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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  November 15, 2021 6:00pm-6:30pm GMT

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the uk terror threat is raised to severe after yesterday's attack outside a hospital in liverpool. the explosion in a taxi is being treated as a terrorist incident. the passenger, who's believed to have built the device, died. the driver of the taxi was injured, but has now been released from hospital as police continue their investigation. our inquiries will now seek to understand how the device was built, the motivation for the incident and to understand if anyone else was involved in it. in the last few minutes, the police have said they have carried out a controlled explosion in the sefton park area of liverpool. we'll bring you the latest. also tonight... the covid booster programme is to be extended — it'll now be offered to people over a0. the government is accused
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of reneging on its promises as it abandons plans to build the eastern leg of h52. and how a moment of silence on saturday's strictly won praise for the show�*s first deaf contestant. and coming up on the bbc news channel, the road to qatar continues, and we will bring you the latest ahead of tonight's qualifiers as england look to finish with a flourish in san marino. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. the uk's terror threat level has been raised to severe, meaning an attack is considered highly likely. it comes after police in liverpool said that an explosion
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as a terrorist incident. officers suspect that the passenger in the back of the taxi, who died at the scene, made the explosive device, but so far the motive is unknown. the blast happened outside liverpool women's hospitaljust before 11 o'clock yesterday morning. raids were carried out in the afternoon on sutcliffe street and rutland avenue. four people have been arrested under terrorism laws and are being questioned today. the driver of the taxi escaped following the explosion and has now been released from hospital. in the last few minutes, the police have announced they have carried out a controlled explosion in the sefton park area of liverpool. our special correspondent ed thomas is outside the hospital in liverpool where the explosion yesterday took place. ed. yes, fiona, to mark this as an investigation gathering momentum. fix, investigation gathering momentum. controlled explosion carried out. that was around one mile away from here at sefton park. that is the latest from there. there are four
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people being questioned by anti—terror detectives. they were arrested over the past 2a of here at the liverpool women's hospital, this detailed forensic search for clues for silent. the taxi rose in before the unthinkable happens. moments after the blast, look at the driver's door. you can see david escape. he runs away. others rushing to help. this is thought to be david with his hands on his head. this evening, his wife rachel said it was a miracle he survived and he is trying to process what happened. today detectives confirmed the passenger who had the explosive device had asked to be taken to the hospital. device had asked to be taken to the hosital. , , ., , , ., hospital. yesterday shortly before 11am a local—
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hospital. yesterday shortly before 11am a local taxi _ hospital. yesterday shortly before 11am a local taxi driver _ hospital. yesterday shortly before 11am a local taxi driver a - hospital. yesterday shortly before 11am a local taxi driver a fare - hospital. yesterday shortly before 11am a local taxi driver a fare in i ”am a local taxi driver a fare in the rutland avenue area of liverpool. the fair, a man, asked to be taken to liverpool hospital, about ten minutes away. as a taxi approach the drop—off point at the hospital, an explosion occurred within the car.— within the car. tonight david currie's family _ within the car. tonight david currie's family said - within the car. tonight david currie's family said he's - within the car. tonight david| currie's family said he's lucky within the car. tonight david - currie's family said he's lucky to be alive, that he is doing ok. —— david perry. he is being praised by the prime minister who urged the public to be alert. it is the prime minister who urged the public to be alert.— public to be alert. it is a stark reminder— public to be alert. it is a stark reminder of— public to be alert. it is a stark reminder of the _ public to be alert. it is a stark reminder of the need - public to be alert. it is a stark reminder of the need for - public to be alert. it is a stark reminder of the need for us . public to be alert. it is a stark| reminder of the need for us all public to be alert. it is a stark - reminder of the need for us all to remain utterly vigilant, and the independentjoint terrorism analysis centre are today raising the uk threat level from substantial to severe, meaning an attack is highly likely. severe, meaning an attack is highly likel . , ., ., , . severe, meaning an attack is highly likel. ., likely. there is a forensic search for evidence _ likely. there is a forensic search for evidence at _ likely. there is a forensic search for evidence at the _ likely. there is a forensic search for evidence at the hospital. - likely. there is a forensic search l for evidence at the hospital. clues into who did this, and why, and just one mile away, four people have now been arrested
