Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 19, 2021 5:00pm-5:46pm GMT

5:00 pm
today at five... "we are sorry" — england cricket chiefs apologise �*unreservedly�* to former player azeem rafiq after he exposed �*institutional racism' in the sport. they also pledge to win back trust in the game. racism and discrimination is a blight on our game. to azeem and all of those who have suffered or experienced any form of discrimination in our sport, we are truly sorry. it comes as another cricketer, alex hales, apologises for wearing blackface makeup at a fancy dress party in 2009. my 205 was full of mistakes like that — you know, reckless mistakes off the field that cost me... let down family, let down team—mates, let down friends. austria is to go back into a full nationwide lockdown because of record covid cases,
5:01 pm
and everyone will have to get vaccinated. here, two children and two women have died in a fire at a house in south east london. a 13—year—old boy is in a critical condition after being shot in the back in birmingham last night. police believe his injuries are life—changing. and drivers will be banned from scrolling, filming or searching playlists on their mobile phones from next year. and in the film review, we'll get mark kermode�*s verdict on tennis biopic �*king richard', which is all about the dad of serena and venus williams. good afternoon. the chief executive of the england and wales cricket board has said �*racism and discrimination
5:02 pm
is a blight�* on the game, and he�*s apologised �*unreservedly�* to former player azeem rafiq. tom harrison�*s comments came after an emergency meeting to discuss racism, after shocking testimony earlier this week from mr rafiq. mr harrison said the ecb is committed to taking wide—ranging action to tackle discrimination and promote inclusion and diversity at all levels. details of how that will happen will be announced in the coming weeks. let�*s hear that statement in full. the ecb, the mcc, and first and recreational county cricket set the following. azeem rafiq has shown a light on our game that has stopped, shamed and cited it�*s all. racism and his commission as a blight on our game 7 saddened. we are truly sorry. oursport our game 7 saddened. we are truly sorry. our sport did not welcome
5:03 pm
you, our game did not accept you as we should have done. we apologise unreservedly for the suffering you have faced. we stand together against discrimination at all levels, and in all its forms, and we are united as a sport to do whatever it takes to eradicate this scourge from our game. we will continue to listen and make swift and positive change, we will embrace and celebrate differences everywhere, knowing that with diversity, we are stronger. today, we discussed commitment to make cricket a sport where everyone feels safe and included. we will now finalise the detail and publish these actions next week. our game must win back your trust. it also comes as batsman alex hales has apologised for painting his face black
5:04 pm
at a fancy dress party in 2009. a photograph of alex hales, who plays for nottinghamshire, has been published by the sun newspaper. he said he was dressed as his musical hero, the rapper tupac shakur, and he deplored discrimination in all its forms. with the allegations that have come to light, _ with the allegations that have come to light, i_ with the allegations that have come to light, i feel like it's important i address— to light, i feel like it's important i address these myself. i'll start with the — i address these myself. i'll start with the picture that has appeared in the _ with the picture that has appeared in the sun— with the picture that has appeared in the sun of me at a fancy dress party— in the sun of me at a fancy dress party in— in the sun of me at a fancy dress party in 2009, and the theme was musicians — party in 2009, and the theme was musicians. tupac is, was, always will be _ musicians. tupac is, was, always will be my— musicians. tupac is, was, always will be my favourite musician, so i went— will be my favourite musician, so i went with — will be my favourite musician, so i went with him. i realise this is incredibly— went with him. i realise this is incredibly disrespectful and i want to apologise for the offence that this has— to apologise for the offence that this has no doubt caused. it was incredibly— this has no doubt caused. it was incredibly foolish on my behalf, and i incredibly foolish on my behalf, and iwaht _ incredibly foolish on my behalf, and iwaht to— incredibly foolish on my behalf, and
5:05 pm
i want to apologise for that and the club for— i want to apologise for that and the club for the embarrassment that would _ club for the embarrassment that would have called them. i guess my 205 was— would have called them. i guess my 205 was full of mistakes like that, reckle55 mi5take5 off the field that cost mew — reckle55 mi5take5 off the field that cost me... let down family, let down team-mates, — cost me... let down family, let down team—mates, let down friends. close relation5hip5 team—mates, let down friends. close relationships i had during my 205. some _ relation5hip5 i had during my 205. some of— relationships i had during my 205. some of these all regret for the rest of— some of these all regret for the rest of my— some of these all regret for the rest of my life. i�*m joined now byjabeer butt, chief executive of the race equality foundation. just tell us what your foundation does. ~ , ., ., ., just tell us what your foundation does. , ., ., ., ., , does. we so promote racial equality in ublic does. we so promote racial equality in public services. _ does. we so promote racial equality in public services. what's _ does. we so promote racial equality in public services. what's your - in public services. what's your reaction from _ in public services. what's your reaction from that's _ in public services. what's your reaction from that's photo? i in public services. what's your| reaction from that's photo? it's shockin: reaction from that'5 photo? it�*s shocking but not reaction from that's photo? it�*s shocking but not surprising. it'5 shocking but not surprising. it�*s amongst a number of incidents over the year. it demonstrates a lack of understanding on the impact of this. how do you respond to the unreserved apology from the ecb to azeem rafiq7
5:06 pm
