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tv   The Papers  BBC News  November 15, 2021 11:30pm-12:01am GMT

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week has been released from jail. danny fenster is on his way home. his release was negotiated by the former us diplomat, bill richardson. the man killed in an explosion outside liverpool women's hospital has been named by police as emad al swealmeen. he was a passenger in a taxi when a homemade bomb exploded on remembrance sunday. the eu is imposing new sanctions against belarus over the migrant crisis on the polish border. the latest measures are said to target people and companies involved in transporting the migrants to the border. the controversial former adviser to donald trump, steve bannon has appeared in court on criminal charges. he's been indicted for contempt of congress, after refusing to cooperate with a probe into the attack on the us capitol.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are broadcaster david davies, and anand menon, who's the director of uk in a changing europe. let's ta ke let's take a look at some of tomorrow's front pages. the financial times leads with plans by shell to move its headquarters and tax base from the netherlands to the uk. the metro tells of the extraordinary escape by taxi driver david perry, who was in his cab when sunday's bomb went off in liverpool. the guardian goes with the raising of the terror threat level in response to that explosion. the telegraph is one of several papers to report on the background of the suspect, saying he converted to christianity, but it's not known if he was following the faith at the time
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of the attack. the mail also looks at the bomber�*s background, saying he'd previously been arrested for possession of a large knife. the i splashes on the fact that people aged over a0 will now be able to get a covid boosterjab. and the manchester evening news — along with a number of other northern papers — mocks up the poster from the movie trainspotting to urge the government to build the high speed hs2 rail system in full. let's bring in and start with the daily telegraph front page. this development about the suspect in this bombing in liverpool, that he was a christian convert — david, take us through the details emerging in this article. irefill
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take us through the details emerging in this article.— in this article. will come of the daily telegraph _ in this article. will come of the daily telegraph and _ in this article. will come of the daily telegraph and its - in this article. will come of the i daily telegraph and its reporters seem to have been among those to find out the most about the alleged bomber�*s background. and yes, he was a failed iraqi asylum seeker, he was confirmed at liverpool cathedral in 2017. one of the other papers tells us he had been employed as a pizza chef in liverpool. but generally they have other things about him, that he may have been on his way, they think, to the liverpool cathedral — but for some reason, he diverted the taxi he was into the liverpool women's hospital. and why that was remains to be seen. he also, clearly, it would seem, according to a number of papers, had
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mental health issues in recent times. ~ , ., ~' mental health issues in recent times. ~ , ., ~ , times. whenever something like this ha - ens, times. whenever something like this happens. there _ times. whenever something like this happens. there is— times. whenever something like this happens, there is an _ times. whenever something like this happens, there is an intrigue - times. whenever something like this happens, there is an intrigue about | happens, there is an intrigue about the background of the person behind it, and i suppose that's driven by the human desire to try and understand what motivates someone to do something so horrific. absolutely, and it is an interesting fact about — absolutely, and it is an interesting fact about this guy that he came over_ fact about this guy that he came over here — fact about this guy that he came over here and converted to christianity. it's also interesting but all— christianity. it's also interesting but all too — christianity. it's also interesting but all too common, as david was saying. _ but all too common, as david was saying. is— but all too common, as david was saying, is this was a guy who was sectioned — saying, is this was a guy who was sectioned for an incident with a knife _ sectioned for an incident with a knife 6 — sectioned for an incident with a knife a few years ago. but one way we try— knife a few years ago. but one way we try and — knife a few years ago. but one way we try and make sense out of things that are _ we try and make sense out of things that are essentially senseless is to try to _ that are essentially senseless is to try to understand the person who carried _ try to understand the person who carried out— try to understand the person who carried out this act. the problem is, of— carried out this act. the problem is, of course, nothing really makes sense _ is, of course, nothing really makes sense we — is, of course, nothing really makes sense. we can learn all about him that we _ sense. we can learn all about him that we want, but to try and figure
