russian might be doing at the moment. very hard for— might be doing at the moment. very hard for the — might be doing at the moment. very hard for the uk and the west in general— hard for the uk and the west in general to— hard for the uk and the west in general to stop vladimir putin from pursuing _ general to stop vladimir putin from pursuing a — general to stop vladimir putin from pursuing a vision of russia which she believes in. let pursuing a vision of russia which she believes in.— pursuing a vision of russia which she believes in. let me stay with ou for she believes in. let me stay with you for this _ she believes in. let me stay with you for this very _ she believes in. let me stay with you for this very detailed - she believes in. let me stay with you for this very detailed story i you for this very detailed story regarding grant shapps, the transport secretary, and what they say is a secret unit called the airfield advisory team which is set up. airfield advisory team which is set u, , ., airfield advisory team which is set up. grant shapps is the transport secretary and _ up. grant shapps is the transport secretary and the _ up. grant shapps is the transport secretary and the department - up. grant shapps is the transport . secretary and the department seems to be there to advise airfields but
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crucially— to be there to advise airfields but crucially has objected to various plans _ crucially has objected to various plans from other parts of the uk government to build on private airfields — government to build on private airfields to build more houses, which — airfields to build more houses, which is — airfields to build more houses, which is the key government priority and also _ which is the key government priority and also thereby a reduction in flying — and also thereby a reduction in flying stop this unit was set up by grant _ flying stop this unit was set up by grant shapps last year to very little — grant shapps last year to very little public awareness is fascinating and the fact that they have objected to building in one case _ have objected to building in one case and — have objected to building in one case and airfield where grant shapps. _ case and airfield where grant shapps, and enthusiastic private pilot, _ shapps, and enthusiastic private pilot, has— shapps, and enthusiastic private pilot, has flown is potentially very troubling — pilot, has flown is potentially very troubling. governments deny anything wrong _ troubling. governments deny anything wrong about that in this report but ithink— wrong about that in this report but i think it _ wrong about that in this report but i think it does raise some questions about— i think it does raise some questions about whether grant shapps and his passion _ about whether grant shapps and his passion for— about whether grant shapps and his passion for private flying might have _ passion for private flying might have got— passion for private flying might have got in the way of government
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policy— making have got in the way of government policy—making or have got in the way of government policy— making or altered have got in the way of government policy—making or altered policy. policy— making or altered policy. because — policy—making or altered policy. because grant shapps sometimes uses this airfield in 0xfordshire where the airfield advisory team successfully apparently persuaded the government housing agency to pull plans for thousands of homes, because he takes off from there sometimes, that is why the sunday times are suggesting that? i’m sometimes, that is why the sunday times are suggesting that? i'm sure he would deny _ times are suggesting that? i'm sure he would deny that. _ times are suggesting that? i'm sure he would deny that. i _ times are suggesting that? i'm sure he would deny that. i making - times are suggesting that? i'm sure he would deny that. i making sure i he would deny that. i making sure that is the link _ he would deny that. i making sure that is the link at _ he would deny that. i making sure that is the link at the _ he would deny that. i making sure that is the link at the sunday - he would deny that. i making sure l that is the link at the sunday times is making? what do you think of the story? simic it is bizarre grant shapps has donated £2 million to gain access to private consultancy, a scheme from a texas—based firm and he is separately funded a scheme to
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subsidise navigation equipment for recreational pilots which government sources last night admitted the department for transport spent £i.i department for transport spent £1.1 million on it so far. there is something here that optionally needs to be investigated and certainly has the hair running at the sunday times and i suspect this will take off, if i may use that phrase over the next few days. we heard the breaking news that the queen will not be attending the remembrance day service at the cenotaph because she has a sprained back according to buckingham palace. it would have been a first public appearance in three weeks after having to go into hospitalfor tests. the mail on sunday had this interesting photograph of members of the royal family 2019 interesting photograph of members of the royalfamily 2019 members of interesting photograph of members of the royal family 2019 members of the royalfamily at the the royal family 2019 members of the royal family at the annual royal british legion festival of remembrance at the royal albert hall and the male on sunday suggesting it