it's apology from the ecb to azeem rafiq7 it�*s very welcome and in contrast with what yorkshire county cricket club did until quite recently. however, it is a case of warm words. we have to see what the actions are to ensure that the details that have been made from azeem rafiq�*s testimony aren�*t replicated elsewhere. testimony aren't replicated elsewhere-— testimony aren't replicated elsewhere. . ~ ., , ., elsewhere. what kind of things would ou su: est elsewhere. what kind of things would you suggest the _ elsewhere. what kind of things would you suggest the ecb _ elsewhere. what kind of things would you suggest the ecb and _ elsewhere. what kind of things would you suggest the ecb and the - elsewhere. what kind of things would you suggest the ecb and the county l you suggest the ecb and the county game does? the you suggest the ecb and the county game does?— you suggest the ecb and the county name does? , ., , ., , game does? the first thing has to be taken these — game does? the first thing has to be taken these allegations _ game does? the first thing has to be taken these allegations seriously. i taken these allegations seriously. what clearly happened at yorkshire county cricket club by that the sounds of things is people have either not taken them seriously or have tried to hide them away or brush them aside, so until you actually take these allegations seriously and act upon them, you�*re not really going to bring about change. secondly, there�*s something around the leadership on these issues. it�*s really important they
5:07 pm
don�*t appoint... where they hopefully won�*t announce people like tom harrison whose leadership in this area who open themselves up to scrutiny, and to take the hard decisions about bringing about change, but also in the way that they operate. change, but also in the way that they operate-— change, but also in the way that the oerate. . ., ., , . ., they operate. what does that mean in ractical they operate. what does that mean in practical terms? _ they operate. what does that mean in practicalterms? i— they operate. what does that mean in practical terms? i suspect _ they operate. what does that mean in practical terms? i suspect it's - practical terms? i suspect it's coin: practical terms? i suspect it's auoin to practical terms? i suspect it's going to mean _ practical terms? i suspect it's going to mean employing - practical terms? i suspect it's - going to mean employing different people and perhaps putting in procedures to victor issues are... —— these issues. we know that black, asian and minority ethnic people are present in the amateur game but don�*t seem to make it into the professional game. we got to find ways that allow them to come into the professional game if they want to. ~ ., .,
5:08 pm
the professional game if they want to. . . ., “ the professional game if they want to. ~ ., ~ the professional game if they want to. ., ~ to. what do you think has been sto -|n~ to. what do you think has been stepping that — to. what do you think has been stopping that them _ to. what do you think has been stopping that them so - to. what do you think has been stopping that them so far. - to. what do you think has been stopping that them so far. it'sl stopping that them so far. it�*s clear from others experience that the root of injury is dependent on whether or not you can put up with some of the racism you�*re going to be facing. saying that the cost is too high a price to pay. thank you for talking to us mr butt. austria is to become the first european union country to reimpose a nationwide coronavirus lockdown, as it tries to slow a record surge in infections. the austrian chancellor, alexander schallenberg, told a press conference that the measure would begin on monday, and last a maximum of 20 days. he also announced that from february next year, covid vaccinations will be compulsory. although he didn�*t say how that would be enforced. translation: our goal was to l vaccinate the unvaccinated rather than lock down the vaccinated. despite campaigns and discussions in the media we haven't managed to persuade
5:09 pm
enough people to get vaccinated. the measures we have introduced over the past few weeks have helped increase the numbers of the vaccinated, but not by enough. for a long time it was the political consensus that we didn't want a vaccine mandate, but now we have to look at the reality. bethany bell is our correspondent in vienna. what�*s the reaction? what's the reaction? this is a controversial _ what's the reaction? this is a controversial measure. - what's the reaction? this is a controversial measure. there j what's the reaction? this is a - controversial measure. there are those who say they�*re running out of patience with the people who haven�*t been vaccinated, they say the government has been too slow to take reaction to the rising number of infections. there are others who have questions whether it is constitutional to have compulsory vaccination. austria�*s third largest political grouping, the far right freedom priority, which has very much campaigned on the platform of
5:10 pm
vaccine scepticism, has called for protests against of this. the leader of the party who is suffering from covid has accused the government of throwing the constitution overboard. the austrian chancellor said it is legal to have compulsory vaccination and austria. he said it has happened in the past with things like the smallpox vaccination. tonight i think a rather confused situation in austria. a lot of people frustrated that once again, the country is facing lockdown and what really have been record numbers of daily infections. been record numbers of daily infections-— infections. and what is the situation — infections. and what is the situation regarding - infections. and what is the situation regarding the - infections. and what is the - situation regarding the vaccination programme, how many people have been vaccinated? 50 programme, how many people have been vaccinated? ., ., ., programme, how many people have been vaccinated? . ., ., ., vaccinated? so far, around two thirds of austria's _ vaccinated? so far, around two thirds of austria's population . vaccinated? so far, around two l thirds of austria's population was thirds of austria�*s population was fully vaccinated, and that�*s one of the lowest figure in western europe. more people have been getting vaccinated, some of them with their
5:11 pm