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out what _ that we want, but to try and figure out what makes someone carry explosives such as this, try and blow— explosives such as this, try and blow up— explosives such as this, try and blow up innocent people, whether that he _ blow up innocent people, whether that he in— blow up innocent people, whether that be in a hospital or cathedral, it defies_ that be in a hospital or cathedral, it defies understanding. that reference — it defies understanding. that reference to _ it defies understanding. that reference to the _ it defies understanding. twat reference to the cathedral — we still aren't clear where exactly he was intending to set this device off. and the saving grace of it all is that he actually didn't get into a busy area, he may have been wanting to get to, david? the worry will be, is he _ wanting to get to, david? the worry will be, is he and _ wanting to get to, david? the worry will be, is he and lunar? _ wanting to get to, david? the worry will be, is he and lunar? i _ wanting to get to, david? the worry will be, is he and lunar? i know- will be, is he and lunar? i know another people who will have been taken into custody within 2a hours, but this is what security forces worry about more than anything else — if someone is a loner who hasn't figured in in any of there, what is it, 3000 people of interest that they keep an eye on, this seems to
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be the more likely background to this guy, and it is scary not least coming up to christmas. trier? this guy, and it is scary not least coming up to christmas. very much so. the guardian _ coming up to christmas. very much so. the guardian reflects _ coming up to christmas. very much so. the guardian reflects in - coming up to christmas. very much so. the guardian reflects in its - so. the guardian reflects in its front page and the headline there, the raising of the terror threat level — but the government saying, or the police saying that this is not a response to any specific intelligence, it's a precautionary move? ~ , , ., move? absolutely, the papers have different lines _ move? absolutely, the papers have different lines here, _ move? absolutely, the papers have different lines here, the _ move? absolutely, the papers have different lines here, the story - move? absolutely, the papers have different lines here, the story we i different lines here, the story we are looking at has a former counterterrorism chief saying there is a danger— counterterrorism chief saying there is a danger of a christmas bombing campaign — is a danger of a christmas bombing campaign. we just don't know at the moment _ campaign. we just don't know at the moment. one of the key things here is whether— moment. one of the key things here is whether this was a single individual acting on his own volition. _ individual acting on his own volition, orwhetherthere individual acting on his own volition, or whether there was something broader here. and it's simply— something broader here. and it's simply too — something broader here. and it's simply too simple the macro soon to know, _ simply too simple the macro soon to know. but— simply too simple the macro soon to know, but that was something really troubling _ know, but that was something really troubling security systems at the moment, —
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troubling security systems at the moment, and that is why the government has increased the terror threat _ government has increased the terror threat level. a government has increased the terror threat level-— threat level. a line of breaking news on that _ threat level. a line of breaking news on that - _ threat level. a line of breaking news on that - we _ threat level. a line of breaking news on that - we are - threat level. a line of breaking news on that - we are just - threat level. a line of breaking - news on that - we are just hearing news on that — we are just hearing from the news agencies that the four men arrested within the macro in relation to that attack have been released from police custody, according to counterterrorism police northwest. that line just emerging in the last few minutes, four men arrested within the macro in relation to that explosion on sunday have been released from within police custody. the other element of interest and all that is the addresses — they were saying that the addresses they were searching throughout today were somehow connected to the suspect and the man they've named as emad al swealmeen? david? , ., , ,, david? sorry, i actually missed your auestion david? sorry, i actually missed your question to — david? sorry, i actually missed your question to me _ david? sorry, i actually missed your question to me there. _ david? sorry, i actually missed your