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believe what type of person would do that. ~ , �* , , that. whilst david currie's friends and colleagues _ that. whilst david currie's friends and colleagues carry _ that. whilst david currie's friends and colleagues carry on _ that. whilst david currie's friends| and colleagues carry on working in disbelief, at what has happened. —— david perry. it disbelief, at what has happened. -- david perry-— david perry. it is shocking how a man can go _ david perry. it is shocking how a man can go out to _ david perry. it is shocking how a man can go out to do _ david perry. it is shocking how a man can go out to do his - david perry. it is shocking how a man can go out to do his normal day's _ man can go out to do his normal day's work— man can go out to do his normal day's work and potentially lose his life. day's work and potentially lose his iife~ he _ day's work and potentially lose his life. he sustained a lot of injuries, _ life. he sustained a lot of injuries, i believe, burst eardrums, back fracture, that isjust injuries, i believe, burst eardrums, back fracture, that is just a word going _ back fracture, that is just a word going between different drivers, so, mostly. _ going between different drivers, so, mostly. it _ going between different drivers, so, mostly. it is — going between different drivers, so, mostly, it is going to be a shock for him — mostly, it is going to be a shock for him and _ mostly, it is going to be a shock for him and his family. he mostly, it is going to be a shock for him and his family.— mostly, it is going to be a shock for him and his family. he is a very nice person. _ for him and his family. he is a very nice person. he — for him and his family. he is a very nice person, he comes— for him and his family. he is a very nice person, he comes in - for him and his family. he is a very nice person, he comes in the - for him and his family. he is a very nice person, he comes in the shop| nice person, he comes in the shop all the _ nice person, he comes in the shop all the lime — nice person, he comes in the shop all the time-— nice person, he comes in the shop all the time. people here are saying he's a hero? — all the time. people here are saying he's a hero? he's _ all the time. people here are saying he's a hero? he's a _ all the time. people here are saying he's a hero? he's a hero, _ all the time. people here are saying he's a hero? he's a hero, yes. - all the time. people here are saying he's a hero? he's a hero, yes. it- all the time. people here are saying he's a hero? he's a hero, yes. it is. he's a hero? he's a hero, yes. it is here at the — he's a hero? he's a hero, yes. it is here at the hospital _ he's a hero? he's a hero, yes. it is here at the hospital where - he's a hero? he's a hero, yes. it is here at the hospital where the - he's a hero? he's a hero, yes. it is. here at the hospital where the panic of yesterday was most acute. this was filmed inside the hospital by the father a newborn baby. we are not using the sound but he comforts
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his distraught wife, as the fire takes hold. today, parents, expectant mothers, told us that it was terrifying. just expectant mothers, told us that it was terrifying-— expectant mothers, told us that it was terrifying. just horrible. when we saw it. was terrifying. just horrible. when we saw it- just _ was terrifying. just horrible. when we saw it. just really _ was terrifying. just horrible. when we saw it. just really scary, - was terrifying. just horrible. when we saw it. just really scary, that l we saw it. just really scary, that they would _ we saw it. just really scary, that they would end _ we saw it. just really scary, that they would end up _ we saw it. just really scary, that they would end up at _ we saw it. just really scary, that they would end up at police -- i we saw it. just really scary, thatl they would end up at police -- at we saw it. just really scary, that i they would end up at police -- at a they would end up at police —— at a hospital— they would end up at police —— at a hospital where there is loads of bahles— hospital where there is loads of babies and things like that, it is 'ust babies and things like that, it is just awful _ babies and things like that, it is 'ust awful. , , ., babies and things like that, it is 'ust awful. , , . , ., ., just awful. this is an investigation involvina just awful. this is an investigation involving counterterrorism - just awful. this is an investigation involving counterterrorism police | involving counterterrorism police and security services, as they move quickly to find out who did this, and why. ed thomas, bbc news, liverpool. the government has heard an emergency cobra meeting with counterterrorism experts to discuss the attack. you say that they know the attack. you say that they know the identity of the attacker but it does not appear that he was known to security services before the explosion on sunday. and as our home affairs correspondentjune kelly reports, they're still trying to determine what the motivation was. was the hospital bomber�*s ultimate planned destination? and did he always intent to kill himself? some of the questions for detectives