booster shots, some with their first vaccinations. austria had already imposed quite tough restrictions on the unvaccinated. since monday, there has been a lockdown for anybody who was unvaccinated here in austria, although there�*s a big question over how often the police were enforcing it. they said they would carry out random spot checks on people, but in a population of 9 billion people, that�*s a big task. also, the situation here, the austrians have been told that this current lockdown is only going to last from a maximum of 20 days for the vaccinated. after that, they hope the numbers will come down and go back to the lockdown for the unvaccinated. some people here are sceptical and say they heard the government make promises before about whether there will be lockdowns or not, and they�*re just waiting to see, waiting for a
5:12 pm
difficult winter ahead. here, the government has released the latest covid figures. there were 44,242 new confirmed cases of covid—i9 in the past 24 hours, and a further 157 deaths were reported within 28 days of a positive test. just over 80% of people in the uk aged 12 and over have received two doses of a coronavirus vaccine. 0ur health correspondent naomi grimley is here. how do we compare to austria, which is going back into lockdown7 the how do we compare to austria, which is going back into lockdown?- is going back into lockdown? the key thin to is going back into lockdown? the key thing to remember— is going back into lockdown? the key thing to remember is _ is going back into lockdown? the key thing to remember is the vaccination | thing to remember is the vaccination rates. in the uk, they�*re ready hi. if you look at austria, it�*s much lower. 67% have been double vaccinated. i think when that comes into case rates, we can see a graph now of what�*s been happening in europe. austria has gone into that
5:13 pm
exponential growth because of that massive pocket of unvaccinated people. the uk have had really high levels all through the summer and into the autumn, but they�*ve been a bit more consistent. they�*re court of —— sort of bouncing around. the more resistance there is built up over time, and that�*s been one of the main planks of the uk policy. now, we heard today about more infection prevalence at the moment. the office for national statistics as one in 65 of us has the virus. last week, it was actually one and 60, so things are getting better. but you just mentioned the daily case rates, they are going up. a lot of experts thinks we have to be a bit worried at this point because we have early indications that cases are rising again.— are rising again. what does that matter of so _ are rising again. what does that matter of so many _ are rising again. what does that matter of so many people - are rising again. what does that matter of so many people are l matter of so many people are vaccinated7 if those cases aren�*t translating into hospitalisation, doesn�*t matter as much as it might
5:14 pm
have done a year ago? doesn't matter as much as it might have done a year ago?— doesn't matter as much as it might have done a year ago? that's a good ruestion, have done a year ago? that's a good question. and _ have done a year ago? that's a good question, and the _ have done a year ago? that's a good question, and the key _ have done a year ago? that's a good question, and the key thing - have done a year ago? that's a good question, and the key thing is - question, and the key thing is hospitalisations are much less than they were a year ago. but as you saw when you read out that figure, reported in the last 24 hours, it�*s still a very high number. the reason is that you cannot really protect, the vaccine does not protect everyone. also we know there�*s a lot of waning. a lot of people are getting the virus even though they�*ve been double vaccinated, and that�*s why it�*s a race against time to get those boosters out. now that�*s going to happen for the over 40s and more more countries. saying they�*re going to vaccinate the whole aduu they�*re going to vaccinate the whole adult population for a third jab. thank you. let�*s speak to the former england cricketer, monty panesar
5:15 pm
good afternoon. thank you for having me on the show. _ good afternoon. thank you for having me on the show. i _ good afternoon. thank you for having me on the show. i want _ good afternoon. thank you for having me on the show. i want to _ good afternoon. thank you for having me on the show. i want to ask - good afternoon. thank you for having me on the show. i want to ask you i me on the show. i want to ask you first of all. — me on the show. i want to ask you first of all. do _ me on the show. i want to ask you first of all, do you _ me on the show. i want to ask you first of all, do you know— first of all, do you know alex hales7 i first of all, do you know alex hales? ~' ., first of all, do you know alex hales? ~ ., ., , first of all, do you know alex hales? ~ ., .,, ., . a hales? i know him as a cricketer, and he's a _ hales? i know him as a cricketer, and he's a very — hales? i know him as a cricketer, and he's a very talented - hales? i know him as a cricketer, | and he's a very talented batsman. and he�*s a very talented batsman. unfortunately, the pictures that emerged was when he was 19, on the same thing with all the robinson and azeem rafiq yesterday. these are young teenagers who at the time didn�*t know what was right or wrong —— 0llie robinson. we may see an educational programme for racial behaviour. that could help young academy players understand a bit more about what�*s offensive and what is it. i�*ilil more about what's offensive and what is it. �* . ., more about what's offensive and what isit.�* ., ., ., is it. i'll come back to that idea if i is it. i'll come back to that idea if i may- _ is it. i'll come back to that idea if i may- me — is it. i'll come back to that idea if i may. me ask— is it. i'll come back to that idea if i may. me ask you _ is it. i'll come back to that idea if i may. me ask you about i is it. i'll come back to that idea if i may. me ask you about the| is it. i'll come back to that idea i if i may. me ask you about the ecb unreserved apology and there pledge
5:16 pm
they need to wait and trust back in cricket. —— win trust back. do you have confidence in them? i cricket. -- win trust back. do you have confidence in them?- have confidence in them? i have confidence _ have confidence in them? i have confidence with _ have confidence in them? i have confidence with the _ have confidence in them? i have confidence with the ecb - have confidence in them? i have confidence with the ecb and i have confidence in them? i have confidence with the ecb and all. have confidence in them? i have i confidence with the ecb and all the other first class members involved. i�*m sure in a week�*s time, we�*ll see a tangible action plan and swift action needs to take place. the strategy needs to be shown to the government, which i have faith, and we don�*t have a lot of time, but i�*m sure the ecb can put up a good plan together. tell sure the ecb can put up a good plan touether. , ., ., i. together. tell us more about your idea of some _ together. tell us more about your idea of some sort _ together. tell us more about your idea of some sort of _ together. tell us more about your idea of some sort of educational l idea of some sort of educational programme for at academy players ways although like we said, any ounuster ways although like we said, any youngster that does get signed up as a professional cricketer, they have to take up a racial behavioural