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question to me there. but _ david? sorry, i actually missed your question to me there. but the - david? sorry, i actually missed your question to me there. but the thing | question to me there. but the thing that strikes me about this as well is the, what was found in the property where the now dead alleged bomber was looming, and there were items of interest, as the police always subtly put it, on that property. always subtly put it, on that preperty-— always subtly put it, on that ro -e . ., ., , property. one of the other big stories which _ property. one of the other big stories which i _ property. one of the other big stories which i want _ property. one of the other big stories which i want to - property. one of the other big stories which i want to turn i property. one of the other big| stories which i want to turn to, which is the front page of the manchester evening news about the h52 manchester evening news about the hs2 announcement which has been heavily trailed it but do to be officially made this week — some big changes to what they originally were, and some crucial parts of that network not being built as new lines but upgrades to existing lines? it’s but upgrades to existing lines? it's an anticipatory story from the manchester evening news and a host of sister— manchester evening news and a host of sister newspapers from across the north— of sister newspapers from across the north of—
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of sister newspapers from across the north of england. they are reacting to rumours— north of england. they are reacting to rumours that the government won't complete _ to rumours that the government won't complete hsz as advertised, but will actually— complete hsz as advertised, but will actually cut short so that in particular, the new line from manchester to leeds will not be built and — manchester to leeds will not be built and the electrification of several— built and the electrification of several sections of track around humberside will not go ahead, as welt _ humberside will not go ahead, as welt this — humberside will not go ahead, as well. this will come as a massive blow to _ well. this will come as a massive blow to people in those regions that have listened to the rhetoric on leveling — have listened to the rhetoric on leveling up and think that it means actually— leveling up and think that it means actually the north of england will see the _ actually the north of england will see the same kinds of infrastructure investment— see the same kinds of infrastructure investment that london and the southeast have seen for so long. so it's a _ southeast have seen for so long. so it's a shot _ southeast have seen for so long. so it's a shot across the bowels of the government, if you like, from these newspapers — government, if you like, from these newspapers saying, "this is what you promised and this is what you need to deiiver?�* — promised and this is what you need to deliver." so it'll be interesting to deliver." so it'll be interesting to see _ to deliver." so it'll be interesting to see what the announcement says tomorrow — to see what the announcement says tomorrow. it to see what the announcement says tomorrow. . ~ , to see what the announcement says tomorrow. ., ~ , ., ., ., , tomorrow. it takes a lot for these newspapers _ tomorrow. it takes a lot for these newspapers to — tomorrow. it takes a lot for these newspapers to drop _ tomorrow. it takes a lot for these newspapers to drop something i tomorrow. it takes a lot for these i newspapers to drop something corny like this, but i suppose the smaller towns and cities that really want to be major hubs and benefit from the
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money that flows out from the bigger cities? —— something coordinated. it is unusual, but not impossible, and never underestimate with the strength of feeling him, for example, manchester, which i suppose you and i know best of the big cities, in the strength of feeling about transport in the disparity between what's been spent on transport in the south and hasn't been spent in the north is really strong with, for example, andy burnham, the mayor of greater manchester — you're right about the smaller towns around the north. but the other thing is people living
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down south do have this strange tendency of still thinking that manchester is just down the road from liverpool and leeds, and newcastle and all the rest of it — these are very strong in their own right, and they feel very strong about their own identities. and cancelling, or not delivering, let's put it like that, on the east midlands line up to leeds will go down immensely badly in that part of the country, no question about that at all. t the country, no question about that at all. ~ . . at all. i think that argument the government _ at all. i think that argument the government has _ at all. i think that argument the government has sort _ at all. i think that argument the government has sort of- at all. i think that argument the government has sort of made . at all. i think that argument the government has sort of made is at all. i think that argument the - government has sort of made is that it's quicker to upgrade existing lines and to build a completely new ones, and benefits will start to be felt in years rather than decades. what do you make of that? i felt in years rather than decades. what do you make of that? i think the issue here _ what do you make of that? i think the issue here is _ what do you make of that? i think the issue here is that _ what do you make of that? i think the issue here is that the h52 - the issue here is that the h52 project — the issue here is that the h52 project isn't really about speed, taking _ project isn't really about speed, taking a — project isn't really about speed, taking a few minutes off turning