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is quite a slimmed down royalfamily these days. it is quite a slimmed down royal family these da s. , ., , these days. it is. people in the 2019 version — these days. it is. people in the 2019 version you _ these days. it is. people in the 2019 version you have - these days. it is. people in the 2019 version you have prince l these days. it is. people in the - 2019 version you have prince harry and meghan and prince andrew, the duke of— and meghan and prince andrew, the duke of york who for various reasons are not— duke of york who for various reasons are not in— duke of york who for various reasons are not in the— duke of york who for various reasons are not in the royal family at least publicly— are not in the royal family at least publicly at— are not in the royal family at least publicly at the moment. what mail on sunday— publicly at the moment. what mail on sunday could not have known when publishing — sunday could not have known when publishing the photographs are the royals _ publishing the photographs are the royals who were in the box at the royal _ royals who were in the box at the royal albert hall are the royals who will be _ royal albert hall are the royals who will be in _ royal albert hall are the royals who will be in attendance today, without the queen — will be in attendance today, without the queen. it shows you the royal family— the queen. it shows you the royal family has— the queen. it shows you the royal family has had a bad few years and has faced _ family has had a bad few years and has faced crisis after crisis. charles— has faced crisis after crisis. charles has always had this vision of a slimmed down monarchy,, very intense _ of a slimmed down monarchy,, very
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intense without harry and meghan, it should _ intense without harry and meghan, it should reflect the line of who would become _ should reflect the line of who would become monarch. | should reflect the line of who would become monarch.— become monarch. i think it is really sad because — become monarch. i think it is really sad because many _ become monarch. i think it is really sad because many of— become monarch. i think it is really sad because many of us _ become monarch. i think it is really sad because many of us are - sad because many of us are continuing in a lockdown situation so this year i didn't want enough to actually see copies of —— copies being sold although i gave to the british legion. —— poppies. at the cenotaph is when we all get together so it is a shame the queen will not be there but it is great she was at the service. she is getting old and as old as many of the veterans. front page of the son has this
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headline crown v the crown, what is that about? the royalfamily headline crown v the crown, what is that about? the royal family has taken advice whether it can sue over series five of the the crown witch has not come out. i assume this is after series three in series four which took us through the story of charles and diana. i would have sued 0livia colman for presenting the queen is so clumsy and inscrutable with nothing behind the eyes so i would have been talking to solicitors a long time ago but now it is to close to the bone when you come to modern times. so it is to close to the bone when you come to modern times.— come to modern times. so they are takin: come to modern times. so they are taking advice- _ come to modern times. so they are taking advice. i _ come to modern times. so they are taking advice. i think— come to modern times. so they are taking advice. i think this _ come to modern times. so they are taking advice. i think this is - taking advice. i think this is probably a warning to everybody that if you can bring it down a bit, bring it down a bit.— if you can bring it down a bit, bring it down a bit. henry, can i talk to you _
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bring it down a bit. henry, can i talk to you about _ bring it down a bit. henry, can i talk to you about strictly - bring it down a bit. henry, can i talk to you about strictly come, dancing, do you watch it? i talk to you about strictly come, dancing, do you watch it? i watched it for the first _ dancing, do you watch it? i watched it for the first time _ dancing, do you watch it? i watched it for the first time ever _ dancing, do you watch it? i watched it for the first time ever last - it for the first time ever last night, rose and giovanni, she is deaf, she is an actor from eastenders. that is not really the story today, i reckon. we are going to show our viewers this in case you missed it. rose ayling ellis and giovanni pernice! # so if you want the truth #