5:17 pm
programme, a seminar, and then do a questionnaire which will probably have a high pass rate. then they can sign the contract. 50 have a high pass rate. then they can sign the contract.— sign the contract. so you mean each individual has _ sign the contract. so you mean each individual has to _ sign the contract. so you mean each individual has to understand - sign the contract. so you mean each individual has to understand what i individual has to understand what racist behaviour looks like and why it�*s offensive7 racist behaviour looks like and why it's offensive?— racist behaviour looks like and why it's offensive? absolutely. what's a racist term. — it's offensive? absolutely. what's a racist term, what's _ it's offensive? absolutely. what's a racist term, what's offensive, i racist term, what�*s offensive, what�*s microagression, what�*s banter. so they have a better understanding.— banter. so they have a better understanding. banter. so they have a better understandinu. ., ~ , ., , . understanding. thank you very much for talkin: understanding. thank you very much for talking to — understanding. thank you very much for talking to us, _ understanding. thank you very much for talking to us, monty. _ belarus�* long—time authoritarian leader alexander lukashenko has told the bbc it�*s "possible" that his border guards might be helping migrants reach poland. thousands of people, mainly from the middle east, have been trying to cross into the european union at the frontier between poland and belarus in recent weeks — and the eu accuses mr lukashenko of masterminding this, in revenge for sanctions. in an exclusive sit—down interview with our russia correspondent, steve rosenberg, mr lukashenko said he has no intention to stop people
5:18 pm
from reaching the eu. translation: 0ur guys are helping the migrants get into the territory. it�*s perfectly possible. i think it�*s absolutely possible. maybe someone help them. i won�*t even look into this. help them. i won't even look into this. ~ ., ., ., help them. i won't even look into this. ., ., ., �* ., , this. who told the eu that belarus had been stopping _ this. who told the eu that belarus had been stopping migrants, i this. who told the eu that belarus had been stopping migrants, buti this. who told the eu that belarus i had been stopping migrants, but now they must catch them themselves7 had been stopping migrants, but now they must catch them themselves? the mi . rants they must catch them themselves? tie: migrants told they must catch them themselves? tte: migrants told that they must catch them themselves? t"t9 migrants told that they they must catch them themselves? tt9: migrants told that they took they must catch them themselves? tt9 migrants told that they took that to mean belarus is open to them. i�*m not going to detain migrants at the border, and if they keep coming from now on, i still won�*t stop them because they�*re not coming to my country, they�*re going to yours. the west stop talking to us. if you don�*t want to, then fine. we will sort this out ourselves as best we can. ~ sort this out ourselves as best we can. ,, sort this out ourselves as best we can. , ,, sort this out ourselves as best we can. we saw protesters being beaten and we saw — can. we saw protesters being beaten and we saw young — can. we saw protesters being beaten and we saw young people _ can. we saw protesters being beaten and we saw young people coming i can. we saw protesters being beaten| and we saw young people coming out of detention centres with injuries on their body. t
5:19 pm
of detention centres with in'uries on their mi of detention centres with injuries on their body._ you i of detention centres with injuries i on their body._ you admit on their body. i admit it. you admit it? there were _ on their body. i admit it. you admit it? there were police _ on their body. i admit it. you admit it? there were police beaten i on their body. i admit it. you admitj it? there were police beaten up too and ou it? there were police beaten up too and you didn't _ it? there were police beaten up too and you didn't show _ it? there were police beaten up too and you didn't show this. _ it? there were police beaten up too and you didn't show this. since i and you didn't show this. since jul . and you didn't show this. since jul , 270 and you didn't show this. since july. 270 ngos— and you didn't show this. since july, 270 ngos have _ and you didn't show this. since july, 270 ngos have been i and you didn't show this. since july, 270 ngos have been shut down in belarus. t�*ilil july, 270 ngos have been shut down in belarus. �* :, , , :, in belarus. i'll answer your question — in belarus. i'll answer your question with _ in belarus. i'll answer your question with an _ in belarus. i'll answer your question with an -- - in belarus. i'll answer your question with an -- we i in belarus. i'll answer your| question with an -- we will in belarus. i'll answer your— question with an -- we will massacre question with an —— we will massacre all the scum that you have been amassing. all those that you�*ve been paying for. all those that you�*ve been paying for. i�*m joined now by alina isachenka from bbc russian. what do you make of what he said and his style? what do you make of what he said and his s le? , , :, :, :, what do you make of what he said and hiss le? ,, :, :, :, his style? very strong language as alwa s. i his style? very strong language as always. ithink— his style? very strong language as always. i think that _ his style? very strong language as always. i think that we _ his style? very strong language as always. i think that we just - his style? very strong language as always. i think that we just heard l always. i think that we just heard feeds in with the narrative, and this is somewhat similar to what he said earlier this year when the migration crisis was just unfolding.