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times— taking a few minutes off turning times - — taking a few minutes off turning times - it's— taking a few minutes off turning times — it's about capacity, this is the point — times — it's about capacity, this is the point of— times — it's about capacity, this is the point of building new lines, if you build — the point of building new lines, if you build new lines you increase overall— you build new lines you increase overall rail — you build new lines you increase overall rail capacity, and that gets rid of— overall rail capacity, and that gets rid of a _ overall rail capacity, and that gets rid of a lot— overall rail capacity, and that gets rid of a lot of the problems of basically— rid of a lot of the problems of basically overcrowding on the rail lines _ basically overcrowding on the rail lines that— basically overcrowding on the rail lines that you've seen in many other parts _ lines that you've seen in many other parts of— lines that you've seen in many other parts of the — lines that you've seen in many other parts of the north, the actually quite _ parts of the north, the actually quite often you'll get fast trains stuck— quite often you'll get fast trains stuck behind slow trains. so campaigners who want these new lines are saying _ campaigners who want these new lines are saying it's notjust about getting _ are saying it's notjust about getting something a little bit quicker, it would be nice if you could — quicker, it would be nice if you could travel for weeks to manchester significant _ could travel for weeks to manchester significant lee quicker, but about capacity— significant lee quicker, but about capacity to — significant lee quicker, but about capacity to link these places up with good, reliable train services with good, reliable train services with enough track capacity that you can count _ with enough track capacity that you can count on them several of the government will say, of course, because — government will say, of course, because we've made these promises, we've _ because we've made these promises, we've had _ because we've made these promises, we've had this dreadful thing called covid _ we've had this dreadful thing called covid which is cost so much money, etc, etc _ covid which is cost so much money, etc, etc. �* ., ., , etc, etc. and those advocates in the north, the etc, etc. and those advocates in the
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north. the mayors — etc, etc. and those advocates in the north, the mayors of _ etc, etc. and those advocates in the north, the mayors of west - etc, etc. and those advocates in the| north, the mayors of west yorkshire and in greater manchester, and on merseyside will say, well, why have you allowed this deception to take hold in a big way, that this is a major priority for the government if you're not going to deliver? and thatis you're not going to deliver? and that is quite a dangerous thing politically. that is quite a dangerous thing oliticall . ~ ., that is quite a dangerous thing oliticall . a, ., ., ., politically. moving onto the front .ae. politically. moving onto the front -a~e of politically. moving onto the front page of the _ politically. moving onto the front page of the times, _ politically. moving onto the front page of the times, we _ politically. moving onto the front page of the times, we spoke - politically. moving onto the front l page of the times, we spoke about how much it takes to get half a dozen newspaper editors to agree on the front page, it also takes quite something to get five former heads of civil—service to sign a letter. but this is what they've done, they want a beefed up system, stronger powers for the prime minister's ethics advisers, all prompted by the owen paterson affair? this ethics advisers, all prompted by the owen paterson affair?— owen paterson affair? this is the five livin: owen paterson affair? this is the five living cabinet _ owen paterson affair? this is the five living cabinet secretaries - five living cabinet secretaries writing — five living cabinet secretaries writing a _ five living cabinet secretaries writing a letter in the times saying that the _ writing a letter in the times saying that the prime minister's adviser on
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ministerial— that the prime minister's adviser on ministerial interests should be given— ministerial interests should be given more power, his or her post should _ given more power, his or her post should be — given more power, his or her post should be placed on a statutory footing — should be placed on a statutory footing with clearly defined roles fully independent of politicians as a way— fully independent of politicians as a way of— fully independent of politicians as a way of ensuring that ministers don't _ a way of ensuring that ministers don't do — a way of ensuring that ministers don't do things in terms of their private — don't do things in terms of their private interests that they shouldn't really be doing. so this is a call— shouldn't really be doing. so this is a call for— shouldn't really be doing. so this is a call for a serious policing system — is a call for a serious policing system that allows the public to have _ system that allows the public to have faith that people are being properly— have faith that people are being properly checked.— have faith that people are being properly checked. have faith that people are being --roerl checked. ., ., , ., properly checked. david, what do you make of this — properly checked. david, what do you make of this plea _ properly checked. david, what do you make of this plea by _ properly checked. david, what do you make of this plea by them? - properly checked. david, what do you make of this plea by them? well, - properly checked. david, what do you j make of this plea by them? well, yes it is an unusual— make of this plea by them? well, yes it is an unusual plea _ make of this plea by them? well, yes it is an unusual plea for— make of this plea by them? well, yes it is an unusual plea for cabinet - it is an unusual plea for cabinet secretaries going right back to lord butler, who served under thatcher in 1988, to come together in this way. for me, it'sjust 1988, to come together in this way. for me, it's just evidence at the aftermath of what has become known as the owen paterson affair isn't going to disappear any time soon — much i'm sure to the displeasure of