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as they try to form a picture of the man who brought terror to liverpool. police have arrested four people said to have links to him, but who are not related. they're described as associates. our inquiries will now continue to seek to understand how the device was built, the motivation for the incident, and to understand if anybody else was involved in it. within hours, in london, ministers and officials were called to a meeting of cobra. this was now a national emergency, with a rapid response from security chiefs. the joint terrorism analysis centre, jtac, are now increasing the united kingdom's threat level from substantial to severe. and there's a reason for that, and that reason is because what we saw yesterday is the second incident in a month. the home secretary referring to the killing of the mp sir david amess in his constituency four weeks ago. that, too, was declared a terrorist incident. a 25—year—old, ali harbi ali,
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has been charged with sir david's murder. in liverpool, rutland avenue in the sefton park area is where the taxi driver picked up the bomber, and it's now a key location. significant items have been found at an address here. we've seen a shift from directed, organised terrorism very much towards individual, lone actors, people who are going online, seeing material and might be engaging with others, but not uncommonly they're just looking at material and forming their own perverse view of the world. counterterrorism detectives will now be trying to build a life story of the man who began his finaljourney here. they will be trying to find out about his beliefs, his mental state and contacts, and that will involve any possible technological evidence, including his use of the internet. tonight, liverpool is waiting to learn the identity of the man
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who mounted this city's first such attack. at this stage, he appears not to have been on the radar of the security service, mi5. from a national police chief, there has been a message of reassurance to the whole country. the raising of the terror threat level is described as a precaution, and not based on any specific intelligence. june kelly, bbc news, liverpool. our security correspondent gordon corera is here. the threat level has been raised to severe, is that because of this one attack or is there more to it? this attack has certainly contributed to that raising of the threat level today stop no doubt about it. but it is worth saying investigators are still cautious about what exactly lay behind this attack, what the motivation was. it doesn't look as if that explosive went off properly or was very large, one of the two, as witnessed by the fact that the taxi driver survived
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even though the perpetrator died. that perpetrator, the individual who appear to have carried this device on board the taxi was not known to mis, on board the taxi was not known to mi5, and that is a source of concern because if he was not on their radar, as it is often put, it makes it harder to understand what his background might have been and what his connections and ideology might have been that motivated him. they will be looking for any connections and contacts. so far, they are, as we heard, no sign of an ongoing threat of credible intelligence of something else being planned, but theissueis something else being planned, but the issue is that we have now had two attacks within a month, the killing of the mp sir david ames a month ago and now, put those together and it has just changed the picture for the authorities of what the uk faces when it comes to the terrorist threat. all people in their 40s across the uk will be offered a covid boosterjab following advice from government scientists. the move adds another 8 million people to the eligible list, taking the total that qualify for a booster to an estimated
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a0 million people in the uk. so far nearly 13 million people have taken up the offer — in part because there has to be a six—month gap between second and third jabs, but accessibility of vaccine centres has also been cited as an issue. second vaccines for 16— and i7—year—olds have also been approved today. the vaccination committee thejcvi says both measures should help to extend our protection into 2022. our medical editor fergus walsh has the details. just a0 days till christmas, and this year's must—have item is not available in the shops. it's the covid boosterjab that is seen as crucial to saving the festive season. you are here for a booster? yes. now it's being extended to the over—a0s. not everyone will get a badge from the prime minister, visiting a medical centre in east london. later in downing street, he warned of storm clouds gathering across europe
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amid a surge in infections. we don't yet know the extent to which this new wave will wash up on our shores, but history shows that we cannot afford to be complacent. can you categorically rule out a christmas lockdown, and how dependent is that on boosterjabs? we don't see anything in the data that says we have to go now to plan b. but clearly we cannot rule anything out. what it means to be fully vaccinated may be changing from two to three doses as it becomes clear that immunity does wane over time. among the over—50s who had the astrazeneca vaccine protection again symptomatic infection stood at aa%, five months after their second dose, but this rose to 93% two weeks after having a pfizer boosterjab.