5:20 pm
lukashenko said he�*s not going to hold migrants crossing into the eu through belarus. earlier, he gave the reason for that, because eu has imposed sanctions. belarus has no longer power to hold the migrants. mr lukashenko has always said —— also said he didn�*t invite the migrants into belarus, and he�*s not responsible for them to come into belarus. the eu tells a different story. france and members of other eu states have accused lukashenko and his close allies of human trafficking thousands of migrants from the middle east and africa into belarus. these people have been promised opportunities to go to belarus and be taken by special bosses into the border where they can cross and come to the eu. it is also worth mentioning that since the
5:21 pm
beginning of this crisis, lukashenko has accused the west and poland in particular of stirring up the migration crisis. every day in belarus estate media, we see pictures and videos of the migrants suffering. authorities sayjust how brutal the polish borderforce is, and they are absolutely cruel towards women and small children. now, this week, lukashenko hasn�*t spoken to angela merkel twice, and according to lukashenko�*s press secretary, there are apparently 7000 migrants in belarus, 2000 of which are at the belarus polish border at the moment. what lukashenko has suggested, the eu to take care of these 2000 migrants, and the remaining 5000 perhaps can go to their own countries. to end, this is
5:22 pm
a very tough situation. the migrants ended up suffering a lot. they have been pushed by the belarussian authorities into the hands of polish guards, and the polish police are pushing them back to the belarus territory. so we are yet to see how the crisis in belarus will unfold. thank you very much. four members of the same family have died in a house fire in south east london. two women, a young boy and a girl were rescued from the house in bexleyheath last night, but died a short time later. a man who managed to leave the building was taken to hospital. tolu adeoye reports. how did two women, a girl and boy come to die as a result of a fire at this house in bexleyheath7 the question on so many minds today as a family grieves. i saw the blue lights flashing and looked out of the window to see police,
5:23 pm
ambulance, fire brigade and that�*s it, out the bedroom window i see a commotion round there. it was at around 8:30pm last night when the london fire brigade rescued the group from the first floor of this house on hamilton road, but all four were pronounced dead at the scene. a man who escaped before firefighters arrived is being treated in hospitalfor leg injuries. his condition is not life threatening. we currently have specialist investigating officers from our fire investigation teams on scene. we are working closely with the metropolitan police service and local specialist investigators to try and understand the causation of this incident. it�*s believed the family were of sri lankan heritage. some relatives arrived at the scene earlier, distressed, asking why. local people are shaken. it's crazy, they had two kids. it's very upsetting. i've got kids myself, - that would be a dreadful thing to happen to my kids.
5:24 pm
and you knew them, did you? i didn't personally know them, but i used to speak to them i when we used to walk past. the met police has said, at this early stage they do not believe the cause of the fire to be suspicious, but inquiries are ongoing. condolences have been coming in, including from the mayor of london, sadiq khan, who said he is heartbroken and his heart goes out to their loved ones and the community at this awful time. family members are receiving specialist support as the investigation continues into this terrible incident that has cut four lives short so suddenly. tolu adeoye, bbc london. a 13—year—old boy is in a critical condition after being shot as he was walking down a street in birmingham last night. the teenager is said to have �*life—changing injuries�* as a result of the attack in the hockley circus area. police say the bomb used in the explosion outside liverpool women�*s hospital on sunday
5:25 pm
could have caused �*significant injury or death�* if it had gone off as the bomber intended. officers say the device contained ball bearings, which could have acted as shrapnel. counter—terror police still don�*t know why the device exploded when it did, but say it could have been triggered by the movement of the taxi he was travelling in. home secretary priti patel has announced she is seeking to declare the whole of palestinian militant group hamas a terrorist organisation. hamas�* military wing is already banned in the uk, but the home secretary now says the whole group, which includes its political section, should be proscribed. it�*s a criminal offence to belong to or invite support for a proscribed organisation or wear clothing which could be seen to support the group. in response, hamas accused the uk of supporting "the aggressors at the expense of the victims".