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number ten, much i'm sure to the displeasure of numberten, regardless much i'm sure to the displeasure of number ten, regardless of whether it's a self—inflicted wound. but another of the papers interestingly says that senior tories may be prepared to support a total ban on mps consultancyjobs. now that prepared to support a total ban on mps consultancy jobs. now that would be a huge change, and it would be interesting to see how many of those members of parliament might decide that now is the good time to bow out as gracefully as they can? the that now is the good time to bow out as gracefully as they can?— as gracefully as they can? the front .a . e as gracefully as they can? the front -a~e of as gracefully as they can? the front page of the — as gracefully as they can? the front page of the eye _ as gracefully as they can? the front page of the eye is _ as gracefully as they can? the front page of the eye is focusing on - page of the eye is focusing on boosterjabs, the boosters have campaign is being opened up to everybody over a0. but there is a gap between the number that are eligible, a0 million adults in the uk, but only 13 million have so far come forward.— uk, but only 13 million have so far come forward. today has been and i dashed a day _ come forward. today has been and i dashed a day of _ come forward. today has been and i dashed a day of identifying - come forward. today has been and i dashed a day of identifying the - dashed a day of identifying the gaps, — dashed a day of identifying the gaps, and we are focusing on the
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people _ gaps, and we are focusing on the people who are now eligible for the oovu _ people who are now eligible for the qovu vaccine, other stories about a relative _ qovu vaccine, other stories about a relative lack — qovu vaccine, other stories about a relative lack of pregnant women who've — relative lack of pregnant women who've come forward to get vaccinated. this is all in the context— vaccinated. this is all in the context of— vaccinated. this is all in the context of a steeply rising number of covid _ context of a steeply rising number of covid cases in the country. they are reporting infections climbing by are reporting infections climbing by a quarter— are reporting infections climbing by a quarter in— are reporting infections climbing by a quarter in a week, cases are sky high _ a quarter in a week, cases are sky high amongst many parts of continental europe, and ministers are warring — continental europe, and ministers are warring if you don't end up like them, _ are warring if you don't end up like them, than — are warring if you don't end up like them, than most countries will reimpose — them, than most countries will reimpose some form of lockdown and the best— reimpose some form of lockdown and the best thing is that those who are eiigibie _ the best thing is that those who are eligible for the boosterjabs, to go and get _ eligible for the boosterjabs, to go and get it — eligible for the boosterjabs, to go and get it. the initial results on the pfizer— and get it. the initial results on the pfizer booster are remarkable. they take — the pfizer booster are remarkable. they take protection up to the 90% mark, _ they take protection up to the 90% mark, weaning quite quickly 6—7 months — mark, weaning quite quickly 6—7 months after taking it. so it will reduce — months after taking it. so it will reduce the _
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months after taking it. so it will reduce the seriousness of qovu infections, _ reduce the seriousness of qovu infections, the booster, and relieve pressure _ infections, the booster, and relieve pressure on — infections, the booster, and relieve pressure on the nhs._ pressure on the nhs. david, i think eve one pressure on the nhs. david, i think everyone is— pressure on the nhs. david, i think everyone is keeping _ pressure on the nhs. david, i think everyone is keeping an _ pressure on the nhs. david, i think everyone is keeping an eye - pressure on the nhs. david, i think everyone is keeping an eye on - everyone is keeping an eye on infections in the countries, and there seems to be a correlation where those who had to take the most stringent measures are where vaccination rates are the lowest? that's right. i don't know about you guys, but i'm still baffled by statistics and what to believe, and what not to believe. as you said, uk infections climbed by a quarter on last week, absolutely true, but it also says that deaths and hospital admissions are full, —— fell, which must be good news. it must be taken into the consideration. i am still baffled by how the government has now come round to the boosterjab is