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for those who have had two doses of pfizer, their protection rose from 63% to 9a%. what's unclear is how long this huge booster protection will last. if the booster programme is successful, and with very high uptake, we can massively reduce the worry about hospitalisation and death due to covid at christmas and for the rest of this winter for literally millions of people. 16 and i7—year—olds will now be offered a second jab as the risk of side—effects, especially heart inflammation, has been found to be rarer than previously thought. we've become more and more reassured that the safety picture in young people and children, teenagers, is just what we've seen in the older population, so our message today is definitely, come forward for your second dose.
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from today in wales, covid passes have been extended to cinemas, theatres and concert halls, and what freedom we all enjoy this christmas is still dependent on how much covid is kept under control. fergus walsh, bbc news. the government's latest coronavirus figures for the uk show there were nearly a0,000 new infections recorded in the latest 2a—hour period, which means on average, there were 38,5a3 new cases reported per day in the last week. currently there are nearly 8,700 people in hospital with covid. a7 deaths were recorded, that's of people who died within 28 days of a positive covid—i9 test. on average in the past week, 156 related deaths were recorded every day. austria has introduced a partial lockdown for the two million people there who haven't had two doses of a coronavirus vaccine. they've been told to stay at home except for work and essential shopping,
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initially for the next ten days. the country has one of the highest infection rates in europe, but one of the continent's lowest vaccination rates. bethany bell reports from vienna. karina doesn't want to get vaccinated against covid—i9, so she's under lockdown like 2 million other austrians. as of today, she is only allowed to leave her home for essential reasons like work or shopping for food. we met her in a vienna park, where she's allowed to take exercise. i was walking by the cafes and it's a bit strange to look inside and no that if i wanted to, i couldn't go in and join. it makes you feel really excluded and ostracised. the lockdown for the unvaccinated is controversial. some took to the streets in protest. police say they are carrying out random spot checks on people
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in public places and fine anyone who can't show a certificate of vaccination or recovery. austria's chancellor says the government was forced to act because of the surge in new infections. translation: we must raise the vaccination rate. - it is shamefully low. a low vaccination rate will not allow us to escape from the pandemic. it will keep us trapped in a vicious circle from one lockdown to the next. since the measures tightened, more austrians have been getting jabbed. as you can see, there are long lines of people that are forming here outside this vienna vaccination centre. some people are coming for their boosterjabs. others are getting their first injections. some austrians are concerned the move isn't constitutional. karl is pro—vaccination, but he's worried about the impact of the lockdown. i think it's a catastrophe to divide between vaccinated and not vaccinated.
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clothes shopping is now only for the vaccinated. many austrians say that makes them feel safer. we all have to be vaccinated. it's the only solution. otherwise we have the problem for quite a long time. people disagree on lockdowns, but if the covid numbers keep rising, austria faces a bleak christmas. bethany bell, bbc news, vienna. the time isjust the time is just gone quarter past six. our top story this evening. the uk terror threat is raised to severe after yesterday's attack outside a hospital in liverpool. and still to come, tensions mount amid a standoff at the border of belarus and poland with thousands of migrants trapped in freezing conditions. coming up on the bbc news channel, one of the best drives ever seen in formula i. lewis hamilton produces a stunning comeback in sao paulo, as one of the closest title battles
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in recent years heats up. the government is set to scrap part of the route of hs2 from the east midlands to leeds. work on the controversial new high—speed line has already begun in the south from london to birmingham. but rather than continuing hs2's eastern leg, instead the department for transport is expected to announce that the line will be upgraded rather than replaced. local labour and tory mps are accusing the government of reneging on its promises. our transport correspondent katy austin reports. this west yorkshire businesswoman often finds that driving is the only option. she would rather get about by train so is disappointed by reports that major rail projects are set to be scaled back. i would have the ability to get to more places by public transport, and not having to drive and find parking, which is very expensive, and also the added