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they danced to silence and it was so emotional. have you seen the clip on social media?— social media? when i watched it for the first time _ social media? when i watched it for the first time two _ social media? when i watched it for the first time two weeks _ social media? when i watched it for the first time two weeks ago - social media? when i watched it for the first time two weeks ago i - social media? when i watched it for the first time two weeks ago i saw. the first time two weeks ago i saw rose and giovanni and i was amazed by her ability to dance, given her deafness, and i did see the clip this morning and thought it was amazing and very moving and i'm sure lots of people will feel the same way. it lots of people will feel the same wa . , ., . lots of people will feel the same wa. , ., . way. it is doing so much good in terms of people _ way. it is doing so much good in terms of people taking - way. it is doing so much good in terms of people taking up - way. it is doing so much good in terms of people taking up and i terms of people taking up and learning sign language. i terms of people taking up and learning sign language. i watched it this morning _ learning sign language. i watched it this morning and _ learning sign language. i watched it this morning and i _ learning sign language. i watched it this morning and i was _ learning sign language. i watched it this morning and i was honestly - learning sign language. i watched it| this morning and i was honestlyjust crying _ this morning and i was honestlyjust crying because it wasjust this morning and i was honestlyjust crying because it was just lovely and so — crying because it was just lovely and so heart—warming and especially in the _ and so heart—warming and especially in the wake — and so heart—warming and especially in the wake of my children in need when _ in the wake of my children in need when you — in the wake of my children in need when you see all those people who extraordinarily get through life with all— extraordinarily get through life with all sorts of impediments and this young — with all sorts of impediments and this young woman is fabulous and a
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wonderful— this young woman is fabulous and a wonderful poster child for us all getting — wonderful poster child for us all getting into learning sign language and taking those small disabilities that we _ and taking those small disabilities that we can't see far more seriously. mike wants very much. thanks— seriously. mike wants very much. thanks very— seriously. mike wants very much. thanks very much. there was plenty of drama in rugby's autumn internationals — scotland losing despite a valiant effort from stuart hogg, while england and ireland both secured eye—catching wins. ben croucher reports. they do haka. new zealand — the most revered, possibly most feared team in world rugby. well, maybe not for ireland. they'd beaten the all blacks just twice before, the third was full of charm. where they faced the intimidation
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without trepidation, where the forwards ran through the all blacks like backs. the penalties were celebrated like tries, the victory was celebrated like few before in dublin, 29—20. there were personal milestones to cheer at murrayfield. two stuart hogg tries made it a record—equalling 24 for scotland. it was in a losing cause as south africa scored two of their own, and put the boot in. they'll travel to twickenham next week to find an england team hitting their stride. freddie steward set them on course for an eighth straight win over australia. jamie blamire may not have such speed, but those in green and gold still couldn't catch him. england's captain said they could still play better — the world champions next saturday might have something to fear. ben croucher, bbc news. england's women face canada later today — whilst wales's women continued their revival with victory over south africa
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at cardiff arms park. last weekend's win overjapan ended a two—year losing streak and they were imprssive again, carys phillips scoring a hat—trick of tries as they won by 29 points to 19. they face canada next in their final autumn international. england lost their test series against france in wheelchair rugby league 2—0. they were beaten 39—26 in the second match in gillingham. they did recover from a 15 point defecit, coming to within a point thanks to this penalty from nathan collins, but in the end world champions france were too strong. the sides should have been playing in a world cup but it's been put back a year because of the pandemic. gareth bale got his 100th cap for wales as they thrashed belarus 5—1 in their world cup qualifier in cardiff. and he marked the milestone by setting up liverpool's neco williams for their second goal which came afterjust 20 minutes. wales are already
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guaranteed a play—off place — and if they get a point in theirfinal game against belgium — they'll finish second in the group which would ensure a home draw in that play—off. really pleased. we knew it would come down to goal difference, as well. even when we were 2—0 up at half—time, we said starting the second half we need to think about the first and get the goal. thankfully, we did. i thought we were clinical tonight when we got the chances. arsenal's women dropped points for the first time in the wsl this season — and only a very late goal saved them from defeat at tottenham. spurs had never taken a point against arsenal in the league — and an upset was on the cards when rachel williams bundled in the opener at the hive. but vivienne miedema scored a stoppage time equaliser, to keep arsenal four points clear at the top of the table.