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so important, but you can't actually, if you look at your nhs record online, it won't tell you whether you've had a boosterjabs or not, it won't confirm it. i had mine two weeks ago and there's still no evidence that i have. and yet we are told tonight, as well as in some newspapers, the government will soon be insisting on three jabs and proof, i assume, be insisting on three jabs and proof, iassume, of be insisting on three jabs and proof, i assume, of three jabs for admission to various things in the future unless things improve radically and quickly. fine future unless things improve radically and quickly. one more sto , radically and quickly. one more story. the _ radically and quickly. one more story, the front _ radically and quickly. one more story, the front page _ radically and quickly. one more story, the front page of- radically and quickly. one more story, the front page of the - story, the front page of the financial times — if we were in portugal and i was calling you at this late hour, it's almost midnight, i'd be getting into trouble if you are my employees because portugal is giving home workers a break, saying bosses are banned from calling out of hours. what's your take on this, good or not? ., ., , , , , not? potentially, yes, the problem with thin . s not? potentially, yes, the problem
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with things like _ not? potentially, yes, the problem with things like this _ not? potentially, yes, the problem with things like this is _ not? potentially, yes, the problem with things like this is they - not? potentially, yes, the problem with things like this is they need i with things like this is they need to target— with things like this is they need to target the areas where it's really— to target the areas where it's really needed. some people really need to— really needed. some people really need to get their e—mails and course room _ need to get their e—mails and course room outside of work hours, and this blanket— room outside of work hours, and this blanket ban— room outside of work hours, and this blanket ban won't help those people. there _ blanket ban won't help those people. there are _ blanket ban won't help those people. there are other people who are genuinely— there are other people who are genuinely believed by their bosses to work— genuinely believed by their bosses to work longer hours that their dish than they— to work longer hours that their dish than they are paid to do, and they will benefit from this protection. from _ will benefit from this protection. from the — will benefit from this protection. from the ft story, this seems to be quite _ from the ft story, this seems to be quite a _ from the ft story, this seems to be quite a blanket measure so i do wonder— quite a blanket measure so i do wonder if— quite a blanket measure so i do wonder if people — they are talking about— wonder if people — they are talking about the — wonder if people — they are talking about the federation of farmers criticising — about the federation of farmers criticising this because the working hours _ criticising this because the working hours of— criticising this because the working hours of their people. the proof with any— hours of their people. the proof with any legislation is what it looks— with any legislation is what it looks like once it's implemented. but there's a danger of taking a sweeping — but there's a danger of taking a sweeping measure like this, which will be _ sweeping measure like this, which will be popular amongst the public will be popular amongst the public will cause — will be popular amongst the public will cause employers real problems. david, _ will cause employers real problems. david, you _ will cause employers real problems. david, you chuckled, was that about the federation of farmers? i was the federation of farmers? i was thinkin: the federation of farmers? i was thinking of _ the federation of farmers? i was thinking of my — the federation of farmers? i was thinking of my brother-in-law. l thinking of my brother—in—law. farmers traditionally moan about something, and if they haven't got something, and if they haven't got something to moan about, the will
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find something. but you think about how this difficult this would be for the farming community— i still haven't got away from the fact that i don't see this getting legs behind in the uk anytime soon, particularly when you think about the experience of certain people in politics in certain heirs to the throne, let alone in broadcasting and, dare i say it, in sport and football where people ring you at all times of the day and night and you have to get use to it or lump it.— use to it or lump it. david, ifi aet use to it or lump it. david, ifi get tweets — use to it or lump it. david, ifi get tweets at _ use to it or lump it. david, ifi get tweets at all _ use to it or lump it. david, ifi get tweets at all hours - use to it or lump it. david, ifi get tweets at all hours of - use to it or lump it. david, ifi get tweets at all hours of the | use to it or lump it. david, if i i get tweets at all hours of the day or night from farmers i've upset, i'm sending them to you. thank you both very much, good to see you. thank you for watching, that's it for the papers, i'll see you next time, bye—bye.