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benefit that on a train, or public transport, i can do work. the london to birmingham phase of hs2, the new high—speed railway, is already being built, but what comes next? the government is due to release a plan later this week setting out how it will improve rail connections across the north of england and the midlands, with nearly £100 billion of funding. but it is expected to show that the eastern leg of hs2 will not happen as initially planned. there will be mostly track upgrades between the west midlands and leeds instead of the fast route, although there is set to be a new high—speed section from birmingham to near nottingham. the plan is also expected to reveal the leads the manchester route under the proposed northern powerhouse rail scheme won't get a whole new line via bradford, but there will be some new track, not high—speed and some upgrades to the existing infrastructure. bradford is counting on better rail connections for regeneration and some see the idea
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of dialling plans back as unthinkable. i just cannot believe they would do that. itjust does not make any economic sense. we know that bradford is a young workforce. 137,000 people here. 25% of the population under the age of 16. we are the workforce of the future. in 2019 the prime minister said this. i want to be the prime minister who does with northern powerhouse rail, what we did for crossrail in london. campaigners now feel he is in danger of breaking his promise. there were real commitments made to the north of england by the prime minister, in his first week in office, that northern powerhouse rail would be one of his top domestic priorities. he saw it as key to unlocking the potential of the northern economy. the prime minister needs to deliver in full what the north needs. there are still those who believe hs2 shouldn't be built at all, but the government thinks the possible new version would still cut
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journey times, the benefits would arrive more quickly and cheaply, but as well as labour, some tory mps are concerned about commitments being watered down, when levelling up is their watchword. katy austin, bbc news. there have been further developments in the racism row involving yorkshire county cricket club. bowler adil rashid has become the third player to claim he heard former england captain, michael vaughan question the number of players of asian heritage in the yorkshire side in 2009. michael vaughan has again categorically denied it and says he was very proud that asian players were included in the team. our sports editor dan roan is outside lords cricket ground. no sign of this row going away. there is not, no. the racism crisis that has cast a lengthening shadow over english cricket is identifying what seems like a daily basis right now. michael vaughan revealed earlier this month that he had been named in a landmark report that looked into azeem rafiq's claims of institutional racism at yorkshire. vaughan denied the allegation that
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he had made a racist remark to a group of asian yorkshire players backin group of asian yorkshire players back in 2009, but today, breaking his silence was the current england star adil rashid, who said in a statement addressing what he called an intensely personal matter that he had heard vaughan say that, becoming the second player to corroborate rafik�*s claims. a few hours later, vaughan issued a statement reiterating his previous denial, saying that it was inconceivable that he would say such a thing and making reference to the fact that a fourth player in that group has said that he couldn't recollect the alleged event. meanwhile, maurice chambers, a second former essex player, has said that he suffered racist bullying while at the county during his period of his career there. he also said he had similar treatment at northamptonshire when he played there. both counties are looking into the claims. the ecb say they are appalled at lord's,
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looking into the claims. the ecb say they are appalled at lords, and tomorrow there chief executive will be giving evidence in front of a parliamentary committee. lian be giving evidence in front of a parliamentary committee. dan roan at lord's, parliamentary committee. dan roan at lord's. thank— parliamentary committee. dan roan at lord's, thank you. _ 12 children and one adult have been treated in hospital after a ceiling collapsed at a primary school in south london. pupils were evacuated from rosemead prep school in dulwich after a second—floor ceiling in a year three classroom caved in this morning. the school says none of the injuries are life threatening. the tension between the eu and belarus has increased with the eu imposing additional sanctions and thousands of migrants now moved right up to the border crossing with poland, trapped in freezing conditions with troops in front and behind them. belarus' president lukashenko is accused of orchestrating the crisis by flying in migrants from the middle east and pushing them towards the country's eu borders with poland, lithuania and latvia — all in revenge for earlier sanctions. lukashenko, who has the support of russia's president putin, has denied the allegations. he claims he's trying to convince the migrants to go home but says they don't want to.
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our correspondent steve rosenberg has spent the day on the belarus side of the border, from where he sent this report in the migrant camp, word had got out, they'd been told this was the moment to make it into the eu. everyone here wanted to believe it was going to happen and the belarusian soldiers didn't try to stop them. in their thousands they streamed towards the border crossing that leads from belarus to poland. and the closer they came, the more urgent it got. the last fence on the belarus side swept away. so after a week in the camp, the migrants are now pouring through, right up to the checkpoint with poland, they're determined to be let through to the european union. attention, attention. but it was no entry.