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lewis hamilton will be hoping for another remarkable comeback at tonight's sao paolo grand prix in brazil, as he tries to revive his title hopes. the world champion had to start the sprint qualigying race from last place, after his car was found to have broken the rules. and he fought his way up to finish fifth — but a five—place penalty for a new engine means he'll be tenth on the grid for the grand prix. his team—mate valtteri bottas is on pole ahead of max verstappen who leads hamilton by 21 points in the chamopionship race. when the t20 world cup started almost a month ago, not many would have predicted we'd be seeing australia and new zealand in the final. but the sides play for the title in dubai later —
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and australia captain aaron finch thinks it's going to be a good one. we play quite a bit against new zealand now and we always have great battles regardless of the format. and, yeah, it's exciting to be playing against new zealand. they're a great team and lead super by kane williamson. so it's just one of those things that both teams seem to have found their way into each other�*s path along the way in some tournaments. so it's really exciting. (sheffield boxer kid galahad suffered a shock defeat in the first sheffield boxer kid galahad suffered a shock defeat in the first defence of his ibf world featherweight title. fighting in his home town, he started as hot favourite against 35—year—old kiko martinez of spain, a fighter whose best days were assumed to be behind him. but galahad was floored by a strong right hand at the end of the fifth round and the fight was stopped just seconds into the sixth. promoter eddie hearn said it was the most stunning thing he'd ever seen in a boxing ring and he'd look at the possibility
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of a rematch. for the highlands and islands in particular. you can see it pushing on with the strengthening breeze. still a bit of drizzle through eastern scotland into the start of the afternoon, still some bouts of rain or drizzle, east anglia, the south—east, but even those will become less numerous through the day. and a bit cloudy around the western coasts but for most it will be a dry afternoon, light winds but pleasant enough where sun shines through. the strongest of the breeze out towards scotland and western scotland and northern ireland but it's here where that breeze is actually
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bringing in the milder air, 13 to 15 degrees high, most other areas around 11 to 13 celsius. as we go through this evening and overnight clear skies across england and wales, will see some mist and fog patches form, but for scotland and northern ireland there are some wet weather to come. some of that when heavy at times pushing its way southwards and eastwards leading to a chillier night tonight across the highlands, islands and western parts of northern ireland and a bit cooler towards some areas of england wales, as those clearer skies, mist and fog patches form. for monday we see that weather front across scotland and northern ireland gradually work its way and grinding to a halt in northern england and parts of north and west wales. so it's here that it will actually turn a little bit damp through the day, some heavy bursts of rain in cumbria and on towards snowdonia, may be but scotland, northern ireland, a much brighter day. early rain in south and east will clear through, plenty of sunshine, isolated showers in the far north—west. across the midlands, east anglia and the south, though, most places will stay dry and the mist and fog should lift to a few sunny spells. temperatures similar to today though little bit cooler through parts of scotland and northern ireland. and then into the week ahead, after a slightly cooler spell midweek, temperatures around
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the average, it will get much, much milder once again. rain most likely across the north, that's because you are close to these areas of low pressure in iceland, whetherfronts scooting by some windy conditions at times and so if it's not some bands of heavy rain it will be a scattering of showers which will pepper western scotland throughout the week. further south, a little bit of rain northern ireland and still, most places will stay dry with the odd glimmer of sunshine and stay pretty mild, too. bye for now.
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this is bbc news ? these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the queen will not attend today's remembrance day service in london after spraining her back. hearing no objections it is so decided. a new global climate deal is struck in glasgow but pledges still aren't enough to limit warming to 1.5 degrees. a previous commitment to phase out coal is watered down at the last—minute by india and china — the un secretary general gave this warning. 0ur planet is hanging by a thread. we are still knocking on the door of climate catastrophe. it is time to go into emergency mode. and — the netherlands becomes the first country in western europe to re—enter a partial coronavirus lockdown this autumn

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