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good evening, i'm tulsen tollett with your sports news — where we start with football, and three of the home nations were in action tonight. northern ireland produced the biggest shock with a goalless draw at home to italy, meaning roberto mancini's side now head for the playoffs. scotland picked up a crucial win over denmark, meaning they've secured a home play off, and england thrashed a hapless san marino to guarantee a spot in next year's finals. katie gornall was watching. side by side, but the gulf between the two could hardly be greater. san marino are the worst team in world football. still, gareth southgate urged england to take them seriously. but it's harry maguire who connects! 1—0 up afterfive minutes, the goals against this part—time defence just kept on coming. top corner this time! harry kane's club form may be up for debate, but for country, he just can't miss. this was his fourth and england's
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sixth of a frantic first half. a draw would have been enough, but they were meant to run up a high score. emile smith—rowe scored his first for his country, 10—0 the final score. england have qualified for qatar and they finished the job in style. there's been a lot to cheer about recently for scotland, but with a playoff place already secured, this was far from a dead rubber. a win against denmark would give them a more favourable draw. they set off at pace. hampden park could feel a goal coming, and john souttar delivered. and souttar! after three years away from the national team with injuries, this was emotional. denmark are in formidable form, but scotland saved their best for last. scotland haven't qualified for a world cup since 1998. on this evidence, the dream is very much alive. northern ireland were already out of world cup contention, but they still managed a famous night at windsor park, holding italy to a goalless draw and forcing the european champions into the playoffs.
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katie gornall, bbc news. after being sacked as aston villa manager little over a week ago, dean smith is back in the premier league. he's the new man in charge at norwich, replacing daniel farke, who was sacked just a day before smith lost his job at villa. his first game in charge will be at home to southampton on saturday. there've been further developments in the racism row involving yorkshire county cricket club. bowler adil rashid has become the third player to claim he heard former england captain, michael vaughan, question the number of players of asian heritage in the yorkshire side in 2009. michael vaughan has again categorically denied it, and says he was very proud that asian players were included in the team. our sports editor dan roan has been at lord's cricket ground, and explained that there is no sign of this row going away. the racism crisis that has cast a lengthening shadow over english cricket is intensifying on what seems like a daily basis right now. earlier this month, the former ashes—winning england captain
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michael vaughan revealed that he had been named in a landmark report that looked into azeem rafiq's claims of institutional racism at yorkshire. now vaughan denied rafiq's allegation that he had made the racist remark to a group of asian yorkshire players back in 2009. but today, breaking his silence was the current england star, adil rashid, who said, in a statement addressing what he called an "intensely personal matter", that he had heard vaughan say that, becoming the second player to corroborate rafiq's claims. now a few hours later, vaughan issued a statement reiterating his previous denial, saying it was inconceivable that he would say such a thing and making reference to the fact that a fourth player inatthe group has said that he couldn't recollect the alleged event. meanwhile, maurice chambers, a second former essex player, has said that he suffered racist bullying while at the county during the period of his career there.