5:26 pm
priti patel has been speaking today on a visit to washington. creates an artificial distinction between various parts. it is right that that list is updated to reflect this. this is an important step, especially for the jewish community. hamas is fundamentally and rapidly anti—semitic. anti—semitism is an evil that i will never tolerate. jewish people routinely feel unsafe at school, in the streets, when they worship, in their homes and online. laws to prosecute drivers who use their mobile phone are to be strengthened. at the moment, motorists are banned only from texting or making calls. but from next year it will also be illegal to take photos, play games or scroll through playlists while driving. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent, colletta smith, reports. # happy birthday to you... joe cairns was 14 years old when he was killed. at the point of the last few months
5:27 pm
of his life, he was spectacular. hurray! i couldn�*t be more proud of him, i couldn�*t. you know, he was always going to deal with different things. but... he was shining. he was. two years ago, joe cairns was sitting in the back of a minibus on the way to his special school when a lorry ploughed straight into the back of them. it was a 45—minute journey until the collision and for 45 minutes, that man was on his phone. 0n various applications — text messages, phone calls, but also he was on sky sports, he was on his facebook, and he was playing a game. the driver was convicted.
5:28 pm
he got eight years for dangerous driving, but changing the law will close a loophole making it easier for police to stop and fine anyone holding their phone and using it for any reason when they are behind the wheel. but you will still be able to use your phone in hands—free mode. if you get caught now, you're going to get a £200 fine and six points on your licence. that is quite significant. the police will be able to enforce the laws much more strongly and actually, there is some quite interesting technology coming out as to other ways we can spot people using their phone. for example, putting cameras in fake hgvs. so be careful on the roads. steph, how do you feel when you see people in their cars using their phones, looking down at their phones? he had a life, a whole beautiful life to lead. and he hasn�*t got it any more. you are missing a part of you, your heart, i gave birth to that boy and i gave him life.
5:29 pm
and through somebody�*s choice that day, they took his life away. and it�*s no more. and has to be out there it has to be, how dangerous it is to use your phone whilst you�*re driving. colletta smith, bbc news, in radcliffe. presidentjoe biden has resumed his duties after he temporarily transferring power to vice president kamala harris due to his annual medical checkup. mr biden underwent anaesthesia for a routine colonoscopy — a procedure undergone by previous presidents. with vice president kamala harris taking over it has made her — technically speaking — the first woman to hold presidential power in the united states. in total, she was in charge for one hour and 20 five minutes. andrew marr has announced he is leaving the bbc after 21 years.
5:30 pm
the journalist and broadcaster has presented the bbc�*s political programme the andrew marr show on sunday mornings for the past 16 years. he said from the new year, he�*ll be moving to global radio — which owns brands including lbc and classic fm — �*to write and present political and cultural shows and to write for newspapers�*. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with louise lear. good afternoon everybody. another mild one out there, and just where we had the warmth yesterday, we�*ve got it today where the wind warms to the east of the mountains. that has produced 17 degrees in parts of aberdeenshire. it�*s been quite a lot of cloud elsewhere, but it is relatively dry and mild, and as we go through the night, we will keep that story going. for one more night at least, this weather front here still producing some persistent rain into for the far north of scotland. producing some gusty winds as well. you can start to see the cooler air
5:31 pm
just pushing in behind that weather front. it will gradually drift steadily southwards tomorrow, so we will see cloudy skies into northern england, northern ireland, north wales by the end of the afternoon. i had a bit, we should see some glimpses of sunshine and a cooler story with winds driving in one or two sharps showers. at least there will be a little more sunshine around but you�*ll notice the difference in the feel of the weather. this is bbc news. the headlines: we are sorry, the england cricket she apologises after he exposed institutional racism in this point. they also pledged to win back trust in the game. it comes as another cricketer has apologised for wearing
5:32 pm
black face makeup and at a fancy dress party in 2009. austria is reimposing a full national lockdown and making vaccinations compulsory as it faces record numbers of covid—i9 infections. the lockdown starts on monday and we laughed up to 20 days. for next year drivers will be banned from scrolling or filming or searching playlists on their mobile phones. time for all the sports. away from the racism crisis in england with just a few weeks to go until the start of the ashes, australian cricket has been plunged into uncertainty after their captain was forced to step down. campaign has given an emotion apology after it emerged he sent sexually explicit text messages to a female colleague. the private exchange was four years ago but he decided to resign as captain when it became clear that
5:33 pm
the incident was going to be made public. he set the cricket australia investigation in 2018 had exonerated him but he deeply regretted his actions at the time and to to stay. he said standing down with the right thing to do for him, his family, and for cricket. the first test starts on december eight in brisbane. the australian on december eight in brisbane. tt9 australian cricket fans and deeply sorry that my past behaviour has impacted our game on the eve of the ashes. forthe impacted our game on the eve of the ashes. for the disappointment i have because the fines and the entire cricket community, i apologise. i have been blessed with wonderful, loving, and supportive family and it breaks my heart to know how much i have written down.— breaks my heart to know how much i have written down. some very strong words from — have written down. some very strong words from the _ have written down. some very strong words from the chair _ have written down. some very strong words from the chair of _ have written down. some very strong words from the chair of the _ have written down. some very strong words from the chair of the women's| words from the chair of the women�*s tennis association who has said they would be no wta events in china next year without proof that their prayer is safe. she has not been heard from