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if you don't follow... polish police were out in force and standing firm. always baby crying for the milk, for nappy, we don't have nothing. please come and help these people, all the guys. the eu says belarus is using migrants as a weapon against the west, to pressure europe, a form of hybrid warfare. these people want a better life. they are desperate to get to the european union, which is right here. but the eu says that these migrants are being used, exploited by belarus to spark a humanitarian crisis on the eu's doorstep. back in the camp, we heard stories of how belarusian soldiers had helped some migrants try to cross illegally into poland. in the night they told us, you will go to poland. they cut the fence. the belarusians cut
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for us and we ran. we run a lot. and then we hide ourselves in the forest. they see us and return back to the site, itjust like a football game. we are in the middle. many of these migrants from the middle east say they're escaping conflict at home. they've paid thousands of dollars each to get here, but they're stuck. they say there's no way back, but for now, there's no way forward. steve rosenberg, bbc news, belarus. royal dutch shell has announced a plan to move its headquarters from the netherlands to the uk as part of a plan to simplify the business. the oil giant will ask shareholders to vote on the proposals. the government here has welcomed the move — but its dutch counterpart said it was "unpleasantly surprised". there has been widespread praise for a few moments of silence on saturday night's strictly. the eastenders actress rose ayling—ellis, the first ever deaf contestant on the show, was performing
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when the music suddenly stopped. but it was no technical mistake. rose and her dance partner continued on, giving a brief impression of rose's world and that of other deaf people. david sillito reports. saturday night, strictly and rose and giovanni's couple's choice dance had a moment of silence. it was amazing, the same as millions of other viewers when we watched her dance, itjust gave me goosebumps. welcome to rose and giovanni. this is deafinitely. rose used to be a part of this deaf—led theater company and her performance on saturday has had an impact. i spoke to artistic director paula garfield. what did you make of rose's dance?
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representing the deaf community as she is through dance, barefoot without shoes means that she can feel the vibrations through the floor, which is something that really resonates with many of us. the silence during the dance. many deaf individuals, we are all individual and how we pick up sounds, we all pick up different frequencies, different amounts. and so i feel that moment of silence, a stoppage to the music. it does truly represent the deaf community, to not be afraid of silence. and while rose can sometimes sense something of the music, when it comes to the strictly studio, it's all about counting. i can hear with my hearing aid the music blasting in the car, but in the rehearsal room i have a lot of background noise, so i'm not really relying on the music. i'm relying on counting and the beat. it was without doubt
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a powerful tv moment. and it's also been, for many of us, a little introductory lesson in british sign language. paula, thank you. david sillito, bbc news. i was watching and it was just great. let's take a look at the weather. he is tomasz schafernaker. how is it looking? it is one of those situations where weather forecasters are starting to run out of words to describe what is going to happen, because the weather just keeps repeating itself. it has been very mild, and one of the reasons is because the jet stream is so far north of us, in between scotland and iceland, so all that warmth and mild air is coming in from southern climes, but it is not exactly sunny. a lot of cloud across the uk, but not a uniform layer, some patches of sunshine coming
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through, and equally tonight some of us will be stuck underneath cloud, in other areas clear spells, and thatis in other areas clear spells, and that is when the temperatures will drop because we haven't got that blanket and it turns cool. so here is the forecast for tomorrow. a little different tomorrow to say the least in the north—west of the uk. we have got some rain on the way. but because this is predominantly high pressure to the south, this weather front with the rain will just fizzle out by the time it reaches the north west of england, and you can see it here on wednesday moving out of the way. broadly speaking, all the way from the azores towards russia, we have got a big area of high pressure across europe, and that is certainly driving the weather conditions across much of england and wales, northern ireland, and to an extent scotland which is always closer to the weather fronts, always a little more cloud here and bits and pieces of rain. on thursday again another one of these weather fronts brings a little bit of damp weather. the weather fronts essentially are more or less where the jet stream is, so

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