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he said he also had similar treatment at northamptonshire when he played there. both counties say they're looking into those claims. the ecb say that they're appalled here at lord's today, and tomorrow, their chief executive, along with rafiq, will be giving evidence in front of a parliamentary committee. now to rugby union, where england captain owen farrell and hooker jamie george have both been ruled out of saturday's test against world champions south africa. the saracens team—mates picked up injuries in the 32—15 win over australia at the weekend. farrell also missed england's opening autumn international against tonga after a false positive covid—19 test result. and disappointing news for ireland captainjonny sexton — he's been ruled out for up to six weeks after he was injured in his side's win over new zealand on saturday, twisting his knee and ankle. it means he'll miss ireland's final autumn international against argentina on sunday. it was the battle of the brits whenjoe salisbury beat
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jamie murray, as the only british players involved in the atp finals went head—to—head in their opening doubles group match. second seeds and us open champions salisbury and his american partner, rajeev ram, won in straight sets against murray and brazil's bruno soares in turin. novak djokovic recovered from a wobbly start to beat casper ruud 7—6, 6—2 in his opening round—robin match. the world number one is aiming for a record—equalling sixth title at the season—ending tournament, which he hasn't won since 2015. meanwhile, roger federer is unlikely to play in next year's australian open as he continues to recoverfrom injury. the 20—time grand slam champion, who is now a0, hasn't played since losing in the wimbledon quarterfinals injuly before undergoing more knee surgery. however, his coach, ivan ljubicic, says he was certain that federer was not thinking about retiring just yet. for more on that and other stories, the bbc sport website is the place to go. but that's all your sport for now.
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hello. well, tuesday promises to be a dry day across most of the uk. it's going to be cloudy and mild once again. and, in fact, not much change expected for the next few days. if anything, the temperatures could rise even further. so why is it so mild? well, on the satellite picture, you'll see this big weather front here. this is very much where the jet stream is. thejet stream is pushing along the weather fronts, but it's also separating the mild air to the south, which has engulfed the uk, indeed much of europe, and is keeping the cold air at bay. so we are to the south of the jet stream in that milder air. but scotland is a little closer to the weather fronts in the north atlantic, so that does mean some of that rain grazing the western isles through the course of the early hours. elsewhere, it'll be dry. and where the skies will have cleared, perhaps a—5 celsius at dawn, so a little on the nippy side, but generally mild.
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now, that weather front does move into scotland, northern ireland, perhaps the lake district and the north of wales, but the rain will be light and fleeting and will complete fizzle away. east and south, it's going to be dry. perhaps a bit of brightness, too. and the same pattern continues into wednesday. so high pressure in the south with that mild air coming in, weather fronts in the north of the atlantic. and again, they are bringing this time some showers to parts of scotland, whereas in the south, central, southern areas of the uk, should be a fine day — in fact, a very bright day, particularly eastern areas and along the south coast. temperatures a little fresher on wednesday, 10—12 celsius, but then they rise again as we head into thursday. now, around this high pressure, we'll run along a current of mild air on thursday. and as it engulfs the uk, the temperatures could a chilly rise even further with a bit of sunshine. so, yes, a bit of cloud and rain here in the northwest of scotland, but widely i think the mid—teens. and look at that — 16 in aberdeen.
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wouldn't be surprised if it gets up to 17, 17 this time in november — extraordinarily mild for eastern parts of scotland. shouldn't last for too long, perhaps into friday. friday could well be another very mild day, with the mid—teens across the country, but i think as we head into the weekend, it's going to turn a lot, a lot cooler. so a very mild week, particularly mild towards the end of the week, and i think the weekend and beyond is going to turn quite a bit colder. bye— bye.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore. i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines: on his way home — an american journalist sentenced to 11 years in prison in myanmar is released. the government tells the bbc their reasons in an exclusive interview. translation: our foreign policy is to keep good relations - with other countries. and we also considered humanitarian reasons. on these grounds, we granted amnesty and deported him today. the uk's raises its terror threat level to "severe" meaning an attack�*s highly likely, as police say they believe the man killed in the liverpool explosion made the bomb himself. our inquiries will now seek to understand how the device was built, the motivation for the incident
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and to understand if anybody else was involved in it.

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