5:34 pm
since alleging that she was sexually assaulted by a high—profile former chinese politician. an e—mail was allegedly sent from her to the wta but as chair, steve simon, has questioned its authenticity. he told the bbc tennis correspondent that no amount of money would prevent them from putting out of china if the conditions are not met. this from putting out of china if the conditions are not met.- from putting out of china if the conditions are not met. this is not about the money, _ conditions are not met. this is not about the money, this _ conditions are not met. this is not about the money, this is - conditions are not met. this is not about the money, this is about i conditions are not met. this is not i about the money, this is about doing what�*s right and making sure that she is safe and free and everything that comes with it based upon the allegations and we want to find out either allegations true and if they are what is the result of that. so 'ust to are what is the result of that. so just to be clear. if you don't get just to be clear. if you don�*t get this independent and verifiable proof that she is safe and is not a full and transparent investigation and they will be no wta tournaments in china next year? that and they will be no wta tournaments in china next year?— and they will be no wta tournaments in china next year? that would be my osition, in china next year? that would be my position. yes- — in china next year? that would be my position, yes. ahead _ in china next year? that would be my position, yes. ahead of— in china next year? that would be my position, yes. ahead of manchester l position, yes. ahead of manchester ci 's position, yes. ahead of manchester city's game — position, yes. ahead of manchester city's game on _ position, yes. ahead of manchester city's game on sunday _ position, yes. ahead of manchester city's game on sunday the - position, yes. ahead of manchester city's game on sunday the club i city�*s game on sunday the club confirmed that kevin de bruyne will
5:35 pm
not be involved after testing positive for coronavirus. the manager said he had tested positive after returning from international duty with belgium. he will isolate for ten days and is led as the premier league match against everything, he will miss wednesday�*s champions league game on the following weekend home game against west term. to formula 1 now where second practice has finished in qatar ahead of the grand prix. lewis hamilton could only manage fourth full stop however, significantly, hamilton was wearing a special helmet with a rainbow flag on it. human rights and in a contentious issue in qatar, especially lgbt rights sending a message to everyone there. rory mcilroy is still in contention after his second round of the dp world tour championship in dubai. he is a shot behind the leaders because he made a mistake at
5:36 pm
the 18th hole. he put the ball wide into the water. he did recover however, eventually to double bogey. they put in at nine under par at the tournament. he is a chip in for eagle was the highlight of his round. that is all the sports for now but you can find more on all of those stories on the bbc sport website. deforestation in brazil�*s amazon rainforest has hit its highest level in over 15 years. a report by the country�*s space research agency found that deforestation increased by 22% ina year. brazil was among a number of nations who promised to end deforestation by 2030 during the cop26 climate summit in glasgow. joining me now is daniela montalto who is a senior forests campaigner for greenpeace uk.
5:37 pm
thank you for talking to us. what do you make of these figures? this thank you for talking to us. what do you make of these figures?- you make of these figures? this is devastating- _ you make of these figures? this is devastating. it _ you make of these figures? this is devastating. it really _ you make of these figures? this is devastating. it really shows i you make of these figures? this is devastating. it really shows what i you make of these figures? this is| devastating. it really shows what is the reality on the ground in brazil despite the promise is pledges from the government of brazil as you mentioned and the pledges of commitments by 2030 when what�*s happening on the ground is as you said the biggest deforestation rates in 15 years. at the time where the amazon is reaching a tipping point. amazon is reaching a tipping point. a point in which the ecosystem is now feeling given the deforestation that continues to increase at an even higher rate than the ncm before. this is to put things in perspective 216 football pitches per hour is what we have lost since august 2020 and july 2021. ltllul’hat
5:38 pm
hour is what we have lost since august 2020 and july 2021. what is the im act august 2020 and july 2021. what is the impact of _ august 2020 and july 2021. what is the impact of fact? _ august 2020 and july 2021. what is the impact of fact? david _ august 2020 and july 2021. what is the impact of fact? david ? - august 2020 and july 2021. what is the impact of fact? david ? this i august 2020 and july 2021. what is the impact of fact? david ? this is i the impact of fact? david ? this is devastating _ the impact of fact? david ? this is devastating for _ the impact of fact? david ? this is devastating for our _ the impact of fact? david ? this is devastating for our climate i the impact of fact? david ? this is devastating for our climate and i devastating for our climate and devastating for our climate and devastating on the ground and people that depend on the forest standing and be at the global level, our claim it depends on the amazon staying in the rainforest and really stabilising the climate which is a function in addition to their value that they biodiversity and the equation for us to fight climate change is not going to adapt if we continue to allow deforestation in the amazon and it�*s interesting to note that the brazilian government came to glasgow milling about these terrible figures. the figures were handed over at the end of october. yet the catholic quiet. ltllul’hat
5:39 pm
handed over at the end of october. yet the catholic quiet.— yet the catholic quiet. what is the motivation of _ yet the catholic quiet. what is the motivation of the _ yet the catholic quiet. what is the motivation of the brazilian - motivation of the brazilian government to continue to chop these trees down in the amazon? the administration _ trees down in the amazon? tt9 administration has been campaigning before he got the power and once in power it has been undermining enforcement and has been removing protection and has been enabling and encouraging the conversion and the opening up of the amazon for the industrial agriculture and illegal logging. the indigenous territories are under attack and in fact the very same politicians that we are hearing back in brazil are pushing for an agenda at the congress that is actually going to strip the rights of indigenous people and enabling and encouraging and
5:40 pm
legalising land grabbing. ltllul’hat enabling and encouraging and legalising land grabbing. what is coin: legalising land grabbing. what is auoin to legalising land grabbing. what is going to stop _ legalising land grabbing. what is going to stop the _ legalising land grabbing. what is going to stop the brazilian i going to stop the brazilian government? who can stop them? it�*s government? who can stop them? it's the government? who can stop them? it�*s the responsibility of those companies that are actually sourcing the very commodities, the products that are driving from the deforestation on the ground. we are talking about the animals that enable the production of animal protein and the production of animal feed is a key driver of deforestation in different ecosystems in brazil and of course cattle ranching, beef production, and the companies that are sourcing products from those companies are driving the ground and that is so producers and companies producing beef and those supermarkets here in
5:41 pm
the uk have a responsibility to stop sourcing products from those that are driving deforestation in the amazon. :. ~ are driving deforestation in the amazon. :, ,, , :, :, are driving deforestation in the amazon. :, ,, :, :, ,, :, , it�*s children in need tonight, and for the first time in its more than 40—year history, the telethon is being held in the north, at mediacity in salford. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson is there and one he�*s been speaking to one this evening�*s presenters mel giedroyc in her dressing room, as she was having her make—up done. here we are in your dressing room. hello, welcome. fifth time doing children in need. what keeps bringing you back? it�*s my favourite night of the year. it�*s almost as good as christmas. you would agree, wouldn�*t you? 0h, definitely. good girl. it isjust... there�*s something about it. there�*s this spirit, this great vibe, everyone puts everything else aside. i know... look, things are weird at the moment still, aren�*t they? times are tough, but even so, i just love the fact that still,
5:42 pm
the great british public pulls togetherfor this night. there�*s something very special about it. we�*re not thinking about anything butjust the young �*uns. slightly different format this year. we�*re not going into the wee small hours. 7pm—10pm, that�*s it. that suits me. to be honest, i was never on the late shift, i was always mid—evening. i�*m 53 now, so that suits me down to the ground. why do you think it is being condensed7 i think for various reasons. i think covid has played a part in that. putting on any live telly at the moment is challenging. it�*s better than it was last year, we didn�*t have an audience last year in the studio. i�*m so excited. tonight, in salford for the first time, we�*ve got some actual folk. i�*ve already seen some people outside, the excitement is... i can feel the adrenaline, it�*s going. the excitement�*s off the scale. one of the real highlights tonight,
5:43 pm
what are you looking forward to? sheeran�*s been in the building, let�*s just say that. we have got, i think, over 20 of britain�*s favourite puppets from present day and also yesteryear. i�*ve seen muffin the mule. i�*m not going to lie, not a lot people can say that. ed the duck, gordon the gopher, bungle, basil, all of them singing an amazing song. and at the heart of it, these are amazing stories and amazing projects helping young people facing unimaginably tough challenges and thats why we are here. i�*m going! that�*s ridiculous. you can�*t have your first cry. i�*m going. it�*s the perimenopause, please forgive me, but pretty much anything sets me off. just seeing your shirt, that is setting me off. it often has that effect. lord, help me, we are going live very, very soon. the bbc children in need appeal show
5:44 pm
will be on bbc one from 7 o�*clock this evening the headlines on bbc news... we are sorry. england cricket chief apologise unreservedly to the former player rafik after he exposed institutional racism in the sport. they also pledged to win back trust in the game. it comes out another cricketer, alex hale has apologised for wearing black face makeup and a party in 2009. austria is reimposing covid—19 knockdown and will make vaccinations compulsory as it faces record numbers of infections. coming up on bbc news, cricket chief in england and rate whales see racism is a blight on the game and the apologise unreservedly as they need to address the scandal involving this point. campaign down as australia test captain before the
5:45 pm
ashes over a historic investigation into sexually explicit texts to a female colleague. plus he will hear from the women�*s tennis association chairman who says they will be no events in china next year without proof that she�*s safe and that�*s all on sports day at 6:30pm. it�*s time for the film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week�*s cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? interesting week. we have met well in an afterlife within a new ghostbusters frame 7 for him obviously. we have petite maman which is a new ghostbusters frame 7 for him obviously. we have petite maman which is a near them which i think is may paint favourite film—maker and we have king richard, about richard who was the father of venus and serena williams.

19 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on